National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rectangular precast concrete

  1. Seismic demands in precast concrete diaphragms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoettler, Matthew John

    2010-01-01

    Precast Concrete Structures. ” PCI Journal , 23(1), pp. 40-seismic design methodology,” PCI Journal, 54(1), pp. 100-part 2: Research program,” PCI Journal, 50(6), pp. 14-31.

  2. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production Shao, Yixin 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE Clean Coal Technology Coal - Environmental Processes Clean Coal Technology Coal - Environmental...

  3. Seismic demands in precast concrete diaphragms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoettler, Matthew John

    2010-01-01

    and Mander, J. B. (2003). “Seismic Performance of PrecastState-of-the-Art Report on Seismic Resistance of Prestresseddevelopment of a diaphragm seismic design methodology,” PCI

  4. Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Rafael

    Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering Rafael (IT); Concrete, precast; Economic factors; Three-dimensional models. Introduction "The application to this; but the funda- mental reason undoubtedly was economic." (Mitchell 1977). Intuitive assessments

  5. Stability design of long precast concrete beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    , CEng, MICE, and H. P. J. Taylor, BSc, PhD, FEng, FICE, FIStructE & This paper presents the equations's modulus of concrete G shear modulus of concrete h height of yoke to cable attachment points above about minor axis m axial load parameter in hanging-beam buckling analysis sy major-axis bending stress

  6. Seismic Performance Assessment and Probabilistic Repair Cost Analysis of Precast Concrete Cladding Systems for Multistory Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Jeffrey Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of Buildings, PCI, Chicago, Illinios, pp.14-31,Resistance of Buildings, PCI, Chicago, Illinios, pp. 80-96,by Precast Concrete Cladding. PCI Journal, PCI, Vol. 37, No.

  7. FRP Shear Transfer Mechanism for Precast Concrete Sandwich Panels K. Hodicky*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) grid as shear reinforcement for precast concrete sandwich panels-six segments representing PCSPS using the Carbon Fiber Reinforcement Polymer (CFRP) grid/rigid foam as shear strength of different fiber reinforced polymer materials, rigid foam thickness and spacing between vertical

  8. Systems building of short span precast concrete bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Marvin

    1975-01-01

    excavations. Independent work by C. E. W. Doehring of Germany resulted in a patent for prestressed concrete in 1888 (16). Doehring's method was that of reinforcing caner ele slabs with metal which had an applied tensile stress before the slab was loaded...

  9. CPI Concrete Plant International 2 | 2013 www.cpi-worldwide.com2 PRECAST CONCRETE ELEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the inherent lack of thermal conductivity in CFRP composites. In addition to offering solid structural and ther with discrete zones of solid concrete can provide a high degree of structural composite action, but also creates, but compromises thermal effi- ciency by creating thermal breaks in the insulation. Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer

  10. Design and Construction Integration of a Continuous Precast Prestressed Concrete Bridge System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subha Lakshmi 1982-

    2011-04-15

    An effective, viable design solution for the elevated viaduct guideway for Universal Freight Shuttle (UFS) system championed by Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) is presented. The proposed precast elevated UFS bridge system is analyzed...

  11. BEHAVIOUR OF PRECAST CONCRETE SHEAR WALL CONNECTIONS UNDER LARGE REVERSED CYCLIC SHEAR LOADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shear wall panels are an economical construction system for low, medium and high rise structures.S. West K.A. Soudki S.H. RizkaIla Structural Engineering and Construction Research and Development of high quality precast elements in a controlled factory environment and rapid cost-effective erection

  12. Shear Connections for the Development of a Full-Depth Precast Concrete Deck System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, Matthew D.

    2010-07-14

    National Cooperative Highway Research Program NS Nelson stud R R-bar shear connection within a pocket system SIP Stay-in-place TR Threaded rod shear connection TRC Threaded rod with coupler shear connection TRE Threaded rod post-installed in epoxy...-to-powder ratio a Width of shear test beam A cv Concrete shear interface area A s Area of one shear connector A sc Cross-sectional area of stud shear connector A se,v Effective cross-sectional area of a single anchor in shear vi A sf Area of steel...

  13. Multiple Shear Key Connections for Precast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for elevator shaft shear wall panelsOne of the main concerns in precast 104 #12;utilize a combination elevator shaft shear wall panels. The tests results were used to develop analytical models to predict the shear Synopsis Seven horizontal connections typi- cally used in precast concrete elevator shaft shear

  14. PCIJOURNAL Development of a Precast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Jeffrey S.

    as seismic shear walls. Many engineers and code officials view prestressed materials as nonductile PCIJOURNAL Development of a Precast Concrete Shear-Wall System Requiring Special Code Acceptance to behave unlike that anticipated by building-code-defined design methods. Building codes require

  15. Copyright 2009 200916 Sustainable Design and Manufacturing of Precast Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepech, Michael D.

    Materials Development ­ High performance construction materials using industrial waste streams of Precast Infrastructure CIFE TAC 2009 2 The big idea The construction of concrete buildings, typically cast are provided for ­ Sustainable Manufacturing ­ Construction & Skilled Trades ­ Transportation · Foundational

  16. A Systematic Investigation of Shear Connections Between Full-Depth Precast Panels and Precast Prestressed Bridge Girders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brey, Robert W.

    2010-07-14

    shear across the interface between the girder and deck. Shear connector performance is characterized by a series of experiments performed on part of a bridge system that mimics a full-depth precast deck on concrete girder with a pocket...

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Ortwein, H. 2005. “Energy management in Precast Concrete5. Elements of strategic energy management, ENERGY STAREnergy Management ..

  18. Beam-Column Behavior Of Circular And Rectangular Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes , Bart Flisak2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , David Shnerch1 , and Sami Rizkalla1 This paper describes the structural behavior and failure modes compression loads, bending and combined axial loads and bending. The study included totally filled of concrete filling of the tubes in bending, and showed that higher strength-to-weight ratio can be achieved

  19. Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Marc W.

    Novex® Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide Version B January 27, 2003 IM-1002 Novex® Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide General information and protocols for using Novex® pre-cast gels www.invitrogen.com tech.....................................................................................................................1 Novex® Pre-Cast Gels

  20. Rizkalla, S., and Tadros, G., "FRP for Prestressing of Concrete Bridges in Canada,"Page 1 FRP for Prestressing of Concrete Bridges in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer, CFRP, tendons and rods for prestressing concrete highway bridges 440, Fiber Reinforced Polymer. Keywords: Bridge, caron fibers, prestressing, concrete, safety Committee 440, Fiber Reinforced Polymer, member of the ACI-ASCE joint Committee 550, Precast Concrete

  1. 1 INTRODUCTION Precast construction was first introduced in Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    1 INTRODUCTION Precast construction was first introduced in Turkey in the 1960s. Common structural systems used in Turkey today are based on systems developed in Western Europe to carry only gravity loads earthquakes in Turkey S.L. Wood & M. Posada University of Texas, Austin, Texas, USA ABSTRACT: Precast frame

  2. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements of structural genomicsOffice ofobservationsReport) | SciTech

  3. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTechReport) |ScienceSciTech Connectgrowth

  4. Seismic retrofit of precast panel buildings in Eastern Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzonev, Tzonu

    2013-01-01

    Many countries in Eastern Europe, particularly ones from the former Soviet Bloc, are facing a potential crisis regarding their deteriorating precast panel apartment buildings. These complexes were built using industrial ...

  5. Concrete Company Aims Higher for More Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, most steel towers that support utility-scale turbines stand about 80 meters tall, but the Tindall Corporation wants to go higher using precast concrete to raise turbines over 100 meters in height to capture stronger, steadier winds - and more energy.

  6. ANALYSIS OF VARIABILITY IN PRECASTING AND INSTALLATION OF PILE FOUNDATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    , h.kaplan@student.utwente.nl 2 Student, Industrial Management, University of Twente, the Netherlands then identifies sources of waste and suggests means to eliminate them. It also presents questions for follow-on research. KEY WORDS Pre-stressed precast piles, production management, deep foundation construction

  7. Seismic Performance and Modeling of Reinforced Concrete and Post-Tensioned Precast Concrete Shear Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanyeri, Ahmet Can

    2014-01-01

    eds. ), “Nonlinear Seismic Analysis of RC Buildings”,vector-valued probabilistic seismic hazard analysisand probabilistic seismic demand analysis: Application to

  8. Constructing earth sheltered housing with concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spears, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This manual provides a state - of - the - art review of the design and construction of an earth - sheltered house using cast - in - place concrete, precast concrete, and concrete masonry. Based on a literature survey, theoretical work, and discussions with researchers and engineers in the concrete industry, the text is designed for use by architects, engineers, and homebuilders. The features of concrete construction that are current accepted practice for the concrete products discussed are shown to be applicable with reasonable care to building a safe, dry, and comfortable earth - sheltered house. The main considerations underlying the recommendations were the use of the earth's mass and passive solar effects to minimize energy needs, the structural capacity of the separate concrete products and their construction methods, and drainage principles and waterproofing details. Shelter ranging from those with at least 2 feet of earth cover to those with an uncovered roof of usual construction are included. To be considered an earth - sheltered residential building, at least half of the exterior wall and roof area that is in direct contact with the conditioned living space must be sheltered from the environment by earth berm or earthfill. Siting considerations, the fundamentals of passive solar heating, planning considerations, and structural considerations are discussed. Detailed guidelines are provided on concrete masonry construction, joint details in walls and floors, waterproofing, formwork and form removal, concrete construction practices, concrete masonry, and surface finishes. Numerous illustrations, tables, and a list of 32 references are provided. (Author abstract modified).

  9. Random rectangular Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    A generalization of the random geometric graph (RGG) model is proposed by considering a set of points uniformly and independently distributed on a rectangle of unit area instead of on a unit square \\left[0,1\\right]^{2}. The topological properties, such as connectivity, average degree, average path length and clustering, of the random rectangular graphs (RRGs) generated by this model are then studied as a function of the rectangle sides lengths a and b=1/a, and the radius r used to connect the nodes. When a=1 we recover the RGG, and when a\\rightarrow\\infty the very elongated rectangle generated resembles a one-dimensional RGG. We provided computational and analytical evidence that the topological properties of the RRG differ significantly from those of the RGG. The connectivity of the RRG depends not only on the number of nodes as in the case of the RGG, but also on the side length of the rectangle. As the rectangle is more elongated the critical radius for connectivity increases following first a power-law an...

  10. Construction and Preliminary HVS Tests of Pre-Cast Concrete Pavement Slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohler, Erwin R.; du Plessis, Louw; Theyse, Hechter

    2008-01-01

    and Scheffy, C. (2003). “Construction and Test Results fromand Ali, A. (2006). “Construction and Test Results on Dowelthe completed CTB prior to construction of the Super-Slab ®

  11. PROCESS MODEL PERSPECTIVES ON MANAGEMENT AND ENGINEERING PROCEDURES IN THE PRECAST/PRESTRESSED CONCRETE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Rafael

    that they reveal are discussed, such as types of contracting arrangements, cost estimating, design outsourcing, engineering design communication, mold design, product diversity, and quality control. The results highlight the engineering lead-time from award of contract until commencement of production, from a current minimum of six

  12. Seismic Performance Assessment and Probabilistic Repair Cost Analysis of Precast Concrete Cladding Systems for Multistory Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Jeffrey Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Lifts 1020 Escalators & Moving Walks D20 Plumbing 2010 Plumbing Fixtures 2020 Domestic Water Distribution 2040 Rain Water Drainage

  13. Innovative use of FRP for the Precast Concrete Industry S. Rizkalla, G. Lucier and M. Dawood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    new and innovative uses for composite materials in civil engineering infrastructure for the past 20 and rehabilitation of existing buildings and bridges. The relatively high initial costs of FRP materials have historically proven to be a barrier to the adoption of this technology for new construction, despite

  14. Characterization of Self-Consolidating Concrete for the Design of Precast, Pretensioned Bridge Superstructure Elements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young Hoon

    2010-01-14

    ...................................................................... 16? 2.5? Bond Characteristics ...................................................................... 28? 2.6 ? Creep and Shrinkage ...................................................................... 29? 2.7? Durability....51. Transition Phase of the Girder to the Composite Deck System. ............... 319? Figure E.1. Creep and Shrinkage for Batches S5G-3c. ................................................ 372? Figure E.2. Creep and Shrinkage for Batches S7G-3c...

  15. Analysis of Short and Long Term Deformations in a Continuous Precast Prestressed Concrete Girder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarremejane, Tristan

    2014-12-09

    , and then initial testing. To support these observations, three creep frames are set up and shrinkage readings are taken. Previous research is reviewed to determine what models should be used for the analysis of the experimental results. A time-dependent Matlab...

  16. Seismic Performance Assessment and Probabilistic Repair Cost Analysis of Precast Concrete Cladding Systems for Multistory Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Jeffrey Patrick

    2010-01-01

    be analyzed as a support movement problem gap bolt Fig. 6.7support movement problem .. 176 Fig. 6.7 Movement of the connector boltsupport movement due to spandrel panel rotation and story shortening gap ? h bolt

  17. Seismic Performance Assessment and Probabilistic Repair Cost Analysis of Precast Concrete Cladding Systems for Multistory Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Jeffrey Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Nov. 8- 9. Arnold, C. 2008. Seismic Safety of the BuildingTab Connections for Gravity and Seismic Loads. Steel Tips,and Brown, A.T. 1995a. Seismic Performance of Architectural

  18. Method and structure for cache aware transposition via rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    via rectangular subsections A method and structure for transposing a rectangular matrix A in a computer includes subdividing the rectangular matrix A into one or more square...

  19. Stress-Strain Model of Unconfined and Confined Concrete and Stress-block Parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murugesan Reddiar, Madhu Karthik

    2010-07-14

    Stress-strain relations for unconfined and confined concrete are proposed to overcome some shortcomings of existing commonly used models. Specifically, existing models are neither easy to invert nor integrate to obtain equivalent rectangular stress...

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

  1. Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular...

  2. Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates...

  3. Design and Development of a Continuous Precast Prestressed Concrete Bridge System for the Multimodal Freight Shuttle Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkar, Anagha 1984-

    2011-04-27

    the safety and serviceability of the existing transportation system. The proposed Multimodal Freight Shuttle (MFS) system offers a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method to transport containerized, intercity or port-to-terminal freight...

  4. Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

    2013-09-10

    Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

  5. ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·· Aggregates have a big impact on the costAggregates have a big impact on the cost of recyclingof recycling the recycle mix #12;Uses of Recycled ConcreteUses of Recycled Concrete 1.1. Aggregate BaseAggregate Base 2ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling #12;Recycled ConcreteRecycled Concrete

  6. Coupling of twin rectangular supersonic jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, G.; Taghavi, Ray

    1998-01-01

    J. Fluid Mech. (1998), vol. 354, pp. 123{146. Printed in the United Kingdom c? 1998 Cambridge University Press 123 Coupling of twin rectangular supersonic jets By GANESH RAMAN 1 AND RAY TAGHAVI 2 1 NYMA, Inc., Experimental Fluid Dynamics Section... on twin supersonic jets that screech at a discrete frequency. The present fundamental research program on twin-jet coupling was undertaken to resolve numerous issues underlined by Tam & Seiner (1987), and Morris (1990). Tam & Seiner (1987) pointed...

  7. Evaluation of high strength concrete prestressed bridge girder design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuadros Olave, Gladys

    2004-09-30

    ..................................................................................................229 B.1 Precasters per DOT (Q 6) ..................................................................................235 B.2 Precasters and Supplied DOT?s (Q 6) ...............................................................238 C.1....) ..........................................251 C.20 U54 Beam Designs - AASHTO LRFD Specifications (Strand Diameter = 0.6 in., Girder Spacing = 16.6 ft.) .......................................251 C.21 Controlling Limit States and Maximum Span Lengths for ft = 6 c...

  8. Alternating current loss reduction for rectangular busbars by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Alternating current loss reduction for rectangular busbars by covering their edges with low permeable magnetic caps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Alternating current...

  9. Sustainability of Concrete forSustainability of Concrete for Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Sustainability of Concrete forSustainability of Concrete for Infrastructure Dr. Jason H. Ideker University #12;Overview · Background and research at OSU · Sustainability and the link to durability · What limits sustainability in concrete materials? ­ Degradation: Alkali-silica reaction ­ Environmental

  10. Hybrid Automata-based CEGAR for Rectangular Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    Hybrid Automata-based CEGAR for Rectangular Hybrid Systems Pavithra Prabhakar, Sridhar Duggirala- example guided abstraction-refinement (CEGAR) for systems modelled as rectangular hybrid automata. The main difference, between our ap- proach and previous proposals for CEGAR for hybrid automata

  11. Fresnel approximations for acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mast, T. Douglas

    Fresnel approximations for acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric sources T. Douglas Masta for determining the acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric, baffled, time-harmonic sources under the Fresnel. The expressions presented are generalized to three different Fresnel approximations that correspond, respectively

  12. Physics from Angular Projection of Rectangular Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashmeet Singh

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model for the angular projection of a rectangular arrangement of points in a grid. This simple, yet interesting problem, has both a scholarly value and applications for data extraction techniques to study the physics of various systems. Our work can interest undergraduate students to understand subtle points in the angular projection of a grid and describes various quantities of interest in the projection with completeness and sufficient rigour. We show that for certain angular ranges, the projection has non-distinctness, and calculate the details of such angles, and correspondingly, the number of distinct points and the total projected length. We focus on interesting trends obtained for the projected length of the grid elements and present a simple application of the model to determine the geometry of an unknown grid whose spatial extensions are known, using measurement of the grid projection at two angles only. Towards the end, our model is shown to have potential applications in various branches of physical sciences including crystallography, astrophysics and bulk properties of materials.

  13. Acoustic-Gravity Waves Interacting with a Rectangular Trench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadri, Usama

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical solution of the two-dimensional linear problem of an acoustic-gravity wave interacting with a rectangular trench, in a compressible ocean, is presented. Expressions for the flow field on both sides of the ...

  14. Uniformly Loaded Rectangular Thin Plates with Symmetrical Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milan Batista

    2010-01-27

    In the article the Fourier series analytical solutions of uniformly loaded rectangular thin plates with symmetrical boundary conditions are considered. For all the cases the numerical values are tabulated.

  15. KRONECKER COEFFICIENTS FOR SOME NEAR-RECTANGULAR VASU V. TEWARI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    KRONECKER COEFFICIENTS FOR SOME NEAR-RECTANGULAR PARTITIONS VASU V. TEWARI Abstract. We give function, Young tableau, near-rectangle, bounded height. 1 #12;2 VASU V. TEWARI computing them

  16. The optimization of solar radiation upon a rectangular building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingle, James Allen

    1973-01-01

    THE OPTIMIZATION OF SOLAR RADIATION UPON A RECTANGULAR BUILDING A Thesis by JAMES ALLEN INGLF. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19... 3 Major Subjeoti Meteorology THE OPTIMIZATION OF SOLAR RADIATION UPON A RECTANGULAR BUILDING A Thesis by JAILS ALLEN INGLE Approved as to style and content bye Cha an of ittee Mr, ' ohn F, Griffiths Member Dro Robert CD Runnels Head...

  17. Shearing Strength of Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallup, R. F.; Russell, F. A.

    1907-01-01

    was to obtain values of shear that might be applied in the design of masonry. BIBLIOGRAPHY. Beu30hanger. In 1878, Herr Bau^changer con­ ducted a series of tests on parte of concrete prisms that had been broken by flexur?. He found concrete two years old... in iron damping frames* The clamping frames 7 and surface plates were made from scrap eastings* The drawings will show without further description* the arrangement of molds and ft*«BM« fnlf design was found fairly satisfactory* the shears ware made...

  18. Technology Transfer Concrete Consortium the National Concrete Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilities Public Outreach & Community Relations Drainage Landscape & Aesthetics Environmental Mitigation Pedestal Concrete o Remove center section of level 2 strut o Place pedestal reinforcing and concrete lift 1 o Restrut as required o Remove center section of level 1 strut #12;Place Pedestal Concrete Lift 2 o

  19. The development of an alternate building system based on the use of an existing standardized component : precast, prestressed, hollow-core concrete slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simovic, Laszlo

    1984-01-01

    The primary scope of this thesis is a conceptual design implementation for a new building systems approach. This system is based on a standardized, economically feasible and widely used prefabricated structural component. ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    it for babies, why not for concrete? #12;2 Non-destructive-testing Methods for Concrete Structures. Irie et al structure · In both cases procedure is destructive Systems to monitor concrete modulus · Ultra-sonic pulse and examined under microscope Limited number of sections can be obtained and only after unloading Destructive

  1. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  2. Concrete Pavement Preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based training modules (coming soon) All materials were developed under the guidance of a technical oversight suppliers, contractors, quality control person- nel, and technicians are invited to schedule training based on the new Concrete Pavement Preservation Guide (2nd edition). A 1- to 1½-day workshop and related training

  3. Permeability of Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Harry

    1911-06-01

    are of doubtful value. Those, however, that are of any value are constituted principally of mixtures of compounds mentioned herein later. Among the materials which are known to ex­ pedite impermeability reground cement, pozzolan, lime, (I) Puller and Thompson... of producing imperme­ ability in concrete reground, pozzolan, and natural ce­ ments, clay and lime have been most generally employed. 29 Reground Cement. The value of regronnd ce­ ment as a waterproofing compound has not been appre­ ciated to any great extent...

  4. Flow adjustment and interior flow associated with a rectangular porous obstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey Tsaros

    The flow at the leading edge and in the interior of a rectangular porous obstruction is described through experiments and scaling. The porous obstruction consists of an emergent, rectangular array of cylinders in shallow ...

  5. The study and characterization of the major flow through rectangular slit virtual impactor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Amit

    2002-01-01

    The major flow through a rectangular slit virtual impactor was experimentally studied. The impactor was a two-dimensional rectangular slit dichotomous sampler. A series of experiments were performed using monodisperse liquid oleic acid particles...

  6. Graph Expansion Analysis for Communication Costs of Fast Rectangular Matrix Multiplication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Graph Expansion Analysis for Communication Costs of Fast Rectangular Matrix Multiplication Grey analysis of computational DAGs is useful for obtaining communication cost lower bounds where previous to fast algorithms for rectangular matrix multiplication, obtaining a new class of communication cost

  7. Equilibrium and Stability of Rectangular Liquid-filled Vessels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trahan, Russell E

    2012-07-11

    Here we focus on the stability characteristics of a rectangular liquid-filled vessel. The position vector of the center of gravity of the liquid volume is derived and used to express the equilibrium angles of the vessel. Analysis of the potential...

  8. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12.3.2. Environmentally friendly modern concretes already include volcanic ash or fly ash from coal-burning power plants as partial substitutes for Portland cement, with...

  9. Overlay Costs National Concrete Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overlay Costs National Concrete Consortium TTCC April 6, 2010 Savannah, Georgia Gary Fick Representing The National Concrete Pavement Technology Center #12;Overlay Cost Tech Brief · Developed to address common questions we have received during our implementation efforts #12;Overlay Cost Tech Brief

  10. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  11. Experimental damage-gas flow correlations for cyclically loaded reinforced concrete walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soppe, Travis E.

    2009-01-01

    will be on cracked concrete permeability and flow rates.Concrete Permeability..Concrete Permeability

  12. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  13. Corrosion resistance of concrete reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward-Waller, Elizabeth, 1982-

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the mechanism of corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete and epoxy coated reinforcing bars as corrosion resistant alternatives. Several case studies explore the durability ...

  14. CONCRETE PAVING & TEXTURING FOR SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    CONCRETE PAVING & TEXTURING FOR SUSTAINABILITY Bernard Igbafen Izevbekhai, Research Operations 2012 #12;OUTLINE #12;SUSTAINABILITY · Meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising Brundtland Commission in 1987: · Successful application of the principles of sustainable development lies

  15. In Defense Of Concrete Explanations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavas, Mehmet

    1979-01-01

    In recent years we have witnessed conflicting proposals in the field of phonology with regard to descriptive and explanatory power of various theories. Especially significant is the controversy involving abstract versus concrete representations...

  16. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandamme, Matthieu

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability ...

  17. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  18. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  19. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  20. Corner heating in rectangular solid oxide electrochemical cell generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichner, Philip (Plum Boro, PA)

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed is an improvement in a solid oxide electrochemical cell generator 1 having a rectangular design with four sides that meet at corners, and containing multiplicity of electrically connected fuel cells 11, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen containing gas is passed into said cells, and said fuel is burned to form heat, electricity, and an exhaust gas. The improvement comprises passing the exhaust gases over the multiplicity of cells 11 in such a way that more of the heat in said exhaust gases flows at the corners of the generator, such as through channels 19.

  1. Improved approximate formulas for flux from cylindrical and rectangular sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, O.J.; Bokharee, S.A.

    1993-03-01

    This report provides two new approximate formulas for the flux at detector points outside the radial and axial extensions of a homogeneous cylindrical source and improved approximate formulas for the flux at points opposite rectangular surface sources. These formulas extend the range of geometries for which analytic approximations may be used by shield design engineers to make rapid scoping studies and check more extensive calculations for reasonableness. These formulas can be used to support skeptical, independent evaluations and are also valuable teaching tools for introducing shield designers to complex shield analyses.

  2. DEVELOPING FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN STRONGLY CURVED DUCTS OF RECTANGULAR CROSS-SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, G.

