Sample records for recovery testing important

  1. RMOTC - Testing - Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Oil Recovery Notice: As of July 1st, 2014, Testing at RMOTC has officially completed. We would like to thank all of our testing partners and everyone who helped make the...

  2. Indentation and Recovery Tests of Common Resilient Floor Coverings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the samples for 30 minutes, with indentation readings being made 15 seconds and 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 minutes after the load was applied. Recovery readings were made 15 seconds and 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes after the test load was removed.... Residual indentation as referred to in this work is that indentation remain- ing at the end of the 30-minute recovery period. A final recovery reading was taken 72 hours after re- moval of the test load. Before the beginning of each test, the sample...

  3. LNG imports make strong recovery in 1996; exports increase also

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, E.J. [Swain (Edward J.), Houston, TX (United States)

    1998-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    LNG imports to the US jumped in 1996 as Algerian base-load plants resumed operations following major revamps. Exports from Alaska to Japan grew by nearly 4% over 1995. Total LNG imports to the US in 1996 were 40.27 bcf compared to 17.92 bcf in 1995, an increase of 124.8%. Algeria supplied 35.32 bcf; Abu Dhabi, 4.95 bcf. About 82.3% of the imported LNG was received at Distrigas Corp.`s terminal north of Boston. The remaining LNG was received at the Pan National terminal in Lake Charles, LA. LNG imports during 1995 fell to such a low level not because of depressed US demand but because of limited supply. The paper discusses LNG-receiving terminals, base-load producers, LNG pricing, and exports.

  4. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 20103-03Energy AdvancedJudge | DepartmentofGeologic

  6. Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2Partners in theLoraDepartment ofThe data

  7. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. The development and testing of the HISAC parachute recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behr, V.L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Speed Airdrop Container (HISAC) is currently being developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Army. The 825 lb HISAC will be delivered from altitudes as low as 200 ft above ground level and speeds as high as Mach 0.95. The parachute recovery system must produce an impact velocity less than 40 fps, an impact angle greater than 70 deg from horizontal and a maximum deceleration less than 30 g's. Candidates for main parachutes to be used in the recovery systems have included a cluster of three 21-ft-dia ribbon parachutes, a cluster of two 22-ft-dia ringslot cargo parachutes, a single high strength 35-ft-dia T-10 canopy, and a cluster of three standard 35-ft-dia T-10 parachutes. Results from airdrop and ground tests indicate that the use of a reefed and staged drogue in conjunction with a cluster of three standard unreefed T-10 personnel parachutes provides the best combined turnover and impact velocity characteristics. Initial deployment of the drogue parachute is produced by an aerodynamically deployed tailplate which produces no appreciable carriage drag. Results from ground tests indicate that reliable deployment of the tailplate is achievable through the use of aerodynamic drag surfaces which are deployed shortly after the HISAC is released from the carriage aircraft. 5 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. A torsion test for the study of the large deformation recovery of shape memory polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A torsion test for the study of the large deformation recovery of shape memory polymers Julie & Development Center, 30500 Mound Rd, Warren, MI 48090-9055, USA. Keywords: Shape memory polymer, Strain was designed and built for testing the shape fixity and shape recovery of shape memory polymers at large

  10. PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i.e., Newtonian or non-Newtonian). The most important properties for testing with Newtonian slurries are the Archimedes number distribution and the particle concentration. For some test objectives, the shear strength is important. In the testing to collect data for CFD V and V and CFD comparison, the liquid density and liquid viscosity are important. In the high temperature testing, the liquid density and liquid viscosity are important. The Archimedes number distribution combines effects of particle size distribution, solid-liquid density difference, and kinematic viscosity. The most important properties for testing with non-Newtonian slurries are the slurry yield stress, the slurry consistency, and the shear strength. The solid-liquid density difference and the particle size are also important. It is also important to match multiple properties within the same simulant to achieve behavior representative of the waste. Other properties such as particle shape, concentration, surface charge, and size distribution breadth, as well as slurry cohesiveness and adhesiveness, liquid pH and ionic strength also influence the simulant properties either directly or through other physical properties such as yield stress.

  11. AVTA: Chrysler RAM Experimental PHEV Pickup Truck Recovery Act Project Testing Results Phase 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act supported a number of projects that together made up the largest ever deployment of plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in the U.S. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Chrysler RAM PHEV, a demonstration vehicle not currently available for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  12. Three important parts of an integrated plant are reactors, separators and a heat exchanger network (HEN) for heat recovery. Within the process engineering community, much

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    exchanger network (HEN) for heat recovery. Within the process engineering community, much attention has beeni ABSTRACT Three important parts of an integrated plant are reactors, separators and a heat and in particular to optimal operation of HENs. The purpose of heat integration is to save energy, but the HEN also

  13. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  14. Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrild, Hanna [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Larsen, Anna W., E-mail: awla@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

  15. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  16. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual tests, including data collection, are the responsibility of the assigned Principal Investigator(s) (PIS) and are not evaluated in this DIE. This DIE focuses on integrating and compiling the evaluations of previous DIES which were prepared for various ESF subsurface testing activities, including the use of temporary items currently located or being developed for these testing activities, and to provide a bounding evaluation for potential future ESF subsurface testing activities that are sufficiently similar to the generic testing activities addressed herein. Subsurface testing activities items/facilities evaluated herein include: ongoing and planned testing in the TS Loop, alcoves, and niches, planned testing in the ECRB Starter Tunnel, borehole drilling and workover, and tracers, fluids, and materials (TFM) usage. Detailed identification of individual testing items/facilities and generic descriptions for subsurface-testing-related activities are provided in Section 6. The conclusions and requirements of this DIE conservatively bound the conclusions and requirements of previously approved DIES for the ESF subsurface testing activities addressed herein, based on conservative engineering judgment and on concurrence with this DIE (via a formal review process) by the originating and reviewing organizations of the previously approved evaluations. Hence, this DIE supersedes the following DIES listed in Table 1.1.

  17. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. THE `TEST STATISTICS REPORT' provides a synopsis of the test attributes and some important statistics. A sample is shown here to the right.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    #12;THE `TEST STATISTICS REPORT' provides a synopsis of the test attributes and some important statistics. A sample is shown here to the right. The Test reliability indicators are measures of how well: Are formulae for testing reliability as a measure of internal consistency. Higher values indicate a stronger

  19. AVTA: Chrysler RAM Experimental PHEV Pickup Truck Recovery Act Project Testing Results- Phase 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Chrysler RAM PHEV, a demonstration vehicle not currently available for sale.

  20. National Dioxin Study Tier 4 - combustion sources: final test report - Site 10, secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace MET-A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, L.E.; McReynolds, J.R.; Benson, D.J.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a dioxin/furan emissions test of a secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace equipped with an afterburner for hydrocarbon emissions control and two baghouses for particulate-emissions control. The cupola furnace is used for recovery of copper from telephone scrap and other copper-bearing materials. The test was No. 10 in a series of dioxin/furan emissions tests conducted under Tier 4 of the National Dioxin Study. The primary objective of Tier 4 is to determine if various combustion sources are sources of dioxin/or furan emissions. If any of the combustion sources are found to emit dioxin or furan, the secondary objective of Tier 4 is to quantify these emissions. Secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnaces are one of 8 combustion-source categories that have been tested in the Tier 4 program. The tested cupola furnace, MET-A, was selected for the test after an initial information screening and a one-day pretest survey visit. Cupola furnace MET-A is a large secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace relative to others in the United States. The furnace feed includes plastic-bearing materials of various types, some of which may contain chlorinated organic compounds. Data presented in the report include dioxin (tera through octa homologue +2378 TCDD) and furan (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDF) results for both stack samples and ash samples. In addition, process data collected during sampling are also presented.

  1. Brayton-cycle heat recovery-system characterization program. Subatmospheric-system test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgmeier, L.; Leung, S.

    1981-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The turbine tests and results for the Brayton cycle subatmospheric system (SAS) are summarized. A scaled model turbine was operated in the same environment as that which a full-scale SAS machine would experience from the hot effluent flue gas from a glass container furnace. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the effects of a simulated furnace flue gas stream on the turbine nozzles and blades. The following specific areas were evaluated: erosion of the turbine nozzles and blades from the dust in the flue gas, hot corrosion from alkali metal salts in the dust and acid vapor (sulfur trioxide and hydrogen chloride) in the flue gas, and fouling and flow blockage due to deposition and/or condensation from the flue gas constituents.

  2. Test of uranium recovery from seawater with a packed bed of amidoxime fiber adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goto, Akira; Kusakabe, Katsuki; Morooka, Shigeharu (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)); Kago, Tokihiro (Towa Univ., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium in seawater was recovered in this study by adsorption with amidoxime fibers synthesized from commercial PAN fibers. To confirm the stability of the fibers and the applicability of an adsorption bed model, a test was performed in a bay in southwest Japan. The amidoxime fiber was packed in an adsorption bed which was towed for 30 hours at a velocity of 1 m[center dot]s[sup [minus]1] or moored in the bay for 37 days. The amount of uranium adsorbed agreed well with the simulation model, and the adsorption fiber proved to be resistant to biological erosion. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Practical Experiences from the USE of a Method for Active Functional Tests and Optimization of Coil Energy Recovery Loop Systems in AHUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksson, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRACTICAL EXPERIENCES FROM THE USE OF A METHOD FOR ACTIVE FUNCTIONAL TESTS AND OPTIMIZATION OF COIL ENERGY RECOVERY LOOP SYSTEMS IN AHUS. J?rgen Eriksson* * ?F-Installation AB, Box 1551 SE 401 51 G?teborg, Sweden. Summary A method...-commissioning, ventilation, energy, efficiency, EES INTRODUCTION The reason to study coil energy recovery loop systems is that they are very common in Sweden and mainly used in cases with high air flow rates such as in hospitals and pharmaceutical industries. The heat...

  4. Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate...

  5. Pries M161: Rock the test! Review sheet for Chapter 11 Chapter 11 is the most important material in the calculus curriculum. Try making flashcards!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pries, Rachel

    Pries M161: Rock the test! Review sheet for Chapter 11 Chapter 11 is the most important material for Taylor polynomials Tests for convergence For each test write down: i) what the test says; ii) a short explanation of why it is true; iii) an example of a series which converges by this test; iv) an example

  6. CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding. As part of the MGSC�������¢����������������s Validation Phase (Phase II) studies, the small injection pilot test was conducted at the Bald Unit site within the Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, which was chosen for the project on the basis of site infrastructure and reservoir conditions. Geologic data on the target formation were extensive. Core analyses, porosity and permeability data, and geophysical logs from 40 wells were used to construct cross sections and structure contour and isopach maps in order to characterize and define the reservoir architecture of the target formation. A geocellular model of the reservoir was constructed to improve understanding of CO2 behavior in the subsurface. At the time of site selection, the Field was under secondary recovery through edge-water injection, but the wells selected for the pilot in the Bald Unit had been temporarily shut-in for several years. The most recently shut-in production well, which was surrounded by four nearby shut-in production wells in a five-spot pattern, was converted to CO2 injection for this pilot. Two additional wells outside the immediate five-spot pattern, one of which was an active producer, were instrumented to measure surface temperature and pressure. The CO2 injection period lasted from September 3, 2009, through December 14, 2010, with one three-month interruption caused by cessation of CO2 deliveries due to winter weather. Water was injected into the CO2 injection well during this period. A total of 6,300 tonnes (6,950 tons) of CO2 were injected into the reservoir at rates that generally ranged from 18 to 32 tonnes (20 to 35 tons) per day. The CO2 injection bottomhole pressure generally remained at 8.3 to 9.0 MPag (1,200 to 1,300 psig). The CO2 injection was followed by continued monitoring for nine months during post-CO2 water injection. A monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program was designed to determine the fate of injected CO2. Extensive periodic sampling and analysis of brine, groundwater, and produced gases began before CO2 injection and continued through the monitored waterflood periods. Samples were gathered from production wells and three newly installed groundwater monitoring wells. Samples underwent geochemical and isotopic analyses to reveal any CO2-related changes. Groundwater and kinetic modeling and mineralogical analysis were also employed to better understand the long-term dynamics of CO2 in the reservoir. No CO2 leakage into groundwater was detected, and analysis of brine and gas chemistry made it possible to track the path of plume migration and infer geochemical reactions and trapping of CO2. Cased-hole logging did not detect any CO2 in the near-wellbore region. An increase in CO2 concentration was first detected in February 2010 from the gas present in the carboy during brine sampling; however, there was no appreciable gas volume associated with the detection of CO2. The first indication of elevated gas rates from the commingled gas of the pilot�������¢����������������s production wells occurred in July 2010 and reached a maximum of 0.36 tonnes/day (0.41 tons/day) in September 2010. An estimated 27 tonnes (30 tons) of CO2 were produced at the surface from the gas separator at the tank battery from September 3, 2009, through September 11, 2011, representing 0.5% of the injected CO2. Consequently, 99.5%

  7. Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

  8. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  9. Blackboard Test Taking tips Very important: If your instructor gives you a time block of one, two, or several days to complete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Blackboard Test Taking tips Very important: If your instructor gives you a time block of one, two instructor might also be less sympathetic. Before you start the test: · Be certain that you are ready to take the test & set aside time in which you will be free from interruptions BEFORE clicking on the link

  10. Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery and Rein- vestment Act accomplishment helping clean up traces of past nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Recovery Act workers safely hauled...

  11. Modern biomarker data analysis entails challenging modeling issues of the utmost importance for public health. Medical tests often use biomarker data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, Maria Isabel Fraga

    of recent advances in the evaluation of medical tests, with a special emphasis on method- ological importance for public health. Medical tests often use biomarker data as input, and the statistical evaluation advances, with an eye on future developments and on trending topics for the upcoming years. We hope

  12. Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act and Energy Department programs were designed to stimulate the economy while creating new power sources, conserving resources and aligning the nation to once again lead the global energy economy.

  13. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8})], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  14. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  15. Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information Center Recovery Act Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related...

  16. Detecting and assessing hydrocarbon reservoirs without the need to drill test wells is of major importance to the petro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    Detecting and assessing hydrocarbon reservoirs without the need to drill test wells is of major of prograding sands and shales. The area is characterized by allochthonous salt of Aptian age, and deepwater depths of about 1200 m, with a known petroleum reservoir about 1100 m below seafloor. Shallow salt occurs

  17. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT RECOVREY M. E. Ward and N. G. Solomon E. S. Tabb Solar Turbines International and Gas Research Institute San Diego, California Chicago, Illinois ABSTRACT i I One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews... tests, promising low temperature heat exchanger tube alloys and coated surfaces were identified. 1INTROUCTION of advanced technology heat recovery techniques 1_ Recovering waste heat from the flue gases of the pr~ary objective. Specific objectives...

  18. Power Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    , will be the use of the ASTM Theoretical Steam Rate Tables. In addition, the author's experience regarding the minimum size for power recovery units that are economic in a Culf Coast plant will be presented. INTROD\\Jr.'rION When surveying an operation... will be discussed in detail. Each term in the equation will be considered in English units. Secondly, the use of Mollier diagrams to estimate the enthalphy change between the initial and final conditions will be considered. The last method, specific to steam...

  19. Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery techniques is waste heat and condensation water recovery system. Waste heat and condensation water recovery system is one of the most important facilities in power plants. High efficiency waste heat

  20. Mass and Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindawai, S. M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - 1 - MASS AND HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM SALAH MAHMOUD HINDAWI DIRECTOR HINDAWI FOR ENGINEERING SERVICES & CONTRACTING NEW DAMIETTA , EGYPT ABSTRACT : In the last few years heat recovery was under spot . and in air conditioning fields... ) as a heat recovery . and I use the water as a mass recovery . The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines . THE BENEFIT OF THIS SYSTEM ARE : 1) Using the heat energy from...

  1. An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of waste heat energy is one element of a complete energy conservation plan. In addition to contributing to the goal of saving energy, utilization of waste heat is also an important source of cost savings. This presentation details...

  2. Determining the optimum nanofluid for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determining the optimum nanofluid for enhanced oil recovery Presented by Katie Aurand katherine and size for EOR applications Determining the optimum nanofluid for enhanced oil recovery Presented = particle modification and testing 3 Determining the optimum nanofluid for enhanced oil recovery Presented

  3. Shock recovery experiments: An assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, G.T. III

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic shock recovery experiments, in which microstructural and mechanical property effects are characterized quantitatively, constitute an important means of increasing our understanding of shock processes. Through studies of the effects of variations in metallurgical and shock loading parameters on structure/property relationships, the micromechanisms of shock deformation, and how they differ from conventional strain rate processes, are beginning to emerge. This paper will highlight the state-of-the-art in shock recovery of metallic and ceramic materials. Techniques will be described which are utilized to ''soft'' recover shock-loaded metallic samples possessing low residual strain; crucial to accurate ''post-mortem'' metallurgical investigations of the influence of shock loading on material behavior. Illustrations of the influence of shock assembly design on the structure/property relationships in shock-recovered copper samples including such issues as residual strain and contact stresses, and their consequences are discussed. Shock recovery techniques used on brittle materials will be reviewed and discussed in light of recent experimental results. Finally, shock recovery structure/property results and VISAR data on the /alpha/--/omega/ shock-induced phase transition in titanium will be used to illustrate the beneficial link between shock recovery and ''real-time'' shock data. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Recovery Act:Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act: Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado using Remote Sensing and On- Site Exploration, Testing and Analysis F. Lee Robinson - PI Flint...

  5. Recovery of uranium from seawater. 13. Long-term stability tests for high-performance chelating resins containing amidoxime groups and evaluation of elution process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egawa, Hiroaki; Kabay, Nalan; Shuto, Taketomi; Jyo, Akinori (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale adsorption/elution cycles were performed to investigate the long-term stability of the chelating resins employed. The adsorbed metal ions were rapidly and quantitatively eluted from the resins with acid eluants. The shrinkage of the resins with successive adsorption/elution cycles influenced the adsorption capacity. The uranium recovery was maintained at a nearly constant value by the employment of bicarbonate eluants. In particular, 2 mol dm[sup [minus]3] NH[sub 4]HCO[sub 3] yielded an efficient stripping for uranium. However, it was clarified that the elution with 0.25 mol dm[sup [minus]3] H[sub 2]SO[sub 4], which gave a high efficiency, was better than the bicarbonate eluants.

  6. Investigating the pore-scale mechanisms of microbial enhanced oil recovery Ryan T. Armstrong, Dorthe Wildenschild n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    capillary desaturation test, where flooding rate was increased post secondary recovery. FurthermoreInvestigating the pore-scale mechanisms of microbial enhanced oil recovery Ryan T. Armstrong recovery biosurfactant bioclogging micromodel water flooding multiphase flow interfacial curvature a b

  7. Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Act State Memo Virgin Islands Recovery Act State Memo Washington Recovery Act State Memo West Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery...

  8. Recovery News Flashes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP http:energy.govemdownloadstru-success-srs-recovery-act-prepares...

  9. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  10. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  11. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  12. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): · CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment · CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well · CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility · CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater · CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches This report covers fiscal year 2009 (October 2008–September 2009). The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0021 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units and identification of any deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the units. The condition of covers, fencing, signs, gates, and locks is documented. In addition, soil moisture monitoring and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. The results of the inspections, summary of maintenance activities, results of vegetations surveys, and analysis of monitoring data are presented in this report. Copies of the inspection checklists are included as Appendix A. Field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix B. Photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix C.

  13. Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report and technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007 for the project 'Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy Oil Recovery Techniques', DE-FC26-04NT15526. Critical year 3 activities of this project were not undertaken because of reduced funding to the DOE Oil Program despite timely submission of a continuation package and progress on year 1 and 2 subtasks. A small amount of carried-over funds were used during June-August 2007 to complete some work in the area of foamed-gas mobility control. Completion of Year 3 activities and tasks would have led to a more thorough completion of the project and attainment of project goals. This progress report serves as a summary of activities and accomplishments for years 1 and 2. Experiments, theory development, and numerical modeling were employed to elucidate heavy-oil production mechanisms that provide the technical foundations for producing efficiently the abundant, discovered heavy-oil resources of the U.S. that are not accessible with current technology and recovery techniques. Work fell into two task areas: cold production of heavy oils and thermal recovery. Despite the emerging critical importance of the waterflooding of viscous oil in cold environments, work in this area was never sanctioned under this project. It is envisioned that heavy oil production is impacted by development of an understanding of the reservoir and reservoir fluid conditions leading to so-called foamy oil behavior, i.e, heavy-oil solution gas drive. This understanding should allow primary, cold production of heavy and viscous oils to be optimized. Accordingly, we evaluated the oil-phase chemistry of crude oil samples from Venezuela that give effective production by the heavy-oil solution gas drive mechanism. Laboratory-scale experiments show that recovery correlates with asphaltene contents as well as the so-called acid number (AN) and base number (BN) of the crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal steam injection wells and implementation of steam trap control that limits steam entry into hor

  14. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Bullock

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and ï?· Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  15. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, For Fiscal Year 2008 (October 2007-September 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): • CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment • CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well • CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility • CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater • CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches The locations of the sites are shown in Figure 1. This report covers fiscal year (FY) 2008 (October 2007–September 2008). Because this is the first combined annual report for these CAUs, this report only covers the period not covered in the previous annual report for each CAU. For example, the last report submitted for CAU 91 covered the period January 2007–December 2007; therefore, this report only covers the remainder of FY2008 (January 2008–September 2008) for CAU 91. The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0021 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units and identification of any deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the units. The condition of covers, fencing, signs, gates, and locks is documented. In addition, soil moisture monitoring and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. The results of the inspections, summary of maintenance activities, results of vegetations surveys, and analysis of monitoring data are presented in this report. Copies of the inspection checklists are included as Appendix A. Field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix B. Photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix C.

  16. Recovery Act: Oxy-Combustion Technology Development for Industrial-Scale Boiler Applications. Task 4 - Testing in Alstom's 15 MWth Boiler Simulation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levasseur, Armand

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), under U.S. DOE/NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005290, is conducting a development program to generate detailed technical information needed for application of oxy-combustion technology. The program is designed to provide the necessary information and understanding for the next step of large-scale commercial demonstration of oxy combustion in tangentially fired boilers and to accelerate the commercialization of this technology. The main project objectives include: Design and develop an innovative oxyfuel system for existing tangentially-fired boiler units that minimizes overall capital investment and operating costs; Evaluate performance of oxyfuel tangentially fired boiler systems in pilot scale tests at Alstom’s 15 MWth tangentially fired Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF); Address technical gaps for the design of oxyfuel commercial utility boilers by focused testing and improvement of engineering and simulation tools; Develop the design, performance and costs for a demonstration scale oxyfuel boiler and auxiliary systems; Develop the design and costs for both industrial and utility commercial scale reference oxyfuel boilers and auxiliary systems that are optimized for overall plant performance and cost; and, Define key design considerations and develop general guidelines for application of results to utility and different industrial applications. The project was initiated in October 2008 and the scope extended in 2010 under an ARRA award. The project is scheduled for completion by April 30, 2014. Central to the project is 15 MWth testing in the BSF, which provided in-depth understanding of oxy-combustion under boiler conditions, detailed data for improvement of design tools, and key information for application to commercial scale oxy-fired boiler design. Eight comprehensive 15 MWth oxy-fired test campaigns were performed with different coals, providing detailed data on combustion, emissions, and thermal behavior over a matrix of fuels, oxy-process variables and boiler design parameters. Significant improvement of CFD modeling tools and validation against 15 MWth experimental data has been completed. Oxy-boiler demonstration and large reference designs have been developed, supported with the information and knowledge gained from the 15 MWth testing. This report addresses the results from the 15 MWth testing in the BSF.

  17. Crude Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheX Imeans ofFHomeImports -

  18. Recovery Act Project Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, these Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) projects exemplify the range of technical assistance provided to federal agencies.

  19. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  20. A statistical and economic analysis of incremental waterflood infill drilling recoveries in West Texas carbonate reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Robert Lane

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimates of recoveries. Accurate infill recovery forecast models may assist operators in determining if well spacings are small enough to economically recover the maximum amount of oil possible. In addition, these models can help the operator evaluate... to determine their effect, if any, on primary, waterflood, and infill recoveries. These parameters were evaluated for their overall correlation to infill recoveries and interaction with other important parameters. Four recovery indicators were used to model...

  1. Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small...

  2. Department of ENENG/ME Spring 2012 Waste Heat Recovery for Small Engine Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of ENENG/ME Spring 2012 Waste Heat Recovery for Small Engine Applications Overview The purpose of this capstone project is to research, test, and apply waste heat recovery to develop laboratory engine test base line results and relate this results to waste heat recovery strategies

  3. Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

  4. Mass and Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindawai, S. M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building...

  5. Recovery Act Funds at Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) are being put to work to improve safety, reliability, and service in systems across the country. Here are case studies from a variety of Recovery Act programs.

  6. Recovery Act State Memos Kentucky

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * KENTUCKY RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)...

  7. Flash Steam Recovery Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronhold, C. J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /condensate recovery system, resulting in condensate flash steam losses to the atmosphere. Using computer simulation models and pinch analysis techniques, the Operational Excellence Group (Six Sigma) was able to identify a project to recover the flash steam losses as a...

  8. Recovery Boiler Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdullah, Z.; Salcudean, M.; Nowak, P.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary computations of the cold flow in a simplified geometry of a recovery boiler are presented. The computations have been carried out using a new code containing multigrid methods and segmentation techniques. This approach is shown...

  9. Recovery Boiler Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdullah, Z.; Salcudean, M.; Nowak, P.

    Preliminary computations of the cold flow in a simplified geometry of a recovery boiler are presented. The computations have been carried out using a new code containing multigrid methods and segmentation techniques. This approach is shown...

  10. Recovery Act State Memos Montana

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 5 RECOVERY ACT SUCCESS STORIES - ENERGY EMPOWERS * Green power transmission line given new life ......

  11. Energy Recovery Ventilator Membrane Efficiency Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees, Jennifer Anne

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ) vc Kinematic Viscosity (m2/s) W Width of Duct (m) w Absolute Humidity (kg water/ kg air) ? Efficiency (%) ? Density of Fluid (kg/m3) ? Viscosity of Fluid (Pa*s) Subscripts a Air c Cold Side c Convective c Cross Sectional Area h Hot Side... .................................................. 55 Figure 25 Cold Side Temperatures vs. Ambient ................................................ 55 Figure 26 Relative Humidities vs. Ambient ........................................................ 56 xi Page Figure 27 Hot Side...

  12. Improved screen-bowl centrifuge recovery using polymer injection technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchett, R.T.; McGough, K.M.; Luttrell, G.H.

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reports the improved screen-bowl centrifuge recovery process using polymer injection technology. Field test and economic analysis are also included in the paper. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Direct Refrigeration from Heat Recovery Using 2-Stage Absorption Chillers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hufford, P. E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the cost of some fossil fuels has moderated, the importance of energy conservation by heat recovery has not diminished. The application of waste heat generated steam to produce chilled water is not new. However, there is a newly developed...

  14. ARM - Recovery Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become a UsergovAboutRecovery Act Recovery Act Logo

  15. Recovery Act Recipient Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Recipient Data Recovery Act Recipient Data A listing of all Recovery Act recipients and their allocations. Updated weekly. recoveryactfunding.xls More Documents &...

  16. Some Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judge, George G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1135 Some Thoughts on Econometric Information Recoverys). Some Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery GeorgeTheoretic Approach To Econometric Information Recovery

  17. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  18. Sparse recovery and Fourier sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Eric C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade a broad literature has arisen studying sparse recovery, the estimation of sparse vectors from low dimensional linear projections. Sparse recovery has a wide variety of applications such as streaming ...

  19. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  20. Recovery Act State Memos Nebraska

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 6 RECOVERY ACT SUCCESS STORIES - ENERGY EMPOWERS * Biofuels company builds new facility in Nebraska ... 7 * Nebraska appliance rebate...

  1. Recovery Act State Memos Arkansas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 RECOVERY ACT SUCCESS STORIES - ENERGY EMPOWERS * Program finds unique way to fund energy upgrades ... 7 * Green collar courses ......

  2. Recovery of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugasaka, K. (Government Industrial Research Inst., Shikoku, Japan); Katoh, S.; Takai, N.; Takahashi, H.; Umezawa, Y.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seawater contains various elements in solution. Deuterium, lithium, and uranium are the important ingredients for energy application at present and in the future. This paper deals with the recovery of uranium from seawater, with emphasis on the development of an adsorbent with high selectivity and rate of adsorption for uranium. Polyacrylamidoxime chelating resins were synthesized from various co-polymers of acrylonitrile and cross-linking agents. The resulting resins with the chelating amidoxime group showed selective adsorption for uranium in seawater. The amount of uranium adsorbed from seawater at room temperature reached 3.2 mg/g resin after 180 days. Polyacrylamidoxime fiber, which was prepared from polyacrylonitrile fiber and hydroxylamine, showed a high rate of adsorption for uranium. The polyacrylamidoxime fiber conditioned with 1 M HC1 and 1 M NaOH adsorbed 4 mg U/g fiber from seawater in ten days. 9 figures, 6 tables.

  3. Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts Better Buildings Residential Network Program...

  4. Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

  5. Wind Technology Testing Center Acquires New Blade Fatigue Test...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the WTTC is one of the largest blade test facilities in the world, testing some of the longest blades made today for the...

  6. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  7. Recovery Act Open House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-Setting Microscopy IlluminatesHandbookRODs Recovery

  8. Walk, Haydel Approach to Process Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldsmith, R. W.; Hendrickson, M. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    velocities. In a grass roots design, equipment is designed for specific needs, but in a revamp there are usually several alter nate ways existing equipment can be utilized. A11 of the important alternates must be eva1 uated before selecting... bundles are encountered, methods balance costs against incremental heat recovery. Other logic re duces multiple parallel streams and adjusts arrangements considering both temperature level and overall coefficient. The log ic and eva1uat ion...

  9. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Menlo Park, CA); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  10. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Golden, CO); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  11. ARM - Recovery Act Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-IIActRecovery Act

  12. Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the Passing of AdmiraltheOil and Less CO2Caustic Recovery

  13. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    three Recovery Act-funded Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. February 28, 2014 Smart Meter Investments Yield Positive Results in Maine Central Maine Power's (CMP) SGIG...

  14. Economic Recovery Loan Program (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Recovery Loan Program provides subordinate financing to help businesses remain viable and improve productivity. Eligibility criteria are based on ability to repay, and the loan is...

  15. Register file soft error recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  16. Recovery Act State Memos Florida

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of renewable energy. The Florida Energy and Climate Commission has awarded the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) 10 million in Recovery Act money, enabling the center to set...

  17. A parametric study of factors affecting oil recovery efficiency from carbon dioxide injection using a compositional reservoir model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Gregory Allen.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors Affecting Oil Recovery Estimating Oil Recovery From Carbon Dioxide Flooding 15 33 CHAPTER III ? FIELD CASE ANALYSIS 38 3. 1 3. 2 3. 3 3. 4 Background Laboratory Analysis Reservoir Analysis Estimates of Injection Recovery and Project... to estimate the recovery of oil from continuous injection of carbon dioxide. Finally, the results of the sensitivity analysis were compared to published laboratory and theoretical models and documented field results to test the correlation model. CHAPTER...

  18. Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japan’s Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

  19. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  20. Hydraulic waste energy recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lederer, C.C.; Thomas, A.H.; McGuire, J.L. (Detroit Buildings and Safety Engineering Dept., MI (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water distribution systems are typically a municipality's largest consumer of energy and greatest expense. The water distribution network has varying pressure requirements due to the age of the pipeline and topographical differences. Certain circumstances require installation of pressure reducing devices in the pipeline to lower the water pressure in the system. The consequence of this action is that the hydraulic energy supplied by the high lift or booster pumps is wasted in the process of reducing the pressure. A possible solution to capture the waste hydraulic energy is to install an in-line electricity generating turbine. Energy recovery using in-line turbine systems is an emerging technology. Due to the lack of technical and other relevant information on in-line turbine system installations, questions of constructability and legal issues over the power service contract have yet to be answered. This study seeks to resolve these questions and document the findings so that other communities may utilize this information. 10 figs.

  1. Speech recovery device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frankle, Christen M.

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided an apparatus and method for assisting speech recovery in people with inability to speak due to aphasia, apraxia or another condition with similar effect. A hollow, rigid, thin-walled tube with semi-circular or semi-elliptical cut out shapes at each open end is positioned such that one end mates with the throat/voice box area of the neck of the assistor and the other end mates with the throat/voice box area of the assisted. The speaking person (assistor) makes sounds that produce standing wave vibrations at the same frequency in the vocal cords of the assisted person. Driving the assisted person's vocal cords with the assisted person being able to hear the correct tone enables the assisted person to speak by simply amplifying the vibration of membranes in their throat.

  2. Waste Steam Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, J. M.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .15 Jet Ejector - 165 p~ia Saturated Motive (965 psia/925?F) JO 2].22 2].]0 23.35 35 23. 22 23.]0 23.35 45 23.22 23.]0 23.35 ($2.l2/MM Btu fuel, 85% boiler efficiency,) 55 23.22 23.30 2].]5 ., 23. 22 23. )0 2].35 80 23. 22 23. JO 23. ]5 1243... technique, and the costs of fuel and electrical power. If turbine flows are unaffected so that no by-product power generation is lost, direct exchange to process and jet ejector compression will always yield an energy profit. Recovery via mechanical...