    2010-01-01

    DEVELOpiNG FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN STRONGLY CURVED DUCTS9092 Developing Flow and Heat Transfer in Strongly CurvedForced Convection Heat Transfer in Curved Rectangular

  3. Hybrid FRP/Concrete Structural Members and Sami Rizkalla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the cost of formworks involved in conventional cast-in-place or pre-cast industries. The shell also acts agent, commercially known as CONEX, in order to prevent separation #12;due to shrinkage. The CONEX was cast from top. Strain gauges were installed on the GFRP shells in the hoop directions in order

  4. Development and HVS Validation of Design Tables for Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui; Jones, David; Wu, Rongzong; Harvey, John T

    2014-01-01

    porous asphalt, pervious concrete and permeable interlockingasphalt, pervious concrete, and permeable concrete slabs toasphalt, pervious concrete and permeable cast concrete slab

  5. Measurement strategy for rectangular electrical capacitance tomography sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Jiamin; Ge, Ruihuan; Qiu, Guizhi; Wang, Haigang [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-04-11

    To investigate the influence of the measurement strategy for the rectangular electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor, a Finite Element Method (FEM) is utilized to create the model for simulation. The simulation was carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics(trade mark, serif) and Matlab(trade mark, serif). The length-width ratio of the rectangular sensing area is 5. Twelve electrodes are evenly arranged surrounding the pipe. The covering ratio of the electrodes is 90%. The capacitances between different electrode pairs are calculated for a bar distribution. The air of the relative permittivity 1.0 and the material of the permittivity 3.0 are used for the calibration. The relative permittivity of the second phase is 3.0. The noise free and noise data are used for the image reconstruction using the Linear Back Projection (LBP). The measurement strategies with 1-, 2- and 4- electrode excitation are compared using the correlation coefficient. Preliminary results show that the measurement strategy with 2-electrode excitation outperforms other measurement strategies with 1- or 4-electrode excitation.

  6. Shear Stress in Smooth Rectangular Open-Channel Flows and Pierre Y. Julien2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Shear Stress in Smooth Rectangular Open-Channel Flows Junke Guo1 and Pierre Y. Julien2 Abstract: The average bed and sidewall shear stresses in smooth rectangular open-channel flows are determined after solving the continuity and momentum equations. The analysis shows that the shear stresses are function

  7. Heat transfer enhancement for turbulent flow through blockages with elongated holes in a rectangular channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yonghee

    2007-09-17

    In this thesis, turbulent forced convective heat transfer downstream of blockages with elongated holes in a rectangular channel was studied. The rectangular channel has a width-to-height ratio of 12:1. The blockages have the same cross section...

  8. Light weight concrete: 226 K contents and dose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    ) commonly used in Hong Kong, namely, autoclave aerated concrete (plus lime), autoclave aerated concrete.N. Yu). #12;in Hong Kong, namely, autoclave aerated concrete (plus lime), autoclave aerated concrete

  9. ACHIEVING "GREEN" CONCRETE THROUGH THE USE OF HIGH PERFORMANCE FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Shih-Ho

    permeability, cracking and subsequent damage. Deterioration of concrete from commonly encountered environmental1 ACHIEVING "GREEN" CONCRETE THROUGH THE USE OF HIGH PERFORMANCE FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE Shih-Ho Chao1 , A. M., ASCE ABSTRACT Concrete is one of the most widely used materials for infrastructure all

  10. Undesired drying of concrete and cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Undesired drying of concrete and cement paste is a nightmare for any construction engineer of the concrete or cement paste surface. Inspired by the art of molecular cooking a team of TU Delft scientists for instance sodium alginates. When sprayed on the surface of concrete or cement paste, a rapid chemical

  11. Recycled Wash Water Crushed Returned Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Recycled Wash Water Crushed Returned Concrete National Concrete Consortium March 2012 Colin Lobo% increase by 2030 "Waste" to "Recycled" Returned Concrete - estimated 2 - 10% of production 8 to 12 million cubic yards Truck and Mixer Washout 50 to 200 gallons per truck WWW. NRMCA.ORG Need to manage

  12. National Concrete Pavement Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application Program Overlay Guide (what do we know!) Field Application Program (We can build it!) Simpler Design Explanation of Current Programs Field Research (What we don't know & how to solve a problem) #12;Concrete Overlay Guide second edition Second Edition September 2008 Contents 1. Overview of Overlay

  13. Study of instabilities and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in volumetrically heated magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct N. Vetcha, S. Smolentsev, M. Abdou, and R. Moreau Citation in a vertical rectangular duct N. Vetcha,1 S. Smolentsev,1,a) M. Abdou,1 and R. Moreau2 1 Mechanical 2013; published online 15 February 2013) We consider magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) rectangular duct flows

  14. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Joliet, IL); Singh, Dileep (Westmont, IL); Pullockaran, Jose D. (Trenton, NJ); Knox, Lerry (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising hydrng a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO.sub.3 of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring.

  15. DEVELOPING FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN STRONGLY CURVED DUCTS OF RECTANGULAR CROSS-SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, G.

    2010-01-01

    123. HUMPHREY, J.A.C. , "Flow in Ducts with Curvature andViscous Flow in Curved Ducts of Rectangular Cross-Sections,"Laminar Flow in a Square Duct of Strong Curvature,1I J.

  16. Interaction of water waves with fluidized mud in a rectangular trench 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemasson, Wilfrid Joel Christian

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic response of fluidized mud in a rectangular trench to water waves propagating over the trench was studied experimentally. It was shown that the motion of the fluid mud became large compared to the surface wave ...

  17. Jet impingement heat transfer in two-pass rotating rectangular channels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuming

    1996-01-01

    The combined effects of rotation and jet impingement on local heat transfer in a two-pass rotating rectangular channel is studied. The results of an experimental investigation on the surface heat transfer coefficients under a perforated plate...

  18. Experimental Two-Phase Flow Characterization of Subcooled Boiling in a Rectangular Channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada Perez, Carlos E.

    2010-01-16

    On the efforts to provide a reliable source of experimental information on turbulent subcooled boiling ow, time resolved Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) experiments were carried out using HFE-301 refrigerant ow through a vertical rectangular...

  19. THE DEVELOPMENT OF LARGE RECTANGULAR CERAMIC INSULATORS FOR ION ACCELERATORS FOR THE NEUTRAL-BEAM PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paterson, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    OF LARGE RECTANGULAR CERAMIC INSULATORS FOR ION ACCELERATORSj o i n t d e t a i l the Ceramic Shop. Thanks are also dueC. P. Smith, "Machinable Class Ceramics, Nev Materials for

  20. Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet with quantum effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lifeng, E-mail: walfe@nuaa.edu.cn; Hu, Haiyan [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 210016 Nanjing (China)

    2014-06-21

    The thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet is investigated by using a rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with quantum effects taken into account when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between the temperature and the Root of Mean Squared (RMS) amplitude of vibration at any point of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet in simply supported case is derived first from the rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with the strain gradient of the second order taken into consideration so as to characterize the effect of microstructure of the graphene sheet. Then, the RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet simply supported on an elastic foundation is derived. The study shows that the RMS amplitude of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet predicted from the quantum theory is lower than that predicted from the law of energy equipartition. The maximal relative difference of RMS amplitude of thermal vibration appears at the sheet corners. The microstructure of the graphene sheet has a little effect on the thermal vibrations of lower modes, but exhibits an obvious effect on the thermal vibrations of higher modes. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of higher modes in the case of smaller sides and lower temperature. The relative difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet decreases monotonically with an increase of temperature. The absolute difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet increases slowly with the rising of Winkler foundation modulus.

  1. Blast simulator wall tests : experimental methods and mitigation strategies for reinforced concrete and concrete Masonry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oesterle, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    in reinforced concrete section d cfb Distance to bottom CFRPof bolt A c Area of concrete A cfb Cross-sectional area offunction for BG programmers F cfb Stress in bottom CFRP F

  2. Critical Heat Flux in Inclined Rectangular Narrow Gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong J. Kim; Yong H. Kim; Seong J. Kim; Sang W. Noh; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-06-01

    In light of the TMI-2 accident, in which the reactor vessel lower head survived the attack by molten core material, the in-vessel retention strategy was suggested to benefit from cooling the debris through a gap between the lower head and the core material. The GAMMA 1D (Gap Apparatus Mitigating Melt Attack One Dimensional) tests were conducted to investigate the critical heat flux (CHF) in narrow gaps with varying surface orientations. The CHF in an inclined gap, especially in case of the downward-facing narrow gap, is dictated by bubble behavior because the departing bubbles are squeezed. The orientation angle affects the bubble layer and escape of the bubbles from the narrow gap. The test parameters include gap sizes of 1, 2, 5 and 10 mm and the open periphery, and the orientation angles range from the fully downward-facing (180o) to the vertical (90o) position. The 15 ×35 mm copper test section was electrically heated by the thin film resistor on the back. The heater assembly was installed to the tip of the rotating arm in the heated water pool at the atmospheric pressure. The bubble behavior was photographed utilizing a high-speed camera through the Pyrex glass spacer. It was observed that the CHF decreased as the surface inclination angle increased and as the gap size decreased in most of the cases. However, the opposing results were obtained at certain surface orientations and gap sizes. Transition angles, at which the CHF changed in a rapid slope, were also detected, which is consistent with the existing literature. A semi-empirical CHF correlation was developed for the inclined narrow rectangular channels through dimensional analysis. The correlation provides with best-estimate CHF values for realistically assessing the thermal margin to failure of the lower head during a severe accident involving relocation of the core material.

  3. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  4. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek concrete scabbling system consists of the MOOSE{reg_sign} scabbler, the SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers, and VAC-PAC. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 3/8 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  5. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  6. Rutting and drainage design methodology for a concrete block pavement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poduska, Daryl Jason

    1998-01-01

    Concrete block pavements (CBP) have historically been hics. used in low trafficked applications as an alternative to asphalt and concrete pavement because of their aesthetic quality. However, concrete block pavements have not been used for high...

  7. Bayesian prediction of modulus of elasticity of self consolidated concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharjee, Chandan

    2009-05-15

    Current models of the modulus of elasticity, E , of concrete recommended by the American Concrete Institute (ACI) and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) are derived only for normally vibrated concrete...

  8. Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Se Hoon

    2010-07-14

    The complex interaction between cement and chemical/mineral admixtures in concrete mixtures sometimes leads to unpredictable concrete performance in the field which is generally defined as concrete incompatibilities. Cement paste rheology...

  9. The life cycle assessment of concrete manufacturing in Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Mostafa, Mayce (Mayce A.)

    2013-01-01

    Concrete is the second most widely used material in the world after water. Annually 9,120 million tons of concrete are produced, which is an equivalent of 1.3 tons of concrete per individual. As the world's primary ...

  10. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  11. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Knox, L.

    1997-04-29

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising mixing a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO{sub 3} of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring. 2 figs.

  12. Comprehensive Database on Concrete Creep and Shrinkage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://iti.northwestern.edu. Evolution of Databases A vast number of creep and shrinkage experiments have been carried out aroundComprehensive Database on Concrete Creep and Shrinkage Zdenek P. Bazant and Guang-Hua Li Structural Database on Concrete Creep and Shrinkage Zdenek P. Bazant1 and Guang-Hua Li2 Abstract: As a sequel

  13. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Naus, Dan J; Remec, Igor; Busby, Jeremy T; Rosseel, Thomas M; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete [1]. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete [2] does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure [3]. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  14. Development and test of a rectangular CERN ConFlat-type flange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miarnau Marin, Ana; Veness, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Standard circular ConFlat® (CF) flanges are widely used in industry due to their high sealing reliability after being subjected to a bakeout process. The Beam Gas Ionisation (BGI) instrument for the CERN Proton Synchrotron accelerator will require a CF-like rectangular sealing system. Although rectangular CF-type flanges with plastically deforming metal seals have been used, no published designs with validated tests for bakeout under UHV conditions are available. Existing circular CERN CF flanges were compared and a design for a rectangular CF flange was proposed. Two prototypes were manufactured along with copper gaskets. The flanges and gaskets were cleaned and prepared for extensive vacuum testing after bakeout cycles up to 350 °C. This paper summarises the design, analysis and manufacturing process and describes the testing procedures and results. Additionally, the limitations when designing a flange of any shape were explored.

  15. Relationship between Frequency of RFID Tags and Its Ability to Penetrate Fresh Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridharan, Rajasekaran

    2011-08-08

    The concrete maturity method can be utilized to determine in situ strength of concrete. It uses the temperature of concrete to determine a maturity index that can then be used to determine strength of concrete. However, monitoring the concrete...

  16. Consolidation of continuously reinforced concrete pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, Dan Parker

    1984-01-01

    Department's "Construction Bulletin C-ll", the initial mix designs were developed. The final step in developing the concrete batch designs consisted of mixing 1. 5 cu. ft. trial batches to determine whether or not the mix designs met the SDHPT...'s specifications for C RC P concrete (Table 2, p. 24). During the mixing process, attempts were made to produce concrete that had a l-l/2 in. 23 Table 1. Test combinations and mix designs. Coarse Aggregate Max. Size (in. ) 1-1/2 3/4 Coarse Aggregate Factor 0...

  17. VOL. 28, NO. 8, AUGUST 1990 AIAA JOURNAL 1447 Flow Distortion in a Circular-to-Rectangular Transition Duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    -to-Rectangular Transition Duct J. J. Miau,* T. S. Leu,? J. H. Chou,f S. A. Lint National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Experiments were made for three circular-to-rectangular transition ducts of the transition duct. The results indicate that the major driving force for flow in the duct to behave three

  18. Carbon dioxide sequestration in concrete in different curing environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in concrete in different curing environments Y.-m. Chun, T.R. Naik, USA ABSTRACT: This paper summarizes the results of an investigation on carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in concrete. Concrete mixtures were not air entrained. Concrete mixtures were made containing

  19. Seismic Fragility Analysis and Loss Estimation for Concrete Structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Jong Wha

    2012-02-14

    seismic vulnerability of concrete structures and effective in quantifying the uncertainties in the loss estimation process....

  20. Performance of Reinforced Concrete Column Lap Splices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberson, Ryan M.

    2010-01-14

    Cantilevered reinforced concrete columns with a lap splice of the longitudinal reinforcement near the base can induce high moment demands on the splice region when lateral loads are present on the structure. Code design specifications typically...

  1. Ductility of lightly reinforced concrete hydraulic structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raines, Amy Lynette

    1994-01-01

    In the past, intake towers built by the Corp of Engineers were designed without consideration of seismic effects. This study investigates an economic approach to determining the ductility of an existing lightly reinforced concrete hydraulic...

  2. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  3. Microstructural viscoplastic continuum model for asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tashman, Laith

    2004-09-30

    deformation of Asphalt Concrete (AC) at high temperatures. These phenomena include strain rate dependency, confining pressure dependency, dilation, aggregate friction, anisotropy, and damage. The model is based on Perzyna's theory of viscoplasticity...

  4. Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

    2012-01-01

    Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

  5. Ground vibration due to a high-speed moving harmonic rectangular load on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, Université de

    Ground vibration due to a high-speed moving harmonic rectangular load on a poroviscoelastic half'Avignon, Facult´e des Sciences, 33 rue Louis Pasteur, F-84000 Avignon, France RUNNING TITLE: Vibrations induced) #12;Abstract The transmission of vibrations in the ground, due to a high-speed moving vertical har

  6. Repulsive Casimir forces produced in rectangular cavities: Possible measurements and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gusso; A. G. M. Schmidt

    2006-01-13

    We perform a theoretical analysis of a setup intended to measure the repulsive (outward) Casimir forces predicted to exist inside of perfectly conducting rectangular cavities. We consider the roles of the conductivity of the real metals, of the temperature and surface roughness. The use of this repulsive force to reduce friction and wear in micro and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) is also considered.

  7. Sensors and Actuators A 127 (2006) 270275 Plastic 95-GHz rectangular waveguides by micro molding technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    2006-01-01

    Sensors and Actuators A 127 (2006) 270­275 Plastic 95-GHz rectangular waveguides by micro molding technologies Firas Sammouraa,, Yu-Chuan Sua, Ying Caib, Chen-Yu Chic, Bala Elamaranc, Liwei Lina, Jung at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019-0016, USA c Agilent Technologies, 1400 Fountain Grove Pky, San Rosa, CA 95403

  8. Recharge/seepage from an array of rectangular Mahender Choudhary a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    Recharge/seepage from an array of rectangular channels Mahender Choudhary a , Bhagu R. Chahar b@civil.iitd.ac.in, chahar_br@yahoo.com (B.R. Chahar). Journal of Hydrology (2007) 343, 71­79 available at www

  9. To be published in NRMCA Concrete Technology Forum: Focus on Sustainable Development, 2008 Internal Curing with Crushed Returned Concrete Aggregates for High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    returned concrete aggregate; internal curing; lightweight aggregate; recycling; sustainability to landfills. It is the authors' contention that recycling crushed returned concrete aggregate (CCA Curing with Crushed Returned Concrete Aggregates for High Performance Concrete Haejin Kim1 and Dale Bentz

  10. Life-Cycle Assessment of Concrete: Decision-Support Tool and Case Study Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gursel, Aysegul Petek

    2014-01-01

    waste from concrete batching involves mixer washout, sludgesof washout, the volume of returned concrete, and the amountwashout, truck wash off, etc. ) for ready-mixed concrete

  11. Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadel, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    lumber pathway, recycled aggregate in the concrete pathway,excess production, recycled aggregate from concrete waste,the application of recycled concrete aggregates during the

  12. Hybrid Simulation of the Seismic Response of Squat Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Catherine Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    2006), Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety Related ConcreteRequirements for Nuclear Safety-Related Concrete Structures,2006. Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety Related Concrete

  13. Strain concentrations in pipelines with concrete coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, O.B.; Verley, R. [Statoil, Trondheim (Norway)

    1996-08-01

    This paper concerns the strain distribution, and in particular strain concentration in field joints, for concrete-covered pipelines during laying. A semi-analytical model, full-scale tests to verify the model, and results of a parameter study are described. The model is used to establish nonlinear moment-curvature curves at a number of cross sections on the concrete-coated pipe and in the field joint (FJ). These are used to establish a strain concentration factor (SCF) for the FJ, or characteristics for a varying stiffness model of a pipe for direct use in lay analyses. Constant moment, four-point bending tests have been conducted on 16-in and 20-in dia, concrete-coated pipes as well as material tests on the pipe steel, corrosion coating and concrete. The behavior of the pipe, and in particular the SCF at the field joints, is investigated and compared to predictions using the semi-analytical model. The model is found to give a good prediction of the SCF and strain distribution along the pipe joint, for both the steel and the concrete, and is suitable for use in lay analyses for the overbend of S-mode lay vessels.

  14. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Naus, Dan J

    2012-05-01

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  15. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production Shao Yixin MATERIALS SCIENCE Clean Coal Technology Coal Environmental Processes Clean Coal Technology Coal Environmental...

  16. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    insulated panel systems, insulated precast concrete walls, a heat pump water heater, geothermal systems, grid-connected solar photovoltaics, adaptive mechanical ventilation,...

  17. A multiresolution finite element method based on a new locking-free rectangular Mindlin plate element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    A locking-free rectangular Mindlin plate element with a new multi-resolution analysis (MRA) is proposed and a multireolution finite element method is hence presented. The MRA framework is formulated out of a mutually nesting displacement subspace sequence. The MRA endows the proposed element with the resolution level (RL) to adjust the element node number, thus modulating structural analysis accuracy accordingly. As a result, the traditional 4-node rectangular Mindlin plate element and method is a mono-resolution one and also a special case of the proposed element and method. The meshing for the monoresolution plate element model is based on the empiricism while the RL adjusting for the multiresolution is laid on the rigorous mathematical basis. The accuracy of a structural analysis is actually determined by the RL, not by the mesh. The rational MRA enables the implementation of the multiresolution Mindlin plate element method to be more rational and efficient than that of the conventional monoresolution or o...

  18. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  19. Analytical solution for free vibrations of simply supported transversally inextensible homogeneous rectangular plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milan Batista

    2010-07-16

    In article, the exact solution of sinusoidal loaded simply supported elastic transversally inextensible rectangular plate is given. The expressions for displacement and stress components are derived and asymptotic expansion with respect to plate thickness are present. The frequency factors for plate thickness to width ratio 0.01, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 and various ratios of plate length to width are given.

  20. Two Channel Dielectric-Lined Rectangular High Transformer Ratio Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shchelkunov, S. V.; LaPointe, M. A. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Marshall, T. C. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Sotnikov, G. [NSC Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Gai, Wei; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Mihalcea, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-11-04

    Current status of a two-channel cm-scale rectangular dielectric lined wakefield accelerator structure is described. This structure is installed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility (AWA), and is presently being evaluated. The device has a transformer ratio of {approx}12.5:1. When driven by a {approx}50 nC single drive bunch it is expected to obtain {approx}6 MV/m acceleration gradient. Related issues are discussed.

  1. GARCON: Genetic Algorithm for Rectangular Cuts OptimizatioN. User's manual for version 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Abdullin; D. Acosta; P. Bartalini; R. Cavanaugh; A. Drozdetskiy; G. Karapostoli; G. Mitselmakher; Yu. Pakhotin; B. Scurlock; M. Spiropulu

    2006-05-17

    This paper presents GARCON program, illustrating its functionality on a simple HEP analysis example. The program automatically performs rectangular cuts optimization and verification for stability in a multi-dimensional phase space. The program has been successfully used by a number of very different analyses presented in the CMS Physics Technical Design Report. The current version GARCON 2.0 incorporates the feedback the authors have received. User's Manual is included as a part of the note.

  2. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkel, B.V.

    1995-03-03

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970`s, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in{sup 2} mix and a 4.5 kip/in{sup 2} mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in{sup 2}. In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F.

  3. Shrinkage - cracking characteristics of structural lightweight concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeen, Robert Gordon

    1969-01-01

    restraint of the material, such as reinforcement and external fri. ction 28 (h) chemical admixtures employed (i) unit water content 2. 4 ~fk' f. C 2. 4. 1 General The cracking of concrete has been a subject of interest to desi. gners for many years... were made on two six by t. )elve in. c; linders from each batch of concrete for purposes of control. . The pecimens were moist cured 14 days prior to testing. Testing was performed in accordance with ASTM C39-64. The data were taken to provid...

  4. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Jr., George D. (Santa Fe, NM); Carey, J. William (Santa Fe, NM)

    1999-09-21

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  5. Measurements of wall heat (mass) transfer for flow through blockages with round and square holes in a wide rectangular channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Naphthalene sublimation and pressure measurement experiments were conducted to study heat (mass) transfer enhancement by blockages with staggered round and square holes for turbulent air flows through the holes in the blockages in an 8:1 rectangular...

  6. Experimental research on heat transfer of natural convection in vertical rectangular channels with large aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Qing; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui [State Key Laboratory of Multi Phase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an JIaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Tian, Wenxi; Ye, Zhonghao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2010-01-15

    This work presents the experimental research on the steady laminar natural convection heat transfer of air in three vertical thin rectangular channels with different gap clearance. The much higher ratio of width to gap clearance (60-24) and the ratio of length to gap clearance (800-320) make the rectangular channels similar with the coolant flow passage in plate type fuel reactors. The vertical rectangular channels were composed of two stainless steal plates and were heated by electrical heating rods. The wall temperatures were detected with the K-type thermocouples which were inserted into the blind holes drilled in the steal plates. Also the air temperatures at the inlet and outlet of the channel were detected. The wall heat fluxes added to the air flow were calculated by the Fourier heat conduction law. The heat transfer characteristics were analyzed, and the average Nusselt numbers in all the three channels could be well correlated with the Rayleigh number or the modified Rayleigh number in a uniform correlation. Furthermore, the maximum wall temperatures were investigated, which is a key parameter for the fuel's integrity during some accidents. It was found that even the wall heat flux was up to 1500 W/m{sup 2}, the maximum wall temperature was lower than 350 C. All this work is valuable for the plate type reactor's design and safety analysis. (author)

  7. Maintenance-based design of concrete parking structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoakes, Christopher D. (Christopher David)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine what type of preventative maintenance for a concrete parking structure will produce the maximum economic benefit. Existing models for concrete deterioration are analyzed for their ...

  8. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01

    ACI-318, Eurocode 8, which has similar provisions to the New Zealand 3101 concrete design standard,ACI-318, Eurocode 8, which has similar provisions to the New Zealand 3101 Concrete Design Standard

  9. Material flow analysis of concrete in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Man-Shi

    2005-01-01

    Concrete is the second most consumed material in the world after water. Due to the sheer mass of concrete consumed annually and its associated resource and environmental impacts, improving the materials management of ...

  10. Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete Incorporated With Phase Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Chia-So

    2015-01-01

    in concrete." Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 27(2),in concrete." Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 62(3),stability." Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 94(7),

  11. Effect of Materials and Curing Period on Shrinkage of Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Maria B.

    2010-02-04

    The ASTM C157 free shrinkage test is used to evaluate the effects of mix proportioning parameters and curing on concrete shrinkage with the goal of providing recommendations that will reduce concrete shrinkage in bridge decks. Specimens are dried up...

  12. Lightweight concrete : investigations into the production of natural fiber reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbis, Leonidia Maria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits of adding natural fiber tensile reinforcement to aerated concrete. Concrete is a great composite material which can be created in various proportions and with various ...

  13. Automated crack control analysis for concrete pavement construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Se Hoon

    2005-11-01

    and the subbase, and concrete shrinkage. Other factors relevant to concrete mixture characteristics such as cement content and type of coarse aggregate affect development of early aged stresses caused by shrinkage and thermally induced contraction. A probabilistic...

  14. A New Protocol for Evaluating Concrete Curing Effectiveness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Peizhi

    2013-07-22

    Excessive early-age concrete surface moisture evaporation causes many problems of concrete pavements, such as plastic shrinkage cracking and delamination; the use of liquid membrane-forming curing compounds is one of the most prevalent methods...

  15. Set in stone? A perspective on the concrete sustainability challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vliet, Krystyn Van J.

    As the most abundant engineered material on Earth, concrete is essential to the physical infrastructure of all modern societies. There are no known materials that can replace concrete in terms of cost and availability. ...

  16. Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete Incorporated With Phase Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Chia-So

    2015-01-01

    cocnrete .2." Solar Energy Materials, 21(1), 61-80. Hawes,in concrete." Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 27(2),in concrete .2." Solar Energy Materials, 21(1), 61-80. [17

  17. Controlling Thermal Properties of Asphalt Concrete and its Multifunctional Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xijun

    2014-08-10

    ) by controlling thermal properties of the construction materials. To change thermal properties of asphalt concrete, expanded polypropylene (EPP) pellet and graphite were selected as the additives and mixed into asphalt concrete. Experimental tests are classified...

  18. Analytical modeling of composite steel-concrete frame systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atahan, Ali Osman

    1996-01-01

    of reinforced concrete or composite steel shapes encased in reinforced concrete (SRC), structural steel beams, and composite beam-column joints. To facilitate the modeling of inelastic deformations in joint regions, a panel element capable of representing joint...