  3. Energy recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Albert S. (Morgantown, WV); Verhoff, Francis H. (Morgantown, WV)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an improved wet air oxidation system and method for reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of waste water used from scrubbers of coal gasification plants, with this COD reduction being sufficient to effectively eliminate waste water as an environmental pollutant. The improvement of the present invention is provided by heating the air used in the oxidation process to a temperature substantially equal to the temperature in the oxidation reactor before compressing or pressurizing the air. The compression of the already hot air further heats the air which is then passed in heat exchange with gaseous products of the oxidation reaction for "superheating" the gaseous products prior to the use thereof in turbines as the driving fluid. The superheating of the gaseous products significantly minimizes condensation of gaseous products in the turbine so as to provide a substantially greater recovery of mechanical energy from the process than heretofore achieved.

  4. Enhanced oil recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

  5. Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, R. L.

    and performance summary at the plant design point is shown in Figure 1. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PLANT The plant has three steam generation units. Each boiler is a natural circulation, single pressure level waste heat recovery boiler. Two of the boilers..." per ANSI/ASME PTC 4 4-1981, Gas Turbine Heat Recovery Steam Generator' All units tested above their design value. The turbine generator set was tested using station instrumentation to verify it was performin at its design point. The overall plant...

  6. Special Report on the "Department of Energy's Efforts to Meet Accountability and Performance Reporting Objectives of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in health and science, and invest in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy will receive an unprecedented $38 billion in Recovery Act funding to support a variety of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. The Recovery Act requires transparency and accountability over these funds. To this end, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued guidance requiring the Department to compile and report a wide variety of funding, accounting, and performance information. The Department plans to leverage existing information systems to develop accounting and performance information that will be used by program managers and ultimately reported to Recovery.gov, the government-wide source of Recovery Act information, and to OMB. The Department's iManage iPortal, a system that aggregates information from a number of corporate systems, will serve as the main reporting gateway for accounting information. In addition, the Department plans to implement a methodology or system that will permit it to monitor information reported directly to OMB by prime funding recipients. Furthermore, performance measures or metrics that outline expected outcomes are being developed, with results ultimately to be reported in a recently developed Department-wide system. Because of the significance of funds provided and their importance to strengthening the Nation's economy, we initiated this review to determine whether the Department had taken the steps necessary to ensure that Recovery Act funds can be appropriately tracked and are transparent to the public, and whether the benefits of the expenditures can be properly measured and reported clearly, accurately, and in a timely manner. Although not yet fully mature, we found that the Department's efforts to develop, refine, and apply the control structure needed to ensure accurate, timely, and reliable reporting to be both proactive and positive. We did, however, identify certain issues relating to Recovery Act performance management, accounting and reporting accuracy, and timeliness that should be addressed and resolved. In particular, at the time of our review: (1) Program officials had not yet determined whether existing information systems will be able to process anticipated transaction increases associated with the Recovery Act; (2) System modifications made to the Department's performance management system to accommodate Recovery Act performance measures had not yet been fully tested and verified; (3) The ability of prime and sub-recipients to properly segregate and report both accounting and performance information had not been determined; (4) There was a lack of coordination between Headquarters organizations related to aspects of Recovery Act reporting. For example, we observed that the Offices of Fossil Energy and Program, Analysis and Evaluation were both involved in developing job creation estimates that could yield significantly different results; and, (5) A significant portion (91 of 142, or 64 percent) of the performance measures developed for the Recovery Act activities were not quantifiable. In some instances, Project Operating Plans had not been finalized and we were not able to verify that all needed performance measures had been developed. Furthermore, the Department had not developed specific metrics to measure federal and contractor jobs creation and retention, an essential Recovery Act objective. The Department had devoted a great deal of time and resources to identifying and mitigating Recovery Act-related risks. For example, the Department developed a risk assessment tool that is intended to assist programs in identifying risks that can prevent its Recovery Act projects from meeting their intended goals. We also found that program staff and management officials at multiple levels were actively engaged in designing Recovery Act-related control and accountability programs. These efforts ra

  7. Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) U.S. Department of...

  8. CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment...

  9. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  10. IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Iowa has substantial natural resources, including wind power and is the largest ethanol producer in the United States. The American Recovery &...

  11. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

  12. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

  13. Analysis of Heavy Oil Recovery by Thermal EOR in a Meander Belt: From Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analysis of Heavy Oil Recovery by Thermal EOR in a Meander Belt: From Geological to Reservoir Energies nouvelles2 INTRODUCTION SAGD will become increasingly important for heavy oil recovery because assessment, well placement and production performance prediction. One of the most famous heavy oil provinces

  14. Enhanced Oil Recovery through Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage January 22, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Enhanced Oil Recovery through Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage January 22, 2014 A Comparative Study Of Continuous And Cyclic Steam Injection With Trapping Of Oil Phase Muhammad Adil Javed Summary of Thesis Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) through steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) has become an important in

  15. Heat Recovery from Coal Gasifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with heat recovery from pressurized entrained and fixed bed coal gasifiers for steam generation. High temperature waste heat, from slagging entrained flow coal gasifier, can be recovered effectively in a series of radiant...

  16. Recovery and purification of ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reyneke, Rian (Katy, TX); Foral, Michael J. (Aurora, IL); Lee, Guang-Chung (Houston, TX); Eng, Wayne W. Y. (League City, TX); Sinclair, Iain (Warrington, GB); Lodgson, Jeffery S. (Naperville, IL)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the recovery and purification of ethylene and optionally propylene from a stream containing lighter and heavier components that employs an ethylene distributor column and a partially thermally coupled distributed distillation system.

  17. Low Level Heat Recovery Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

  18. Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, H. Z.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat recovery from refrigeration machines is a concept which has great potential for implementation in many businesses. If a parallel requirement for refrigeration and hot water exists, the installation of a system to provide hot water as a by...

  19. INFORMATION: Special Report on "Selected Department of Energy Program Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was enacted on February 17, 2009, to jumpstart the economy by creating or saving millions of jobs, spurring technological advances in health and science, and investing in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy received over $32.7 billion in Recovery Act funding for various science, energy, and environmental programs and initiatives. As of November 2009, the Department had obligated $18.3 billion of the Recovery Act funding, but only $1.4 billion had been spent. The Department's Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, Environmental Management, Science, and Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability received the majority of funding allocated to the Department, about $32.3 billion. Obligating these funds by the end of Fiscal Year 2010, as required by the Recovery Act, and overseeing their effective use in succeeding years, represents a massive workload increase for the Department's programs. The effort to date has strained existing resources. As has been widely acknowledged, any effort to disburse massive additional funding and to expeditiously initiate and complete projects increases the risk of fraud, waste and abuse. It is, therefore, important for the Department's program offices to assess and mitigate these risks to the maximum extent practicable. In this light, we initiated this review as an initial step in the Office of Inspector General's charge to determine whether the Department's major program offices had developed an effective approach for identifying and mitigating risks related to achieving the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. The Department's program offices included in our review identified risks and planned mitigation strategies that, if successfully implemented and executed, should help achieve the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. While each office identified risks unique to its respective areas of responsibility, there were a number of risks shared in common. These included the mechanical and substantive requirements related to the award and distribution of funds; program and project performance monitoring; and, program and project execution activities. In particular, the offices self-identified common risks such as: (1) The inability to award and distribute funds in a timely manner to achieve the goals of the Recovery Act; (2) The sufficiency of monitoring procedures and resources to, among other things, prevent and detect fraud, waste and abuse throughout the performance period of financial assistance awards and contracts; and (3) The inherent cost, schedule and performance risks associated with first-of-a-kind, innovative research and demonstration projects. Our review confirmed that the Department had begun to implement a number of strategies designed to mitigate these and other program-specific risks. Our testing, however, identified challenges to the effective implementation of these mitigation strategies that need to be addressed if the Department is to meet the goals and objectives established by the Recovery Act. At the time of our review: (1) Program staffing resources, critical to the success of all other mitigation strategies, remained inadequate both in numbers and qualifications (certifications and training) for positions in procurement and acquisition, project management, and monitoring and oversight functions; (2) Performance measures for achieving Recovery Act goals such as distributing funds in an expeditious manner had not always been established and included in performance plans, and, in financial assistance and contract documents; and (3) Programs had not consistently demonstrated that previously reported deficiencies, identified through audits, inspections, investigations and other oversight activities, had been considered in designing mitigation strategies for the Recovery Act related risks. As we noted in our Special Report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act at the Department of Energy (OAS-RA-09-01, March 2009) these sorts of deficiencies, which w

  20. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  1. Architectural Support for Automated Software Attack Detection, Recovery, and Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zambreno, Joseph A.

    Architectural Support for Automated Software Attack Detection, Recovery, and Prevention Jesse University Ames, IA 50011, USA Email: {jsathre, abaumgar, zambreno}@iastate.edu Abstract--Attacks on software systems architecture aimed at attack detection. Traditional techniques ignore the arguably more important

  2. Monitoring ecological recovery in a stream impacted by contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, G.R.; Cada, G.F.; Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G. [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past in-ground disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. A biological monitoring program initiated in 1984 has evaluated the effectiveness of the extensive remedial actions undertaken to address contamination sources. Elements of the monitoring program included toxicity testing with fish and invertebrates, bioaccumulation monitoring, and instream monitoring of streambed invertebrate and fish communities. In the mid 1980`s, toxicity tests on stream water indicated that the headwaters of the stream were acutely toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates as a result of infiltration of a metal-enriched groundwater from ponds used to dispose of acid wastes. Over a twelve year period, measurable toxicity in the headwaters decreased, first becoming non-toxic to larval fish but still toxic to invertebrates, then becoming intermittently toxic to invertebrates. By 1997, episodic toxicity was infrequent at the site that was acutely toxic at the start of the study. Recovery in the fish community followed the pattern of the toxicity tests. Initially, resident fish populations were absent from reaches where toxicity was measured, but as toxicity to fish larvae disappeared, the sites in upper Bear Creek were colonized by fish. The Tennessee dace, an uncommon species receiving special protection by the State of Tennessee, became a numerically important part of the fish population throughout the upper half of the creek, making Bear Creek one of the most significant habitats for this species in the region. Although by 1990 fish populations were comparable to those of similar size reference streams, episodic toxicity in the headwaters coincided with a recruitment failure in 1996. Bioaccumulation monitoring indicated the presence of PCBs and mercury in predatory fish in Bear Creek, and whole forage fish contained elevated levels of cadmium, lead, lithium, nickel, mercury, and uranium.

  3. LPG-recovery processes for baseload LNG plants examined

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, C.H. [Bechtel Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    With demand on the rise, LPG produced from a baseload LNG plant becomes more attractive as a revenue-earning product similar to LNG. Efficient use of gas expanders in baseload LNG plants for LPG production therefore becomes more important. Several process variations for LPG recovery in baseload LNG plants are reviewed here. Exergy analysis (based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics) is applied to three cases to compare energy efficiency resulting from integration with the main liquefaction process. The paper discusses extraction in a baseload plant, extraction requirements, process recovery parameters, extraction process variations, and exergy analysis.

  4. Cyclic 3',5'-AMP Relay in Dictyostelium discoideum IV. Recovery of the CAMP Signaling Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devreotes, Peter

    Cyclic 3',5'-AMP Relay in Dictyostelium discoideum IV. Recovery of the CAMP Signaling Response to test stimuli, although reduced in magnitude, had an accelerated time-course when they closely followed

  5. OPERATOR'S MANUAL IMPORTANT NOTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    . An ISO 9001 Company. ©2010, KEPCO, INC. P/N 228-1724 REV 1 ATE 1/2 RACK POWER SUPPLY AUTOMATIC TEST

  6. DOE Policy Re Recovery Act Recipient Use of Recovery Act Logos on Signage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (“DOE”) policy regarding use of the Recovery Act logo by Recovery Act recipients and subgrantees.

  7. import java.io.IOException; import java.net.URI;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Laura

    import java.io.IOException; import java.net.URI; import java.util.Enumeration; import net.jxta.discovery.DiscoveryService; import net.jxta.document.AdvertisementFactory; import net.jxta.document.Element; import net.jxta.document.MimeMediaType; import net.jxta.document.StructuredDocument; import net.jxta.document.StructuredDocumentFactory; import

  8. New Impetus for resource recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marier, D.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indications are that the resource recovery field is getting a renewed focus as communities again respond to continuing waste problems and as more companies offer recycling and waste-to-energy services. Recent entries to the field include new divisions of an Australian firm, a Finnish environmental services company, an Italian tire recycler. Two utility affiliates have entered the resource recovery field, and one major engineering and construction firm is entering the field at the same time another is leaving. These companies and their waste processes are briefly described.

  9. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energy Recovery ActCategoryRecovery Act

  10. Road to Recovery: Bringing Recovery to Small Town America

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nettamo, Paivi

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act hits the road to reach out to surrounding towns of the Savannah River Site that are struggling with soaring unemployment rates. This project helps recruit thousands of people to new jobs in environmental cleanup at the Savannah River Site.

  11. Road to Recovery: Bringing Recovery to Small Town America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nettamo, Paivi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act hits the road to reach out to surrounding towns of the Savannah River Site that are struggling with soaring unemployment rates. This project helps recruit thousands of people to new jobs in environmental cleanup at the Savannah River Site.

  12. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  13. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  14. September 2010 American Recovery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    September 2010 i American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Naval by applying GSHP systems. The current HVAC system for the building is a conventional Air Handling Unit (AHU) system with chiller. The heating and the DHW are provided by district steam. The building is close

  15. Biosurfactant and enhanced oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

    1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A pure culture of Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 (ATCC No. 39307) and a process for using said culture and the surfactant lichenysin produced thereby for the enhancement of oil recovery from subterranean formations. Lichenysin is an effective surfactant over a wide range of temperatures, pH's, salt and calcium concentrations.

  16. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  17. Quantifying Vegetation Recovery on Santa Rosa Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentschlar, Elizabeth

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of recovery on barrier islands after hurricanes is not well understood, because the majority of studies have focused on the geomorphic impact of storms on barrier islands. Dune vegetation recovery is a vital component of barrier island...

  18. District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation’s energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in the District of Columbia...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Recovery Act (ARRA) Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with: ARRA * awardees * contractors * DOE * Energy * Grid Integration * Partnership * photovoltaic * Photovoltaics * PV * Recovery Act * reliability * Renewable Energy * SAND...

  20. Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

  1. Reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.; Pope, G.A.; Schechter, R.S.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research in this annual report falls into three tasks each dealing with a different aspect of enhanced oil recovery. The first task strives to develop procedures for accurately modeling reservoirs for use as input to numerical simulation flow models. This action describes how we have used a detail characterization of an outcrop to provide insights into what features are important to fluid flow modeling. The second task deals with scaling-up and modeling chemical and solvent EOR processes. In a sense this task is the natural extension of task 1 and, in fact, one of the subtasks uses many of the same statistical procedures for insight into the effects of viscous fingering and heterogeneity. The final task involves surfactants and their interactions with carbon dioxide and reservoir minerals. This research deals primarily with phenomena observed when aqueous surfactant solutions are injected into oil reservoirs.

  2. Uranium Recovery from Seawater: Development of Fiber Adsorbents Prepared via Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Kim, Jungseung [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gill, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel adsorbent preparation method using atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) combined with radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) was developed to synthesize an adsorbent for uranium recovery from seawater. The ATRP method allowed a much higher degree of grafting on the adsorbent fibers (595 2818%) than that allowed by RIGP alone. The adsorbents were prepared with varied composition of amidoxime groups and hydrophilic acrylate groups. The successful preparation revealed that both ligand density and hydrophilicity were critical for optimal performance of the adsorbents. Adsorbents synthesized in this study showed a relatively high performance (141 179 mg/g at 49 62 % adsorption) in laboratory screening tests using a uranium concentration of ~6 ppm. This performance is much higher than that of known commercial adsorbents. However, actual seawater experiment showed impeded performance compared to the recently reported high-surface-area-fiber adsorbents, due to slow adsorption kinetics. The impeded performance motivated an investigation of the effect of hydrophilic block addition on the graft chain terminus. The addition of hydrophilic block on the graft chain terminus nearly doubled the uranium adsorption capacity in seawater, from 1.56 mg/g to 3.02 mg/g. The investigation revealed the importance of polymer chain conformation, in addition to ligand and hydrophilic group ratio, for advanced adsorbent synthesis for uranium recovery from seawater.