  19. Development and HVS Validation of Design Tables for Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui; Jones, David; Wu, Rongzong; Harvey, John T

    2014-01-01

    for Infiltration Rate of In Place Pervious Concrete, whichfor Infiltration Rate of In Place Pervious Concrete, which

  20. Amr Abdelrahman, PhD Professor of Concrete Structures,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amr Abdelrahman, PhD Professor of Concrete Structures, Structural Engineering Dept., Ain Shams Behavior and Design of Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Structures and Masonry Wall Design. He conducts and Construction of Concrete Structures, Egyptian Code for Design of Bridges and Egyptian Code for Use

  1. A NOVEL MICROWAVE CAMERA FOR NDE OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Flaviis, Franco

    A NOVEL MICROWAVE CAMERA FOR NDE OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES By Maria Q. Feng1 , Yoo Jin Kim2 , Franco a novel microwave camera for detecting and quantitatively assessing such internal damage in concrete. For the experimental verification, a prototype planar microwave camera was fabricated and tested on a concrete block

  2. A new healing process for concrete enables autonomous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    emissions. For 100 kg of concrete produced, some 20kg of CO2 are emitted. Sustainability as a driver distances. Concrete structures are also energy-efficient. Yet concrete is a major contributor to CO2 / Valorisation Centre Mekelweg 2 2628 CD Delft T: 015-2786751 www.patent.tudelft.nl Source: Eelke Dekker #12;

  3. Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics Gregor Vilkner Submitted Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics Gregor Vilkner Thin sheet concrete crushed glass as aggregate, a multitude of different esthetic effects can be produced, which again open up

  4. Effect of confinement on shear dominated reinforced concrete elements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powanusorn, Suraphong

    2005-02-17

    cap deformations, namely the effects of concrete shrinkage and interfacial bond-slip between the concrete and main flexural reinforcement in the bent caps, were discussed. Parametric studies showed that the tension-stiffening in the proposed............................................156 5.4.3 Strength Prediction...............................................................160 5.5 Parametric Studies......................................................................163 5.5.1 Effect of Shrinkage in Concrete...

  5. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870/sup 0/C (950 to 1600/sup 0/F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium.

  6. Concrete Pavement Sustainability Sustainability Track Leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Preservation/Rehabilitation/Recycling Strategies · S.5: Improved Economic Life Cycle Cost Analysis · S.6 #12;What Else is Happening? · FHWA advocating "Green Paving" technologies ­ Recycled concrete, two mixtures ­ Alkali-activated systems · Inorganic polymers (geopolymers) · Carbon sequestering cements #12;In

  7. Nuclear waste package fabricated from concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1987-03-01

    After the United States enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1983, the Department of Energy must design, site, build and operate permanent geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The Department of Energy has recently selected three sites, one being the Hanford Site in the state of Washington. At this particular site, the repository will be located in basalt at a depth of approximately 3000 feet deep. The main concern of this site, is contamination of the groundwater by release of radionuclides from the waste package. The waste package basically has three components: the containment barrier (metal or concrete container, in this study concrete will be considered), the waste form, and other materials (such as packing material, emplacement hole liners, etc.). The containment barriers are the primary waste container structural materials and are intended to provide containment of the nuclear waste up to a thousand years after emplacement. After the containment barriers are breached by groundwater, the packing material (expanding sodium bentonite clay) is expected to provide the primary control of release of radionuclide into the immediate repository environment. The loading conditions on the concrete container (from emplacement to approximately 1000 years), will be twofold; (1) internal heat of the high-level waste which could be up to 400/sup 0/C; (2) external hydrostatic pressure up to 1300 psi after the seepage of groundwater has occurred in the emplacement tunnel. A suggested container is a hollow plain concrete cylinder with both ends capped. 7 refs.

  8. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  9. Design and Proportioning of Concrete Paving Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consortium April 8th, 2008 Baton Rouge, LA American Concrete Pavement Association #12;Part of the Mix Track from EB001, IMCP, etc Spring 08 ­ Select authors, let contracts, delegate assignments and start writing · Curing · Hydration Processes · Introduction to the M-E PDG · Joint Layout and Design · Life Cycle Cost

  10. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01

    In Phase II the main load bearing wall was reconfigured as aIn Phase II the main load bearing wall was reconfigured as aa rectangular load bearing wall acting as the main lateral

  11. Final Technical Report HFC Concrete: A Low-�������­���¢�������Energy, Carbon-�������­Dioxide-�������­Negative Solution for reducing Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Larry McCandlish, Principal Investigator; Dr. Richard Riman, Co-Principal Investigator

    2012-05-14

    Solidia/CCSM received funding for further research and development of its Low Temperature Solidification Process (LTS), which is used to create hydrate-free concrete (HFC). LTS/HFC is a technology/materials platform that offers wide applicability in the built infrastructure. Most importantly, it provides a means of making concrete without Portland cement. Cement and concrete production is a major consumer of energy and source of industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The primary goal of this project was to develop and commercialize a novel material, HFC, which by replacing traditional concrete and cement, reduces both energy use and GHG emissions in the built infrastructure. Traditional concrete uses Portland Cement (PC) as a binder. PC production involves calcination of limestone at {approx}1450 C, which releases significant amounts of CO{sub 2} gas to the atmosphere and consumes a large amount of energy due to the high temperature required. In contrast, HFC is a carbonate-based hydrate-free concrete (HFC) that consumes CO{sub 2} gas in its production. HFC is made by reaction of silicate minerals with CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 C, more than an order-of-magnitude below the temperature required to make PC. Because of this significant difference in temperature, it is estimated that we will be able to reduce energy use in the cement and concrete industry by up to 30 trillion Btu by 2020. Because of the insulating properties of HFC, we believe we will also be able to significantly reduce energy use in the Building sector, though the extent of this saving is not yet quantified. It is estimated that production of a tonne of PC-based concrete requires about 6.2 million Btu of energy and produces over 1 tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions (Choate, 2003). These can be reduced to 1.9 million Btu and 0.025 tonnes of CO{sub 2} emissions per tonne of HFC (with overall CO{sub 2}-negativity possible by increasing carbonation yield). In this way, by replacing PC-based concrete with HFC in infrastructure we can reduce energy use in concrete production by 70%, and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 98%; thus the potential to reduce the impact of building materials on global warming and climate change is highly significant. Low Temperature Solidification (LTS) is a breakthrough technology that enables the densification of inorganic materials via a hydrothermal process. The resulting product exhibits excellent control of chemistry and microstructure, to provide durability and mechanical performance that exceeds that of concrete or natural stone. The technology can be used in a wide range of applications including facade panels, interior tiles, roof tiles, countertops, and pre-cast concrete. Replacing traditional building materials and concrete in these applications will result in significant reduction in both energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions.

  12. Concrete decontamination by Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    EHS is being developed for decontaminating concrete structures from radionuclides, organic substances, and hazardous metals. EHS involves the generation of powerful shock waves and intense cavitation by a strong pulsed electric discharge in a water layer at the concrete surface; high impulse pressure results in stresses which crack and peel off a concrete layer of controllable thickness. Scabbling produces contaminated debris of relatively small volume which can be easily removed, leaving clean bulk concrete. Objective of Phase I was to prove the technical feasibility of EH for controlled scabbling and decontamination of concrete. Phase I is complete.

  13. An Alternative Mechanism for Accelerated Carbon Sequestration in Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselbach, Liv M.; Thomle, Jonathan N.

    2014-07-01

    The increased rate of carbon dioxide sequestration (carbonation) is desired in many primary and secondary life applications of concrete in order to make the life cycle of concrete structures more carbon neutral. Most carbonation rate studies have focused on concrete exposed to air under various conditions. An alternative mechanism for accelerated carbon sequestration in concrete was investigated in this research based on the pH change of waters in contact with pervious concrete which have been submerged in carbonate laden waters. The results indicate that the concrete exposed to high levels of carbonate species in water may carbonate faster than when exposed to ambient air, and that the rate is higher with higher concentrations. Validation of increased carbon dioxide sequestration was also performed via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is theorized that the proposed alternative mechanism reduces a limiting rate effect of carbon dioxide dissolution in water in the micro pores of the concrete.

  14. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillman, Eric D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2014-06-15

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 ?m in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  15. Photon exchange and entanglement formation during the transmission through a rectangular quantum barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Sulyok; Katharina Durstberger-Rennhofer; Johann Summhammer

    2014-10-17

    When a quantum particle traverses a rectangular potential created by a quantum field both photon exchange and entanglement between particle and field take place. We present analytic results for the transition amplitudes of any possible photon exchange processes for an incoming plane wave and initial Fock, thermal and coherent field states. We show that for coherent field states the entanglement correlates the particle's position to the photon number in the field instead of the particle's energy as usual. Besides entanglement formation, remarkable differences to the classical field treatment also appear with respect to the symmetry between photon emission and absorption, resonance effects and if the field initially occupies the vacuum state.

  16. Critical heat flux for free convection boiling in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the experimental data on free convection boiling critical heat flux (CHF) in vertical rectangular channels reveals three mechanisms of burnout. They are the pool boiling limit, the circulation limit, and the flooding limit associated with a transition in flow regime from churn to annular flow. The dominance of a particular mechanism depends on the dimensions of the channel. Analytical models were developed for each free convection boiling limit. Limited agreement with data is observed. A CHF correlation, which is valid for a wide range of gap sizes, was constructed from the CHFs calculated according to the three mechanisms of burnout. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  18. A Direct Approach to the Electromagnetic Casimir Energy in a Rectangular Waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madad Ali Valuyan; Reza Moazzemi; Siamak S. Gousheh

    2008-06-10

    In this paper we compute the leading order Casimir energy for the electromagnetic field (EM) in an open ended perfectly conducting rectangular waveguide in three spatial dimensions by a direct approach. For this purpose we first obtain the second quantized expression for the EM field with boundary conditions which would be appropriate for a waveguide. We then obtain the Casimir energy by two different procedures. Our main approach does not contain any analytic continuation techniques. The second approach involves the routine zeta function regularization along with some analytic continuation techniques. Our two approaches yield identical results. This energy has been calculated previously for the EM field in a rectangular waveguide using an indirect approach invoking analogies between EM fields and massless scalar fields, and using complicated analytic continuation techniques, and the results are identical to ours. We have also calculated the pressures on different sides and the total Casimir energy per unit length, and plotted these quantities as a function of the cross-sectional dimensions of the waveguide. We also present a physical discussion about the rather peculiar effect of the change in the sign of the pressures as a function of the shape of the cross-sectional area.

  19. Concrete decontamination by Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS). Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-30

    Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS) technology and equipment for decontaminating concrete structures from radionuclides, organic substances, and hazardous metals is being developed by Textron Systems Division (TSD). This wet scabbling technique involves the generation of powerful shock waves and intense cavitation by a strong pulsed electric discharge in a water layer at the concrete surface. The high pressure impulse results in stresses which crack and peel off a concrete layer of a controllable thickness. Scabbling produces contaminated debris of relatively small volume which can be easily removed, leaving clean bulk concrete. This new technology is being developed under Contract No. DE-AC21-93MC30164. The project objective is to develop and demonstrate a cost-efficient, rapid, controllable process to remove the surface layer of contaminated concrete while generating minimal secondary waste. The primary target of this program is uranium-contaminated concrete floors which constitute a substantial part of the contaminated area at DOE weapon facilities.

  20. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akka?, Ay?e; Ba?yi?it, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-16

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated.

  1. Sustained concrete attack by low-temperature, fragmented core debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Bradley, D.R.; Blose, R.E.; Ross, J.W.; Gilbert, D.W.

    1987-07-01

    Four experiments were performed to study the interactions between low-temperature core debris and concretes typical of reactor structures. The tests addressed accident situations where the core debris is at elevated temperature, but not molten. Concrete crucibles were formed in right-circular cylinders with 45 kg of steel spheres (approx.3-mm diameter) as the debris simulant. The debris was heated by an inductive power supply to nominal temperatures of 1473 K to 1673 K. Two tests were performed on each of two concrete types using either basalt or limestone aggregate. For each concrete, one test was performed with water atop the debris while the second had no water added. The results show that low-temperature core debris will erode either basalt or limestone-common sand concretes. Downward erosion rates of 3 to 4 cm/hr were recorded for both concrete types. The limestone concrete produced a crust layer within the debris bed that was effective in preventing the downward intrusion of water. The basalt concrete crust was formed above the debris and consisted of numerous, convoluted, thin layers. Carbon dioxide and water release from the decomposition of concrete were partially reduced by the metallic debris to yield carbon monoxide and hydrogen, respectively. The overlying water pool did not effect the reduction reactions.

  2. Computational Modeling of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shastri, Ajay Seshadri

    2012-02-14

    . The model is developed in the finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The concrete damaged plasticity model was used to simulate the behavior of concrete. A calibration model using a cantilever beam was produced to generate key parameters in the model... Stress (ABAQUS 2008)??????.????...61 Fig. 3.9. CPS8 Element Used for Modeling Concrete (ABAQUS 2008)?????64 Fig. 4.1. Elevation and Cross-Section of the Cantilever Beam?????????66 Fig. 4.2. Compressive Stress-Strain Behavior of Concrete...

  3. Concrete growth problems and remedial measures at TVA projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammer, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Most concrete structures are designed and detailed to provide for a volume decrease without excessive cracking. Occasionally, however, a concrete structure exhibits a long-term increase in volume termed concrete growth. Concrete growth may result from a variety of reactions, such as the hydration of unstable oxides included in the concrete mix, or the oxidation of minerals or from an outside attack of sulfates. The most important reaction creating concrete growth is that between minor alkali hydroxides from cement and the concrete aggregates. Two distinctly different harmful reactions have been recognized: the alkali-silicate and alkali-carbonate reactions. Concrete deteriorating from an alkali-aggregate reaction, regardless of the type, develops an obvious network of cracks called pattern or map cracking. These alkali-aggregate reactions and their accompanying concrete growth have presented numerous problems at TVA's Fontana Dam, Chickamauga Dam and lock, and Hiwassee Dam. Much has been learned about alkali-aggregate reaction since 1940. Most harmful reactions can now be prevented in proposed structures by interpreting the results of standard test methods. It is not possible, however, in existing structures to determine how far the growth phenomenon has progressed, how long the effects will have to be dealt with, or what the future effects will be. A program of close surveillance and monitoring is maintained at these projects, and problems are dealt with as they arise.

  4. Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete Incorporated With Phase Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Chia-So

    2015-01-01

    approximate mixture of water and air content requirementsthe known ingredients (i.e. , water, air, cement, and coarsewith the air-entrained concrete and the water is suggested

  5. Development of ultrasonic methods for the nondestructive inspection of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, T.N.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1983-08-01

    Nondestructive inspection of Portland cement and refractory concrete is conducted to determine strength, thickness, presence of voids or foreign matter, presence of cracks, amount of degradation due to chemical attack, and other properties without the necessity of coring the structure (which is usually accomplished by destructively removing a sample). This paper reviews the state of the art of acoustic nondestructive testing methods for Portland cement and refractory concrete. Most nondestructive work on concrete has concentrated on measuring acoustic velocity by through transmission methods. Development of a reliable pitch-catch or pulse-echo system would provide a method of measuring thickness with access from only one side of the concrete.

  6. International Conference on Advanced Composite Materials in Bridges and Structures Confrence Internationale sur les matriaux composites d'avant-garde pour ponts et charpentes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , precast prestressed concrete sandwich wall panels have been used as building envelopes for various6th International Conference on Advanced Composite Materials in Bridges and Structures 6ième is not a new challenge, but one that is decades old. Due to recent advances in the prestressed precast concrete

  7. CONCRETE SUPPORT DESIGN FOR MISCELLANEOUS ESF UTILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Misiak

    1999-06-21

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to design concrete supports for the miscellaneous utility equipment used at the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Two utility systems are analyzed: (1) the surface collection tanks of the Waste Water System, and (2) the chemical tracer mixing and storage tanks of the Non-Potable Water System. This analysis satisfies design recommended in the Title III Evaluation Reports for the Subsurface Fire Water System and Subsurface Portion of the Non-Potable Water System (CRWMS M&O 1998a) and Waste Water Systems (CRWMS M&O 1998b).

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 48, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2000 333 Fig. 3. Electric shielding effectiveness at the center of rectangular cavity with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patwari, Neal

    shielding effectiveness at the center of rectangular cavity with multiple slots as a function of the number of slots; a = 1 cm, T = 3a, = 20 cm, h = 50 cm, d = 0:4 cm, = 0 . of the magnetic shielding effectiveness the electric shielding effectiveness of the 2-D rectangular cavity with a slot and the measured one

  9. Seismic behaviour of mixed reinforced concreteSeismic behaviour of mixed reinforced concrete nreinforced masonr all str ct resunreinforced masonry wall structuresy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenstra, Arjen K.

    Seismic behaviour of mixed reinforced concreteSeismic behaviour of mixed reinforced concrete and Structural Dynamics Laboratory Research IssueResearch Issue Seismic Behaviour of mixed reinforced concrete (RC) unreinforced masonrySeismic Behaviour of mixed reinforced concrete (RC)- unreinforced masonry

  10. Density modification by two superposing TE{sub 10} modes in a plasma filled rectangular waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomar, Sanjay K.; Malik, Hitendra K. [Plasma Waves and Particle Acceleration Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)] [Plasma Waves and Particle Acceleration Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

    2013-07-15

    Microwave and plasma interaction is examined via two fundamental TE{sub 10} modes propagating in a plasma filled rectangular waveguide after superposing at a smaller angle. The propagation of the resultant mode realized from these two modes is governed by a wave equation obtained using the Maxwell's equations. This equation is solved numerically using fourth order Runge-Kutta method for the field amplitude of the microwave in the waveguide considering the waveguide to be made up of a perfect conductor and filled with different types of initial plasma density distributions, viz. homogeneous density, linear density with gradient in the propagation direction, and the density with Gaussian profile along the waveguide width. A phenomenon similar to the duct formation by high power microwaves is found to take place, where the plasma density attains interesting profiles. These profiles can be controlled by the angle of superposition, phase difference between the fields of the two modes, microwave frequency and microwave field amplitude.

  11. Microwave breakdown for the TE{sub 10} mode in a rectangular waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Aria, Anil K. [Plasma Waves and Particle Acceleration Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi–110 016 (India)] [Plasma Waves and Particle Acceleration Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi–110 016 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Microwave breakdown is studied for the lowest order TE{sub 10} mode in a rectangular waveguide with the help of direct variational approach via the continuity equation along with the use of ionisation and attachment frequency. We investigate the role of the ionisation, attachment of electron with neutral gas or air molecules and the diffusion on microwave breakdown threshold in the waveguide filled with air or Ar Gas. We examine the effect of different gases and microwave parameters on the diffusion length and the breakdown threshold of electric field of continuous microwave and pulsed microwave. We also employ numerical approach for obtaining the results and compare them with the ones of variational approach.

  12. Lyapunov exponents for products of rectangular real, complex and quaternionic Ginibre matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Ipsen

    2015-03-26

    We study the joint density of eigenvalues for products of independent rectangular real, complex and quaternionic Ginibre matrices. In the limit where the number of matrices tends to infinity, it is shown that the joint probability density function for the eigenvalues forms a permanental point process for all three classes. The moduli of the eigenvalues become uncorrelated and log-normal distributed, while the distribution for the phases of the eigenvalues depends on whether real, complex or quaternionic Ginibre matrices are considered. In the derivation for a product of real matrices, we explicitly use the fact that all eigenvalues become real when the number of matrices tends to infinity. Finally, we compare our results with known results for the Lyapunov exponents as well as numerical simulations.

  13. Modeling the ASR Induced Strains and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Li

    2013-05-17

    In the past few decades, several researchers have studied the effects of ASR induced expansion in concrete. Several models have been proposed to model the effects of ASR in concrete. While most of these models focus on plain concrete...

  14. Experimental damage-gas flow correlations for cyclically loaded reinforced concrete walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soppe, Travis E.

    2009-01-01

    strength concrete (low w/c ratio) will be less permeable.strength concrete (low w/c ratio) will be less permeable.permeable specimen was the specimen with the lowest concrete

  15. Instantaneous In-Situ Determination of Water-Cement Ratio of Fresh Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancio, Mauricio; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Brooks, Zenzile; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Glaser, Steve D.

    2010-01-01

    of fresh concrete (0% fly ash) Table 4 – Relationshipof fresh concrete (0% fly ash) electrical resistivity (?-m)resistivity and w/cm ratio of fresh concrete (25% fly ash)

  16. Formation of Rectangular Packing and One-Dimensional Lines of C60 on 11-Phenoxyundecanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    Formation of Rectangular Packing and One-Dimensional Lines of C60 on 11-Phenoxyundecanethiol Self Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois. We discuss the possible causes for the formation of this structure as well as the differences between

  17. DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A RECTANGULAR HE-COOLED REFRACTORY FOAM HX-CHANNEL FOR DIVERTOR APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    .williams@ultramet.com A rectangular single channel low pressure drop helium-cooled refractory metal heat exchanger (HX) tube the path of helium flow through foam to about 11 mm and thus the pressure drop through the porous media surfaces, such as a flat-plate divertor, without substantially increasing the coolant pressure losses. We

  18. Tilt Beam Characteristic by Changing Length of Finite-Sized Square Dielectric Substrate of One Arm Rectangular Spiral Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Flaviis, Franco

    Tilt Beam Characteristic by Changing Length of Finite-Sized Square Dielectric Substrate of One Arm by changing the length of finite-sized square dielectric substrate of one arm rectangular spiral antenna has). Horizontal spiral arm length (HL) is varied from HL=0.8o to HL=5.2o to choose the length that yields

  19. Matrix Operations Recall that an matrix A is a rectangular array of scalars arranged in rows and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Matrix Operations Recall that an matrix A is a rectangular array of scalars arranged in rows and columns: We will also denote the matrix A by . In the case we call a square matrix. If all the entries of the matrix A are zero, we call A the zero matrix and denote it by . The term matrix was first used in 1850

  20. Heat Transfer in Rectangular Channels (AR=2:1) of the Gas Turbine Blade at High Rotation Numbers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Jiang 1980-

    2011-08-03

    phenomena in the turn region, especially near hub portion is rare. This dissertation is to study the heat transfer in rectangular channels with turns in the tip or the hub portion respectively at high rotation numbers close to the engine condition...

  1. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  2. Perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargile, J.D.; Giltrud, M.E.; Luk, V.K.

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses fourteen tests which were conducted to investigate the perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs. The 4340-steel projectile used in the test series is 50.8 mm in diameter, 355.6 mm in length, has a mass of 2.34 kg. and an ogive nose with caliber radius head of 3. The slabs, contained within steel culverts, are 1.52 m in diameter and consist of concrete with a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 38.2 MPa and maxima aggregate size of 9.5 mm. Slab thicknesses are 284.4, 254.0, 215.9 and 127.0 mm. Tests were conducted at impact velocities of about 313 m/s on all slab thicknesses and about 379 and 471 m/s on the 254.0-mm-thick slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. Information obtained from the tests used to determine the loading (deceleration) on the projectile during the perforation process, the velocity-displacement of the projectile as it perforated the slab, and the projectile position as damage occurred on the backface of the slab. The test projectile behaved essentially as a rigid body for all of the tests.

  3. A Study of Fire Durability for a Road Tunnel: Comparing CFD and Simple Analytical Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reszka, Pedro; Steinhaus, Thomas; Biteau, Hubert; Carvel, Ricky O; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

    The durability of various typical tunnel sections in the event of a prescribed 100 MW fire has been assessed. Cast-iron sections, pre-cast concrete sections and in-situ concrete cut and cover sections are all considered ...

  4. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  5. Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT may be substituted for part of the required Portland cement. Substitution of mineral admixtures shall Cement shall not exceed the percentages shown in the following table: MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTION

  6. Performance of Concrete Made With Slag Cement and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Performance of Concrete Made With Slag Cement and Portland-Limestone Blended Cement Philadelphia;Today's Discussion ! The materials ! Slag cement ! Portland-limestone cement ! Use in concrete is slag cement? #12;! Non-metallic product of an iron blast furnace ! Granulated ! Ground ! Cementitious

  7. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  8. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  9. Behavior of fullscale concrete segmented pipelines under permanent ground displacements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    Behavior of fullscale concrete segmented pipelines under permanent ground displacements Junhee, Indiana; d Department of Civil Engineering, Merrimack College, MA ABSTRACT Concrete pipelines are one pipelines and eventually lead to joint failures. In order to understand and model the typical failure

  10. Concrete Security for Entity Recognition: The Jane Doe Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zenner, Erik

    Concrete Security for Entity Recognition: The Jane Doe Protocol Stefan Lucks1 , Erik Zenner2 , Andr NEC Europe Ltd Dirk.Westhoff@nw.neclab.eu Abstract. Entity recognition does not ask whether ­ the "Jane Doe Protocol" ­, and provides a formal proof of its concrete security. The protocol neither

  11. DATA FOR THE CALCULATION OF ALBEDOS FROM CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    DATA FOR THE CALCULATION OF ALBEDOS FROM CONCRETE IRON, LEAD, AND WATER FOR PHOTONS AND NEUTRONS for the neutron albedo, and (3) the secondary-photon albedo for incident neutrons. Albedo data is provided for four materials: concrete, iron, lead, and water. Unlike previous compilations of albedo data, modern

  12. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB`s) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing.

  13. Concrete and Sustainable Development Special Publication ACI 206, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    for cement, such as fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag. Also other recycled materials are finding increased application in concrete production. For example, recycled concrete has been used successfully in numerous projects, and crushed waste glass is now available as a valuable source of aggregate

  14. COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Sustainability of Concrete Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavement (Utilizing on-site Recycled Aggregates) · Lime Treated Subgrade (Utilizing on-site Recycled Recycled Coarse Aggregate Inspector Removing Debris Sieve % Pass ASTM #57 ASTM #67 1-1/2" 100 100 100 1.5 0 - 5 0 - 5 I-225 Recycled Coarse Aggregate Gradation Mobile Concrete Plant Concrete Pavement

  15. Early age delamination in concrete pavements made with gravel aggregates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Juanyu

    2009-06-02

    ........................................................................................................165 6.32 Moisture profiles of test section 2....................................................................166 6.33 Evaporation rate of concrete at 24 hours..........................................................167 6.34 Free shrinkage... with time for different sections................................................168 6.35 Maximum free shrinkage of concrete...............................................................169 6.36 Main effects plot for maximum free shrinkage...