  3. Adsorption calorimetry in enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, L.A.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption calorimetry is a technique which has been used at the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Reserch (NIPER) to help in the understanding of adsorption as it impacts enhanced oil recovery by chemical flooding. Abstraction of chemicals by reservoir minerals comprises a major obstacle to the technical and economic success of this process. Adsorption is also important in other fields such as catalysis, lubrication, ore flotation, and printing. Adsorption calorimetry is useful because it measures both the amount of adsorption and its enthalpy. The enthalpy helps to guide the extrapolation of adsorption to higher temperatures as well as acting as a probe of surface properties such as heterogeneity. Adsorption calorimetry helps to distinguish physical from chemisorption. It is also useful in distinguishing water-wet from oil-wet surfaces. This paper discusses flow adsorption calorimetry. The advantage of using a flowing system over the classic immersion technique is that it is fast and easy to use, and data for the entire isotherm are collected on a single sample of solid. In flow calorimetry the surface excess amount and the thermal data are obtained simultaneously on one and the same sample of solid, thus avoiding some sampling problems. Some disadvantages of the method are somewhat short equilibration times and the cumulative nature of the data. Aspects of adsorption of special interest to enhanced oil recovery such as the nature and charge of minerals, the structure and charge of surfactants, the effects of brine and temperature, and the effects of aqueous or hydrocarbon environment are important parameters of surfactant flooding; they are treated in this paper.

  4. Development of an In Situ Biosurfactant Production Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; Kathleen Duncan; D.R. Simpson; N. Youssef; N. Ravi; M.J. Folmsbee; T.Fincher; S. Maudgalya; Jim Davis; Sandra Weiland

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term economic potential for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is large with more than 300 billion barrels of oil remaining in domestic reservoirs after conventional technologies reach their economic limit. Actual EOR production in the United States has never been very large, less than 10% of the total U. S. production even though a number of economic incentives have been used to stimulate the development and application of EOR processes. The U.S. DOE Reservoir Data Base contains more than 600 reservoirs with over 12 billion barrels of unrecoverable oil that are potential targets for microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). If MEOR could be successfully applied to reduce the residual oil saturation by 10% in a quarter of these reservoirs, more than 300 million barrels of oil could be added to the U.S. oil reserve. This would stimulate oil production from domestic reservoirs and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign imports. Laboratory studies have shown that detergent-like molecules called biosurfactants, which are produced by microorganisms, are very effective in mobilizing entrapped oil from model test systems. The biosurfactants are effective at very low concentrations. Given the promising laboratory results, it is important to determine the efficacy of using biosurfactants in actual field applications. The goal of this project is to move biosurfactant-mediated oil recovery from laboratory investigations to actual field applications. In order to meet this goal, several important questions must be answered. First, it is critical to know whether biosurfactant-producing microbes are present in oil formations. If they are present, then it will be important to know whether a nutrient regime can be devised to stimulate their growth and activity in the reservoir. If biosurfactant producers are not present, then a suitable strain must be obtained that can be injected into oil reservoirs. We were successful in answering all three questions. The specific objectives of the project were (1) to determine the prevalence of biosurfactant producers in oil reservoirs, and (2) to develop a nutrient regime that would stimulate biosurfactant production in the oil reservoir.

  5. Occidental vertical modified in situ process for the recovery of oil from oil shale, Phase 2. Construction, operation, testing, and environmental impact. Final report, August 1981-December 1982. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, A.L.; Zahradnik, R.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occidential Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) recently completed the demonstration of mining, rubblization, ignition, and simulataneous processing of two commericalized modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the Logas Wash facility near DeBeque, Colorado. Upon completion of Retort 6 in 1978, Occidential began incorporating all of the knowledge previously acquired in an effort to design two more commercial-sized MIS retorts. Any commercial venture of the future would require the ability to operate simultaneously more than one retort. Thus, Retorts 7 and 8 were developed during 1980 and 1981 through joint funding of the DOE and OOSI in Phase II. Rubblization of the retorts produced an average rubble void of 18.5% in the low grade shale (17 gallons per ton) at the Logan Wash site. After rubblization, bulkheads were constructed, inlet and offgas pipes were installed and connected to surface processing facilities and liquid product handling systems were connected to the retorts. Extensive instrumentation was installed in cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories for monitoring the complete operation of the retorts. After pre-ignition testing, Retort 8 was ignited in December of 1981 and Retort 7 was ignited in January of 1982. The retorts were operated without interruption from ignition until mid- November of 1982 at which time inlet gas injection was terminated and water quenching was begun. Total product yield from the two retorts was approximately 200,000 barrels of oil, or 70% of the Fischer Assay oil-in-place in the rubblized rock in the two retrots. Water quenching studies were conducted over a period of several months, with the objective of determining the rate of heat extraction from the retorts as well as determining the quantity and quality of offgas and water coming out from the quenching process. Data from these studies are also included in this Summary Report. 62 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Recovery Act ? An Interdisciplinary Program for Education and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Recovery Act An Interdisciplinary Program for Education and Outreach in Transportation Electrification Recovery Act An Interdisciplinary...

  7. A mixed formulation for a modification to Darcy equation with applications to enhanced oil recovery and carbon-dioxide sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakshatrala, K B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider a modification to Darcy equation by taking into account the dependence of viscosity on the pressure. We present a stabilized mixed formulation for the resulting governing equations. Equal-order interpolation for the velocity and pressure is considered, and shown to be stable (which is not the case under the classical mixed formulation). The proposed mixed formulation is tested using a wide variety of numerical examples. The proposed formulation is also implemented in a parallel setting, and the performance of the formulation for large-scale problems is illustrated using a representative problem. Two practical and technologically important problems, one each on enhanced oil recovery and carbon-dioxide sequestration, are solved using the proposed formulation. The numerical results clearly indicate the importance of considering the role of dependence of viscosity on the pressure.

  8. Investigation of Electrochemical Recovery of Zirconium from Spent Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Simpson; II-Soon Hwang

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project uses both modeling and experimental studies to design optimal electrochemical technology methods for recovery of zirconium from used nuclear fuel rods for more effective waste management. The objectives are to provide a means of efficiently separating zirconium into metallic high-level waste forms and to support development of a process for decontamination of zircaloy hulls to enable their disposal as low- and intermediate-level waste. Modeling work includes extension of a 3D model previously developed by Seoul National University for uranium electrorefining by adding the ability to predict zirconium behavior. Experimental validation activities include tests for recovery of zirconium from molten salt solutions and aqueous tests using surrogate materials. *This is a summary of the FY 2013 progress for I-NERI project # 2010-001-K provided to the I-NERI office.

  9. Engine breather oil recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, S.R.; Norton, J.G.; Wilson, J.D.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an engine breather oil recovery system, for use with reciprocating engines having an oil breather and an oil reservoir recovery system. It comprises:an engine breather outlet from the engine; a vapor and oil separator device in fluid flow connection with the engine breather outlet; a motive flow suction means in fluid flow connection between the separator device and the engine, so as to provide a substantially continuous pressure drop between the separator device and the engine oil reservoir; an engine fluid system in parallel with the separator device; and an engine driven pump in fluid flow connection with such other engine fluid system, wherein the motive force for the motive flow suction means is provided by the fluid from the engine pump.

  10. Advanced Burners and Combustion Controls for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, J. L.

    ADVANCED BURNERS AND COMBUSTION CONTROLS FOR INDUSTRIAL HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS J.L.FERRI GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION TOWANDA, PA ABSTRACT When recuperators are installed on indus trial furnaces, burners and ratio control systems must...ChieVi able not only through design, but also I because the burner internals are all;: ceramic and can wi thstand high tempera~ tures, particularly at low inputs (higih turndown) where the flame front recedes into the burner. A burner test furnace...

  11. Counterpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, a counterpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  12. Overpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, an overpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  13. Kraft recovery boiler physical and chemical processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.N.; Frederick, W.J. (Adams (Terry N.), Tacoma, WA (USA); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this book is on the recent research into the physical and chemical processes occurring in and around a black liquor recovery boiler. Almost all of the detailed technical information in this book has previously appeared in the open literature. The purpose here is not to present research for the first time, but to present it in a context of the other processes occurring in recovery boilers. Topics covered include: general characteristics of recovery boilers; black liquor thermal and transport properties; black liquor droplet formation and combustion; recovery boiler char bed processes; flow and mixing in Kraft recovery boilers; entrainment and carryover in recovery furnaces; fume formation and dust chemistry; deposits and boiler plugging; and recovery boiler thermal performance. 257 refs., 102 figs., 38 tabs.

  14. Final Report, Materials for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems, Tasks 3 and 4 Materials for Heat Recovery in Recovery Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R.; Kish, Joseph R.; Singh, Preet M.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Yuan, Jerry; Gorog, J. Peter; Frederick, Laurie A.; Jette, Francois R.; Meisner, Roberta A.; Singbeil, Douglas L.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE-funded project on materials for industrial heat recovery systems included four research tasks: materials for aluminum melting furnace recuperator tubes, materials and operational changes to prevent cracking and corrosion of the co-extruded tubes that form primary air ports in black liquor recovery boilers, the cause of and means to prevent corrosion of carbon steel tubes in the mid-furnace area of recovery boilers, and materials and operational changes to prevent corrosion and cracking of recovery boiler superheater tubes. Results from studies on the latter two topics are given in this report while separate reports on results for the first two tasks have already been published. Accelerated, localized corrosion has been observed in the mid-furnace area of kraft recovery boilers. This corrosion of the carbon steel waterwall tubes is typically observed in the vicinity of the upper level of air ports where the stainless clad co-extruded wall tubes used in the lower portion of the boiler are welded to the carbon steel tubes that extend from this transition point or “cut line” to the top of the boiler. Corrosion patterns generally vary from one boiler to another depending on boiler design and operating parameters, but the corrosion is almost always found within a few meters of the cut line and often much closer than that. This localized corrosion results in tube wall thinning that can reach the level where the integrity of the tube is at risk. Collection and analysis of gas samples from various areas near the waterwall surface showed reducing and sulfidizing gases were present in the areas where corrosion was accelerated. However, collection of samples from the same areas at intervals over a two year period showed the gaseous environment in the mid-furnace section can cycle between oxidizing and reducing conditions. These fluctuations are thought to be due to gas flow instabilities and they result in an unstable or a less protective scale on the carbon steel tubes. Also, these fluctuating air flow patterns can result in deposition of black liquor on the wall tubes, and during periods when deposition is high, there is a noticeable increase in the concentrations of sulfur-bearing gases like hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. Laboratory studies have shown that chromized and aluminized surface treatments on carbon steel improve the resistance to sulfidation attack. Studies of superheater corrosion and cracking have included laboratory analyses of cracked tubes, laboratory corrosion studies designed to simulate the superheater environment and field tests to study the movement of superheater tubes and to expose a corrosion probe to assess the corrosion behavior of alternate superheater alloys, particularly alloys that would be used for superheaters operating at higher temperatures and higher pressures than most current boilers. In the laboratory corrosion studies, samples of six alternate materials were immersed in an aggressive, low melting point salt mixture and exposed for times up to 336 h, at temperatures of 510, 530 or 560°C in an inert or reactive cover gas. Using weight change and results of metallographic examination, the samples were graded on their resistance to the various environments. For the superheater corrosion probe studies, samples of the same six materials were exposed on an air-cooled corrosion probe exposed in the superheater section of a recovery boiler for 1000 h. Post exposure examination showed cracking and/or subsurface attack in the samples exposed at the higher temperatures with the attack being more severe for samples 13 exposed above the first melting temperature of the deposits that collected on the superheater tubes. From these superheater studies, a ranking was developed for the six materials tested. The task addressing cracking and corrosion of primary air port tubes that was part of this project produced results that have been extensively implemented in recovery boilers in North America, the Nordic countries and many other parts of the world. By utilizing these results, boilers ar

  15. Company Level Imports Archives

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level Imports Company Level

  16. Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stidham, Paul Emery

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

  17. Energy balance for uranium recovery from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.; Lindner, H. [The University of Texas, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy return on investment (EROI) of an energy resource is the ratio of the energy it ultimately produces to the energy used to recover it. EROI is a key viability measure for a new recovery technology, particularly in its early stages of development when financial cost assessment would be premature or highly uncertain. This paper estimates the EROI of uranium recovery from seawater via a braid adsorbent technology. In this paper, the energy cost of obtaining uranium from seawater is assessed by breaking the production chain into three processes: adsorbent production, adsorbent deployment and mooring, and uranium elution and purification. Both direct and embodied energy inputs are considered. Direct energy is the energy used by the processes themselves, while embodied energy is used to fabricate their material, equipment or chemical inputs. If the uranium is used in a once-through fuel cycle, the braid adsorbent technology EROI ranges from 12 to 27, depending on still-uncertain performance and system design parameters. It is highly sensitive to the adsorbent capacity in grams of U captured per kg of adsorbent as well as to potential economies in chemical use. This compares to an EROI of ca. 300 for contemporary terrestrial mining. It is important to note that these figures only consider the mineral extraction step in the fuel cycle. At a reference performance level of 2.76 g U recovered per kg adsorbent immersed, the largest energy consumers are the chemicals used in adsorbent production (63%), anchor chain mooring system fabrication and operations (17%), and unit processes in the adsorbent production step (12%). (authors)

  18. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  19. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  20. Counterpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to a high-power pulsing circuit and more particularly to a repetitive pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit for an electromagnetic launcher. In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, a counterpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  1. Overpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to a high-power pulsing circuit and more particularly to a repetitive pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit for an electromagnetic launcher. In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, an overpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  2. Recovery Act State Memos Tennessee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8, 2015JuneDepartmentRecovery

  3. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8,Past Opportunities » Recovery Act

  4. Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Kegang; Zeng, Zhengwen; He, Jun; Pei, Peng; Zhou, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Huang, Luke; Ostadhassan, Mehdi; Jabbari, Hadi; Blanksma, Derrick; Feilen, Harry; Ahmed, Salowah; Benson, Steve; Mann, Michael; LeFever, Richard; Gosnold, Will

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 1, 2008 US DOE-sponsored research project entitled “Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery” under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0005643 officially started at The University of North Dakota (UND). This is the final report of the project; it covers the work performed during the project period of October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013. The objectives of this project are to outline the methodology proposed to determine the in-situ stress field and geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 3% to a higher level. The success of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing depends on knowing local in-situ stress and geomechanical properties of the rocks. We propose a proactive approach to determine the in-situ stress and related geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in representative areas through integrated analysis of field and well data, core sample and lab experiments. Geomechanical properties are measured by AutoLab 1500 geomechanics testing system. By integrating lab testing, core observation, numerical simulation, well log and seismic image, drilling, completion, stimulation, and production data, in-situ stresses of Bakken formation are generated. These in-situ stress maps can be used as a guideline for future horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracturing design to improve the recovery of Bakken unconventional oil.

  5. IDAHO RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SNAPSHOT Idaho has substantial natural resources, including wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  6. GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ACT SNAPSHOT Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  7. Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dan Nocera talks about Sun Catalytix, the next generation of solar energy, and ARPA-E funding through the Recovery Act.

  8. Combustion & Fuels Waste Heat Recovery & Utilization Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion & Fuels Waste Heat Recovery & Utilization Project Project Technical Lead - Thermoelectric Analysis & Materials 27 February 2008 2008 DOE OVT Annual Merit Review 2008...

  9. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Financial Assistance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - ARRAAttachment3.rtf FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act - Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR) Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement...

  10. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  11. Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production.

  12. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  13. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants willows Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon...

  14. ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Arizona has substantial natural resources, including coal, solar, and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment...

  15. Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers are in the final stage of decommissioning a nuclear reactor after they recently removed thick steel shields once used to absorb...

  16. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    imaging as well as next-generation oxygen-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy Microfluidics manipulation and manufacturing. Learn more detail about Recovery Act Instruments...

  17. Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Table Updated: March 20, 2015 FY 2016 February 2015 CRC Calculation Table (pdf) Final FY 2015 CRC Letter & Table (pdf) Note: The Cost...

  18. Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to examine a specific application of the use of an ORC heat recovery system and compare it to a stear), Rankine cycle heat recovery system. The particular application ~ssumed is heat recovery from diesel engine exhaust gas at a temPErature of 700F. Figure...,vaporized and superheated ina flue gas heat recovery su bsystem. he super heated fluid is expanded through a turbine for power p oduction, condensed in a water cooled condenser and return d to the vaporizer via feed pu mps. In the steam cycle, a port n of the Figure 1...

  19. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes...

  20. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

  1. Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the federal Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS), businesses may recover investments in certain property through depreciation deductions. The MACRS establishes a set of class l...