  16. Impact of Curing Methods on Curling of Concrete Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Curing Methods on Curling of Concrete Pavements Amir Hajibabaee Travis Ebisch Tyler Ley is Curling? Curling is when the edges of a concrete pavement (or slab) deflect up compared to the middle is curing important? Proper curing will: · Reduce permeability · Improve strength · Improve water

  17. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  18. Testing and evaluation of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Harris, M.T.; Ally, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    The goals and objectives of the technical task plan (TTP) are to (1) describe the nature and extent of concrete contamination within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and emerging and commercial technologies applicable to these problems; (2) to match technologies to the concrete problems and recommend up to four demonstrations; (3) to initiate recommended demonstrations; and (4) to continue investigation and evaluation of the application of electrokinetic decontamination processes to concrete. This document presents findings of experimental and theoretical studies of the electrokinetic decontamination (EK) process and their implications for field demonstrations. This effort is an extension of the work performed under TTP 142005, ``Electroosmotic Concrete Decontamination. The goals of this task were to determine the applicability of EK for treating contaminated concrete and, if warranted, to evaluate EK as a potential technology for demonstration. 62 refs.

  19. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    the binder and recycled materials as aggregate has a doubleUsing recycled materials as aggregate in concrete divertsa recycled material that can be used as concrete aggregate.

  20. Laboratory Evaluation of Corrosion Resistance of Steel Dowels in Concrete Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancio, Mauricio; Carlos, Cruz Jr.; Zhang, Jieying; Harvey, John T; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ali, Abdikarim

    2005-01-01

    I, however, a more permeable concrete was used, with water-I, however a more permeable concrete was used with a water-

  1. Development and HVS Validation of Design Tables for Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui; Jones, David; Wu, Rongzong; Harvey, John T

    2014-01-01

    permeability of the porous asphalt and pervious concrete ispermeability was measured according to ASTM C1701 (Standard Test Method for Infiltration Rate of In Place Pervious Concrete,

  2. Review of Concrete Biodeterioration in Relation to Buried Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turick, C; Berry, C.

    2012-10-15

    Long-term storage of low level radioactive material in below ground concrete disposal units (DUs) (Saltstone Disposal Facility) is a means of depositing wastes generated from nuclear operations of the U.S. Department of Energy. Based on the currently modeled degradation mechanisms, possible microbial induced effects on the structural integrity of buried low level wastes must be addressed. Previous international efforts related to microbial impacts on concrete structures that house low level radioactive waste showed that microbial activity can play a significant role in the process of concrete degradation and ultimately structural deterioration. This literature review examines the recent research in this field and is focused on specific parameters that are applicable to modeling and prediction of the fate of concrete vaults housing stored wastes and the wastes themselves. Rates of concrete biodegradation vary with the environmental conditions, illustrating a need to understand the bioavailability of key compounds involved in microbial activity. Specific parameters require pH and osmotic pressure to be within a certain range to allow for microbial growth as well as the availability and abundance of energy sources like components involved in sulfur, iron and nitrogen oxidation. Carbon flow and availability are also factors to consider in predicting concrete biodegradation. The results of this review suggest that microbial activity in Saltstone, (grouted low level radioactive waste) is unlikely due to very high pH and osmotic pressure. Biodegradation of the concrete vaults housing the radioactive waste however, is a possibility. The rate and degree of concrete biodegradation is dependent on numerous physical, chemical and biological parameters. Results from this review point to parameters to focus on for modeling activities and also, possible options for mitigation that would minimize concrete biodegradation. In addition, key chemical components that drive microbial activity on concrete surfaces are discussed.

  3. A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Using recycled materials as aggregate in concrete divertsa recycled material that can be used as concrete aggregate.

  4. Computers and Concrete, Vol. 3, No. 5 (2006) 313-334 313 Design optimization of reinforced concrete structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    formulation aiming to achieve optimal design of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is presented here. Optimal.) Sequential Quadratic Programming algorithm for the design optimization of RC structures. A number of examples optimization approach for the design of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Optimal sizing and reinforcing

  5. Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, Lisa K.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

  6. Normal and refractory concretes for LMFBR applications. Volume 2. Evaluation of concretes for LMFBR applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Chern, J.C.; Abrams, M.S.; Gillen, M.P.

    1982-06-01

    The extensive literature on the properties and behavior at elevated temperature of portland cement concrete and various refractory concretes was reviewed to collect in concise form the physical and chemical properties of castable refractory concretes and of conventional portland cement concretes at elevated temperature. This survey, together with an extensive bibliography of source documents, is presented in Volume 1. A comparison was made of these properties, the relative advantages of the various concretes was evaluated for possible liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications, and a selection was made of several materials of interest for such applications. Volume 2 concludes with a summary of additional knowledge needed to support such uses of these materials together with recommendations on research to provide that knowledge.

  7. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  8. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  9. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

  10. Recent Advances in Understanding Radiation Damage in Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Remec, Igor; Giorla, Alain B; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has resulted in a renewed focus on long-term aging of materials at nuclear power plants (NPPs) including concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis, jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Nuclear Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete (Graves et al., (2014)). Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete (Hilsdorf et al., (1978)) does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure (Kontani et al., (2011)). To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, the Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are working to better understand radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines recent progress toward: 1) assessing the radiation environment in concrete biological shields and defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield for extended operation, and estimating adsorbed dose, 2) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, 3) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete and its components under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish conservative bounds and inform damage models, 4) developing improved models to enhance the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete and 5) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge including developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in data obtained from various concretes and from accelerated irradiation experiments.

  11. The Thermal Conductivity of Low Density Concretes Containing Perlite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarbrough, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    CONDUCTIVITY OF LOW DENSITY CONCRETES CONTAINING PERLITE David W. Yarbrough Department of Chemical Engineering Tennessee Technological University Cookeville, Tennessee ABSTRACT The thermal conductivity, k, of low density concretes made from Portland... cement and perlite has been measured near room temperature using an unguarded linear heat flow apparatus. Perlite based concretes having densities from 44.3 1b/ft 3 to 66.6 1b/ft 3 were found to have thermal conductivities from 1.55 Btu?in/ft 2 ?h...

  12. Roadmap 2030: The U.S. Concrete Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-12-01

    Roadmap 2030: The U.S. Concrete Industry Technology Roadmap tracks the eight goals published in the American Concrete Institute Strategic Development Council's Vision 2030: A Vision for the U.S. Concrete Industry. Roadmap 2030 highlights existing state-of-the-art technologies and emerging scientific advances that promise high potential for innovation, and predicts future technological needs. It defines enabling research opportunities and proposes areas where governmental-industrial-academic partnerships can accelerate the pace of development. Roadmap 2030 is a living document designed to continually address technical, institutional, and market changes.

  13. Linear stability of magnetohydrodynamic flow in a perfectly conducting rectangular duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priede, J?nis; Molokov, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    We analyse numerically the linear stability of a liquid metal flow in a rectangular duct with perfectly electrically conducting walls subject to a uniform transverse magnetic field. A vector stream function formulation is used with Chebyshev collocation method to solve the eigenvalue problem for small-amplitude perturbations. A relatively weak magnetic field is found to render the flow linearly unstable as two weak jets appear close to the centre of the duct at the Hartmann number Ha \\approx 9.6. In a sufficiently strong magnetic field, the instability following the jets becomes confined in the layers of characteristic thickness \\delta \\sim Ha^{-1/2} located at the walls parallel to the magnetic field. In this case the instability is determined by \\delta, which results in both the critical Reynolds and wavenumbers numbers scaling as \\sim \\delta^{-1}. Instability modes can have one of the four different symmetry combinations along and across the magnetic field. The most unstable is a pair of modes with an even...

  14. Accelerator Research Building - Setting up of Building Site, Excavation Work, Drainage, Reinforced Concrete Structure, Scaffolding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1960-01-01

    Accelerator Research Building - Setting up of Building Site, Excavation Work, Drainage, Reinforced Concrete Structure, Scaffolding

  15. Hematitic concretions at Meridiani Planum, Mars: Their growth timescale and possible relationship with iron sulfates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winglee, Robert M.

    sedimentological evidence that they are concretions, which form when water carries dissolved minerals through

  16. Disk-shaped Compact Tension Test for Plain Concrete A. Amirkhanian1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    aggregate and recycled concrete aggregate have been consistent and repeatable. A finite element model (FEM

  17. Mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete reinforced with polypropylene fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    replacement material in mortar and concrete. In addition, shrinkage and permeability of hardened concreteMechanical properties of self-compacting concrete reinforced with polypropylene fibres O. Gencel*1,2 , C. Ozel3 , W. Brostow2 and G. Marti´nez-Barrera4 The properties of hardened concrete can

  18. Numerical simulation of the non-isothermal developing flow of a nonlinear viscoelastic fluid in a rectangular channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikoleris, Teo

    1988-01-01

    NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE NON-ISOTHERMAL DEVELOPING FLOXV OF A NONLINEAR VISCOELASTIC FLUID IN A RECTANGULAR CHANNEL A Thesis by TEO NIKOLERIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... developing flow of a nonlinear viscoelas- tic fluid. The temperature dependence of the rheological parameters was imposed using an Arrhenius-like exponential relationship. The flow was creeping, at the early stages of thermal development and wall cooling...

  19. An exact solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a rectangular potential for real and imaginary time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor F. Los; Mykola "Nicholas" V. Los

    2015-09-09

    A propagator for the one dimensional time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation with an asymmetric rectangular potential is obtained using the multiple-scattering theory approach. It allows for the consideration of the reflection and transmission processes as the particle scattering at the potential jump (in contrast to the conventional wave-like picture) and for accounting for the nonclassical counterintuitive contribution of the backward-moving component of the wave packet attributed to the particle. This propagator completely resolves the corresponding time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (defines the wave function ${\\psi}(x,t)$) and allows for considering the quantum mechanical effects of a particle reflection from the potential downward step/well and a particle tunneling through the potential barrier as a function of time. These results are related to fundamental issues such as measuring time in quantum mechanics (tunneling time, time of arrival, dwell time). For imaginary time, which represents an inverse temperature $(t\\rightarrow-i{\\hbar}/k_{B}T)$, the obtained propagator is equivalent to the density matrix for a particle that is in a heat bath and is subject to a rectangular potential. If one shifts to imaginary time $(t\\rightarrow-it)$, the matrix element of the calculated propagator in the spatial basis provides a solution to the diffusion-like equation with a rectangular potential. The obtained exact results are presented as the integrals from elementary functions and thus allow for a numerical visualization of the probability density $|\\psi(x,t)|^2$, the density matrix and the solution of the diffusion-like equation. The results obtained may also be useful for spintronics applications due to the fact that the asymmetric (spin-dependent) rectangular potential can model the potential profile in layered magnetic nanostructures.

  20. Integral regular truncated pyramids with rectangular bases and the diophantine equation x^2+y^2+z^2= t^2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantine Zelator

    2012-10-23

    A regular truncated pyramid with rectangular bases;consists of two rectangular bases whose centers are orthogonally aligned with respect to the parallel planes containing their bases; and two pairs of congruent isosceles trapezoids(the four lateral faces). Thrre are six lengths involved:the larger base dimensions a and b; a>(or=)b. The smaller base dimensions c and d; c>(or=d). The height H, and the common length t of the four lateral faces. When a,b,c,d,H,t, and the volume V are all positive integers; we have an integral regular truncated pyramid with rectangular bases(see Definition 1 in the introduction). The two key geometric conditions that the above six lengths must satisfy are, a/b=c/d(see Section 3) and the equation, 4t^2= 4H^2+(a-c)^2+(b-d)^2 (*), derived in Section4. When H,a,c,b,d,t; are all positive integers. A modulo4 congruence shows that both the positive integers a-c and b-d; must be even. Consequently, equation (*) reduces to the equation, t^2= H^2+x^2+y^2 (**). All the positive integer solutions to (**) can be found, parametrically described, in reference [1]. Using the general positive integer solution to (**), we Proposition 1(Section7); which gives precise conditions that describe the set of all integral regular truncated pyramids with rectangular bases. In Proposition 2, we describe a 3-parameter family of such pyramids. In Proposition 3, we describe the square case: a=b> c=d.

  1. Qualification of concrete mixtures for fast track construction applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secmen, Serhan

    1997-01-01

    Fast track construction is a special type of construction where construction methods and activities are planned to minimize the construction duration. Since the duration of the hardening period of concrete is largely undefined at the time...

  2. Natural fiber reinforced aerated concrete : an experimental investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbis, Leonidia Maria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare existing research with aerated concrete and fiber reinforcement to original experiments completed investigating the benefits of adding natural fiber tensile reinforcement to aerated ...

  3. Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the model basis for C-A-S-H. The Al-tobermorite is produced by reaction of seawater, lime, and a particular volcanic ash that the Romans used in their concrete mixture. "Cement...

  4. Roman Seawater Concrete Holds the Secret to Cutting Carbon Emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that industry puts into the air." The carbon footprint of Roman concrete, made from lime, volcanic ash, and seawater, is much smaller. Read the News Release Drill core of...

  5. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilincarslan, Semsettin; Akkas, Ayse; Mavi, Betuel; Guenoglu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender

    2011-12-26

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  6. Seismic fragility estimates for reinforced concrete framed buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramamoorthy, Sathish Kumar

    2007-04-25

    Gravity load designed (GLD) reinforced concrete (RC) buildings represent a common type of construction in the Mid-America Region. These buildings have limited lateral resistance and are susceptible to story mechanisms during earthquake loading...

  7. Life cycle assessment of concrete pavements : impacts and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loijos, Alex (Alexander Nikos)

    2011-01-01

    The concrete pavement network in the United States plays a crucial role in the economy by enabling the transport of people and goods, but it also leads to resource consumption and environmental impacts. This thesis is ...

  8. Design of wind turbines with Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jammes, François-Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) has proven an asset for bridge design as it significantly reduces costs. However, UHPC has not been applied yet to wind turbine technology. Design codes do not propose any recommendations ...

  9. Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act project, which is expected to reduce 3.1 million GGEyear and 8,429 pounds of carbon dioxide per year. Location: Chicago, Illinois Partner: Ozinga Brothers Concrete...

  10. Seismic rehabilitation of a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Laila Margarita

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of seismic rehabilitation techniques used to eliminate punching shear failures was assessed for flat-slab structural systems. This type of retrofit was evaluated for a four-story reinforced concrete (RC) ...

  11. Clumped-isotope constraints on cement paragenesis in septarian concretions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loyd, SJ; Loyd, SJ; Dickson, JAD; Boles, JR; Tripati, AK

    2014-01-01

    model for the type Kimmeridge Clay: a discussion: Nature, v.concretions from the Kimmeridge Clay Formation of southernmodel for the type Kimmeridge Clay: Nature, v. 277, p. 377–

  12. Nonwoven Geotextile Interlayers for Concrete Pavements and Overlays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Nonwoven Geotextile Interlayers for Concrete Pavements and Overlays Robert O. Rasmussen, Ph Stabilized) Nonwoven Geotextile Interlayer Richtlinie für die Standardisierung des Oberbaues von Requirements Test Procedure Geotextile Type Nonwoven, needle-punched, no thermal treatment (calendaring or IR

  13. Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic; Davy, C.A.; Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean

    2012-07-15

    This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

  14. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  15. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  16. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  17. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  18. Observation of flexural cracks in loaded concrete beams using MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    of the concrete which had been previously determined by scanning the beam soon after casting. The particular sand can be used.1 (c) None of the equipment inserted in the bore of the magnet can contain any iron

  19. Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E.

    2009-07-01

    The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete Incorporated With Phase Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Chia-So

    2015-01-01

    Portland cement: Type II 2. Fly ash: Class F coal ash. (15%Damage Constitutive Model of Fly Ash Concrete under Freeze-sand, coarse aggregate, fly ash and supercizer. In addition,

  1. Geopolymer concretes: a green construction technology rising from the ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allouche, E.

    2009-07-01

    Researchers at Louisiana Tech University have embarked on a multi-year research initiative to develop applications for inorganic polymer concrete, or geopolymer concrete, in the area of civil construction, and to bring solve of these applications to market. One objective was to produce a spray-on coating for use in the harsh environment of wastewater conveyance and treatment facilities. Another project is to establish relationships between fly ash composition and particle size distribution and the mechanical attributes and workability of the resulting geopolymer concrete. A third project is to develop a 'smart' geopolymer concrete whose response to a given electric current can be correlated to the stress level to which the structure is subjected. 1 fig., 6 photos.

  2. Development of a Reaction Signature for Combined Concrete Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghanem, Hassan A.

    2010-07-14

    is highly repeatable and reliable. To relate the effect of material combinations to field performance, concrete samples with different w/cm?s and fly ash contents using selective aggregates were tested at different alkalinities. To combine aggregate...

  3. Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) for Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) for Stormwater Management Benefits and Uses · Quantity, Pollutant Reduction, and Flood Control · Recharges Groundwater · Reduction in Stormwater Cost Can Be Comparable for PICP with Reduced Stormwater Infrastructure VS. Standard Pavement

  4. Viscoelastic{Viscoplastic Damage Model for Asphalt Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Michael A.

    2010-10-12

    in experiments, and their model was limited to uniaxial loading. Chehab et al. (2003) developed a continuum viscoelastoplastic model for undamaged asphalt concrete, but its scope was also limited to uniaxial characterization. Uzan (2005) developed a damaged...

  5. Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete Incorporated With Phase Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Chia-So

    2015-01-01

    in concrete .2." Solar Energy Materials, 21(1), 61-80. [17]steady-state for cyclic energy-storage in paraffin wax."validation." Renewable Energy, 61, 132-135. Farid, M. , and

  6. Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Brij D.

    2004-09-30

    (Member) (Head of Department) August 2003 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Evaluation of Moisture Damage within Asphalt Concrete Mixes. (August 2003) Brij D. Shah, B.E., Gujarat University Chair...

  7. Hydrogen production during fragmented debris/concrete interactions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Blose, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    In the unlikely event that molten core debris escapes the reactor pressure vessel, the interactions of the debris with concrete and structural materials become the driving forces for severe accident phenomena. The Ex-vessel Core Debris Interactions Program at Sandia Laboratories is a research effort to characterize the nature of these interactions and the magnitude of safety-related phenomena such as hydrogen generation, aerosol production, and fission product release that arise because of the melt/concrete interactions.

  8. Optimisation of Shear Strengthened Reinforced Concrete Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapa, Hiran D.; Lees, Janet M.

    2014-05-21

    fle nS nL nP S1/a S2/a S3/a 2 5 25 0.42 0.58 — 83.3 0.73 2 5 50 0.40 0.60 — 92.8 0.81 2 10 25 0.39 0.61 — 96.0 0.84 2 10 50 0.38 0.61 — 107.1 0.94 2 15 5 0.42 0.58 — 91.6 0.80 2 20 5 0.39 0.60 — 94.7 0.83 Mean 0.40 0.60 — — — SD 0.02 0.01 — — — 3 5 25... . Engineering Optimisation 39(4): 471–494. Hoult NA and Lees JM (2009a) Efficient CFRP strap configurations for the shear strengthening of reinforced concrete T-beams. ASCE Journal of Composites for Construction 13(1): 45–52. Hoult NA and Lees JM (2009b...

  9. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

  10. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and initial results are also presented along with a discussion of the preliminary findings. Comparative NDE of various defects in reinforced concrete specimens is a key component in identifying the most promising techniques and directing the research and development efforts needed to characterize concrete degradation in commercial NPPs. This requires access to the specimens for data collection using state-of-the-art technology. The construction of the specimen detailed in this report allows for an evaluation of how different NDE techniques may interact with the size and complexities of NPP concrete structures. These factors were taken into account when determining specimen size and features to ensure a realistic design. The lateral dimensions of the specimen were also chosen to mitigate unrealistic boundary effects that would not affect the results of field NPP concrete testing. Preliminary results show that, while the current methods are able to identify some of the deeper defects, improvements in data processing or hardware are necessary to be able to achieve the precision and reliability achieved in evaluating thinner and less heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  11. Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Powers, Laura; Whyatt, Greg A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-06

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the test methods performed throughout the lifetime of the project has focused on different aspects of the concrete waste form weathering process. Diffusion of different analytes [technetium-99 (Tc-99), iodine-125 (I-125), stable iodine (I), uranium (U), and rhenium (Re)] has been quantified from experiments under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The water-saturated conditions provide a conservative estimate of the concrete’s performance in situ, and the unsaturated conditions provide a more accurate estimate of the diffusion of contaminants from the concrete.

  12. Code requirements for concrete repository and processing facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hookham, C.J. [Black & Veatch, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Palaniswamy, R. [Bechtel Savannah River, Inc., North Augusta, SC (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The design and construction of facilities and structures for the processing and safe long-term storage of low- and high-level radioactive wastes will likely employ structural concrete. This concrete will be used for many purposes including structural support, shielding, and environmental protection. At the present time, there are no design costs, standards or guidelines for repositories, waste containers, or processing facilities. Recently, the design and construction guidelines contained in American Concrete Institute (ACI), Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety Related Concrete Structures (ACI 349), have been cited for low-level waste (LLW) repositories. Conceptual design of various high-level (HLW) repository surface structures have also cited the ACI 349 Code. However, the present Code was developed for nuclear power generating facilities and its application to radioactive waste repositories was not intended. For low and medium level radioactive wastes, concrete has a greater role and use in processing facilities, engineered barriers, and repository structures. Because of varied uses and performance/safety requirements this review of the current ACI 349 Code document was required to accommodate these special classes of structures.

  13. Nondestructive detection and characterization of carbonation in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Gun; In, Chi-Won; Kurtis, Kimberly E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [Georgia Institute of Technology, GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering (United States); Jacobs, Laurence J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology, GW Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Exposure of concrete to the environment leads to changes in composition, microstructure, and properties; these effects often start from the surface of a concrete structure. A specific, widespread environmental effect is carbonation, where carbon dioxide penetrates the surface of concrete and reacts with calcium hydroxide that is a product of Portland cement hydration in concrete. Carbonation is of interest not only because it can lead to the initiation of reinforcement corrosion, but also carbon is increasingly used during curing to alter the surface properties of cement-based materials as a method to 'sink' carbon in cement-based materials. Nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurements are performed on uncarbonated and carbonated concrete samples to assess any mechanical changes induced by carbonation,. In order to minimize the effects of contact conditions, the generated signals are detected by a noncontact air-coupled transducer (100 kHz) at locations along the propagation axis. The nonlinearity parameter, ? is used to quantitatively characterize the degree of carbonation. To more accurately analyze the data, corrections are made for the effects of attenuation and diffraction. A comparison between the carbonated and uncarbonated samples demonstrates that pores and micro-cracks are affected by the carbonation product and these significantly change the measured nonlinearity parameter.

  14. Rarefied gas flow in a rectangular enclosure induced by non-isothermal walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Manuel; Tatsios, Giorgos; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Stefanov, Stefan

    2014-05-15

    The flow of a rarefied gas in a rectangular enclosure due to the non-isothermal walls with no synergetic contributions from external force fields is investigated. The top and bottom walls are maintained at constant but different temperatures and along the lateral walls a linear temperature profile is assumed. Modeling is based on the direct numerical solution of the Shakhov kinetic equation and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Solving the problem both deterministically and stochastically allows a systematic comparison and verification of the results as well as the exploitation of the numerical advantages of each approach in the investigation of the involved flow and heat transfer phenomena. The thermally induced flow is simulated in terms of three dimensionless parameters characterizing the problem, namely, the reference Knudsen number, the temperature ratio of the bottom over the top plates, and the enclosure aspect ratio. Their effect on the flow configuration and bulk quantities is thoroughly examined. Along the side walls, the gas flows at small Knudsen numbers from cold-to-hot, while as the Knudsen number is increased the gas flows from hot-to-cold and the thermally induced flow configuration becomes more complex. These flow patterns with the hot-to-cold flow to be extended to the whole length of the non-isothermal side walls may exist even at small temperature differences and then, they are enhanced as the temperature difference between the top and bottom plates is increased. The cavity aspect ratio also influences this flow configuration and the hot-to-cold flow is becoming more dominant as the depth compared to the width of the cavity is increased. To further analyze the flow patterns a novel solution decomposition into ballistic and collision parts is introduced. This is achieved by accordingly modifying the indexing process of the typical DSMC algorithm. The contribution of each part of the solution is separately examined and a physical interpretation of the flow configuration, including the hot-to-cold flow close to the side walls, in the whole range of the Knudsen number is provided.

  15. Analysis of coupled transport phenomena in concrete at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beneš, Michal; Zeman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study a non-linear numerical scheme arising from the implicit time discretization of the Ba\\v{z}ant-Thonguthai model for hygro-thermal behavior of concrete at high temperatures. Existence and uniqueness of the time-discrete solution in two dimensions is established using the theory of pseudomonotone operators in Banach spaces. Next, the spatial discretization is accomplished by the conforming finite element method. An illustrative numerical example shows that the numerical model reproduces well the rapid increase of pore pressure in wet concrete due to extreme heating. Such phenomenon is of particular interest for the safety assessment of concrete structures prone to thermally-induced spalling.

  16. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  17. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  18. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot-blast machine that removes layer of concrete of varying depths. Hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is reused until it is pulverized to dust, which is deposited in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  19. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  20. Reuse of Concrete within DOE from Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripp, Julia Lynn; Meservey, Richard Harlan; Smith, Anthony Mactier; Chen, S. Y.; Kamboj, S.