  2. Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel EOR method using carbonated water injection followed by depressurization is introduced. Results from micromodel experiments are presented to demonstrate the fundamental principles of this oil recovery method. A depressurization process (1 MPa/hr) was applied to a micromodel following carbonated water injection (Ca ? 10-5). The exsolved CO2 in water-filled pores blocked water flow in swiped portions and displaced water into oil-filled pores. Trapped oil after the carbonated water injection was mobilized by sequentially invading water. This method's self-distributed mobility control and local clogging was tested in a sandstone sample under reservoir conditions. A 10% incremental oil recovery was achieved by lowering the pressure 2 MPa below the CO2 liberation pressure. Additionally, exsolved CO2 resides in the pores of a reservoir as an immobile phase with a high residual saturation after oil production, exhibiting a potential synergy opportunity between CO2 EOR and CO2 sequestration

  3. Low-Salinity Waterflooding to Improve Oil Recovery - Historical Field Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding is by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of wa-terfloods. Laboratory water-flood tests and single-well tracer tests have shown that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery, but work designed to test the method on a field scale has not yet been undertaken. Historical waterflood records could unintentionally provide some evidence of improved recovery from waterflooding with lower salinity brine. Nu-merous fields in the Powder River basin of Wyoming have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) obtained from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Three Minnelusa formation fields in the basin were identified as potential candidates for waterflood comparisons based on the salinity of the connate and injection water. Historical pro-duction and injection data for these fields were obtained from the public record. Field waterflood data were manipulated to be displayed in the same format as laboratory coreflood re-sults. Recovery from fields using lower salinity injection wa-ter was greater than that using higher salinity injection wa-ter—matching recovery trends for laboratory and single-well tests.

  4. Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits be obtained from the Public Health Agency Canada (PHAC) to facilitate customs clearance. 2) If a permit

  5. Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nocera, Dave

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    BOSTON- At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dan Nocera talks about Sun Catalytix, the next generation of solar energy, and ARPA-E funding through the Recovery Act. To learn about more ARPA-E projects through the Recovery Act: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx

  6. Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery January 8, 2014 Los Alamos simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known production. Due to carbon capture and storage technology advances, prolonged high oil prices

  7. Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    emissions and capture biogas--a useful source of energy. About Anaerobic Digestion Biogas recovery systems manure in an oxygen-free environment. One of the natural prod- ucts of anaerobic digestion is biogas Digestion Biogas recovery systems are a proven technology. Currently, more than 30 digester systems

  8. Thermal recovery of oil and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, R.M. (Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (CA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is organized into the following chapters: Introduction to Thermal Recovery; Conduction of Heat Within Solids; Convective Heating within Reservoirs; Steamfloodings; The Displacement of Heavy Oil; Cyclic Steam Simulation; Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage; Steam Recovery Equipment and Facilities; and In Situ Combustion.

  9. Recovery in aluminium Ph.D. thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be superior. iii #12;The first use of the method was a study of recovery of a deformed aluminium alloy (AA1050). The aluminium alloy was deformed by cold rolling to a thickness reduction of 38%. The sample was annealed at 300Recovery in aluminium Ph.D. thesis by Carsten Gundlach Supervisors: Henning Friis Poulsen Wolfgang

  10. Method for enhanced oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comberiati, Joseph R. (Morgantown, WV); Locke, Charles D. (Morgantown, WV); Kamath, Krishna I. (Chicago, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for enhanced recovery of oil from relatively "cold" reservoirs by carbon dioxide flooding. In oil reservoirs at a temperature less than the critical temperature of 87.7.degree. F. and at a pore pressure greater than the saturation pressure of carbon dioxide at the temperature of the reservoir, the carbon dioxide remains in the liquid state which does not satisfactorily mix with the oil. However, applicants have found that carbon dioxide can be vaporized in situ in the reservoir by selectively reducing the pore pressure in the reservoir to a value less than the particular saturated vapor pressure so as to greatly enhance the mixing of the carbon dioxide with the oil.

  11. Waste water heat recovery appliance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapin, H.D.; Armstrong, P.R.; Chapin, F.A.W.

    1983-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient convective waste heat recovery heat exchanger was designed and tested. The prototype appliance was designed for use in laundromats and other small commercial operations which use large amounts of hot water. Information on general characteristics of the coin-op laundry business, energy use in laundromats, energy saving resources already in use, and the potential market for energy saving devices in laundromats was collected through a literature search and interviews with local laundromat operators in Fort Collins, Colorado. A brief survey of time-use patterns in two local laundromats was conducted. The results were used, with additional information from interviews with owners, as the basis for the statistical model developed. Mathematical models for the advanced and conventional types were developed and the resulting computer program listed. Computer simulations were made using a variety of parameters; for example, different load profiles, hold-up volumes, wall resistances, and wall areas. The computer simulation results are discussed with regard to the overall conclusions. Various materials were explored for use in fabricating the appliance. Resistance to corrosion, workability, and overall suitability for laundromat installations were considered for each material.

  12. "Smart" Multifunctional Polymers for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles McCormick; Andrew Lowe

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein we report the synthesis and solution characterization of a novel series of AB diblock copolymers with neutral, water-soluble A blocks comprised of N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) and pH-responsive B blocks of N,N-dimethylvinylbenzylamine (DMVBA). To our knowledge, this represents the first example of an acrylamido-styrenic block copolymer prepared directly in homogeneous aqueous solution. The best blocking order (using polyDMA as a macro-CTA) was shown to yield well-defined block copolymers with minimal homopolymer impurity. Reversible aggregation of these block copolymers in aqueous media was studied by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. Finally, an example of core-crosslinked micelles was demonstrated by the addition of a difunctional crosslinking agent to a micellar solution of the parent block copolymer. Our ability to form micelles directly in water that are responsive to pH represents an important milestone in developing ''smart'' multifunctional polymers that have potential for oil mobilization in Enhanced Oil Recovery Processes.

  13. Resource recovery and epidemiology of anaerobic wastewater treatment process in a controlled ecological life support system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K.; Hunt, M.D.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of work accomplished under two different areas: (1) Resource Recovery of an Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment process, and (2) Epidemiological Study of an Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Process are documented. The first part of the work was to set up and test three anaerobic digesters and then run these three digesters with a NASA-simulated wastewater. The second part of the work was to use a multi-drug resistant strain of Salmonella choleraesuis as the indicator bacteria for the epidemiological study. Details of these two parts can be found in two master`s theses and are described in Sections 3 and 4 of this report. Several important results condensed from these two parts are summarized in Section 2.

  14. Correlation of Beam Electron and LED Signal Losses under Irradiation and Long-term Recovery of Lead Tungstate Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Batarin; J. Butler; A. M. Davidenko; A. A. Derevschikov; Y. M. Goncharenko; V. N. Grishin; V. A. Kachanov; A. S. Konstantinov; V. I. Kravtsov; Y. Kubota; V. S. Lukanin; Y. A. Matulenko; Y. M. Melnick; A. P. Meschanin; N. E. Mikhalin; N. G. Minaev; V. V. Mochalov; D. A. Morozov; L. V. Nogach; A. V. Ryazantsev; P. A. Semenov; V. K. Semenov; K. E. Shestermanov; L. F. Soloviev; S. Stone; A. V. Uzunian; A. N. Vasiliev; A. E. Yakutin; J. Yarba

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation damage in lead tungstate crystals reduces their transparency. The calibration that relates the amount of light detected in such crystals to incident energy of photons or electrons is of paramount importance to maintaining the energy resolution the detection system. We report on tests of lead tungstate crystals, read out by photomultiplier tubes, exposed to irradiation by monoenergetic electron or pion beams. The beam electrons themselves were used to measure the scintillation light output, and a blue light emitting diode (LED) was used to track variations of crystals transparency. We report on the correlation of the LED measurement with radiation damage by the beams and also show that it can accurately monitor the crystals recovery from such damage.

  15. Important Trinity / NERSC-8 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RFP Important Trinity NERSC-8 Documents Important Trinity NERSC-8 Documents Trinity NERSC-8 Use Case Scenarios for Burst Buffer and Power Management PDF Facility Limits...

  16. Randomization tests for quantifying species importance to ecosystem function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    and grasses on soil properties in a variety of eco- systems (see Binkley & Giardina 1998; Schlesinger, such as legumes, on biodiversity­productivity relation- ships in grasslands (Spehn et al. 2002), to name just

  17. Microbial enhanced oil recovery research. [Peptides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, M.M.; Georgiou, G. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface active lipopeptide produced by Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 was isolated to near apparent homogeneity. NMR experiments revealed that this compound consists of a heptapeptide with an amino acid sequence similar to surfactin and a heterogeneous fatty acid consisting of the normal-, anteiso-, and iso- branched isomers. The surface activity of the B. licheniformis JF-2 surfactant was shown to depend on the presence of fermentation products and is strongly affected by the pH. Under conditions of optimal salinity and pH the interfacial tension against decane was 6 [times] 10[sup 3] mN/m which is one of the lowest values ever obtained with a microbial surfactant. Microbial compounds which exhibit particularly high surface activity are classified as biosurfactants. Microbial biosurfactants include a wide variety of surface and interfacially active compounds, such as glycolipids, lipopeptides polysaccharideprotein complexes, phospholipids, fatty acids and neutral lipids. Biosurfactants are easily biodegradable and thus are particularly suited for environmental applications such as bioremediation and the dispersion of oil spills. Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 has been shown to be able to grow and produce a very effective biosurfactant under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in the presence of high salt concentrations. The production of biosurfactants in anaerobic, high salt environments is potentially important for a variety of in situ applications such as microbial enhanced oil recovery. As a first step towards evaluating the commercial utility of the B. licheniformis JF-2 surfactant, we isolated t-he active. compound from the culture supernatant, characterized its chemical structure and investigated its phase behavior. We found that the surface activity of the surfactant is strongly dependent on the pH of the aqueous. phase. This may be important for the biological function of the surfactant and is of interest for several applications in surfactancy.

  18. Modeling of irradiation embrittlement and annealing/recovery in pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, R.G.; Freyer, P.D. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) annealing studies are interpreted in light of the current understanding of radiation embrittlement phenomena in RPV steels. An extensive RPV irradiation embrittlement and annealing database has been compiled and the data reveal that the majority of annealing studies completed to date have employed test reactor irradiated weldments. Although test reactor and power reactor irradiations result in similar embrittlement trends, subtle differences between these two damage states can become important in the interpretation of annealing results. Microstructural studies of irradiated steels suggest that there are several different irradiation-induced microstructural features that contribute to embrittlement. The amount of annealing recovery and the post-anneal re-embrittlement behavior of a steel are determined by the annealing response of these microstructural defects. The active embrittlement mechanisms are determined largely by the irradiation temperature and the material composition. Interpretation and thorough understanding of annealing results require a model that considers the underlying physical mechanisms of embrittlement. This paper presents a framework for the construction of a physically based mechanistic model of irradiation embrittlement and annealing behavior.

  19. RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    several years of site characterization and baseline studies necessary to advance CO2 injection tests that could yield important EOR and storage findings. Numerous...

  20. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery Program Plan Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery Program Plan Microsoft Word - OE PSRP June 5 2009...

  1. Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number 1910-5149 Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number...

  2. South Carolina Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    South Carolina Recovery Act State Memo South Carolina has substantial nuclear and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful...

  3. Washington Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery Act State Memo Washington State has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  4. Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special Notice Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special...

  5. advanced oil recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known 4 Enhanced oil recovery through water imbibition in fractured...

  6. actinides recovery rar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known 111 Key recovery in a business environment Computer Technologies...

  7. abnormal metabolic recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known 140 Key recovery in a business environment Computer Technologies...

  8. advanced secondary recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known 116 Key recovery in a business environment Computer Technologies...

  9. FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act - Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR) FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act - Integrated...

  10. Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs (August 2013) Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid...

  11. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Invesment Grant Awards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Invesment Grant Awards- By Category Updated July 2010 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Invesment Grant Awards- By Category Updated July...

  12. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA, clean energy projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA, clean energy projects, energy efficiency, smart grid, alternative fuels, geothermal energy American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA,...

  13. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through September 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

  14. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013. OE...

  15. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2014. OE ARRA...

  16. Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New Mexico Energy Secretary Chu Announces 384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New...

  17. New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric...

  18. Arizona Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Arizona has substantial natural resources, including coal, solar, and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  19. Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  20. Texas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Texas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, biomass, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making...

  1. Alabama Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama has substantial natural resources, including gas, coal, biomass, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery &...

  2. Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration. Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration. Abstract: A novel EOR method using...

  3. Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming has substantial natural resources including coal, natural gas, oil, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  4. Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  5. Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office...

  6. Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project September...

  7. Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada...

  8. Dynamic Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under Irradiation and Implications for Long-Term Immobilization of Actinides. Dynamic Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under...

  9. President Obama Announces Over $467 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar Energy Projects President Obama Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar...

  10. President Obama Announces Over $467 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    President Obama Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar Energy Projects President Obama Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for...

  11. DOE Offers $15 Million Geothermal Heat Recovery Opportunity ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    15 Million Geothermal Heat Recovery Opportunity DOE Offers 15 Million Geothermal Heat Recovery Opportunity August 25, 2010 - 11:11am Addthis Photo of geothermal power plant....

  12. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers biomass-firedboilers.pdf More Documents &...

  13. Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  14. Montana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Montana has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  15. Alaska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery &...

  16. Kansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, biomass and wind power.The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making...

  17. Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana has substantial natural resources, including abundant oil, gas, coal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  18. Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  19. addiction recovery principles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management, and recovery coaching helped, or are now helping, transform addiction treatment into a more person-centered, holistic, family-centered, and recovery-focused system...

  20. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  1. An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An overview presentation of R&D...

  2. Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry 2005...

  3. Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty...

  4. Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control Overview of progress...

  5. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War...

  6. Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry A...

  7. High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Presentatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Presentation by Capstone Turbine Corporation, June 2011 High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery -...

  8. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards- By Category Updated July 2010 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards- By Category Updated...

  9. Steelmaker Matches Recovery Act Funds to Save Energy & Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and installed with DOE Recovery Act Funding. Blast Furnace Gas Recovery Boiler Provides Steam and Power at Steel Mill More Documents & Publications Capturing Waste Gas: Saves...

  10. americium recovery service: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Asynchronous intrusion recovery for interconnected web services Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Asynchronous intrusion recovery for...

  11. Audit Report: The Department of Energy's American Recovery and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - California State Energy Program Audit Report: The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - California...

  12. RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

  13. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  14. AVTA: ChargePoint America Recovery Act Charging Infrastructure Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act supported a number of projects that together made up the largest ever deployment of plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in the U.S. The following reports describe results of data collected through the Chargepoint America project, which deployed 4,600 public and home charging stations throughout the U.S. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  15. Importance of life cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, J.S.

    1994-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) as a tool to assist the waste professional with integrated waste management. LCA can be the connection between the waste professional and designer/producer to permit the waste professional to encourage the design of products so material recovery is most efficient and markets can be better predicted. The waste professional can better monitor the involvement of the consumer in waste management by using LCA and looking upstream at how the consumer actually reacts to products and packaging. LCA can also help the waste professional better understand the waste stream.

  16. Rateless Codes with Progressive Recovery for Layered Multimedia Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhao; Xu, Mai; Lu, Jianhua

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a novel approach, based on unequal error protection, to enhance rateless codes with progressive recovery for layered multimedia delivery. With a parallel encoding structure, the proposed Progressive Rateless codes (Pro-Rateless) assign unequal redundancy to each layer in accordance with their importance. Each output symbol contains information from all layers, and thus the stream layers can be recovered progressively at the expected received ratios of output symbols. Furthermore, the dependency between layers is naturally considered. The performance of the Pro-Rateless is evaluated and compared with some related UEP approaches. Results show that our Pro-Rateless approach provides better performance both theoretically and numerically.

  17. Strontium-90 and promethium-147 recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoisington, J.E.; McDonell, W.R.

    1982-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium-90 and promethium-147 are fission product radionuclides with potential for use as heat source materials in high reliability, non-interruptible power supplies. Interest has recently been expressed in their utilization for Department of Defense (DOD) applications. This memorandum summarizes the current inventories, the annual production rates, and the possible recovery of Sr-90 and Pm-147 from nuclear materials production operations at Hanford and Savannah River. Recovery of these isotopes from LWR spend fuel utilizing the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant (BNFP) is also considered. Unit recovery costs at each site are provided.

  18. (Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA)); Khan, L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Yang, D. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering coal fines which are currently disposed of with plant effluent streams, in order to produce a fine clean coal product. This product can then be blended with the coarse clean coal from the preparation plant. Recovery of coal from the effluent stream samples will be effected by means of Michigan Technological University's static tube flotation process. This process has been successfully demonstrated on a number of raw coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the combustible matter. The process parameters will be modified so that this technology can be applied to preparation plant effluents in order to recover a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal that is, at a minimum, compatible with the quality of the clean coal currently produced from the preparation plant. The main activities during this period were setting up the static tube test unit to conduct the experimental work as outlined in the project work plan. The first of four effluent slurry samples collected from four operating Illinois preparation plants was tested at Michigan Technological University. The first batch of tests resulted in a clean coal containing 7.5% ash at 94.5% combustible matter recovery. Another test aimed at lowering the ash further analyzed at 3.0% ash and 0.92% total sulfur. In addition, analyses of particle size distribution and sink-float testing of the +200 mesh material were undertaken as a part of the effluent characterization work. 5 tabs.

  19. Importance Driven Rendering Using Importance Information in the Rendering Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Heidrun

    Importance Driven Rendering ­ Using Importance Information in the Rendering Process R. Schultz describes the concept of using importance in- formation in the rendering process. Doing so, we can adapt the rendering time and image quality to the requirements of a user. For that, we discuss two problems

  20. An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

  1. Energy Recovery from Solid Waste for Small Cities - Has the Time Really Come?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, W. T., Jr.; Paxton, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to consider energy recovery from solid waste using modular, two stage incinerations with waste heat recovery....

  2. Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, M.

    applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas...

  3. Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demolished under the Recovery Act program at Los Alamos National Laboratory is now a pile of rubble. Built in 1965, the 34,000-square foot High Temperature Chemistry Facility...

  4. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  5. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  6. Unconventional gas recovery: state of knowledge document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, C.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a synthesis of environmental data and information relevant to the four areas of unconventional gas recovery (UGR) resource recovery: methane from coal, tight western sands, Devonian shales and geopressurized aquifers. Where appropriate, it provides details of work reviewed; while in other cases, it refers the reader to relevant sources of information. This report consists of three main sections, 2, 3, and 4. Section 2 describes the energy resource base involved and characteristics of the technology and introduces the environmental concerns of implementing the technology. Section 3 reviews the concerns related to unconventional gas recovery systems which are of significance to the environment. The potential health and safety concerns of the recovery of natural gas from these resources are outlined in Section 4.

  7. Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping...

  8. Fluid Catalytic Cracking Power Recovery Computer Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samurin, N. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operating conditions. The digital computer model simulates the performance of the axial compressor, power recovery expander, regenerator section, and system pressure drops. The program can simulate the process system design conditions for compatibility...

  9. Accuracy guarantees for l1-recovery ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 5, 2010 ... entries in the signal x (of norm x1 = 5s). On Figure 3 we present the recovery error as a function of s. We run the same simulations in the ...

  10. RECOVERY ACT: TAPOCO PROJECT: CHEOAH UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Paul; 740, 293 Highway; Baden, NC 28009

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Funding Opportunity Announcement Number: DE-FOA-0000120, Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Modernization, Alcoa Power Generating Inc. (APGI), a fully owned subsidiary of Alcoa Inc., implemented major upgrades at its Cheoah hydroelectric facility near Robbinsville, North Carolina.

  11. Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and radioactive waste landfill. MDA-B was used from 1944 to 1948. April 14, 2011 Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment For the first...

  12. Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have the refrigerant recovered in accordance with EPA's requirements for servicing. However, equipment that typically

  13. Autonomous Thruster Failure Recovery for Underactuated Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Miller September 2010 SSL #13­10 #12;2 #12;Autonomous Thruster Failure Recovery for Underactuated Spacecraft Christopher Masaru Pong, David W. Miller September 2010 SSL #12­11 This work is based

  14. Recovery Act State Memos South Dakota

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    solar-wind generates savings for S.D. city ... 6 Clean energy tax credits and grants: 1 For total Recovery Act jobs numbers in South Dakota go to...

  15. Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

    The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping...

  16. Autonomous thruster failure recovery for underactuated spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pong, Christopher Masaru

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thruster failures historically account for a large percentage of failures that have occurred on orbit. Therefore, autonomous thruster failure detection, isolation, and recovery (FDIR) is an essential component to any robust ...

  17. Recovery Act-Funded HVAC projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy was allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to conduct research into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) technologies and...

  18. Pennsylvania Solid Waste- Resource Recovery Development Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act promotes the construction and the application of solid waste disposal/processing and resource recovery systems that preserve and enhance the quality of air, water, and land resources. The...

  19. An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

  20. Recovery Plan Scots Pine Blister Rust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Monitoring and Detection 7 V. Response 8 VI. USDA Pathogens Permits 9 VII. Economic Impact and Compensation Recovery System (NPDRS) called for in Homeland Security Presidential Directive Number 9 (HSPD-9

  1. Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) Launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) Launch Press Kit/AUGUst 2011 #12;http of its four channels to AC-3, making each channel's secondary audio MPEG 1 Layer II. For digital downlink

  2. Fluid Catalytic Cracking Power Recovery Computer Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samurin, N. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operating conditions. The digital computer model simulates the performance of the axial compressor, power recovery expander, regenerator section, and system pressure drops. The program can simulate the process system design conditions for compatibility...

  3. Recovery Act Worker Update: Mike Gunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tire, Brian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mike Gunnels at the Savannah River Site tells how the Recovery Act got him out of unemployment and the benefits of training and teamwork in his new job with the Department of Energy.

  4. Recovery Act Worker Update: Mike Gunnels

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tire, Brian

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Mike Gunnels at the Savannah River Site tells how the Recovery Act got him out of unemployment and the benefits of training and teamwork in his new job with the Department of Energy.

  5. Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy was allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to conduct research into working fluid technologies and applications. Projects funded by the...

  6. Energy Recovery from Potato Chip Fryers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, H. B.; Kympton, H. W.; Arnold, J. W.; Paisan, J. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, operating characteristics, and energy savings from an energy recovery system employed on a potato chip fryer which became operational in December, 1979, is discussed. The design incorporates a modification to an odor control system which...

  7. Recovery Act-Funded Water Heating Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy was allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to conduct research into water heating technologies and applications. Projects funded by the...

  8. Recovery Act State Memos American Samoa

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery Act funds to set up eight anemometers to measure and quantify the territory's wind potential. Award(s): 9.6 million, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant...

  9. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  10. Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Heat Recovery- Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF) Thomas O?Brien Recycled Energy Development, LLC tobrien@recycled-energy.com Submerged Arc Furnaces are used to produce high temperature alloys. These furnaces typically run at 3000oF using...

  11. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruch, M. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -expanding variety of industrial processes. One notable application in recent years has been for combustion airs preheat of fired heaters in petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants. Another recent development has been a waste heat recovery boiler using heat...

  12. Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

  13. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

  14. Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachs, Ely; Mierlo, Frank van; Obama, Barack

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production. To read more about the project: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx#1366 To see more projects funded by the Recovery Act through ARPA-E: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx

  15. Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sachs, Ely; Mierlo, Frank van; Obama, Barack

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production. To read more about the project: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx#1366 To see more projects funded by the Recovery Act through ARPA-E: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx

  16. Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery Technology Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exhaust waste heat recovery systems have the potential to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy for conventional and hybrid electric powertrains spanning passenger to heavy truck applications. This chapter discusses thermodynamic considerations and three classes of energy recovery technologies which are under development for vehicle applications. More specifically, this chapter describes the state-of-the-art in exhaust WHR as well as challenges and opportunities for thermodynamic power cycles, thermoelectric devices, and turbo-compounding systems.

  17. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

  18. Recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swansiger, W.A.

    1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the recovery of tritium from various tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium. More particularly, the invention relates to the recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium wherein the reaction is conducted in a reactor which permits the reaction to occur as a moving front reaction from the point where the tritium enters the reactor charged with uranium down the reactor until the uranium is exhausted.

  19. Advanced Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, G. R.

    ADVANCED FLUIDIZED BED WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS G. R. PETERSON Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office Idaho Falls, Idaho ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industri al Programs, has sponsored... the development of a Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery System (FBWHRS) and a higher temperature variant, the Ceramic Tubular Distributor Plate (CTOP) Fluidized Bed Heat Exchanger (FBHX) system. Both systems recover energy from high-temperature flue gases...

  20. LOWER COLUMBIA SALMON RECOVERY & SUBBASIN PLAN December 2004 RECOVERY GOALS 5-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." This vision for recovery encompasses ESA de-listing goals in the sense that ESA de-listing could be achieved

  1. Effects of nutritional status on metabolic rate, exercise and recovery in a freshwater fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gingerich, Andrew J.; Philipp, D. P.; Suski, C. D.

    2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of feeding on swimming performance and exercise recovery in fish is poorly understood. Examining swimming behavior and physiological status following periods of feeding and fasting is important because wild fish often face periods of starvation. In the current study, researchers force fed and fasted groups of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) of similar sizes for a period of 16 days. Following this feeding and fasting period, fish were exercised for 60 s and monitored for swimming performance and physiological recovery. Resting metabolic rates were also determined. Fasted fish lost an average of 16 g (nearly 12%) of body mass, while force fed fish maintained body mass. Force fed fish swam 28% further and required nearly 14 s longer to tire during exercise. However, only some physiological conditions differed between feeding groups. Resting muscle glycogen concentrations was twofold greater in force fed fish, at rest and throughout recovery, although it decreased in both feeding treatments following exercise. Liver mass was nearly three times greater in force fed fish, and fasted fish had an average of 65% more cortisol throughout recovery. Similar recovery rates of most physiological responses were observed despite force fed fish having a metabolic rate 75% greater than fasted fish. Results are discussed as they relate to largemouth bass starvation in wild systems and how these physiological differences might be important in an evolutionary context.

  2. Research report Axon growth and recovery of function supported by human bone marrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Itzhak

    may be donor-dependent. Similarly, a battery of behavioral tests showed partial recovery in some highlight the need for establishing adequate characterization, including the development of relevant, and characterization. As a 0006-8993/$ - see front matter D 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j

  3. The effect of surface and interfacial tensions upon the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Erasmo Trevino

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF SURFACE AND INTERFACIAL TENSIONS UPON THE RECOVERY OF OIL BY WATER FLOODING A Dissertation By ERASMO T . GUERRERO Approved as to style and content by: J t Q J w & U 7 T Chsfirman of Cfommittee f Head of Department TABLE....................................................................................................... .......... 25 Surface and Interfacial Tensions..........................................................26 Adsorption............................... .................. . ........................................ .......... 31 Flow Tests...

  4. On an inverse problem: the recovery of non-smooth solutions to backward heat equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    On an inverse problem: the recovery of non-smooth solutions to backward heat equation Fabien Ternat solu- tions of backward heat equation. In this paper, we test the viability of using these techniques to recover non-smooth solutions of backward heat equation. In particular, we numerically integrate

  5. Continuous data backup and recovery solutions To support your business objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been specifically tested to support Tivoli storage software. Take advantage of this major breakthroughContinuous data backup and recovery solutions To support your business objectives not only hampers management. · Affordable, easy-to-manage servers -- IBM ~TM xSeries® and IBM ~ BladeCenter® systems not only

  6. ASSESSING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SAFETY AND RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKES USING A SYSTEM-OF-SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by Monte Carlo simulation the probability that the nuclear power plant enters in an unsafe stateASSESSING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SAFETY AND RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKES USING A SYSTEM in which the plant is embedded. As a test system, we consider the impacts produced on a nuclear power plant

  7. BER Estimation for Serial Links Based on Jitter Spectrum and Clock Recovery Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BER Estimation for Serial Links Based on Jitter Spectrum and Clock Recovery Characteristics Dongwoo technique estimates the BER based on the spectral information of jitter and the characteristics of the clock-volume production testing [1]. One of the major contributors to the BER is jitter. Jitter is defined

  8. Evaluate Supply and Recovery of Woody Biomass for Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Biomass Recovery DataContrasting Woody Biomass Recovery Data Forest Biomass Supply in the Southeastern4/11/2011 1 Evaluate Supply and Recovery of Woody Biomass for Energy Production from Natural. Other studies of biomass supply have supply have assumedassumed a technical recovery rate

  9. The Externalities of Strong Social Capital: Post-Tsunami Recovery in Southeast India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Externalities of Strong Social Capital: Post-Tsunami Recovery in Southeast India DANIEL P villages in Tamil Nadu, India following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, this paper demonstrates that high findings have important implications for academic studies of social capital and policy formation for future

  10. Jim Duckworth, WPI Verilog for Testing -Module 61 Test Benches (Test Fixtures)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xinming

    Jim Duckworth, WPI Verilog for Testing - Module 61 Test Benches (Test Fixtures) Verilog for Testing #12;Jim Duckworth, WPI Verilog for Testing - Module 62 Overview · We have concentrated on Verilog for synthesis · Can also use Verilog as a test language · Very important to conduct comprehensive verification

  11. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Wang; H. Xiao; R. May

    1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient and complete recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has proven difficult due to a lack of robust instrumentation that can monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multi-lateral wells. The main objective of the research program is to develop cost-effective, reliable fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring and /or control of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. This report presents the detailed research work and technical progress from October 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999. The research performed over the first year of the program has followed the schedule as proposed, and solid research progress has been made in specification of the technical requirements, design and fabrication of the SCIIB sensor probes, development of the sensor systems, development of DSP-based signal processing techniques, and construction of the test systems. These technical achievements will significantly help to advance continued research on sensor tests and evaluation during the second year of the program.

  12. Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada 1) Determine whether) If a permit is required from the CFIA* (a division of Agriculture Canada), please go to the CFIA website Agency Canada (PHAC) or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). #12;

  13. Resource Recovery Opportunities at America’s Water Resource Recovery Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Resource Recovery Opportunities at America’s Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL

  14. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-dimension, high-ZT BiTe and Pb-based nanocomposites produced with a low-cost scalable process were used for development and testing of TE module prototypes, and demonstration of a waste heat recovery system

  15. Handleiding Import & Export RSS Feeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    Handleiding Import & Export RSS Feeds Version: 1.0 RSS Feeds Date: 17-04-2013 #12;2 Exporteren RSS bestand. 1) Selecteer "Import and export.." 2) Selecteer "Export to a file" en vervolgens "Next" #12;3 3) Selecteer "Feeds" en vervolgens "Next" 4) Selecteer "Export" Wanneer u geen locatie opgeeft, zal Internet

  16. Electrochemical Recovery of Sodium Hydroxide from Alkaline Salt Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Edwards, T.B.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistically designed set of tests determined the effects of current density, temperature, and the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate on the recovery of sodium as sodium hydroxide (caustic) from solutions simulating those produced from the Savannah River Site (SRS) In-Tank Precipitation process. These tests included low nitrate and nitrite concentrations which would be produced by electrolytic nitrate/nitrite destruction. The tests used a two compartment electrochemical cell with a Nafion Type 324 ion-exchange membrane. Caustic was successfully recovered from the waste solutions. Evaluation of the testing results indicated that the transport of sodium across the membrane was not significantly affected by any of the varied parameters. The observed variance in the sodium flux is attributed to experimental errors and variations in the performance characteristics of individual pieces of the organic-based Nafion membrane.Additional testing is recommended to determine the maximum current density, to evaluate the chemical durability of the organic membrane as a function of current density and to compare the durability and performance characteristics of the organic-based Nafion membrane with that of other commercially available organic membranes and the inorganic class of membranes under development by Ceramatec and PNNL.

  17. Evaluation of effects of phenol recovery on biooxidation and tertiary treatment of SRC-I wastewater. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Watt, J.C.; Cowan, W.F.; Schuyler, S.E.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addition of phenol recovery to the wastewater treatment scheme in the Baseline Design for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant was evaluated as a major post-Baseline effort. Phenol recovery affects many downstream processes, but this study was designed to assess primarily its effects on biooxidation and subsequent tertiary treatment. Two parallel treatment schemes were set up, one to treat dephenolated wastewaters and the other for processed nondephenolated wastewaters, a simulation of the Baseline Design. The study focused on comparisons of five areas: effluent quality; system stability; the need for continuous, high-dose powdered activated carbon (PAC) augmentation to the bioreactor; minimum bioreactor hydraulic residence time (HRT); and tertiary treatment requirements. The results show that phenol recovery improves the quality of the bioreactor effluent in terms of residual organics and color. With phenol recovery, PAC augmentation is not required; without phenol recovery, PAC is needed to produce a comparable effluent. Dephenolization also enhances the stability of biooxidation, and reduces the minimum HRT required. With tertiary treatment, both schemes can meet the effluent concentrations published in the SRC-I Final Envivornmental Impact Statement, as well as the anticipated effluent limits. However, phenol recovery does provide a wider safety margin and could eliminate the need for some of the tertiary treatment steps. Based solely on the technical merits observed in this study, phenol recovery is recommended. The final selection should, however, also consider economic tradeoffs and results of other studies such as toxicology testing of the effluents. 34 references, 30 figures and 26 tables.

  18. Alternate Materials for Recovery Boiler Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ever escalating demands for increased efficiency of all types of boilers would most sensibly be realized by an increase in the steam parameters of temperature and pressure. However, materials and corrosion limitations in the steam generating components, particularly the superheater tubes, present major obstacles to boiler designers in achieving systems that can operate under the more severe conditions. This paper will address the issues associated with superheater tube selection for many types of boilers; particularly chemical recovery boilers, but also addressing the similarities in issues for biomass and coal fired boilers. It will also review our recent study of materials for recovery boiler superheaters. Additional, more extensive studies, both laboratory and field, are needed to gain a better understanding of the variables that affect superheater tube corrosion and to better determine the best means to control this corrosion to ultimately permit operation of recovery boilers at higher temperatures and pressures.