    2000-09-01

    A protocol has been developed for use in the disposition of concrete from Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) projects. The purpose of this protocol is to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites in releasing concrete for re-use within the DOE complex. Current regulations allow sites to release surface-contaminated materials if they contain very low amounts of radioactivity and to possibly release materials with volumetric contamination, or higher levels of surface contamination on a case-bycase basis. In all cases, an ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) analysis that evaluates the risks of releasing volumetrically contaminated concrete or concrete with higher levels of surface contamination, is required. To evaluate the dose impacts of re-using radioactively contaminated material, the measured radiation levels (pCi/g or disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100 cm2) must be converted to the estimated dose (mrem/yr) that would be received by affected individuals. The dose depends on the amounts and types of isotopes present and the time, distance, and method of exposure (e.g., inhalation or external exposure). For each disposition alternative, the protocol provides a systematic method to evaluate the impact of the dose on affected individuals. The cost impacts of re-using concrete also need to be evaluated. They too depend on the disposition alternative and the extent and type of contamination. The protocol provides a method to perform a detailed analysis of these factors and evaluate the dose and cost impacts for various disposition alternatives. Once the dose and cost impacts of the various alternatives have been estimated, the protocol outlines the steps required to release and re-use the concrete material.

  1. Electrochemical Aging of Thermal-Sprayed Zinc Anodes on Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Cryer, C.B.; McGill, G.E.

    1996-10-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used in impressed current cathodic protection systems for some of Oregon's coastal reinforced concrete bridges. Electrochemical aging of zinc anodes results in physical and chemical changes at the zinc-concrete interface. Concrete surfaces heated prior to thermal-spraying had initial adhesion strengths 80 pct higher than unheated surfaces. For electrochemical aging greater than 200 kC/m{sup 2} (5.2 A h/ft{sup 2}), there was no difference in adhesion strengths for zinc on preheated and unheated concrete. Adhesion strengths decreased monotonically after about 400 to 600 kC/m{sup 2} (10.4 to 15.6 A-h/ft{sup 2}) as a result of the reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. A zone adjacent to the metallic zinc (and originally part of the zinc coating) was primarily zincite (ZnO), with minor constituents of wulfingite (Zn(OH){sub 2}), simonkolleite (Zn{sub 5}(OH) {sub 8}C{sub l2}{sup .}H{sub 2}O), and hydrated zinc hydroxide sulfates (Zn{sub 4}SO{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}{sup .}xH{sub 2}O). This zone is the locus for cohesive fracture when the zinc coating separates from the concrete during adhesion tests. Zinc ions substitute for calcium in the cement paste adjacent to the coating as the result of secondary mineralization. The initial estimate of the coating service life based on adhesion strength measurements in accelerated impressed current cathodic protection tests is about 27 years.

  2. SU-E-T-598: The Effects of Arm Speed for Quality Assurance and Commissioning Measurements in Rectangular and Cylindrical Scanners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakhtiari, M; Schmitt, J [RadAmerica, LLC--MedStar Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cylindrical and rectangular scanning water tanks are examined with different scanning speeds to investigate the TG-106 criteria and the errors induced in the measurements. Methods: Beam profiles were measured in a depth of R50 for a low-energy electron beam (6 MeV) using rectangular and cylindrical tanks. The speeds of the measurements (arm movement) were varied in different profile measurements. Each profile was measured with a certain speed to obtain the average and standard deviation as a parameter for investigating the reproducibility and errors. Results: At arm speeds of ?0.8 mm/s the errors were as large as 2% and 1% with rectangular and cylindrical tanks, respectively. The errors for electron beams and for photon beams in other depths were within the TG-106 criteria of 1% for both tank shapes. Conclusion: The measurements of low-energy electron beams in a depth of R50, as an extreme case scenario, are sensitive to the speed of the measurement arms for both rectangular and cylindrical tanks. The measurements in other depths, for electron beams and photon beams, with arm speeds of less than 1 cm/s are within the TG-106 criteria. An arm speed of 5 mm/s appeared to be optimal for fast and accurate measurements for both cylindrical and rectangular tanks.

  3. Quick setting water-compatible furfuryl alcohol polymer concretes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Ridge, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY); Horn, William H. (Brookhaven, NY)

    1982-11-30

    A novel quick setting polymer concrete composite comprising a furfuryl alcohol monomer, an aggregate containing a maximum of 8% by weight water, and about 1-10% trichlorotoluene initiator and about 20-80% powdered metal salt promoter, such as zinc chloride, based on the weight of said monomer, to initiate and promote polymerization of said monomer in the presence of said aggregate, within 1 hour after mixing at a temperature of -20.degree. C. to 40.degree. C., to produce a polymer concrete having a 1 hour compressive strength greater than 2000 psi.

  4. Fiber reinforcement of asphalt concrete using cow manure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakar, Mohammed Abu

    1976-01-01

    FIBER REINFORCEMENT OF ASPHALT CONCRETE USING COW MANURE A Thesis by MOHAMMED ABU BAKAR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Uaivers"ty in partial fulfill-ent of the recuirement for the degree of STER OF SCIENCE December I976... klajor Subject: Mechanical Engineering FIBER REINFORCKCENT OF ASPHALT CONCRETE USING COW MANURE A These. s by MOE&RM ABU BAKAR Approved as to style and content by: c -~WiH. rman ot Commrt ee ead or Departm ) (M ber) / ( rber) (Member) December...

  5. High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-15

    This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

  6. Environmental, Economic, and Social Impacts of Concrete Pavement Material Choices: A Life-Cycle Assessment Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyunsoung

    2014-12-12

    Transportation Agencies (STAs) in rendering better-informed decisions for the concrete pavement material choices, the major research objective is to analyze the environmental, economic, and social impacts of the four concrete pavement alternatives from...

  7. Dual Coding Theory and Chinese: Recall of Concrete and Abstract Sentences in Chinese-English Bilinguals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuei-Fen

    2010-10-12

    concreteness and abstractness on immediate recall. Forty Chinese-English bilinguals read and recalled five concrete sentences and five matched abstract sentences. Of the ten sentences, five were English, and five were Chinese. Due to the characteristics...

  8. Detection of defects in FRP-reinforced concrete with the acoustic-laser vibrometry method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Justin Gejune

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening and retrofitting of concrete structural elements has become increasingly popular for civil infrastructure systems. When defects occur in FRP-reinforced concrete elements at the ...

  9. Fire Experiments of Thin-Walled CFRP Pretensioned High Strength Concrete Slabs Under Service Load 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrasi, Giovanni; Maluk, Cristian; Bisby, Luke; Hugi, Erich; Kanik, Birol

    2012-06-14

    deteriorates at elevated temperature and that high strength concrete tends to an explosive spalling failure mode when subjected to a fire. The bond strength reductions in fire, their impacts on the load-bearing capacity of prestressed concrete structures...

  10. Properties of concrete paving blocks made with waste marble Osman Gencela,f,*, Cengiz Ozelb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Laboratory of Advanced Polymers & Optimized Materials (LAPOM), Department of Materials Science: Concrete paving blocks Recycled aggregate Marble waste Concrete wear a b s t r a c t Marble industry

  11. Evaluation of allowable stresses for high strength concrete prestressed bridge girders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moutassem, Fayez

    2003-01-01

    ) produced without using exotic materials or techniques. The design provisions for the design of prestressed concrete members according to the AASHTO Standard and LRFD Specifications are based on mechanical properties determined for normal strength concrete...

  12. Lightweight concrete : investigations into the production of variable density cellular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Timothy Graham

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the intersection between material composition and form in the development of a new type of concrete. As concrete is the most widely used building material in the world, innovation in this material ...

  13. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  14. Evaluation of Multiple Corrosion Protection Systems for Reinforced Concrete Bridge Decks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, Jason Leigh

    2009-12-09

    Chloride-induced corrosion is one of the leading causes of premature serviceability failure in reinforced concrete bridge decks. In an effort to mitigate the effect of corrosion on the longevity of concrete bridge decks, several corrosion protection...

  15. Fire performance of unprotected and protected concrete filled steel hollow structural sections 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rush, David Ian

    2013-11-28

    Concrete filled steel hollow structural (CFS) sections are increasingly used to support large compressive loads in buildings, with the concrete infill and the steel tube working together to yield several benefits both ...

  16. Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class F fly ash 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei Tung

    1995-01-01

    strength, splitting-tensile strength, Young's modulus of elasticity, drying shrinkage, resistance to freeze-thaw cycling, pore structure and activation energy. A preliminary economic analysis was also performed on HVFA concrete. The HVFA concrete evaluated...

  17. Caltrans Experience with Ternary Mix for Long-performing Concrete Mehdi Parvini, CA DOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caltrans Experience with Ternary Mix for Long-performing Concrete Mehdi Parvini, CA DOT Introduction and Background The Project The Result Ternary Mix is a concrete mixture containing three strength, low permeability, corrosion resistance, sulfate resistance, ASR resistance, and elimination

  18. Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete buildings A Dissertation Submitted in Partial dissertation entitled "Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete frame and wall- frame buildings. Buildings designed for seismic loading, and buildings designed only for gravity loads, are considered

  19. The use of nondestructive testing methods for the condition assessment of concrete bridge girders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unruh, Richard Cornelius, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    There are over 594,000 publicly controlled bridges in the United States. Concrete and pre-stressed concrete bridges account for nearly 50% of the bridges in the US inventory. This proportion is increasing each year, as new ...

  20. A multiple scattering theory approach to solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with an asymmetric rectangular potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor F. Los; Nicholas V. Los

    2015-06-29

    An exact time-dependent solution for the wave function $\\psi(r,t)$ of a particle moving in the presence of an asymmetric rectangular well/barrier potential varying in one dimension is obtained by applying a novel for this problem approach using multiple scattering theory (MST) for the calculation of the space-time propagator. This approach, based on the localized at the potential jumps effective potentials responsible for transmission through and reflection from the considered rectangular potential, enables considering these processes from a particle (rather than a wave) point of view. The solution describes these quantum phenomena as a function of time and is related to the fundamental issues (such as measuring time) of quantum mechanics. It is presented in terms of integrals of elementary functions and is a sum of the forward- and backward-moving components of the wave packet. The relative contribution of these components and their interference as well as of the potential asymmetry to the probability density $|\\psi(x,t)|^2$ and particle dwell time is considered and numerically visualized for narrow and broad energy (momentum) distributions of the initial Gaussian wave packet. The obtained solution is also related to the kinetic theory of nanostructures due to the fact that the considered potential can model the spin-dependent potential profile of the magnetic multilayers used in spintronics devices.

  1. Ray Tracing through the Edge Focusing of Rectangular Benders and an Improved Model for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolski, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barlow, David B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macek, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCrady, Rodney C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Particle ray tracing through simulated 3D magnetic fields was executed to investigate the effective quadrupole strength of the edge focusing of the rectangular bending magnets in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). The particle rays receive a kick in the edge field of the rectangular dipole. A focal length may be calculated from the particle tracking and related to the fringe field integral (FINT) model parameter. This tech note introduces the baseline lattice model of the PSR and motivates the need for an improvement in the baseline model's vertical tune prediction, which differs from measurement by .05. An improved model of the PSR is created by modifying the fringe field integral parameter to those suggested by the ray tracing investigation. This improved model is then verified against measurement at the nominal PSR operating set point and at set points far away from the nominal operating conditions. Lastly, Linear Optics from Closed Orbits (LOCO) is employed in an orbit response matrix method for model improvement to verify the quadrupole strengths of the improved model.

  2. Comparison of non-neutral electron plasma confinement in harmonic and rectangular potentials in a very dense regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, T. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics department, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University (Egypt); Mohri, A. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamazaki, Y. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Confinement of high density electron plasmas in a strong uniform magnetic field was experimentally studied in a multi-ring trap (MRT). The trap was housed inside a bore tube and surrounded by a superconducting solenoid. A 5 T magnetic field was used to provide radial confinement while an electrostatic harmonic or rectangular potential well was used for axial confinement. For trapped electrons of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} in a harmonic potential well (HPW) with the trap length of L{sub T} = 320 mm, the plasma lifetime was about 10{sup 4} s and it became much longer at lower N = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9}. Such long holding times were achieved without application of rotating electric fields. Contrastingly, in a rectangular potential well (RPW), the plasma of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} under the same trap length expanded to cover the whole Faraday Cup within 200 s, where its radial expansion rate was {eta} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mm/s, which was 20 times faster than HPW. The lifetime for RPW became shorter with increasing L{sub T} and scaled as 1/[L{sub T}]{sup 2}. This scaling found for high density plasmas is similar to the obtained one with different Penning-Malmberg traps at UC San Diego (USCD).

  3. Performance-Based Concrete Pavement Mix Design System Performance-Based Design Guide for New and Rehabilitated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Research Plan #12;· Performance-Based Concrete Pavement Mix Design System · Performance Systems and Economics · Concrete Pavement Sustainability The CP Road Map #12;The Problem... · Not many

  4. Microscale investigation of the corrosion performances of low-carbon and stainless steels in highly alkaline concretes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2012-01-01

    Strength of Alkali Activated Fly Ash (OPC-free) Concrete. ”of Alkali- Activated Fly Ash Concrete. ” ACI MaterialsResistance in Activated Fly Ash Mortars. ” Cement and

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    concrete Process Water Multiple low volume drum washoutsconcrete is reused, disposal costs avoided and water use for truck washout

  6. Simplified vector-valued probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and probabilistic seismic demand analysis : application to the 13-story NEHRP reinforced concrete frame-wall building design example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, André R.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic collapse safety of reinforced concrete buildings: I. AssessmentSeismic collapse safety of reinforced concrete buildings: II. comparative assessment

  7. PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT FOR FLEXIBLE OVER RIGID COMPOSITE PAVEMENTS (Tollway)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT FOR FLEXIBLE OVER RIGID COMPOSITE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective portland cement concrete for special applications to composite pavements as shown and described. Constructing the Jointed Plain Ternary Cement Concrete Pavement layer of the composite pavement on a prepared

  8. Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in Hong Kong Y using jour Canadian linseed oil- based sealants on concrete specimens madejrom G30120 and G45120 Keywords: Unseed Oil, Concrete Surface Treatment, Salt Spray Resistance, Carbonation, Bond Strength, Ultra

  9. Development and HVS Validation of Design Tables for Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui; Jones, David; Wu, Rongzong; Harvey, John T

    2014-01-01

    permeable interlocking concrete pavements, with many studies focusing on infiltrationConcrete, which is similar to ASTM C1781 [Standard Test Method for Surface Infiltration Rate of PermeableConcrete, which is similar to ASTM C1781 [Standard Test Method for Surface Infiltration Rate of Permeable

  10. Paper No. RBCSR RESPONSE OF A BURIED CONCRETE PIPELINE TO GROUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    Paper No. RBCSR RESPONSE OF A BURIED CONCRETE PIPELINE TO GROUND RUPTURE: A FULL-SCALE EXPERIMENT A typical water distribution system includes a network of steel and concrete pipelines. Concrete segmental pipelines are particularly vulnerable to damage by ground rupture. Ground displacements may produce

  11. Corresponding author Measuring Concrete Crosstie Rail Seat Pressure Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    loads and cumulative freight tonnages, as well as increased interest in high speed passenger rail severe service conditions, such as areas of high curvature, heavy axle load or high speed passenger train1 Corresponding author Measuring Concrete Crosstie Rail Seat Pressure Distribution with Matrix

  12. REHABILITATION OF CONCRETE BRIDGES FOR SHEAR DEFICIENCY USING CFRP SHEETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications, under the efforts of ISIS Canada, of using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) sheets Creek Bridge in Alberta. KEY WORDS: bridges, carbon fiber reinforced plastics, concrete, girders, such as carbon, glass and ararnid fiber composites, have been considered for solutions to such problems

  13. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek scabbling technology was tested at Florida International University (FIU) and is being evaluated as a baseline technology. This report evaluates it for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek concrete scabbling system consisted of the MOOSE, SQUIRREL-I, and SQUIRREL-III scabblers. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross-section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 318 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation conducted during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended. Because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place, results may be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  14. FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF IMPACT DAMAGED PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BRIDGE GIRDER REPAIRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vehicles is a major expense for bridge maintenance departments. The use of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer with one ruptured prestressing strand. The concrete section was restored with a polymer modified mortar loadings that all bridge girders undergo. The use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) has emerged

  15. Damage Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Columns Under High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    include seismic design of reinforced concrete structures. M. Sakashita holds M.S. degree from as a Ph. D. student at Kyoto University. His research interests include seismic design of shear wall of seismic design of buildings, including foundations. Fundamental studies have been carried out to elucidate

  16. Art & Mathematics: The Interstices of the Abstract and Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    Art & Mathematics: The Interstices of the Abstract and Concrete Luiz Velho IMPA ­ Instituto de Matemática Pura e Aplicada Luiz Velho Interatividades - Ciclo Arte, Ciência e Tecnologia 2 Outline · Motivation and Concepts · Art and Mathematics · Surfaces and Sculptures · Scenes and Images · Conclusions

  17. TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR READY-MIXED CONCRETE OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR READY-MIXED CONCRETE OPERATIONS IN THE LOWER FRASER BASIN DOE FRAP 1997-13 Prepared for: Environment Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution Action Plan through its Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. Environment Canada is not responsible

  18. Seismic Design of Concrete-Filled Circular Steel Bridge Piers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    .1-M94, AISC LRFD 1994, and the Eurocode 4 1994 codes and standards against experimental data from, allowing effective composite action to develop. There are a number of national codes and standards Institute ``Building Code Re- quirements for Reinforced Concrete'' ACI 1963 and later in 1986 by the first

  19. Silica Fume as a Radon Retardant from Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Silica Fume as a Radon Retardant from Concrete K . N . Y U , * , R . V . B A L E N D R A N of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Radon, and tracheobronchial deposition of radon progeny can lead to lung cancers. Aggregates (granite) are known

  20. The IPS Compiler: Optimizations, Variants and Concrete Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The IPS Compiler: Optimizations, Variants and Concrete Efficiency Yehuda Lindell Eli Oxman Benny, it is black-box in the underlying semi-honest protocol, and it has excellent asymptotic efficiency. In this paper, we study the IPS compiler from a number different angles. We present an efficiency improvement

  1. Compressive Strength of Gamma-Irradiated Polymer Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    ­5]. Several silica sands have been used in the foundry industry: (a) Type 6/16 [particle size distribution 2 concrete (PC) was developed by using differ- ent concentrations of silica sand as aggregate and corrosion resistance. Let us first make a survey of PCs used so far. Silica sand, gravel, or fly ash

  2. Optimizing the use of fly ash in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, M.

    2007-07-01

    The optimum amount of fly ash varies not only with the application, but also with composition and proportions of all the materials in the concrete mixture (especially the fly ash), the conditions during placing (especially temperature), construction practices (for example, finishing and curing) and the exposure conditions. This document discusses issues related to using low to very high levels of fly ash in concrete and provides guidance for the use of fly ash without compromising the construction process or the quality of the finished product. The nature of fly ashes including their physical, mineralogical and chemical properties is covered in detail, as well as fly ash variability due to coal composition and plant operating conditions. A discussion on the effects of fly ash characteristics on fresh and hardened concrete properties includes; workability, bleeding, air entrainment, setting time, heat of hydration, compressive strength development, creep, drying shrinkage, abrasion resistance, permeability, resistance to chlorides, alkali-silica reaction (ASR), sulfate resistance, carbonation, and resistance to freezing and thawing and deicer salt scaling. Case studies were selected as examples of some of the more demanding applications of fly ash concrete for ASR mitigation, chloride resistance, and green building.

  3. Modeling Blast Loading on Buried Reinforced Concrete Structures with Zapotec

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bessette, Greg C.

    2008-01-01

    A coupled Euler-Lagrange solution approach is used to model the response of a buried reinforced concrete structure subjected to a close-in detonation of a high explosive charge. The coupling algorithm is discussed along with a set of benchmark calculations involving detonations in clay and sand.

  4. INTERIM REPORT ON CONCRETE DEGRADATION MECHANISMS AND ONLINE MONITORING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Neal, Kyle; Kosson, David; Adams, Douglas

    2014-09-01

    The existing fleets of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, though most these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. The online monitoring of concrete structure conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory will develop and demonstrate concrete structures health monitoring capabilities. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Therefore, the structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University proposes to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses available techniques and ongoing challenges in each of the four elements of the proposed framework with emphasis on degradation mechanisms and online monitoring techniques.

  5. National Concrete Consortium Meeting March 31 April 2, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the transport properties of concrete and relates these to anticipated performance under exposure conditions. The research team is reviewing each test to determine cost, time, basic principles, conditioning, and data obtained. An open house is planned for early 2010. Tom Adams of the American Coal Ash Association

  6. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE GROUTS AND VAULT CONCRETES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K; John Harbour, J; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-11-25

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone. Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement (dry premix) to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of three types of saltstone and two vault concretes. The saltstone formulations included saltstone premix batched with (1) Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), (2) Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), and (3) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60). The vault concrete formulations tested included the Vault 1/4 concrete and two variations of the Vault 2 concrete (Mix 1 and Mix 2). Wet properties measured for the saltstone formulations included yield stress, plastic viscosity, wet unit weight, bleed water volume, gel time, set time, and heat of hydration. Hydraulic and physical properties measured on the cured saltstone and concrete samples included saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention, compressive strength, porosity, particle density, and dry bulk density. These properties were determined following a minimum 28 day curing period. Additional testing of the three saltstone formulations was conducted following a minimum 90 day curing period. The compressive strength of each saltstone and concrete material was measured at approximately 14, 28, 56, and 90 days. Recommended hydraulic property values for each saltstone grout and the vault concretes are provided. The hydraulic properties provided for each material include the saturated hydraulic conductivity, dry bulk density, particle density, and porosity. In addition, water retention data are presented for each material along with the van Genuchten transport parameters as determined using the RETC code.

  7. Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 ANALYSIS OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES ACROSS THE DUCTILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    basic details Input basic details Uncracked analysis Modify details Start Stop Start No (a) Existing Department of Civil Engineering, University of Bristol, UK Keywords: Concrete, Ductility, Failure, FRP and / or reinforcement detailing ­ with moment redistribution for less onerous detailing ­ to give sufficient ductility

  8. The concrete road : development and present status of design and construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puell, Heinz Werner

    1935-01-01

    School. furthermore, I wish to thank both the Be-* part meats of Highways of the State of Washington and the State Highway Commission of Kansas for the oppor­ tunity to learn through experience on jobs and inspec­ tion trips. I also appreciate very... and Prevention by Joints 62 4. Reinforcement of Concrete Pavement Slabs 8o ¥1 Page. D. Design and Treatment of Concrete Mixtures ltil 1. Concrete Mixtures and* Aggregates lo2 2. workability of Concrete . ..* 123 3. Durability of Concrete 129 4. Curing...

  9. Equivalence of zeta function technique and Abel-Plana formula in regularizing the Casimir energy of hyper-rectangular cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rui-hui Lin; Xiang-hua Zhai

    2014-12-02

    Zeta function regularization is an effective method to extract physical significant quantities from infinite ones. It is regarded as mathematically simple and elegant but the isolation of the physical divergency is hidden in its analytic continuation. By contrast, Abel-Plana formula method permits explicit separation of divergent terms. In regularizing the Casimir energy for a massless scalar field in a $D$-dimensional rectangular box, we give the rigorous proof of the equivalence of the two methods by deriving the reflection formula of Epstein zeta function from repeatedly application of Abel-plana formula and giving the physical interpretation of the infinite integrals. Our study may help with the confidence of choosing any regularization method at convenience among the frequently used ones, especially the zeta function method, without the doubts of physical meanings or mathematical consistency.

  10. Derivation and generalization of the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Di-Fu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Wang, Hong-Gang; Li, Wei

    2013-12-15

    Field analysis method is used to derive the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities. This dispersion relation is then extended to the general case in which the rising-sun magnetron can be with multi-group cavities of different shapes and sizes, and from which the dispersion relations of conventional magnetron, rising-sun magnetron, and magnetron-like device can be obtained directly. The results show that the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the dispersion relation are less than 3%, the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the cutoff frequencies of ? mode are less than 2%. In addition, the influences of each structure parameter of the magnetron on the cutoff frequency of ? mode and on the mode separation are investigated qualitatively and quantitatively, which may be of great interest to designing a frequency tuning magnetron.

  11. High-frame rate, fast neutron imaging of two-phase flow in a thin rectangular channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zboray, R; Dangendorf, V; Stark, M; Tittelmeier, K; Cortesi, M; Adams, R

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of performing high-frame-rate, fast neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a thin channel with rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. A polychromatic, high-intensity fast neutron beam with average energy of 6 MeV was produced by 11.5 MeV deuterons hitting a thick Be target. Image sequences down to 10 millisecond exposure times were obtained using a fast-neutron imaging detector developed in the context of fast-neutron resonance imaging. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and bubble velocities have been measured. The first results are promising, improvements for future experiments are also discussed.

  12. HOSNY, AMR. Behavior of Concrete Members Containing Lightweight Synthetic Particles. (Under the direction of Dr. Sami Rizkalla.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for pumping purposes, thus reducing the wear and tear of the equipment, and produces durable concrete

  13. ISSN 13921320 MATERIALS SCIENCE (MEDZIAGOTYRA). Vol. 16, No. 3. 2010 Concretes Containing Hematite for Use as Shielding Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    and hematite composites have lower drying shrinkage than plain concrete, thus lowering stresses resulting from the shrinkage. Keywords: hematite, heavyweight concrete, radiation shielding, concrete aggregate. 1 facilities. Concrete is a relatively inexpensive material, it can be easily handled and cast into complex

  14. Microscale investigation of the corrosion performances of low-carbon and stainless steels in highly alkaline concretes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2012-01-01

    concrete cover are therefore also important for the corrosion performance, mainly due to the permeability

  15. 3D NUMERICAL STUDY OF MHD FLOW IN A RECTANGULAR DUCT WITH A FLOW CHANNEL INSERT Damien Sutevski, Sergey Smolentsev, Neil Morley, Mohamed Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    3D NUMERICAL STUDY OF MHD FLOW IN A RECTANGULAR DUCT WITH A FLOW CHANNEL INSERT Damien Sutevski of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in poloidal ducts of the Dual-Coolant Lead-Lithium (DCLL) blanket with an insulating- conducting FCI. The FCI and duct geometry match those of an experiment performed recently in Southwestern

  16. Effect of rib spacing on heat transfer and friction in a rotating two-pass rectangular (AR=1:2) channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yao-Hsien

    2006-10-30

    The research focuses on testing the heat transfer enhancement in a channel for different spacing of the rib turbulators. Those ribs are put on the surface in the two pass rectangular channel with an aspect ratio of AR=1:2. ...

  17. 1 Rectangular Bunched Rutile TiO2 Nanorod Arrays Grown on Carbon 2 Fiber for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    a study of rectangular bunched 13 TiO2 nanorod (NR) arrays grown on carbon fibers (CFs) 14 from titanium are fabricated by using etched TiO2 18 NR-coated CFs as the photoanode. An absolute energy 19 conversion (CFs). Relative to the traditional photoanode, CFs are 47 flexible, conductive, and stable in liquid

  18. Step into the campus : transforming problems of scale in mass housing projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pein, Christiane Ulrike

    1996-01-01

    Berlin-Marzahn, the largest peripheral city of Berlin, is the focus of th is thesis. Initiated in the 1970's it is an urban landscape of monolithic apartment blocks of precast concrete construction. This landscape lacks ...

  19. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: S&A Homes, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    This builder worked with IBACOS to design urban infill HERS-51 homes with compact duct layout in conditioned space, foam insulated precast concrete foundations, high-efficiency HVAC, and tankless water heaters

  20. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tindall Homes, Columbus, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-01

    The builder worked with IBACOS to build 20 HERS-58 homes with R-49 mixed attic insulation, poly-iso foam in advanced framed walls, precast concrete basement walls with rigid foam, tight airsealing, and HRV

  1. 78 PCI JOURNAL This paper presents the results of nonlinear finite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    78 PCI JOURNAL This paper presents the results of nonlinear finite element analyses conducted. Recently, the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI), and many PCI Producer Members, have questioned

  2. PCC Pavement Sustainability in New York Economy, Environment, and Society: 2 Out of 3 is Easy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are expensive. 6. Recycled PCC pavement is frequently used as subbase or used in commercial concrete. NYSDOT a reactive coarse aggregate is selected. 4. NYSDOT uses precast slabs to ensure traffic is not interrupted

  3. Contaminated concrete: Occurrence and emerging technologies for DOE decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Morris, M.I.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of the Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition Focus Area, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development, are to select, demonstrate, test, and evaluate an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific problems posed by deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning, (D&D). In response to these goals, technical task plan (TTP) OR152002, entitled Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods, was submitted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report describes the results from the initial project tasks, which focused on the nature and extent of contaminated concrete, emerging candidate technologies, and matching of emerging technologies to concrete problems. Existing information was used to describe the nature and extent of contamination (technology logic diagrams, data bases, and the open literature). To supplement this information, personnel at various DOE sites were interviewed, providing a broad perspective of concrete contamination. Because characterization is in the initial stage at many sites, complete information is not available. Assimilation of available information into one location is helpful in identifying potential areas of concern in the future. The most frequently occurring radiological contaminants within the DOE complex are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and it daughters), and {sup 60}Co, followed closely by {sup 90}Sr and tritium, which account for {minus}30% of the total occurrence. Twenty-four percent of the contaminants were listed as unknown, indicating a lack of characterization information, and 24% were listed as other contaminants (over 100 isotopes) with less than 1% occurrence per isotope.

  4. Methodology for predicting asphalt concrete overlay life against reflection cracking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayawickrama, Priyantha Warnasuriya

    1985-01-01

    METHODOLOGY FOR PREDICTING ASPHALT CONCRETE OVERLAY Lr 8 AGAINST REFLECTION CRACKING A Thesis by PRIYANTHA NARNASURIYA JAYAWICKRAMA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirements.... Experimental investigations carried out at Ohio State University ( 1, 2, 3) and Texas A8M University ( 4, 5, 6 ) have verified the applicability of fracture mechanics principles in predicting fatigue life of asphalt TIP OF THE CRACX /~ // N/i OVERLAY OLD...

  5. Evaluation of Rexene polymers in hot mixed asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Mary Anne Reese

    1991-01-01

    flexibility and ductility at lower temperatures. The mixture study investigated the performance of asphalt concrete mixtures made with a control asphalt cement and mixtures made with the polymer modified asphalt cements. Susceptibility of the mixture..., indicating that the polymer modified mixtures are less susceptible to permanent deformation. Rexene APAO polymers will provide marketable products for modifying paving grade asphalts and can compete equitably with other commercially available polymers...

  6. Evaluation of a microplane model for progressive fracture in concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loper, James Harris

    1988-01-01

    59 60 61 61 Page Numerical Integration over a Unit ? Cylinder Cracking Criterion NUMERICAL RESULTS Uniaxial and Biaxial Tension Pure Shear after Uniaxial Tension Shear-Panel Bending of a One ? Way Slab CONCLUSIONS Numerical Aspects... on Unisxial Compressive Re- sponse (Rusch 1960). Mohr ? Coulomb Failure Theory. Biaxial Strength of Concrete (Kupfer and Gerstle 1969). Uniaxial Behavior of a Plastic Material (Bazant 1980). Page 19 20 25 10 12 13 15 16 Uniaxial Behavior of a...

  7. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Wong, P.B. (Bechtel National, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 {times} 100 {times} 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10{sup {minus}8}, 10{sup {minus}12} and 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr{sup +6} to Cr{sup +3} and Tc{sup +7} to Tc{sup +4} and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site.

  8. Evaluation of a stack: A concrete chimney with brick liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R.; Amin, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, West Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A 200 ft. tall stack, consisting of a concrete chimney with an independent acid proof brick liner built in the 1950`s, serving the Separations facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), was evaluated for the performance category 3 (PC3) level of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) effects. The inelastic energy absorption capacity of the concrete chimney was considered in the evaluation of the earthquake resistance, in particular, to compute the F{sub {mu}} factor. The calculated value of F{sub {mu}} exceeded 3.0, while the seismic demand for the PC3 level, using an F{sub {mu}} value of 1.5, was found to be less than the capacity of the concrete chimney. The capacity formulation of ACI 307 was modified to incorporate the effect of an after design opening on the tension side. There are considerable uncertainties in determining the earthquake resistance of the independent brick liner. The critical liner section, located at the bottom of the breeching opening, does not meet the current recommendations. A discussion is provided for the possible acceptable values for the ``Moment Reduction Factor``, R{sub w} or F{sub {mu}} for the liner. Comments are provided on the comparison of stack demands using response spectra (RS) versus time history (TH) analysis, with and without soil structure interaction (SSI) effects.

  9. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wong, P.B. [Bechtel National, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 {times} 100 {times} 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10{sup {minus}8}, 10{sup {minus}12} and 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr{sup +6} to Cr{sup +3} and Tc{sup +7} to Tc{sup +4} and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site.

  10. To be presented at ACI Fall 2009 Session on "Material Science Modeling as a Solution to Concrete Problems" (New Orleans) Virtual Testing of Concrete Transport Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    To be presented at ACI Fall 2009 Session on "Material Science Modeling as a Solution to Concrete permeability test (RCPT) that simulates the standard ASTM test method for conductivity of concrete cylinders; durability; microstructure; permeability; transport; virtual testing. #12;Biography: ACI member Dale P. Bentz

  11. Normal and refractory concretes for LMFBR applications. Volume 1. Review of literature on high-temperature behavior of portland cement and refractory concretes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Chern, J.C.; Abrams, M.S.; Gillen, M.P.

    1982-06-01

    The extensive literature on the properties and behavior at elevated temperature of portland cement concrete and various refractory concretes was reviewed to collect in concise form the physical and chemical properties of castable refractory concretes and of conventional portland cement concretes at elevated temperature. This survey, together with an extensive bibliography of source documents, is presented in Volume 1. A comparison was made of these properties, the relative advantages of the various concretes was evaluated for possible liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications, and a selection was made of several materials of interest for such applications. Volume 2 concludes with a summary of additional knowledge needed to support such uses of these materials together with recommendations on research to provide that knowledge.

  12. Two fully reversed cyclic tests were conducted at 1/4 scale on a typical hollow rectan-gular reinforced concrete pier designed to support the Skyway Structures of the new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Eric

    are extended to Dr. Robert Dowell and Dan Parker of Anatech Corp. who prepared the nite element predictions for each of the test units. We would also like to recognize Dr. Dowell for generously sharing his moment

  13. Attack of fragmented-core debris on concrete in the presence of water. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Bradley, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the unlikely event that core debris escapes the reactor pressure vessel, the interactions of the debris with concrete, structural materials, and coolant become the driving force for severe accident phenomena. The Ex-Vessel Core Debris Interactions Program at Sandia National Laboratories is an experimental research effort to characterize these interactions and the magnitude of safety-related phenomena such as flammable gas generation, aerosol production, fission product release, and concrete attack. Major areas of study within the program include molten core simultants in contact with concrete, high pressure melt streaming into scaled reactor cavities, the addition of coolant to high-temperature melt/concrete interactions, and the attack of hot, solid core debris on concrete. This paper describes results from the last of these efforts, i.e., hot, but not molten debris attacking concrete.

  14. Blunt-crack band propagation in finite-element analysis for concrete structures. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Bazant, Z.P.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The knowledge of concrete fracture is needed in nuclear reactor safety. The question of safety arises from the potential of concrete to crack under thermal loading. It has been postulated that structural concrete could be exposed to very high temperature, which may result from hot reactor coolant or even core debris coming in direct contact with the concrete. The utilization of the blunt crack approach for simulating concrete cracking in a general-purpose code is explored. The difficulties encountered in establishing the proper direction of crack propagation in an arbitrary discretization are described. Crack propagation is considered within the context of two types of solution techniques: (1) implicit solution of the static crack advance, and (2) explicit time integration using a dynamic relaxation technique to simulate the static crack advance. Also, in both solution techniques an elastic model is used to characterize the concrete.

  15. Lintel testing for reduced shear reinforcement in insulation concrete form systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    Historically, cast-in-place concrete for residential construction has been primarily limited to below grade applications such as footings and foundation walls. Such construction was relatively labor intensive, and, therefore was not considered a viable alternative for other parts of the building. However, the recent advent of insulating concrete form (ICF) wall construction and the Prescriptive Method for Insulating Concrete Forms in Residential Construction (Prescriptive Method) has resulted in a competitive and energy efficient alternative for above grade walls in residential construction. The purpose of this test program is to investigate the structural capacity and performance of the concrete lintels typically used in ICF construction. Lintels are reinforced concrete structural elements that support loads above openings in concrete walls.

  16. TRANS4: a computer code calculation of solid fuel penetration of a concrete barrier. [LMFBR; GCFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, C. M.; Kumar, R.; Fink, J. K.

    1980-07-01

    The computer code, TRANS4, models the melting and penetration of a solid barrier by a solid disc of fuel following a core disruptive accident. This computer code has been used to model fuel debris penetration of basalt, limestone concrete, basaltic concrete, and magnetite concrete. Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the importance of various properties on the rate of penetration. Comparisons were made with results from the GROWS II code.

  17. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    processes to reduce the carbon footprint of concrete. Thelargest share of energy and carbon footprint of the concreteproduct have a negative carbon footprint because they are

  18. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Old Reinforced Concrete Buildings with Seismically Vulnerable Beam-Column Joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARK, SANGJOON

    2010-01-01

    concrete standard compressive strength (ACI 318-08, 2008).of standard hooks in tension, l dh , is proposed by ACI 318-

  19. Hybrid Simulation of the Seismic Response of Squat Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Catherine Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    the standard quasi-static test procedure from ITG 1.1 (ACIstandard quasi-static reinforced concrete testing protocol from ITG 1.1 (ACI

  20. Instantaneous In-Situ Determination of Water-Cement Ratio of Fresh Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancio, Mauricio; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Brooks, Zenzile; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Glaser, Steve D.

    2010-01-01

    p. 519-543. ACI, ACI 211.1: Standard Practice for Selectingfact, according to ACI’s standard concrete mix-proportioning

  1. Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bovaird, Chase C.

    2011-09-30

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages in concrete. These concrete-encased waste stacks are expected to vary in size with maximum dimensions of 6.4 m long, 2.7 m wide, and 4 m high. The waste stacks are expected to have a surrounding minimum thickness of 15 cm of concrete encasement. These concrete-encased waste packages are expected to withstand environmental exposure (solar radiation, temperature variations, and precipitation) until an interim soil cover or permanent closure cover is installed and to remain largely intact thereafter. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. This report presents the results of investigations elucidating the uranium mineral phases controlling the long-term fate of uranium within concrete waste forms and the solubility of these phases in concrete pore waters and alkaline, circum-neutral vadose zone environments.

  2. Upscaling permeability for fractured concrete: meso-macro numerical approach coupled to strong discontinuities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass (gas and water) transfers within concrete are an important issue dealing with numerous appli, the latter aims at extending its nuclear powerplants lifetime which requires accurate quantifications

  3. Development of a low-profile portable concrete barrier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidry, Todd Randall

    1991-01-01

    A low-profile portable concrete barrier (PCB) has been developed for use in low-speed (approximately 45 mph [73 km/h] or less) work zones. The purpose of the low-profile barrier is to shield the work zone and redirect errant vehicles while.... SEQUENTIAL PHOTOGRAPHS OF CRASH TESTS APPENDIX D. ACCELEROMETER TRACES AND PLOTS OF ROLL, PITCH AND YAW RATES APPENDIX E. TEST VEHICLE PROPERTIES VITA Page 6 8 8 10 10 13 13 17 18 19 20 24 29 29 41 50 52 53 63 68 73 82 85 LIST...

  4. Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibilitydefault ChangesORNL's Jaguar beingConcrete Industry

  5. Use of Residual Solids from Pulp and Paper Mills for Enhancing Strength and Durability of Ready-Mixed Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarun R. Naik; Yoon-moon Chun; Rudolph N. Kraus

    2003-09-18

    This research was conducted to establish mixture proportioning and production technologies for ready-mixed concrete containing pulp and paper mill residual solids and to study technical, economical, and performance benefits of using the residual solids in the concrete. Fibrous residuals generated from pulp and paper mills were used, and concrete mixture proportions and productions technologies were first optimized under controlled laboratory conditions. Based on the mixture proportions established in the laboratory, prototype field concrete mixtures were manufactured at a ready-mixed concrete plant. Afterward, a field construction demonstration was held to demonstrate the production and placement of structural-grade cold-weather-resistant concrete containing residual solids.

  6. Humectant use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Collins, W.K.; Bennett, J.E.; Laylor, H.M.

    2000-11-01

    Use of humectants to improve the thermal-sprayed zinc anode performance during the cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete was examined. A humectant is a hygroscopic material. It is applied onto the surface of the zinc anode to keep the concrete-anode interface moist and a good conductor. The thermodynamics of humectants are discussed. Laboratory results are presented on the effects of using lithium bromide (LiBr) and lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}) as humectants in galvanic cathodic protection (GCP) and impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems, in high and low relative humidities, and on new and previously electrochemically aged CP systems. LiNO{sub 3} and LiBr promoted more effective CP performance. Both improved the performance of aged slabs, suggesting that application of humectants onto existing CP systems would be of benefit. Microscopy showed that humectant-treated slabs develop the same cement-reaction zone, zinc anode structures as untreated slabs. Microscopy of LiBr-treated slabs revealed that the highest concentration of bromide was in the reaction zone. In GCP tests, LiBr was more effective than LiNO{sub 3}. In accelerated ICCP tests, LiNO{sub 3} was more effective than LiBr. It was surmised that bromide could be oxidized in the high-voltage accelerated ICCP tests. At the lower impressed currents of most installed ICCP systems, LiBr may perform as well as or better than LiNO{sub 3}.

  7. Humectant use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Russell, J.H.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.; Collins, W.K.; Bennett, J.E.; H.M. Laylor

    2000-03-01

    The use of humectants to improve the thermal-sprayed zinc anode performance during the cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete is examined. A humectant is a hygroscopic material. It is applied onto the surface of the zinc anode to keep the concrete-anode interface moist and a good conductor. The thermodynamics of humectants are discussed. Laboratory results are presented on the effects of using LiBr and LiNO{sub 3} as humectants in galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) systems, in high and low relative humidities, and on new and previously electrochemically aged CP systems. LiNO{sub 3} and LiBr promoted more effective CP performance. Both improved the performance of aged slabs, suggesting that application of humectants onto existing CP systems would be of benefit. Microscopy showed that humectant-treated slabs develop the same cement-reaction zone-zinc anode structures as untreated slabs. Microscopy of LiBr-treated slabs revealed that the highest concentration of bromide was in the reaction zone. In GCP tests, LiBr was more effective than LiNO{sub 3}. In accelerated ICCP tests, LiNO{sub 3} was more effective than LiBr. It was surmised that bromide could be oxidized in the high-voltage accelerated ICCP tests. At the lower impressed currents of most installed ICCP systems, LiBr may perform as well as or better than LiNO{sub 3}.

  8. Carbon paint anode for reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cryer, C.B.; Laylor, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Solvent-based acrylic carbon paint anodes were installed on the north approach spans of the Yaquina Bay Bridge (Newport OR) in 1985. The anodes continue to perform satisfactorily after more than 15 years service. The anodes were inexpensive to apply and field repairs are easily made. Depolarization potentials are consistently above 100 mV with long-term current densities around 2 mA/m 2. Bond strength remains adequate, averaging 0.50 MPa (73 psi). Some deterioration of the anode-concrete interface has occurred in the form of cracks and about 4% of the bond strength measurements indicated low or no bond. Carbon anode consumption appears low. The dominant long-term anode reaction appears to be chlorine evolution, which results in limited further acidification of the anode-concrete interface. Chloride profiles were depressed compared to some other coastal bridges suggesting chloride extraction by the CP system. Further evidence of outward chloride migration was a flat chloride profile between the anode and the outer rebar.

  9. Concrete Dust Suppression System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The improved technology is a water-based dust suppression system for controlling concrete dust generated by demolition equipment, in this case a demolition ram. This demonstration was performed to assess the effectiveness of this system to (1) minimize the amount of water used to suppress potentially contaminated dust, (2) focus the water spray on the dust-generating source and (3) minimize the dust cloud generated by the demolition activity. The technology successfully reduced the water required by a factor of eight compared to the traditional (baseline) method, controlled the dust generated, and permitted a reduction in the work force. The water spray can be focused at the ram point, but it is affected by wind. Prior to the use of this dust control system, dust generated by the demolition ram was controlled manually by spraying with fire hoses (the baseline technology). The improved technology is 18% less expensive than the baseline technology for the conditions and parameters of this demonstration, however, the automated system can save up to 80% versus the baseline whenever waste water treatment costs are considered. For demolishing one high-walled room and a long slab with a total of 413 m{sup 3} (14,580 ft{sup 3}) of concrete, the savings are $105,000 (waste water treatment included). The improved technology reduced the need for water consumption and treatment by about 88% which results in most of the savings.

  10. Development and Construction of Low-Cracking High-Performance Concrete (LC-HPC) Bridge Decks: Free Shrinkage, Mixture Optimization, and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindquist, Will David

    2008-01-01

    parts covering (1) the development of an aggregate optimization and concrete mixture design program entitled KU Mix, (2) free-shrinkage tests to evaluate potential LC-HPC mixtures developed for use in bridge decks, and (3) the construction...

  11. FIBER OPTIC SENSING OF A CARBON FIBER PRESfRESSED CONCRETE HIGHWAY BRIDGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIBER OPTIC SENSING OF A CARBON FIBER PRESfRESSED CONCRETE HIGHWAY BRIDGE R. M. Measuresl , T. Rizkalla5 1Fiber Optic Smart Structures Lab: UTlAS, 4925 Dufferin St., Downsview, Ontario, CANADA 2 Con ofsteel within large concrete structures, such as bridges are leading to consideration ofcarbonfiber based

  12. STRENGTHENING OF CONCRETE ROOF USING CFRP STRIPS Emile Shehata, Sami Rizkalla .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRENGTHENING OF CONCRETE ROOF USING CFRP STRIPS Emile Shehata, Sami Rizkalla . ISIS-Canada NCE and control the deformation of existing roof panels at the North End Winnipeg Pollution Control Center (NEWPCC old concrete roof structure. The use of epoxy-bonded CFRP laminates was selected du

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: survey of models for concrete degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Benjamin W; Huang, Hai

    2014-08-01

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of two primary properties: its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. Concrete structures have been known to last for hundreds of years, but they are also known to deteriorate in very short periods of time under adverse conditions. The use of concrete in nuclear facilities for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. The goal of this report is to review and document the main aging mechanisms of concern for concrete structures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the models used in simulations of concrete aging and structural response of degraded concrete structures. This is in preparation for future work to develop and apply models for aging processes and response of aged NPP concrete structures in the Grizzly code. To that end, this report also provides recommendations for developing more robust predictive models for aging effects of performance of concrete.

  14. Doctoral Defense "Frost Deterioration in Concrete Due to Deicer Salt Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Frost Deterioration in Concrete Due to Deicer Salt Exposure: Mechanism-freeze climate zone. During winter a deicer-salt application is needed to melt snow on highways. Freezing in the presence of a deicer salt solution is considered a severe concrete exposure condition. Prolonged exposure

  15. Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

  16. Assessment of the Behavior of Buried Concrete Pipelines Subjected to Ground Rupture: Experimental Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Assessment of the Behavior of Buried Concrete Pipelines Subjected to Ground Rupture: Experimental: Rapid assessment of damage to buried pipelines from earthquake-induced ground deformation is a crucial for buried concrete pipelines subjected to ground deformation. A custom-designed sensing strategy

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    diesel, the predominant fuel in ready mixed concrete production and delivery, has experienced rapid pricediesel price of $2.89 per gallon, gasoline price of $2.81 per gallon, fuel oil priceprices; which can result in significant uncertainties. The 2007 fuel use in concrete trucks, mainly diesel,

  18. Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 WHEN PLASTICITY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 rd July, 2007 WHEN PLASTICITY? Chris MORLEY Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, UK Keywords: concrete, plasticity, cracking, flow, size effect, fibre reinforcement 1 BACKGROUND The need for adequate

  19. Anisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Anisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures Ragueneau F with damage induced anisotropy modelling for concrete-like materials. A thermodynamics based constitutive relationship is presented coupling anisotropic damage and elasticity. The biaxial behaviour of such a model

  20. Bond Characteristics and Shear Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with High-Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the behavior of reinforced concrete structures (ACI 408 2003). Previous research (Orangin et al. 1977; Darwin. The applicability of various building codes and standards for concrete beams with HS shear reinforcement was also; Zuo and Darwin 2000) including the current ACI Committee *Corresponding author. Email address: tarek

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    ACI 306 for Cold Weather Concreting and the guidelines in the StandardACI American Concrete Institute ASD Adjustable-speed drive ASTM American Society for StandardsACI 306R-2. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C94. Standard

  2. Concrete as a Green Building Material Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Concrete as a Green Building Material C. Meyer Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA Abstract Concrete is by far the most widely used construction material worldwide. Its huge popularity of tons of natural materials mined and processed each year, by their sheer volume, are bound to leave

  3. STATIC AND FATIGUE PERFORMANCE OF 40 YEAR OLD PRESTRESSED CONCRETE GIRDERS STRENGTHENED WITH VARIOUS CFRP SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATIC AND FATIGUE PERFORMANCE OF 40 YEAR OLD PRESTRESSED CONCRETE GIRDERS STRENGTHENED program aimed at investigating the static and fatigue behavior of 40 year old prestressed concrete bridge girders were tested as control girders (one in static and one in fatigue), while the remaining ten girders

  4. Video Conference Agenda and Meeting Notes: Two-Lift Concrete Pavements 27 June 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center including a link to two-lift concrete pavements including exposed aggregate surfaces. The end Lift? · Need for safety ­ the potential for maintaining good skid resistance. · Need for recycling ­ especially in top lift of two-lift concrete. Recycled material use was big ­ another real potential

  5. Determination of the kink point in the bilinear softening model for concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    -point bending specimens with concrete mixtures containing virgin coarse aggregate, recycled concrete coarse aggregate (RCA), and a 50­50 blend of RCA and virgin coarse aggregate. The verification and validation strength, the total fracture energy, the maximum aggregate size, and a kink point stress of 0.15f 0

  6. COARSE AGGREGATE FOR COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT Effective: January 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Specifications: "(g) Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA). If recycled coarse aggregate is specified for use in a concrete mix design, the recycled coarse aggregate will be generated from a Tollway approved source of existing concrete or asphalt pavement. The recycled coarse aggregate may be processed from a non

  7. Towards Prestressed Thin-Sheet Glass Concrete Products Gregor Vilkner and Christian Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    applications. By using crushed glass as aggregate, a multitude of different esthetic effects can be produced Concrete; 555 Concrete with Recycled Materials (Chair); Joint ACI-ASCE Committee 447, Finite Element of crushed glass for natural aggregate opens up additional options, primarily in the field of architectural

  8. VILKNER, Glass Concrete with Carpet Fibers, 1/10 Fax: +1 212 854 7267

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    @civil.columbia.edu PROPERTIES OF GLASS CONCRETE CONTAINING RECYCLED CARPET FIBERS G. Vilkner, C. Meyer, and S. Shimanovich of recycling strategies are now being explored. At Columbia University, a major study to evaluate the feasibility of using post-consumer glass as aggregate in concrete has been expanded to investigate

  9. A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

    2012-06-29

    The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

  10. A TWO-LEVEL-PERFORMANCE-BASED DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURAL WALLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasani, Mehrdad

    A TWO-LEVEL-PERFORMANCE-BASED DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURAL WALLS Mehrdad Sasani 1 Abstract Performance-based design can be defined as a systematic method of designing structural systems, a performance- based design of reinforced concrete (RC) structural walls at the serviceability and life- safety

  11. PERFORMANCE RELATED SPECIAL PROVISION FOR HIGH-EARLY STRENGTH CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE (Tollway)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE RELATED SPECIAL PROVISION FOR HIGH-EARLY STRENGTH CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE (Tollway under Restrained Shrinkage REQUIREMENTS Contractor shall provide a concrete mix design according ¾-inch graded material. Length Change Measured shrinkage shall not be greater than 0.05 percent after 28

  12. Optimization of cement and fly ash particle sizes to produce sustainable concretes Dale P. Bentz a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Optimization of cement and fly ash particle sizes to produce sustainable concretes Dale P. Bentz a of experiment Fly ash Hydration Particle size distribution Strength Sustainability a b s t r a c t In the drive. High volume fly ash concretes have been proposed as one potential approach for achieving substantial

  13. CONCRETE PAVING PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT USING A MULTI-TASK AUTONOMOUS ROBOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams II, Robert L.

    of identifying productivity benefits in an automated concrete paving operation, two concrete paving processes for the determination of productivity indicators of automated operations in hazardous environments, using the respective and string-lines. These types of controls limit productivity, because their installation is slow

  14. Field Applications of Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes for Marine Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SP·215-9 Field Applications of Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes for Marine Piles by A. Fam. R. Greene in marine environments. The pile consists of a concrete-filled circular fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tube, supports for marine structures and for bridge pier protection. In these applications, the pile is subjected

  15. Design and Performance of Elastic Fastening System Assemblies and Concrete Sleepers for Heavy-Haul Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    , Inc. Overland Park, KS, USA Abstract As heavy-haul freight axle loads and cumulative tonnages increase costs of concrete sleeper fastening systems is of paramount importance to the railway industry to ensure addressing current problems the industry is facing regarding the use of concrete sleepers and fastening

  16. Concrete poetry in England and Scotland 1962-75: Ian Hamilton Finlay, Edwin Morgan, Dom Sylvester Houédard and Bob Cobbing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Gregory Charles

    2013-11-26

    This thesis examines concrete poetry in England and Scotland from 1962 to 1975. Through the 1950s-70s, international concrete poetry evolved away from constructivist influenced, “classical” ideals of minimalism and iconic ...