  19. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  20. Surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sethl, V.K.; Satchwell, R.M.; Johnson, L.A. Jr.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological studies have shown that there are many surface or near-surface deposits in the United States that contain large quantities of petroleum. In the State of Wyoming, a high concentration of such deposits exists in the Wind River, Big Horn, and Powder River Basins. These shallow deposits typically occur as unconsolidated or friable formations that contain millions of barrels of oil. Conventional petroleum production techniques have been attempted in many of these deposits with little or no economic success. In an attempt to improve the production economics, the Western Research Institute was solicited to develop a technique for the recovery of oil from these deposits. WRI, with support from the Economic and Community Development Division of the State of Wyoming, and as a part of the WRI/US Department of Energy, Jointly Sponsored Research program, proposed to develop, test, and demonstrate a viable and economical technology for the recovery of oil using mining and surface recovery processes. Reneau Energy, Inc. of La Quinta, California, agreed to participate in the project in providing a test site and mined materials. The goal of the proposed project to be completed in two phases, was to develop existing energy resources which are not presently being utilized. Phase 1 of the project, consisting of six specific tasks, was conducted to evaluate the suitability of various surface processing schemes. Phase 1 also included gravity drainage tests to determine if recovery techniques such as horizontal drilling could be applied. Phase 1 work was completed, and a final report was prepared and submitted to the funding agencies. Based on the results obtained in Phase 1 of the project, fluidized-bed based thermal recovery appeared to be a viable option. A 100 tons per day pilot plant was designed, constructed, and operated in the field. This report describes the results and experiences of the Phase 2 testing.

  1. Response of left ventricular ejection fraction to recovery from general anesthesia: measurement by gated radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coriat, P.; Mundler, O.; Bousseau, D.; Fauchet, M.; Rous, A.C.; Echter, E.; Viars, P.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To test the hypothesis that, after anesthesia for noncardiac surgical procedures, the increased cardiac work during recovery induces wall motion and ejection fraction (EF) abnormalities in patients with mild angina pectoris, gated radionuclide angiography was performed in patients undergoing simple cholecystectomy under narcotic-relaxant general anesthesia. The ejection fraction was determined during anesthesia at the end of surgery, and then determined 3 min and 3 hr after extubation. A new angiography was performed 24 hr later, and a myocardial scintigraphy (Thallium 201) was performed during infusion of the coronary vasodilator, dipyridamole. In the first part of the investigation, eight patients without coronary artery disease (CAD) (group 1) and 20 patients with mild angina (group 2) were studied. In the second part of the study, seven patients (group 3) with mild angina pectoris received an intravenous infusion of 0.4 microgram X kg-1 X min-1 of nitroglycerin started before surgery and gradually decreased 4 hr after extubation. In group 1, EF remained unchanged at recovery. In contrast in group 2, EF responded abnormally to recovery: EF decreased from 55% during anesthesia to 45% 3 min after extubation (P less than 0.001). Patients in group 3, who received intravenous nitroglycerin, showed no change of EF at recovery. This study demonstrates that recovery from general anesthesia causes abnormalities in left ventricular function in patients suffering from CAD. These abnormalities are prevented by prophylactic intravenous nitroglycerin.

  2. Oil recovery enhancement from fractured, low permeability reservoirs. Annual report 1990--1991, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, S.W.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint funding by the Department of Energy and the State of Texas has Permitted a three year, multi-disciplinary investigation to enhance oil recovery from a dual porosity, fractured, low matrix permeability oil reservoir to be initiated. The Austin Chalk producing horizon trending thru the median of Texas has been identified as the candidate for analysis. Ultimate primary recovery of oil from the Austin Chalk is very low because of two major technological problems. The commercial oil producing rate is based on the wellbore encountering a significant number of natural fractures. The prediction of the location and frequency of natural fractures at any particular region in the subsurface is problematical at this time, unless extensive and expensive seismic work is conducted. A major portion of the oil remains in the low permeability matrix blocks after depletion because there are no methods currently available to the industry to mobilize this bypassed oil. The following multi-faceted study is aimed to develop new methods to increase oil and gas recovery from the Austin Chalk producing trend. These methods may involve new geological and geophysical interpretation methods, improved ways to study production decline curves or the application of a new enhanced oil recovery technique. The efforts for the second year may be summarized as one of coalescing the initial concepts developed during the initial phase to more in depth analyses. Accomplishments are predicting natural fractures; relating recovery to well-log signatures; development of the EOR imbibition process; mathematical modeling; and field test.

  3. Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. Accomplishments for this period are presented.

  4. User data package for implementation of electrolytic recovery technology in Navy electroplating shops. Final report, March 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, K.; Koff, J.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY94 the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) completed tests on three electrolytic recovery systems used for the recovery of metals and destruction of cyanide from electroplating wastewaters. Field testing and evaluation was conducted at NSY Norfolk, NAWC Indianapolis, and NADEP Cherry Pt. for five metal recovery applications: silver cyanide, copper cyanide, acid copper, electroless nickel, and tin-lead fluoborate. Advanced design features for metal recovery, including enhanced fluidized circulation, specialized oxidizing anodes, and high porous surface area cathodes were evaluated to optimize performance. NFESC demonstrated that electrolytic recovery systems can be adapted for effective use in the Navy plating operations where production is often sporadic as contrasted to industrial plating processes. The electrolytic recovery units removed metal ions from the rinsewater to below 1 ppm for each application. Electrowinning, as an alternative technology, can reduce industrial waste treatment costs and hazardous sludge generated from conventional treatment This User Data Package (UDP) covers the design, operational and maintenance requirements for these electrolytic systems. This UDP will be applicable to small Navy plating shops where closed-loop waste recycling and point source minimization is necessary for environmental compliance and cost competitiveness.

  5. Steam Coal Import Costs - EIA

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 46.96 39.34...

  6. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

  7. Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Camillo, Nicole G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

  8. Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Camillo, Nicole G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY Digesters Do Not Address theMethane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE

  9. Plans for an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Erik [CERN; Bruning, O S [CERN; Calaga, Buchi Rama Rao [CERN; Schirm, Karl-Martin [CERN; Torres-Sanchez, R [CERN; Valloni, Alessandra [CERN; Aulenbacher, Kurt [Mainz; Bogacz, Slawomir [JLAB; Hutton, Andrew [JLAB; Klein, M [University of Liverpool

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline electron accelerator for LHeC and one option for FCC-he is an Energy Recovery Linac. To prepare and study the necessary key technologies, CERNhas started – in collaboration with JLAB and Mainz University – the conceptual design of an ERL Test Facility (ERL-TF). Staged construction will allow the study under different conditions with up to 3 passes, beam energies of up to about 1 GeV and currents of up to 50 mA. The design and development of superconducting cavity modules, including coupler and HOM damper designs, are also of central importance for other existing and future accelerators and their tests are at the heart of the current ERL-TF goals. However, the ERL-TF could also provide a unique infrastructure for several applications that go beyond developing and testing the ERL technology at CERN. In addition to experimental studies of beam dynamics, operational and reliability issues in an ERL, it could equally serve for quench tests of superconducting magnets, as physics experimental facility on its own right or as test stand for detector developments. This contribution will describe the goals and the concept of the facility and the status of the R&D.

  10. Asynchronous intrusion recovery for interconnected web services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabatini, David M.

    Asynchronous intrusion recovery for interconnected web services Ramesh Chandra, Taesoo Kim, and tracking down and recovering from such an attack re- quires significant manual effort. Web services for such web services. Aire addresses several challenges, such as propagating repair across services when some

  11. After a Disaster: Recovery Safety Tips (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    /recovery_assistance Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension Service se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas AgriLife Extension Service est...

  12. An Integrated Low Level Heat Recovery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, A. V., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large amount of low level thermal energy is lost to air or water in a typical petroleum refinery. This paper discusses a complex integrated low level heat recovery system that is being engineered for installation in a large petroleum refinery...

  13. After a Disaster: Recovery Safety Tips (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    /recovery_assistance Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension Service se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas AgriLife Extension Service est...

  14. Heat Recovery Boilers for Process Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.; Rentz, J.; Flanagan, D.

    of the use of heat recovery due primarily to process considerations. On the other hand, cost and payback are main considerations in the case of gas turbine and incineration plants, where large quantities of gases are exhausted at temperatures varying from 800...

  15. The Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Jose G.; Lovell, Ashley C.; Kensing, Robert H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M University System Texas Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter, Director College Station B-1456 The Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 Better Estate Plannin CONTENTS Increase in Unified Credit... .................................................................... 7 Repeal of Orphans' Exclusion ............................................................. 7 Delay in the Imposition of New Generation-Skipping Tax .................................... 7 Technical Changes in Special Use Valuation Provisions...

  16. Disaster Resiliency and Recovery: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the nation's leader in energy efficient and renewable energy technologies, practices, and strategies. For the last 15 years, NREL has provided expertise, tools, and innovations to private industry; federal, state, and local governments; non-profit organizations; and communities during the planning, recovery, and rebuilding stages after disaster strikes.

  17. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  18. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 West Drilling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    President of Cascade Drilling, Bruce, talks about his contract with the Department of Energy and what his team is doing to improve water treatment and environmental cleanup. The small business owner hits on how the Recovery Act saved him from downsizing and helped him stay competitive and safe on site.

  19. Energy Recovery from Potato Chip Fryers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, H. B.; Kympton, H. W.; Arnold, J. W.; Paisan, J. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permits heat recovery from the fryer cooking fumes. The fumes consist primarily of water vapor (11 psia) and air (3.7 psia) at a temperature of 275 F. About 10% of the available energy is dissipated in a scrubber which removes particulate material...

  20. Waste water treatment and metal recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Waste water treatment and metal recovery Nickel catalysts for hydrogen production Nickel and single versions of which contained cobalt, chromium, carbon, molybdenum, tungsten, and nickel. In 1911 and 1912% on their stainless steel production. The company paid sizable dividends to its owners until it was dissolved

  1. Avoided Gigawatts Through Utility Capital Recovery Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frosenfeld, A. N.; Verdict, M. E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structure is possible through the use of capital recovery fees for new electric meter hookups similar to those commonly used for new water and wastewater hookups where the developer/owner is required to capitalize the marginal cost of new demand. By giving...

  2. Evaluation of solvent-based in situ processes for upgrading and recovery of heavy oil bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerksen, J.H.; Eloyan, A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solvent-based in situ recovery processes have been proposed as lower cost alternatives to thermal processes for recovery of heavy oil and bitumen. Advantages of solvent based processes are: reduced steam requirements, reduced water treating, and in situ upgrading of the produced oil. Lab results and process calculations show that low-pressure, low-energy solvent-based in situ processes have considerable technical and economic potential for upgrading and recovery of bitumen and heavy oil. In a lab flow test using Athabasca tar sand and propane as solvent, 50 percent of the bitumen was recovered as upgraded oil. Relative to the raw bitumen, API gravity increased by about 10{degrees}API, viscosity was reduced 30-fold, sulfur content was reduced about 50 percent, and metals content was also substantially reduced. Process uncertainties that will have a major impact on economics are: (1) oil production rate, (2) oil recovery, (3) extent of in situ upgrading, and (4) solvent losses. Additional lab development and field testing are required to reduce these process uncertainties and to predict commercial-scale economics.

  3. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 21, 2011 Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers re- cently cleaned up a second...

  4. Industrial HVAC Air-to-Air Energy Recovery Retrofit Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, E. L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrofitting air-to-air energy recovery equipment is relatively simply to design and easy to install. Additionally, HVAC energy recovery is almost risk free when compared to process retrofit. Life cycle cost analysis is the best way to illustrate...

  5. ADAPTIVE SENSING FOR SPARSE SIGNAL RECOVERY Jarvis Haupt, Robert Nowak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Rui

    ADAPTIVE SENSING FOR SPARSE SIGNAL RECOVERY Jarvis Haupt, Robert Nowak University of Wisconsin remains stable in the presence of random noise; i.e., the recovery degrades gracefully, but markedly

  6. advanced heat recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling,000 tons (Standby) (average) Heat Recovery 13.5 MW 5.6MW 1 MW...

  7. BRIEF REPORT Autonomic recovery and habituation in social anxiety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    trait socially anxious (HTSA) and low trait socially anxious (LTSA) individuals show comparable between groups might emerge during recovery or habituation, 35 HTSA and LTSA participants gave two the LTSA participants, autonomic measures showed comparable reactivity, habituation, and recovery

  8. Mineral Nutrient Recovery from Pyrolysis Co-Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Jatara Rob

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -bed reactors located in College Station, TX and Wyndmoor, PA. Nutrient recoveries, on a feedstock basis, were calculated for a comparison of reactor efficiencies. In addition to nutrient recoveries, physical and chemical properties of input biomass and of bio...

  9. Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure Henrik B. Mller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure Henrik B. Møller Danish Institute This thesis, entitled "Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure" is presented in partial of digested and separated products.................... 13 3. Methane productivity and greenhouse gas emissions

  10. 2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program 2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies...

  11. Secretary Chu Announces $93 Million from Recovery Act to Support...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    93 Million from Recovery Act to Support Wind Energy Projects Secretary Chu Announces 93 Million from Recovery Act to Support Wind Energy Projects April 29, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis...

  12. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery Act-Funded A123 Systems Battery Plant Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery Act-Funded A123 Systems Battery Plant...

  13. Development of More Effective Biosurfactants for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInerney, M.J.; Mouttaki, H.; Folmsbee, M.; Knapp, R.; Nagle, D.

    2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research was to develop effective biosurfactant production for enhanced oil recovery in the United States.

  14. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) -...

  15. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications...

  16. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...

  17. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

  18. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat...

  19. Optimization Online - Sparse Recovery on Euclidean Jordan Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingchen Kong

    2013-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 3, 2013 ... Keywords: Sparse recovery on Euclidean Jordan algebra, nuclear norm minimization, restricted isometry property, null space property, ...

  20. 200,000 homes weatherized under the Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today Vice President Biden announced that the Weatherization Assistance Program has weatherized 200,000 homes under the Recovery Act.

  1. Kraft lignin recovery by ultrafiltration: economic feasibility and impact on the kraft recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkman, A.G.; Gratzl, J.S.; Edwards, L.L.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread use of the kraft pulping process could provide a ready supply of lignin materials for many uses. Simulation studies demonstrate that recovery of the high-molecular-weight kraft lignin by ultrafiltration of a fraction of the black liquor flow is attractive from both an economic and an operational standpoint. Benefits are derived from relief of a furnace-limited recovery system and from the marketing of the lignin or modified lignin products. 10 references.

  2. Recovery of uranium from seawater by composite fiber adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubuke, Y.; Aoki, T.; Tanaka, H.; Tabushi, I. (Dept. of Synthetic Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Yoshida, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606 (JP)); Kamaishi, T.; Hagiwara, I. (Polymers Research Lab., Toray Industries Inc., Sonoyama 3-2-1, Ohtsu 520 (JP))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors of this paper developed a composite fiber adsorbent (CFA) to entrap finely powdered amidoxime into fibrils of supporting material with silica in a previous report. This was further tested for uranyl recovery directly from seawater. The adsorption rate showed a flow rate dependence with almost a saturation value of {approximately}100 {mu}g of U/g of CFA at a mean flow rate of sea current. Chemical as well as physical deterioration was overcome by using 1 N NaHCO{sub 3} and 0.72 M NaCl as liberating and washing agents, to keep the pH and ionic strength, respectively, constant, and the initial adsorption rate was maintained even after a recycle time of 50. A continuous passage of seawater showed a linear increase of the adsorption to afford 1560 {mu}g of U/g of CFA after 3 weeks.

  3. Evaluation of Reservoir Wettability and its Effect on Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, Jill S.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this five-year project are: (1) to achieve improved understanding of the surface and interfacial properties of crude oils and their interactions with mineral surfaces, (2) to apply the results of surface studies to improve predictions of oil production from laboratory measurements, and (3) to use the results of this research to recommend ways to improve oil recovery by waterflooding. During the second year of this project we have tested the generality of the proposed mechanisms by which crude oil components can alter wetting. Using these mechanisms, we have begun a program of characterizing crude oils with respect to their wettability altering potential. Wettability assessment has been improved by replacing glass with mica as a standard surface material and crude oils have been used to alter wetting in simple square glass capillary tubes in which the subsequent imbibition of water can be followed visually.

  4. Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in research on methane recovery from coalbeds, eastern gas shales, western gas sands, and geopressured aquifers. In the methane from coalbeds project, data on information evaluation and management, resource and site assessment and characterization, model development, instrumentation, basic research, and production technology development are reported. In the methane from eastern gas shales project, data on resource characterization and inventory, extraction technology, and technology testing and verification are presented. In the western gas sands project, data on resource assessments, field tests and demonstrations and project management are reported. In the methane from geopressured aquifers project, data on resource assessment, supporting research, field tests and demonstrations, and technology transfer are reported.