  17. Project Profile: Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The University of Arkansas, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing a novel concrete material that can withstand operating temperatures of 500°C or more and is measuring the concrete properties.

  18. The results of the CCI-3 reactor material experiment investigating 2-D core-concrete interaction and debris coolability with a silliceous concrete crucible.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Basu, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division; NRC

    2006-01-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. Despite years of international research, there are remaining uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. In the continuing effort to bridge this data gap, the third in a series of large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiments (CCI-3) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test involved the interaction of a 375 kg core-oxide melt within a two-dimensional siliceous concrete crucible. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predetermined ablation depth was reached, the cavity was flooded to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a summary description of the test facility and an overview of test results.

  19. Measurement of concrete E-modulus evolution since casting: A novel method based on ambient vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azenha, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.azenha@civil.uminho.p [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); ISISE - Institute for Sustainability and Innovation in Structural Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Escola de Engenharia, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Magalhaes, Filipe [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Faria, Rui [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Cunha, Alvaro [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-07-15

    The use of ambient vibration tests to characterize the evolution of E-modulus of concrete right after casting is investigated in this paper. A new methodology is proposed, which starts by casting a concrete cylindrical beam inside a hollow acrylic formwork. This beam is then placed horizontally, simply supported at both extremities, and vertical accelerations resulting from ambient vibration are measured at mid-span. Processing these mid-span acceleration time series using power spectral density functions allows a continuous identification of the first flexural frequency of vibration of the composite beam, which in turn is correlated with the evolutive E-modulus of concrete since casting. Together with experiments conducted with the proposed methodology, a complementary validation campaign for concrete E-modulus determination was undertaken by static loading tests performed on the composite beam, as well as by standard compressive tests of concrete cylinders of the same batch loaded at different ages.

  20. Computational experiences with variable modulus, elastic-plastic, and viscoelastic concrete models. [HTGR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    Six years ago the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approached the Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop a comprehensive concrete structural analysis code to predict the static and dynamic behavior of Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessels (PCRVs) that serve as the containment structure of a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. The PCRV is a complex concrete structure that must be modeled in three dimensions and posseses other complicating features such as a steel liner for the reactor cavity and woven cables embedded vertically in the PCRV and wound circumferentially on the outside of the PCRV. The cables, or tendons, are used for prestressing the reactor vessel. In addition to developing the computational capability to predict inelastic three dimensional concrete structural behavior, the code response was verified against documented experiments on concrete structural behavior. This code development/verification effort is described.

  1. Contract with Messrs Candini, Vandoni, Guffant & Co. for Reinforced Concrete Work and Stonework on the Main Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1957-01-01

    Contract with Messrs Candini, Vandoni, Guffant & Co. for Reinforced Concrete Work and Stonework on the Main Building

  2. Behavior of Concrete Bridge Decks Reinforced with MMFX Steel Hatem Seliem, Doctoral Student, Civil Engineering Dept., NCSU, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behavior of Concrete Bridge Decks Reinforced with MMFX Steel Hatem Seliem, Doctoral Student, Civil is considered to be one of the leading causes of deterioration of concrete bridges. This fact has led 60 steel in concrete bridge decks. However, despite these field applications, there is insufficient

  3. Combined effects of fly ash and waste ferrochromium on properties of concrete Osman Gencel a,d,,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Combined effects of fly ash and waste ferrochromium on properties of concrete Osman Gencel a,d,,1 Accepted 24 November 2011 Keywords: Concrete durability Ferrochromium Fly ash Waste in concrete a b s t r was replaced with fly ash at the ratio of 10, 20 and 30 wt.%. Coarse limestone aggregates were replaced

  4. Enhancing High Volume Fly Ash Concretes Using Fine Limestone Powder by Jussara Tanesi, Dale Bentz, and Ahmad Ardani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Enhancing High Volume Fly Ash Concretes Using Fine Limestone Powder by Jussara Tanesi, Dale Bentz of replacing 50 % or more of the portland cement in a conventional concrete with fly ash, producing a so-called high volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete. While these mixtures typically perform admirably in the long term

  5. Achieving "Green" Concrete Through The Use Of High Performance FiberThe Use Of High Performance Fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Shih-Ho

    : rapid increase in the permeability occurred for plain concrete under stress; increasep y p ; remainedAchieving "Green" Concrete Through The Use Of High Performance FiberThe Use Of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete ShihShih--Ho Chao,Ho Chao, Ph.DPh.D Assistant Professor, Department of Civil

  6. Moisture-Driven Deterioration and Abrasion of Concrete Sleeper Rail Seats Submitted for publication in the proceedings of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    -entrained, low- permeability concrete. Care should be exercised when using pads that do not seal waterMoisture-Driven Deterioration and Abrasion of Concrete Sleeper Rail Seats Submitted for publication on the results of a 2008 railway industry survey on concrete sleepers, rail seat deterioration (RSD) is the most

  7. A mobile computed tomographic unit for inspecting reinforced concrete columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumitra, T.; Srisatit, S.; Pattarasumunt, A.

    1994-12-31

    A mobile computed tomographic unit applicable in the inspection of reinforced concrete columns was designed, constructed and tested. A CT image reconstruction programme written in Quick Basic was first developed to be used on an IBM PC/AT microcomputer. It provided user friendly menus for data processing and displaying CT image. The prototype of a gamma-ray scanning system using a 1.11 GBq Cs-137 source and a NaI(T1) scintillation detector was also designed and constructed. The system was a microcomputer controlled, single-beam rotate-translate scanner used for collecting transmitted gamma-ray data in different angles. The CT unit was finally tested with a standard column and a column of an existing building. The cross sectional images of the columns could be clearly seen. The positions and sizes of the reinforced bars could be estimated.

  8. Concrete uses of XML in software development and data analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Patton

    2003-06-11

    XML is now becoming an industry standard for data description and exchange. Despite this there are still some questions about how or if this technology can be useful in High Energy Physics software development and data analysis. This paper aims to answer these questions by demonstrating how XML is used in the IceCube software development system, data handling and analysis. It does this by first surveying the concepts and tools that make up the XML technology. It then goes on to discuss concrete examples of how these concepts and tools are used to speed up software development in IceCube and what are the benefits of using XML in IceCube's data handling and analysis chain. The overall aim of this paper it to show that XML does have many benefits to bring High Energy Physics software development and data analysis.

  9. High temperature concrete composites containing organosiloxane crosslinked copolymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeldin, Arkady (Rego Park, NY); Carciello, Neal (Patchogue, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence (Port Jefferson, NY); Fontana, Jack (Shoreham, NY)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to high temperature polymer concrete composites comprising about 10-30% by weight of a liquid monomer mixture consisting essentially of an organosiloxane polymer crosslinked with an olefinically unsaturated monomer selected from the group consisting of styrene, methyl methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, triallyl cyanurate, n-phenylmalimide, divinyl benzene and mixtures theroef; and about 70-90% by weight of an inert inorganic filler system containing silica sand and preferably a member selected from the group consisting of portland cement, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3, carbon black and mixtures thereof; and optionally a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide and other organic peroxides to initiate crosspolymerization of the monomer mixture in the presence of the inorganic filler.

  10. Impact of ASCE-95 wind provisions on reinforced concrete chimneys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, Inc., West Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of the study on the impact of the ASCE 7-95 provisions primarily on the along wind load calculations for reinforced concrete chimneys. The results of this study provided, in part, a basis for the adoption of the revised load and strength factors for wind load design in ACI 307-98. The study was undertaken to: compare unfactored along wind chimney loads resulting from fastest miles per hour (FMPH) and three second gust (TSG) procedures; quantify design changes resulting from FMPH to TSG in terms of the reinforcing steel; review the historical basis for the current load factors (LF) and strength factors (SF); and to recommend a set of LF and SF for the design of chimneys without significantly changing the present design confidence level.

  11. Insulating concrete forms: Installed cost and acoustic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The NAHB Research Center conducted a study to compare the cost and performance of Insulating Concrete Form (ICF) walls to conventional wood-frame exterior walls. This report contains the results of the cost study and sound transmission tests. Three home were built and monitored. One home has an ICF plank system, one has an ICF block system, and one is of conventional 2x4 lumber construction. The homes have identical floor plans and are located side by side. The findings indicate that the labor costs for the ICFs were slightly to moderately higher than the wood framing. However, the sound tests indicate that the ICF walls perform significantly better than the wood walls when no openings were present. The report summarizes the findings and recommends ways to increase the cost-effectiveness of ICFs.

  12. Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Schaich, Charles R. (Lenoir City, TN); Foster, Jr., Don (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface.

  13. Concrete Model Descriptions and Summary of Benchmark Studies for Blast Effects Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, C; Kokko, E; Darnell, I; Dunn, T; Hagler, L; Leininger, L

    2005-07-21

    Concrete is perhaps one of the most widely used construction materials in the world. Engineers use it to build massive concrete dams, concrete waterways, highways, bridges, and even nuclear reactors. The advantages of using concrete is that it can be cast into any desired shape, it is durable, and very economical compared to structural steel. The disadvantages are its low tensile strength, low ductility, and low strength-to-weight ratio. Concrete is a composite material that consists of a coarse granular material, or aggregate, embedded in a hard matrix of material, or cement, which fills the gaps between the aggregates and binds them together. Concrete properties, however, vary widely. The properties depend on the choice of materials used and the proportions for a particular application, as well as differences in fabrication techniques. Table 1 provides a listing of typical engineering properties for structural concrete. Properties also depend on the level of concrete confinement, or hydrostatic pressure, the material is being subjected to. In general, concrete is rarely subjected to a single axial stress. The material may experience a combination of stresses all acting simultaneously. The behavior of concrete under these combined stresses are, however, extremely difficult to characterize. In addition to the type of loading, one must also consider the stress history of the material. Failure is determined not only by the ultimate stresses, but also by the rate of loading and the order in which these stresses were applied. The concrete model described herein accounts for this complex behavior of concrete. It was developed by Javier Malvar, Jim Wesevich, and John Crawford of Karagozian and Case, and Don Simon of Logicon RDA in support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's programs. The model is an enhanced version of the Concrete/Geological Material Model 16 in the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D. The modifications that were made to the original model ensured that the material response followed experimental observations for standard uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial tests for both tension and compression type loading. A disadvantage of using this material model, however, is the overwhelming amount of input that is required from the user. Therefore, the goal of this report is to provide future users with the tools necessary for successfully using this model.

  14. Fly ash and concrete: a study determines whether biomass, or coal co-firing fly ash, can be used in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shuangzhen; Baxter, Larry

    2006-08-01

    Current US national standards for using fly ash in concrete (ASTM C618) state that fly ash must come from coal combustion, thus precluding biomass-coal co-firing fly ash. The co-fired ash comes from a large and increasing fraction of US power plants due to rapid increases in co-firing opportunity fuels with coal. The fly ashes include coal fly ash, wood fly ash from pure wood combustion, biomass and coal co-fired fly ash SW1 and SW2. Also wood fly ash is blended with Class C or Class F to produce Wood C and Wood E. Concrete samples were prepared with fly ash replacing cement by 25%. All fly ash mixes except wood have a lower water demand than the pure cement mix. Fly ashes, either from coal or non coal combustion, increase the required air entraining agent (AEA) to meet the design specification of the mixes. If AEA is added arbitrarily without considering the amount or existence of fly ash results could lead to air content in concrete that is either too low or too high. Biomass fly ash does not impact concrete setting behaviour disproportionately. Switch grass-coal co-fired fly ash and blended wood fly ash generally lie within the range of pure coal fly ash strength. The 56 day flexure strength of all the fly ash mixes is comparable to that of the pure cement mix. The flexure strength from the coal-biomass co-fired fly ash does not differ much from pure coal fly ash. All fly ash concrete mixes exhibit lower chloride permeability than the pure cement mixes. In conclusion biomass coal co-fired fly ash perform similarly to coal fly ash in fresh and hardened concrete. As a result, there is no reason to exclude biomass-coal co-fired fly ash in concrete.

  15. Impact of Material Deterioration on the Strength of Reinforced Concrete Half Joint Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desnerck, P.; Lees, J. M.; Morley, C.

    2015-01-01

    . and HUANG P., “Validation of an alternative reinforcing detail for the dapped ends of prestressed double tees.” PCI J., vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 38–49, 2002. [6] CLARK L. and THOROGOOD P., “Serviceability behaviour of reinforced concrete half joints,” Struct... . Eng., vol. 66, no. 18, pp. 295–302, 1988. [7] PRESTRESSED CONCRETE INSTITUTE, PCI Design Handbook, 7th ed. Pre- cast/Prestressed Concrete Institute, 2007, p. 786. [8] TNO DIANA BV, “TNO Diana 9.5.” Delft, the Netherlands, 2014. [9] DESNERCK P., LEES...

  16. CFRP SHEAR STRENGTHENING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE T-BEAMS WITH CORRODED SHEAR LINKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Shunde; Dirar, Samir; Yang, Jian; Chan, Andrew H. C.; Elshafie, Mohammed

    2014-12-17

    better bond 57 performance between the concrete and the FRP reinforcement (Chaallal et al., 2011). 58 A careful review of the published literature reveals that research studies investigating the 59 shear behavior of RC beams strengthened using the DE... of reinforced concrete 500 beams strengthened in shear using L-shaped CFRP plates: experimental investigation.” J. 501 Compos. Constr., 10.1061/(ASCE)CC.1943-5614.0000398, 04013033. 502 503 Rahal, K. N., and Rumaih, H. A. (2011). “Tests on reinforced concrete...

  17. A comparison of direct and indirect methods of determining tensile strength of concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James Timon

    1957-01-01

    . iameter and height of the cyl1nder are used in the determ1nation of the tensile strength of the concrete. This method of test has been adopted as the standard method of determin5ng the tensile strength of concrete by Japan and Brasil ~ Investigations... the scope of this invest1gation. Only the relat1onship between the tensile strengths of concretes with variable water- cement ratios was studied. Flexural snd compressive strength values determ1ned by standard test methods were used for correlation...

  18. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    2009. CO 2 Capture in the Cement Industry. Energy Procedia2 Capture Technologies for Cement Industry. Energy Procedia,J.M. Makar, T. Sato. 2010. Cement and concrete nanoscience

  19. Evaluation and optimization of pervious concrete with respect to permeability and clogging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joung, Young

    2010-01-20

    Although pervious concrete was first used in the nineteenth century, it has only recently begun to increase in popularity. As urban areas expand, the problems associated with runoff management have become more challenging. The focus on the negative...

  20. Meso-Scale Model for Simulations of Concrete Subjected to Cryogenic Temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masad, Noor Ahmad

    2013-07-17

    , there is significant interest in the construction of LNG tanks to achieve low cost and safe storage. Three systems are typically used to store LNG: single containment, double containment, and full containment. Concrete is used in these containment systems...

  1. Influence of coarse aggregate size, shape and surface texture on rutting of hot mix asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeggoni, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1 ) Evaluate the influence of coarse aggregate shape and surface texture on deformation characteristics of asphalt concrete, 2) Characterize aggregate elongation, shape and texture using fractal dimensional...

  2. Tests of concrete beams with externally-bonded glass-fiber fabric web reinforcement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabholkar, Niranjan Shamsunder

    1999-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures deteriorate with use and over a period of time, due to several factors such as physical and chemical aging, corrosion, service loads exceeding design loads and inadequate durability. One of the large number...

  3. Predicting current compressive strength of concrete based on non-destructive testing by way of sound 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coots, Emmit Kevin

    2013-02-22

    There are many ways to test the compressive strength of concrete to include both destructive and non-destructive methods. There are many pros and cons associated with the various methods of testing to include cost, size, and method associated...

  4. A Continuum Coupled Moisture-mechanical Constitutive Model for Asphalt Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakiba, Maryam

    2013-12-09

    The presence and flow of moisture degrade engineering properties of asphalt concrete as part of thermodynamic, chemical, physical, and mechanical processes. This detrimental effect is referred to as moisture damage. The aim of this dissertation...

  5. Nonlinear finite element modelling and parametric study of CFRP shear-strengthened prestressed concrete girders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qapo, Michael; Dirar, Samir; Yang, Jian; Elshafie, Mohammed Z. E. B.

    2014-12-16

    This paper presents a three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) model for prestressed concrete girders strengthened in shear with externally bonded carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement. A total strain rotating crack model...

  6. Advancement of Erosion Testing, Modeling, and Design of Concrete Pavement Subbase Layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Youn Su

    2010-10-12

    Concrete pavement systems have great capacity to provide long service lives; however, if the subbase layer is improperly designed or mismanaged, service life would be diminished significantly since the subbase layer performs ...

  7. Unbonded Post Tensioned Concrete in Fire: A Review of Data from Furnace Tests and Real Fires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gales, John; Bisby, Luke; Gillie, Martin

    The fire-safe design of concrete structures which incorporate post-tensioned prestressing tendons has recently been the subject of debate within the structural engineering community, particularly when unbonded post-tensioned ...

  8. Material worlds : [de]constructing the ethos of concrete in Mumbai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Priyanka (Priyanka Dinesh)

    2008-01-01

    What can a building material tell us about a city? As the most widely used structural building material in the world, reinforced cement concrete shapes the urban form of several of our largest megacities Sao Paulo, Cairo, ...

  9. Performance based evaluation of the seismic resistance of structures with concrete diaphragms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, Joel Martin

    2001-01-01

    Under seismic loading, floor and roof systems in reinforced concrete (RC) buildings act as diaphragms to transfer earthquake loads to the vertical lateral force resisting system (LFRS). In current practice, horizontal diaphragms are typically...

  10. Influence of compaction on the interfacial transition zone and the permeability of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leemann, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch; Muench, Beat; Gasser, Philippe; Holzer, Lorenz

    2006-08-15

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is regarded as a key feature for the transport properties and the durability of concrete. In this study one self-compacting concrete (SCC) mixture and two conventionally vibrated concrete (CVC) mixtures are studied in order to determine the influence of compaction on the porosity of the ITZ. Additionally oxygen permeability and water conductivity were measured in vertical and horizontal direction. The quantitative analysis of images made with an optical microscope and an environmental scanning electron microscope shows a significantly increased porosity and width of the ITZ in CVC compared to SCC. At the same time oxygen permeability and water conductivity of CVC are increased in comparison to SCC. Moreover, considerable differences in the porosity of the lower, lateral and upper ITZ are observed in both types of concrete. The anisotropic distribution of pores in the ITZ does not necessarily cause anisotropy in oxygen permeability and water conductivity though.

  11. A regression model predicting the compressive strength of concrete by means of nondestructive, acoustic measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto, Zeena Blossom

    2001-01-01

    A sample size of 81, 4" diameter concrete standard cylinders were tested using nondestructive means. These cylinders were collected from three different ready-mix plants across Texas located in Houston, San Antonio and Victoria. The sound...

  12. Debonding failure of CFRP reinforced concrete beams and in-situ monitoring schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sieber, Ryan (Ryan C.)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) systems have gained much popularity as a method for reinforcing existing concrete structures. However a variety of sudden failure methods, such as debonding, delamination, and creep rupture ...

  13. Stochastic Life-cycle Analysis of Deteriorating Infrastructure Systems and an Application to Reinforced Concrete Bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh Kumar, 1982-

    2012-11-30

    investigates the effect of seismic degradation on the reliability of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges. For this purpose, we model the seismic degradation process in the RC bridge columns which are the primary lateral load resisting system in a bridge...

  14. Performance of Multiple Corrosion Protection Systems for Reinforced Concrete Bridge Decks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Matt

    2011-01-18

    The performance of corrosion protection systems for reinforcing steel in concrete is evaluated. In addition to conventional and conventional epoxy-coated reinforcement, the corrosion protection systems tested include epoxy coatings with improved...

  15. Effects of moisture on debonding in FRP-retrofitted concrete systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuakta, Chakrapan, 1980-

    2011-01-01

    FRP (fiber reinforced polymer) retrofit systems for reinforced concrete (RC) structures have been widely used in the past 10 years, and numerous studies on its short-term debonding behavior have been conducted extensively. ...

  16. Environmental durability of FRP bond to concrete subjected to freeze-thaw action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dohnálek, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the environmental durability of the adhesive bond between fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) and concrete. The study specifically focused on freeze-thaw cycling exposure of such ...

  17. Activities in Support of Continuing the Service of Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The license renewal process in the U.S. is outlined and its current status provided. Operating experience related to performance of the concrete structures is presented. Basic components of a program to manage aging of the concrete structures are identified and described: (1) Degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; (2) Assessment and remediation: i.e., component selection, in- service inspection, non-destructive examinations, and remedial actions; and (3) Estimation of performance at present or some future point in time: i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk. Finally, areas are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Mechanical Properties of Complex Oxides in Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Juhyuk

    2013-01-01

    atomic coordinates of Jennite………………………………167 Table A4.O O O O O Table A6. Relaxed atomic coordinates of tricalciumatomic coordinates of crystals in concrete Table A1. Relaxed

  19. STATE OF THE ART OF CONCRETE-FILLED FRP TUBULAR STRUCTURAL MEMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Fig. 1 and concrete was cast from the top. The central hole in column C3 was achieved using fit to the tubes by adding an expansive agent in order to prevent separation due to shrinkage

  20. Strain concentrations in pipelines with concrete coating full scale bending tests and analytical calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verley, R.; Ness, O.B. [Statoil, Trondheim (Norway)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of full scale bending tests on 16 in. and 20 in. diameter, concrete coated pipes with polyethene and asphalt corrosion coatings. Constant moment, four-point bending was applied to a pipe string consisting of one pipe joint welded between two half-length joints. The strain concentration factor (SCF) at the field joints (FJ), expressing the ratio between the strain in the FJ and the average strain for the pipe joint, was investigated and compared to predictions using an analytical model presented in an accompanying paper (Ness and Verley, 1995). Material tests on the pipe steel, the corrosion coating and the concrete were conducted. The analytical model is found to give a good prediction of the strain distribution along the pipe joint, for both the steel and the concrete, and therefore also of the SCF. The sliding of the concrete over the steel is also predicted reasonably well.

  1. Assessment of durability performance of "Early-Opening-to-Traffic" Portland Cement Concrete pavement and patches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Pradhumna Babu

    1999-01-01

    -thaw, shrinkage, chemical attack, abrasion resistance, fatigue life, volumetric expansion, practicality, and concrete costs. The assessment discusses material combinations, mixture designs, and construction practices on performance. A computer program using...

  2. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Applications of 100 Percent Fly Ash Concrete. 2005 World ofTowards sustainable solutions for fly ash through mechanicalVerification of Self- Cementing Fly Ash Binders for “Green”

  3. Site Selection for Concrete Batch Plant to Support Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.

    2001-06-15

    WSRC conducted a site selection study to identify, assess, and rank candidate sites for an onsite concrete batch plant at the Savannah River Site in the vicinity of F-Area.

  4. Assessment of FRP-confined concrete : understanding behavior and issues in nondestructive evaluation using radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jose Alberto, 1978-

    2006-01-01

    Increase in the use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials for strengthening and retrofitting of concrete columns and bridge piers has urged the development of' an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) ...

  5. Laboratory evaluation of crumb rubber asphalt concrete mixtures using the concepts of SMA mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebala, Somasekhar Reddy

    1994-01-01

    the potential to significantly improve the resistance to fatigue and thermal cracking characteristics of asphalt concrete mixtures. The wet method appears to yield better performance regardless of the rubber particle size. Fine rubber would improve the fatigue...

  6. Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ramesh

    2009-05-15

    reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue...

  7. Evaluation of the filler effects on fatique cracking and permanent deformation of asphalt concrete mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzo, Richard P

    1997-01-01

    The addition of hydrated lime to asphalt has shown to be beneficial with an improvement in the Theological properties of the binder, as well as resistance to permanent deformation (rutting) and fatigue cracking of asphalt concrete mixtures...

  8. Design and analysis of a concrete modular housing system constructed with 3D panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarcia, Sam Rhea, 1982-

    2004-01-01

    An innovative modular house system design utilizing an alternative concrete residential building system called 3D panels is presented along with an overview of 3D panels as well as relevant methods and markets. The proposed ...

  9. What is ecclesiology about? The provenance and prospects of recent concrete approaches to ecclesiology. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawksley, Theodora Lucy

    2012-06-26

    Over the last fifteen years, a small group of ecclesiologists has been engaged in redefining the object of ecclesiological inquiry and the purpose of ecclesiological reflection. These ‘concrete’ ecclesiologies take the ...

  10. Continuum-Based Constitutive Modeling of Coupled Oxidative Aging-Mechanical Response of Asphalt Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmani, Eisa

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative aging is known to be one of the main contributors to reducing the service life of asphalt pavements. Asphalt concrete becomes stiffer and more brittle when it reacts with oxygen. The aged asphalt pavement is more susceptible to crack...

  11. The Results of the CCI-3 Reactor Material Experiment Investigating 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction and Debris Coolability with a Siliceous Concrete Crucible

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Lomperski, S. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Basu, S. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, MS-T10K8, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two objectives: 1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and 2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs of future plants. With respect to the second objective, there are remaining uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion profiles predicted by codes such as WECHSL, COSACO, TOLBIAC, MEDICIS, and MELCOR. In the continuing effort to bridge this data gap, the third in a series of large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiments (CCI-3) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test investigated the long-term interaction of a 375 kg core-oxide melt within a two-dimensional siliceous concrete crucible. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predetermined time interval, the cavity was flooded with water to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a description of the facility and an overview of results from this test. (authors)

  12. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

  13. Characterization of basin concrete in support of structural integrity demonstration for extended storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, A.

    2014-09-30

    Concrete core samples from C basin were characterized through material testing and analysis to verify the design inputs for structural analysis of the L Basin and to evaluate the type and extent of changes in the material condition of the concrete under extended service for fuel storage. To avoid the impact on operations, core samples were not collected from L area, but rather, several concrete core samples were taken from the C Basin prior to its closure. C basin was selected due to its similar environmental exposure and service history compared to L Basin. The microstructure and chemical composition of the concrete exposed to the water was profiled from the water surface into the wall to evaluate the impact and extent of exposure. No significant leaching of concrete components was observed. Ingress of carbonation or deleterious species was determined to be insignificant. No evidence of alkali-silica reactions (ASR) was observed. Ettringite was observed to form throughout the structure (in air voids or pores); however, the sulfur content was measured to be consistent with the initial concrete that was used to construct the facility. Similar ettringite trends were observed in the interior segments of the core samples. The compressive strength of the concrete at the mid-wall of the basin was measured, and similar microstructural analysis was conducted on these materials post compression testing. The microstructure was determined to be similar to near-surface segments of the core samples. The average strength was 4148 psi, which is well-above the design strength of 2500 psi. The analyses showed that phase alterations and minor cracking in a microstructure did not affect the design specification for the concrete.

  14. A study of the bond characteristics of concrete reinforcing bars coated with epoxy compounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Indravadan S

    1964-01-01

    A STUDY OF THE BOND CHARACTERISTICS OF CONCRETE REINFORCING BARS COATED WITH EPCKY COMPOUNDS A Thesis By Indravadan S. Desai Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1964 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY OF THE BOND CHARACTERISTICS OF CONCRETE REINFORCING BARS COATED WITH EPOXY COMPOUNDS A Thesis By Indravadan S. Desai Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  15. Variance analysis in the quality control of ready mixed concrete in a major structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valle Aguilar, Jorge Luis

    1984-01-01

    of strength variations in concrete Fly ash in ready mixed concrete Statistical Inference Hypothesis testing . Analysis of variance Duality control charts Linear regression and correlation Page 10 12 15 17 18 19 20 22 24 24 24 26 27 CHAPTER... Comparison of variances (o') for different ready mixed plants Comparison of means (X) and variances (o'). Comparison of means (7J) and variances (o') for various mix designs, f'c = 3000 psi Comparison of means (X) and variances (o') for mix designs...

  16. LWR Sustainability: Assessment of Aging of Nuclear Power Plant Safety Related Concrete Strutures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves III, Herman; Naus, Dan J

    2013-01-01

    Current regulatory testing and inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience is presented. Techniques commonly used to inspect NPP concrete structures to assess and quantify age-related degradation are summarized. An approach for conduct of condition assessments of structures in NPPs is presented. Criteria, based primarily on visual indications, are provided for use in classification and assessment of concrete degradation. Materials and techniques for repair of degraded structures are generally discussed.

  17. Prescriptive method for insulating concrete forms in residential construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrankar, A.; Elhajj, N.

    1998-05-01

    Characterized as strong, durable, and energy-efficient, a new wall system for housing called Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs) is emerging as an alternative to lumber wall frames. Due to rising costs and varying quality of framing lumber, home builders are increasing their use of ICFs even though added engineering costs make ICF homes slightly more expensive than homes with wood framing. To improve the affordability and acceptance of ICF homes, this report sets guidelines on the design, construction and inspection of ICF wall systems in residential construction. Based on thorough testing and research, the Prescriptive Method section of the report outlines minimum requirements for ICF systems including wall thickness, termite protection, reinforcement, lintel span, and connection requirements. It highlights construction and thermal guidelines for ICFs and explains how to apply the prescriptive requirements to one- and two-family homes. The Commentary section provides supplemental information and the engineering assumptions and methods used for the prescriptive method. Appendices contain step-by-step examples on how to apply ICF requirements when designing a home. They also contain engineering technical substantiation and metric conversion factors.

  18. Method of lining a vertical mine shaft with concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eklund, James D. (Mattawa, WA); Halter, Joseph M. (Richland, WA); Rasmussen, Donald E. (Spokane, WA); Sullivan, Robert G. (Richland, WA); Moffat, Robert B. (Federal Way, WA)

    1981-01-01

    The apparatus includes a cylindrical retainer form spaced inwardly of the wall of the shaft by the desired thickness of the liner to be poured and having overlapping edges which seal against concrete flow but permit the form to be contracted to a smaller circumference after the liner has hardened and is self-supporting. A curb ring extends downwardly and outwardly toward the shaft wall from the bottom of the retainer form to define the bottom surface of each poured liner section. An inflatable toroid forms a seal between the curb ring and the shaft wall. A form support gripper ring having gripper shoes laterally extendable under hydraulic power to engage the shaft wall supports the retainer form, curb ring and liner until the newly poured liner section becomes self-supporting. Adjusting hydraulic cylinders permit the curb ring and retainer form to be properly aligned relative to the form support gripper ring. After a liner section is self-supporting, an advancing system advances the retainer form, curb ring and form support gripper ring toward a shaft boring machine above which the liner is being formed. The advancing system also provides correct horizontal alignment of the form support gripper ring.

  19. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  20. Results of Reactor Materials Experiments Investigating 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction and Debris Coolability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Basu, S. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, MS-T10K8, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is conducting reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: 1) resolution of the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and 2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants and provide the technical basis for better containment designs of future plants. With respect to the second objective, there remain uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a first step in bridging this gap, a large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiment (CCI-1) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test investigated the interaction of a 400 kg core-oxide melt with a crucible made of siliceous concrete along two walls and the base. The two remaining walls were made of non-ablative magnesium oxide. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predefined ablation depth was achieved, the cavity was flooded to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a description of the test facility and an overview of results from this test. (authors)

  1. EVALUATION OF SULFATE ATTACK ON SALTSTONE VAULT CONCRETE AND SALTSTONESIMCO TECHNOLOGIES, INC. PART1 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C

    2008-08-19

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of a durability analysis performed by SIMCO Technologies Inc. to assess the effects of contacting saltstone Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes with highly alkaline solutions containing high concentrations of dissolved sulfate. The STADIUM{reg_sign} code and data from two surrogate concretes which are similar to the Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes were used in the preliminary durability analysis. Simulation results for these surrogate concrete mixes are provided in this report. The STADIUM{reg_sign} code will be re-run using transport properties measured for the SRS Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concrete samples after SIMCO personnel complete characterization testing on samples of these materials. Simulation results which utilize properties measured for samples of Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes will be provided in Revision 1 of this report after property data become available. The modeling performed to date provided the following information on two concrete mixes that will be used to support the Saltstone PA: (1) Relationship between the rate of advancement of the sulfate front (depth of sulfate ion penetration into the concrete) and the rate of change of the concrete permeability and diffusivity. (2) Relationship between the sulfate ion concentration in the corrosive leachate and the rate of the sulfate front progression. (3) Equation describing the change in hydraulic properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity) as a function of sulfate ion concentration in the corrosive leachate. These results have been incorporated into the current Saltstone PA analysis by G. Flach (Flach, 2008). In addition, samples of the Saltstone Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes have been prepared by SIMCO Technologies, Inc. Transport and physical properties for these materials are currently being measured and sulfate exposure testing to three high alkaline, high sulfate leachates provided by SRNL is underway to validate the predicted results. Samples of saltstone were also prepared and will be evaluated for durability using the STADIUM{reg_sign} code and SIMCO methodology. Results available as of August 15 are included in this draft report. A complete set of results for saltstone will be available by December 31, 2008.

  2. Feasibility studies to rehabilitate TVA`s Chickamauga Navigation Facility due to the effects of concrete growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niznik, J.A.; Conner, G.G.

    1995-12-31

    Chickamauga Dam is a multi-purpose project constructed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in the early 1940s. Shortly after construction it was evident there was an alkali-aggregate reaction taking place in the concrete structures. This reaction resulted in a phenomenon of concrete growth; i.e., unchecked expansion of the concrete which causes high stresses, cracking and movement of concrete structures, and undesirable side effects. This problem has increased in severity resulting in increased concerns about structural integrity of the dam structures and long term outages to navigation.

  3. TAYLOR BRIDGE -FIELD ASSESSMENT Doug STEWARTi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Taylor "smart" Bridge utilizing fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing materials as the primaryTAYLOR BRIDGE - FIELD ASSESSMENT Doug STEWARTi , Emile SHEHATAi , Gamil TADROS2 and Sami RIZKALLA2 reinforcement for precast concrete bridge girders, concrete bridge deck, and traffic barrier. To provide

  4. From micro- to nano-scale molding of metals : size effect during molding of single crystal Al with rectangular strip punches.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.; Meng, W. J.; Mei, F.; Hiller, J.; Miller, D. J. (Materials Science Division); (Louisiana State Univ.); (Enervana Tech. LLC)

    2011-02-01

    A single crystal Al specimen was molded at room temperature with long, rectangular, strip diamond punches. Quantitative molding response curves were obtained at a series of punch widths, ranging from 5 {micro}m to 550 nm. A significant size effect was observed, manifesting itself in terms of significantly increasing characteristic molding pressure as the punch width decreases to 1.5 {micro}m and below. A detailed comparison of the present strip punch molding results was made with Berkovich pyramidal indentation on the same single crystal Al specimen. The comparison reveals distinctly different dependence of the characteristic pressure on corresponding characteristic length. The present results show the feasibility of micro-/nano-scale compression molding as a micro-/nano-fabrication technique, and offer an experimental test case for size-dependent plasticity theories.

  5. Cleareye In-Ground and In-Concrete DIV Inspections: FY11 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Morra, Marino; Knopik, Clint D.; Severtsen, Ronald H.; Jones, Anthony M.; Lechelt, Wayne M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Good, Morris S.; Sorensen, Jerry B.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2012-01-23

    This report summarizes the results of a series of feasibility testing studies for in-ground and in-concrete imaging/detection technologies including radar imaging and acoustic time-of flight method. The objectives of this project are: (1) Design Information Verification (DIV) Tools for In-Concrete Inspections - To determine the feasibility of using holographic radar imaging (HRI), radar imaging, and acoustic time-of-flight (TOF) non-destructive evaluation technologies to detect, locate and identify pipes and voids embedded in standard-density and high-density concrete walls that typify those the IAEA will need to verify during field inspections; (2) DIV Tools for In-Ground Inspections - To determine the feasibility of using HRI and radar imaging non-destructive evaluation technologies to detect, locate, and identify objects buried at various depths made of various materials (metal, plastic, wood, and concrete) and representing geometries that typify those the IAEA will need to verify during field inspections; and (3) Based on the results of the studies, recommend the next steps needed to realize fieldable tools for in-concrete and in-ground inspections (including detection of deeply buried polyvinyl chloride [PVC] pipes) that employ the technologies shown to be feasible.

  6. Distinctive microstructural features of aged sodium silicate-activated slag concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Bernal, Susan A.; Mejía de Gutiérrez, Ruby; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van; Provis, John L.

    2014-11-15

    Electron microscopic characterisation of 7-year old alkali-activated blast-furnace slag concretes enabled the identification of distinct microstructural features, providing insight into the mechanisms by which these materials evolve over time. Backscattered electron images show the formation of Liesegang-type ring formations, suggesting that the reaction at advanced age is likely to follow an Oswald supersaturation–nucleation–depletion cycle. Segregation of Ca-rich veins, related to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2}, is observed in microcracked regions due to the ongoing reaction between the pore solution and available calcium from remnant slag grains. A highly dense and uniform interfacial transition zone is identified between siliceous aggregate particles and the alkali activated slag binders, across the concretes assessed. Alkali-activated slag concretes retain a highly dense and stable microstructure at advanced ages, where any microcracks induced at early ages seem to be partially closing, and the remnant slag grains continue reacting.

  7. Application of Nonlinear Elastic Resonance Spectroscopy For Damage Detection In Concrete: An Interesting Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byers, Loren W.; Ten Cate, James A.; Johnson, Paul A.

    2012-06-28

    Nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy experiments conducted on concrete cores, one chemically and mechanically damaged by alkali-silica reactivity, and one undamaged, show that this material displays highly nonlinear wave behavior, similar to many other damaged materials. They find that the damaged sample responds more nonlinearly, manifested by a larger resonant peak and modulus shift as a function of strain amplitude. The nonlinear response indicates that there is a hysteretic influence in the stress-strain equation of state. Further, as in some other materials, slow dynamics are present. The nonlinear response they observe in concrete is an extremely sensitive indicator of damage. Ultimately, nonlinear wave methods applied to concrete may be used to guide mixing, curing, or other production techniques, in order to develop materials with particular desired qualities such as enhanced strength or chemical resistance, and to be used for damage inspection.

  8. Structural and seismic analyses of waste facility reinforced concrete storage vaults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1995-07-01

    Facility 317 of Argonne National Laboratory consists of several reinforced concrete waste storage vaults designed and constructed in the late 1940`s through the early 1960`s. In this paper, structural analyses of these concrete vaults subjected to various natural hazards are described, emphasizing the northwest shallow vault. The natural phenomenon hazards considered include both earthquakes and tornados. Because these vaults are deeply embedded in the soil, the SASSI (System Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction) code was utilized for the seismic calculations. The ultimate strength method was used to analyze the reinforced concrete structures. In all studies, moment and shear strengths at critical locations of the storage vaults were evaluated. Results of the structural analyses show that almost all the waste storage vaults meet the code requirements according to ACI 349--85. These vaults also satisfy the performance goal such that confinement of hazardous materials is maintained and functioning of the facility is not interrupted.

  9. Investigation of air-entraining admixture dosage in fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ley, M.T.; Harris, N.J.; Folliard, K.J.; Hover, K.C.

    2008-09-15

    The amount of air-entraining admixture (AEA) needed to achieve a target air content in fresh concrete can vary significantly with differences in the fly ash used in the concrete. The work presented in this paper evaluates the ability to predict the AEA dosage on the basis of tests on the fly ash alone. All results were compared with the dosage of AEA required to produce an air content of 6% in fresh concrete. Fly ash was sampled from six separate sources. For four of these sources, samples were obtained both before and after the introduction of 'low-NOx burners'. Lack of definitive data about the coal itself or the specifics of the burning processes prevents the ability to draw specific conclusions about the impact of low-NOx burners on AEA demand. Nevertheless, the data suggest that modification of the burning process to meet environmental quality standards may affect the fly ash-AEA interaction.

  10. Analytical Results For MOX Colemanite Concrete Samples Received On September 4, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-09-24

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  11. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  12. Analytical Results For MOX Colemanite Concrete Samples Received On November, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-12-18

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  13. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON NOVEMBER 21, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  14. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; McGill, Galen E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are being used in Oregon in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for reinforced concrete bridges. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center, is collaborating with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to evaluate the long-term performance and service life of these anodes. Laboratory studies were conducted on concrete slabs coated with 0.5 mm (20 mil) thick, thermal-sprayed zinc anodes. The slabs were electrochemically aged at an accelerated rate using an anode current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3mA/ft2). Half the slabs were preheated before thermal-spraying with zinc; the other half were unheated. Electrochemical aging resulted in the formation at the zinc-concrete interface of a thin, low pH zone (relative to cement paste) consisting primarily of ZnO and Zn(OH)2, and in a second zone of calcium and zinc aluminates and silicates formed by secondary mineralization. Both zones contained elevated concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. The original bond strength of the zinc coating decreased due to the loss of mechanical bond to the concrete with the initial passage of electrical charge (aging). Additional charge led to an increase in bond strength to a maximum as the result of secondary mineralization of zinc dissolution products with the cement paste. Further charge led to a decrease in bond strength and ultimately coating disbondment as the interfacial reaction zones continued to thicken. This occurred at an effective service life of 27 years at the 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) current density typically used by ODOT in ICCP systems for coastal bridges. Zinc coating failure under tensile stress was primarily cohesive within the thickening reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. There was no difference between the bond strength of zinc coatings on preheated and unheated concrete surfaces after long service times.

  15. Humectants To Augment Current From Metallized Zinc Cathodic Protection Systems on Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino Jr., Bernard S.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Russell, James H. Russell; Bullard, Sophie J.; Collins, W. Keith; Bennett, Jack E.; Soltesz, Steven M.; Laylor, H. Martin

    2002-12-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) systems using thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are employed to mitigate the corrosion process in reinforced concrete structures. However, the performance of the anodes is improved by moisture at the anode-concrete interface. Research was conducted to investigate the effect of hydrophilic chemical additives, humectants, on the electrical performance and service life of zinc anodes. Lithium bromide and lithium nitrate were identified as feasible humectants with lithium bromide performing better under galvanic CP and lithium nitrate performing better under impressed current CP. Both humectants improved the electrical operating characteristics of the anode and increased the service life by up to three years.

  16. A mechanistic model for the prediction of stresses, strains, and displacements in continuously reinforced concrete pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Richard Paul

    1988-01-01

    has also increased beyond 6&~ for a distance equal to 6. Case 4 also has three zones, and is similar to Case 2 except that the concrete has displaced more than 6'& for a distance equal to f3, but Es is less than d&. Case 5 is a continuation of Case... of a continu- ously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) system under the influence of thermal, shrinkage, and traffic loading are available. The CRCP-1, CRCP-2, and CRCP-3 models, developed by the Center for Transportation Research at the University...

  17. Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

    2013-03-31

    Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 �ºC to 600 �ºC) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

  18. Non-laminated FRP Strap Elements for Reinforced Concrete, Timber and Masonry Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lees, Janet M.; Winistörfer, A. U.

    2010-05-11

    - metallic versions of support pads of the type shown in Fig. 5 have also been developed (Nägeli 2006). Straps consisting of 10 layers of 0.13 mm CFRP tape supported on high density polyethylene (HDPE), GFRP or CFRP prestressed concrete pads have been... for Reinforced Concrete Structures (FRPRCS-7). SP-230 , eds: C.K. Shield, J.P. Busel, S.L. Walkup and D.D. Gremel, ACI International SP-230-40, pp.685-704. 7. Hoult, N.A. and Lees, J.M. (2009), Efficient CFRP strap configurations for the shear...

  19. Coal fly ash: the most powerful tool for sustainability of the concrete industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, P.K.

    2008-07-01

    In the last 15 years the global cement industry has almost doubled its annual rate of direct emissions of carbon dioxide. These can be cut back by reducing global concrete consumption, reducing the volume of cement paste in mixtures and reducing the proportion of portland clinker in cement. It has recently been proved that use of high volumes of coal fly ash can produce low cost, durable, sustainable cement and concrete mixtures that would reduce the carbon footprint of both the cement and the power generation industries. 2 photos.

  20. Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Tailored Properties Cementitious materials comprise a large portion of domestic structures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Tailored Properties Cementitious materials comprise a large portion of domestic structures and infrastructure. The development of ultra-high performance concrete control the performance of these materials. A nano- micro-meso scale cohesive finite element method (CFEM

  1. Early-age concrete temperature and moisture relative to curing effectiveness and projected effects on selected aspects of slab behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Dan

    2009-05-15

    of TMAC2 program. The concrete pavement was cast at the FAA National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) near Atlantic City, New Jersey. In this study, the concrete set maturity was 6 determined and the relationship between shrinkage................................................................................... 144 Fig. V-10. Vibrating Wire Gage EM-5........................................................................ 144 Fig. V-11. Free Shrinkage Test Setup.......................................................................... 145 Fig. V-12...

  2. 98 OCTOBER 2003 / Concrete international The Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials (ACBM) is a consortium of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transformed from time domain to frequency domain, and it represents the wave energy that is reflected from of the wave energy is transmitted through the concrete. A schematic representation of the concrete University, The University of Michigan, and The National Institute of Standards and Technology. For more

  3. EVALUATION OF LINSEED OIL AS A CONCRETE SEALANT J. R. Wright, Z. Shen and S. H. Rizkalla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    y \\ I ti , " EVALUATION OF LINSEED OIL AS A CONCRETE SEALANT by J. R. Wright, Z. Shen and S. H linseed oil as a concrete sealant and to provide data which could be used to examine the effectiveness of the linseed oil/mineral spirits (1:1) solution as a sealant in comparison to other commercially available

  4. FDR for non destructive evaluation: inspection of external post-tensioned ducts and measurement of water content in concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of water content in concrete F. Visco-Comandini(1) , T. Bore(2) , G. Six(1) , F. Sagnard(1) , S. Delepine water content assessment technologies [18]. Another example concerns the bridges which include "external of post tensioned ducts or to measure the water content in concrete, we propose a structural health

  5. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Pape, Yann Le; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation.

  6. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 454, Vol. 42, No. 2-3, June-September 2005, pp. 21-46 SEISMIC RETROFITTING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    , Italy ABSTRACT The seismic retrofitting of reinforced concrete buildings not designed to withstand seismic action is considered. After briefly introducing how seismic action is described for design-46 SEISMIC RETROFITTING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS USING TRADITIONALAND INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES Giuseppe

  7. Accelerated quantification of critical parameters for predicting the service life and life cycle costs of chloride-laden reinforced concrete structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillai Gopalakrishnan, Radhakrishna

    2003-01-01

    The use of corrosion resistant steels (instead of conventional carbon steels) and/or high performance concrete can increase the overall service life and can reduce the life cycle cost (LCC) of reinforced concrete (RC) structures exposed to chloride...

  8. Performance of concrete in fire: a review of the state of the art, with a case study of the windsor tower fire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Ian A; Borg, Audun; Hitchen, Neil; Welch, Stephen

    This paper provides a “State of the Art” review on current research into the effects of fire exposures upon concrete. The principal influences of high temperature in concrete are loss of compressive strength and spalling, ...

  9. The effect of fly ash content and types of aggregates on the properties of pre-fabricated concrete interlocking blocks (PCIBs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    The effect of fly ash content and types of aggregates on the properties of pre-fabricated concrete blocks Concrete waste Marble waste Fine aggregate Fly ash Waste management a b s t r a c t We studied the influence of fly ash content and replacement of crushed sand stone aggregate with concrete wastes and marble

  10. Nuclear Facility Construction- Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 (HSS CRAD 64-15, Rev. 0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Criteria Review and Approach Document (HSS CRAD 64-15) establishes review criteria and lines of inquiry used by the Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations to assess the quality of the manufacturing and placement of concrete used in nuclear facility construction at the Department of Energy

  11. Automatically Grounding Semantically-enriched Conceptual Models to Concrete Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal, Avigdor

    Automatically Grounding Semantically-enriched Conceptual Models to Concrete Web Services Eran Toch semantic Web services. We envision a world in which a designer defines a "virtual" Web service as part of a business process, while requiring the system to seek actual Web services that match the specifi- cations

  12. Concrete properties evaluation by statistical fusion of NDT techniques Zoubir Mehdi Sbartaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on the implementation of a general strategy for enhancing the assessment of RC structures by NDT techniques. A large of the pore network, water content, strength, etc. Therefore, extracting one concrete property from one NDT by the enhancement of the quality in the assessment [10]. Knowledge of the assessment quality is very important

  13. Model-based analysis of a concrete building subjected to fire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Ian A; Welch, Stephen; Alvear, Daniel; Lazaro, Mariano; Capote, Jorge A

    A case study is presented of the Windsor Tower fire in Madrid, a mainly concrete-framed office block, which was involved in a major, multiple floor fire in February 2005. The performance of the structure is documented and examined using all...

  14. MOISTURE EFFECT ON DURABILITY OF AXIALLY LOADED CONCRETE-FILLED TUBULAR FRP PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to piles composed of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP), recycled plastics, or hybrid materials. Some_rizkalla@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite piles are a possible foundation alternative for projects: a fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) shell and a concrete infill (no steel reinforcement). The FRP shell

  15. Teaching With Concrete and Abstract Visual Representations: Effects on Students' Problem Solving, Problem Representations, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Teaching With Concrete and Abstract Visual Representations: Effects on Students' Problem Solving/or abstract visual problem representa- tions during instruction on students' problem-solving practice, near outperformed Groups A and C on problem-solving practice in Experiments 1 and 2 and outperformed Group C

  16. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete ColumnSteel Beam Roof Level T-Connections under Displacement Reversals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra-Montesinos, Gustavo J.

    Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Column­Steel Beam Roof Level T-Connections under Displacement study on the seismic response of two hybrid RC column-to-steel S beam RCS roof level T longitudinal bars; and 2 confinement requirements in RCS roof level T-connections. In the first subassembly

  17. A new mineralogical approach to predict coefficient of thermal expansion of aggregate and concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neekhra, Siddharth

    2005-02-17

    TE.........................10 Gnomix pvT High Pressure Dilatometer ...............................................................17 3. CoTE LABORATORY TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT........................18 Volumetric Dilatometer Method... Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete (17).............................................. 16 Figure 5 Gnomix pvT High Pressure Dilatometer (19). ............................................... 17 Figure 6 The Dilatometer Test Device...

  18. Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasareanu, Corina

    Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA Software Corina S. Pasareanu, Peter C. Mehlitz, David H. Bushnell, Karen Gundy-Burlet, Michael Lowry NASA.h.bushnell, karen.gundy-burlet, michael.r.lowry}@nasa.gov Suzette Person Department of Computer Science

  19. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao promising carbon uptake results and is a viable option for carbonation curing. Carbon sequestration increase in Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions over the past five decades, specific ways to reduce

  20. Experimental study on the behavior of segmented buried concrete pipelines subject to ground movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    Experimental study on the behavior of segmented buried concrete pipelines subject to ground of Civil Engineering, Merrimack College, MA ABSTRACT Seismic damage to buried pipelines is mainly caused. In particular, a pipeline crossing the fault plane is subjected to significant bending, shear, and axial forces