  5. Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexin Wang

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

  6. Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor; Silin, Dimitriy Borisovic; De, Asoke Kumar

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

  7. Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor (Oakland, CA); Silin, Dimitriy Borisovich (Pleasant Hill, CA); De, Asoke Kumar (San Jose, CA)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

  8. Coking Coal Import Costs - EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 48.67 46.59 49.25 78.98...

  9. Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigations Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-51324 Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics leading to partial recovery of heat conducted through the wall. The Infiltration Heat Recovery (IHR) factor was introduced to quantify the heat recovery and correct the conventional calculations

  10. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller

    2006-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A mixture of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. The mixture is single phase for higher salinity or calcium concentrations than that for either surfactant used alone. This makes it possible to inject the surfactant slug with polymer close to optimal conditions and yet be single phase. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. It uses partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for mobility control. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of naphthenic soap and significant reduction of synthetic surfactant adsorption. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT takes advantage of the observation that the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Even for a fixed ratio of soap to surfactant, the range of salinity for low IFT was wider than that reported for surfactant systems in the literature. Low temperature, forced displacement experiments in dolomite and silica sandpacks demonstrate that greater than 95% recovery of the waterflood remaining oil is possible with 0.2% surfactant concentration, 0.5 PV surfactant slug, with no alcohol. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the role of soap/surfactant ratio on passage of the profile through the ultralow IFT region, the importance of a wide salinity range of low IFT, and the importance of the viscosity of the surfactant slug. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs as well as a drive fluid for ASP flooding. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. It has been modified to represent the effects of a change in wettability produced by surfactant injection.

  11. Evaluation of reservoir wettability and its effect on oil recovery. Annual report, February 1, 1996--January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, J.S.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first year of the project, {open_quotes}Evaluation of Reservoir Wettability and its Effect on Oil Recovery.{close_quotes} The objectives of this five-year project are: (1) to achieve improved understanding of the surface and interfacial properties of crude oils and their interactions with mineral surfaces, (2) to apply the results of surface studies to improve predictions of oil production from laboratory measurements, and (3) to use the results of this research to recommend ways to improve oil recovery by waterflooding. During the first year of this project we have focused on understanding the interactions between crude oils and mineral surfaces that establish wetting in porous media. Mixed-wetting can occur in oil reservoirs as a consequence of the initial fluid distribution. Water existing as thick films on flat surfaces and as wedges in comers can prevent contact of oil and mineral. Water-wet pathways are thus preserved. Depending on the balance of surface forces-which depend on oil, solid, and brine compositions-thick water films can be either stable or unstable. Water film stability has important implications for subsequent alteration of wetting in a reservoir. On surfaces exposed to oil, the components that are likely to adsorb and alter wetting can divided into two main groups: those containing polar heteroatoms, especially organic acids and bases; and the asphaltenes, large molecules that aggregate in solution and precipitate upon addition of n-pentane and similar agents. In order to understand how crude oils interact with mineral surfaces, we must first gather information about both these classes of compounds in a crude oil. Test procedures used to assess the extent of wetting alteration include adhesion and adsorption on smooth surfaces and spontaneous imbibition into porous media. Part 1 of this project is devoted to determining the mechanisms by which crude oils alter wetting.

  12. Composite tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers: A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keiser, J.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in the mid-1960s, increasing energy costs in Finland and Sweden made energy recovery more critical to the cost-effective operation of a kraft pulp mill. Boiler designers responded to this need by raising the steam operating pressure, but almost immediately the wall tubes in these new boilers began to corrode rapidly. Test panels installed in the walls of the most severely corroding boiler identified austenitic stainless steel as sufficiently resistant to the new corrosive conditions, and discussions with Sandvik AB, a Swedish tube manufacturer, led to the suggestion that coextruded tubes be used for water wall service in kraft recovery boilers. Replacement of carbon steel by coextruded tubes has solved most of the corrosion problems experienced by carbon steel wall tubes, however, these tubes have not been problem-free. Beginning in early 1995, a multidisciplinary research program funded by the US Department of Energy was established to investigate the cause of cracking in coextruded tubes and to develop improved materials for use in water walls and floors of kraft recovery boilers. One portion of that program, a state-of-the-art review of public- and private-domain documents related to coextruded tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers is reported here. Sources of information that were consulted for this review include the following: tube manufacturers, boiler manufacturers, public-domain literature, companies operating kraft recovery boilers, consultants and failure analysis laboratories, and failure analyses conducted specifically for this project. Much of the information contained in this report involves cracking problems experienced in recovery boiler floors and those aspects of spout and air-port-opening cracking not readily attributable to thermal fatigue. 61 refs.

  13. Wettability and Oil Recovery by Imbibition and Viscous Displacement from Fractured and Heterogeneous Carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman R. Morrow; Jill Buckley

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About one-half of U.S. oil reserves are held in carbonate formations. The remaining oil in carbonate reservoirs is regarded as the major domestic target for improved oil recovery. Carbonate reservoirs are often fractured and have great complexity even at the core scale. Formation evaluation and prediction is often subject to great uncertainty. This study addresses quantification of crude oil/brine/rock interactions and the impact of reservoir heterogeneity on oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement from pore to field scale. Wettability-alteration characteristics of crude oils were measured at calcite and dolomite surfaces and related to the properties of the crude oils through asphaltene content, acid and base numbers, and refractive index. Oil recovery was investigated for a selection of limestones and dolomites that cover over three orders of magnitude in permeability and a factor of four variation in porosity. Wettability control was achieved by adsorption from crude oils obtained from producing carbonate reservoirs. The induced wettability states were compared with those measured for reservoir cores. The prepared cores were used to investigate oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement. The results of imbibition tests were used in wettability characterization and to develop mass transfer functions for application in reservoir simulation of fractured carbonates. Studies of viscous displacement in carbonates focused on the unexpected but repeatedly observed sensitivity of oil recovery to injection rate. The main variables were pore structure, mobility ratio, and wettability. The potential for improved oil recovery from rate-sensitive carbonate reservoirs by increased injection pressure, increased injectivity, decreased well spacing or reduction of interfacial tension was evaluated.

  14. Proposed Guideline Clarifications for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Erik; Kansa, Eric C; Yee, Raymond

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    th align="right" valign="top">CFDA: Design Recovery> 1642990396473 CFDA>2004031CFDA> CFDA-title>Design Recovery Transparency

  15. Imaging of CO2 injection during an enhanced-oil-recovery experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection during an Enhanced-Oil-Recovery Experiment RolandEnergy (DOE) as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project, was

  16. Preface: The Dalmarnock Fire Tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torero, Jose L; Carvel, Ricky O

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the current state of the art, the vibrancy of the profession and existing data from numerous large scale tests, why are new large scale experiments like the Dalmarnock Tests important or, indeed, even necessary?

  17. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECT OF DYNAMIC FEED CONDITIONS ON WATER RECOVERY FROM IC ENGINE EXHAUST BY CAPILLARY CONDENSATION WITH INORGANIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL] [ORNL; Bischoff, Brian L [ORNL] [ORNL; Hunter, James A [ORNL] [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL] [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inorganic membrane water recovery concept is evaluated as a method to recovering water from the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. Integrating the system on-board a vehicle would create a self-sustaining water supply that would make engine water injection technologies consumer transparent . In laboratory experiments, water recovery from humidified air was measured to evaluate how different operating parameters affect the membrane system s efficiency. The observed impact of transmembrane pressure and gas flow rate suggest that gas residence time is more important than water flux through the membrane. Heat transfer modeling suggests that increasing membrane length can be used to improve efficiency and allow greater flow per membrane, an important parameter for practical applications where space is limited. The membrane water recovery concept was also experimentally validated by extracting water from diesel exhaust coming from a stationary generator. The insight afforded by these studies provides a basis for developing improved membrane designs that balance both efficiency and cost.

  18. The physical separation and recovery of metals from wastes. Process engineering for the chemical, metals and minerals industries, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veasey, T.J.; Wilson, R.J. (eds.) (Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical Engineering); Squires, D.M. (ed.) (Newell Engineering Ltd., Redditch (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book deals with the physical processes used for the separation of secondary metals from waste sources. The introduction briefly considers the history of the secondary metals industries, defines the terms used in materials recycling and discusses the potential for resource recovery and improved processing. A comprehensive survey is given of the unit operations employed for metals recovery and reclamation, and this is followed by detailed descriptions of processes used to treat fragmentized metal wastes and granulated metal wastes. The final chapter reviews the processing of urban wastes for metals recovery, and gives details of modern plant and practices. The volume aims to bring together technical information on metals recovery from a wide range of sources in order to give a unified review of an important engineering and environmental topic. Topics include: general definitions used in materials recycling; the potential for resource recovery; secondary metals; ranking of scrap; the potential for improved processing; comminution; physical separation methods; the scrap industry; automobile composition; shredders; non-magnetic processing; metal reclamation processes; waste tire processing; battery processing; thermal processing systems; composition of urban waste; and material recovery.

  19. Microbial enhancement of oil recovery: Recent advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Woodhead, A.D.; Vivirito, K.J. (eds.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During recent years, systematic, scientific, and engineering effort by researchers in the United States and abroad, has established the scientific basis for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) technology. The successful application of MEOR technology as an oil recovery process is a goal of the Department of Energy (DOE). Research efforts involving aspects of MEOR in the microbiological, biochemical, and engineering fields led DOE to sponsor an International Conference at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1992, to facilitate the exchange of information and a discussion of ideas for the future research emphasis. At this, the Fourth International MEOR Conference, where international attendees from 12 countries presented a total of 35 papers, participants saw an equal distribution between research'' and field applications.'' In addition, several modeling and state-of-the-art'' presentations summed up the present status of MEOR science and engineering. Individual papers in this proceedings have been process separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Recovery Boiler Superheater Ash Corrosion Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University] [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations] [FPInnovations

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the trend towards increasing the energy efficiency of black liquor recovery boilers operated in North America, there is a need to utilize superheater tubes with increased corrosion resistance that will permit operation at higher temperatures and pressures. In an effort to identify alloys with improved corrosion resistance under more harsh operating conditions, a field exposure was conducted that involved the insertion of an air-cooled probe, containing six candidate alloys, into the superheater section of an operating recovery boiler. A metallographic examination, complete with corrosion scale characterization using EMPA, was conducted after a 1,000 hour exposure period. Based on the results, a ranking of alloys based on corrosion performance was obtained.

  1. Microbial enhanced oil recovery and compositions therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryant, Rebecca S. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for microbial enhanced oil recovery, wherein a combination of microorganisms is empirically formulated based on survivability under reservoir conditions and oil recovery efficiency, such that injection of the microbial combination may be made, in the presence of essentially only nutrient solution, directly into an injection well of an oil bearing reservoir having oil present at waterflood residual oil saturation concentration. The microbial combination is capable of displacing residual oil from reservoir rock, which oil may be recovered by waterflooding without causing plugging of the reservoir rock. Further, the microorganisms are capable of being transported through the pores of the reservoir rock between said injection well and associated production wells, during waterflooding, which results in a larger area of the reservoir being covered by the oil-mobilizing microorganisms.

  2. Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

  3. Prioritizing material recovery for end-of-life printed circuit boards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xue, E-mail: xxw6590@rit.edu [Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Gaustad, Gabrielle, E-mail: gabrielle.gaustad@rit.edu [Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Material recovery driven by composition, choice of ranking, and weighting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Economic potential for new recycling technologies quantified for several metrics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Indicators developed for materials incurring high eco-toxicity costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methodology useful for a variety of stakeholders, particularly policy-makers. - Abstract: The increasing growth in generation of electronic waste (e-waste) motivates a variety of waste reduction research. Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are an important sub-set of the overall e-waste stream due to the high value of the materials contained within them and potential toxicity. This work explores several environmental and economic metrics for prioritizing the recovery of materials from end-of-life PCBs. A weighted sum model is used to investigate the trade-offs among economic value, energy saving potentials, and eco-toxicity. Results show that given equal weights for these three sustainability criteria gold has the highest recovery priority, followed by copper, palladium, aluminum, tin, lead, platinum, nickel, zinc, and silver. However, recovery priority will change significantly due to variation in the composition of PCBs, choice of ranking metrics, and weighting factors when scoring multiple metrics. These results can be used by waste management decision-makers to quantify the value and environmental savings potential for recycling technology development and infrastructure. They can also be extended by policy-makers to inform possible penalties for land-filling PCBs or exporting to the informal recycling sector. The importance of weighting factors when examining recovery trade-offs, particularly for policies regarding PCB collection and recycling are explored further.

  4. Application of computed tomography to enhanced oil recovery studies in naturally fractured reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fineout, James Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , they developed both a single matrix block model and a dual matrix block model with variable fracture width. These tests related imbibition theory with regard to matrix block size, permeability and fluid viscosity affects on oil recovery. They also determined... in naturally fractured reservoirs have relied upon material balance calculations to determine saturation changes. Through the use of Computed Tomography scanning, we have developed a technique not only to determine saturation changes but also positional...

  5. Investigations of nonsurgical embryo recovery in swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altenhof, Russell Lynn

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject. : Animal Science INVESTIGATIONS OF NONSURGICAL EMBRYO RECOVERY IN SWINE A Thesis by RUSSELL LYNN ALTENHOF Approved as to style and content by: D C. K ae er (Co-Chairman of Committee) T. D. Tanksle , Jr. (Co-Chairman of Committee... and Krall, 1977). Recent evidence indicates that beta adrenegic agonists stimulate cANP- + + dependent phosphorylation and Na /K transport that + + in turn stimulated Na /Ca exchange at the plasma membrane or in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (Scheid et al...

  6. Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in response to production from different horizons is studied using numerical simulation methods. The Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya is used as an example where a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlies the main liquid-dominated reservoir. The possibility of improving energy recovery from vapor-dominated reservoirs by tapping deeper horizons is considered.

  7. Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the flow properties for compressor selection? What controls should be incorporated? How much operator and maintenance effort will be required for safe, efficient operation? What kind of process and hardware problems should be watched for? When...? This paper will touch on all these issues. SYSTEM CONFIGURATION A schematic of a typical refinery flare gas recovery facility is shown in Figure I. The facilities include the following pieces of equipment: - compressor suction drum - compressor set...

  8. HVAC Energy Recovery Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnier, R. J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . As shown in Chart 5, the power requirements to operate an energy recovery system are a significant factor in the economic evaluations of the project as well as the additional costs for auxiliary components. These extra costs must be included... in the overall feasibility analysis. Chart 5 - Auxiliary Components FAN TYPE SUPPLY EXHAUST STATIC PRESSURE EXCHANGER FAN FAN PUMP COMPRESSOR FILTERS CONTROLS REQUIREMENTS, IN WG SUPPLY EXHAUST STATIONARY ? ? ? 1 1.0- 2.0 l.0- 2.0 HEAT WHEEL HYGROSCOPIC...

  9. Financial Recovery: Homeowner's Property Insurance Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granovsky, Nancy L.

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    - owner?s property insurance. Does my property insurance cover water damage? Basic property policies do not insure against flood damage. Homeown- ers have to rely on flood coverage purchased separately through FEMA?s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP... ER-035 9-23 Financial Recovery: Homeowner?s Property Insurance Issues Nancy L. Granovsky, Professor and Extension Family Economics Specialist, The Texas A&M University System People affected by hurricanes have many questions about their home...

  10. Technologies for the separation and recovery of hydrogen from refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcher, F.P.; Miller, G.Q.; Mitariten, M.J. [UOP, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective use and recovery of hydrogen from the major hydrogen-containing streams in the refinery is an important strategy to meet the refining demands of the 1990`s. Hydrogen upgrading in refinery applications can be achieved by pressure swing adsorption (PSA), selective permeation using polymer membranes, and cryogenic separation. Each of these processes has different characteristics which are of advantage in different situations. Process selection and specific application examples are discussed.

  11. The Use of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Recovery from Industrial Off-Gas Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, W. J.; Guerrero, P. S.; Goodell, P. D.

    that for hydrogen produced from steam reforming of natural gas, are at best marginal relative to the competing technologies such as cryogenic, membrane and pressure s~ing adsorption systems. INTRODUCTION Hydrogen is one of the most important chemical species... commercial technologies for hydrogen recovery ar cryogenic separation, pressure swin adsorption CPSA) and membrane separ ation. The two former processes purify the stream by adsorbing 0 freezing out the non-hydrogen com ponents. Cryogenic systems have...

  12. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... forests can be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence...

  13. Automated product recovery in a Hg-196 photochemical isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.

    1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing deposited product from a photochemical reactor used in the enrichment of [sup 196]Hg has been developed and shown to be effective for rapid re-cycling of the reactor system. Unlike previous methods relatively low temperatures are used in a gas and vapor phase process of removal. Importantly, the recovery process is understood in a quantitative manner so that scaling design to larger capacity systems can be easily carried out. 2 figs.

  14. Automated product recovery in a HG-196 photochemical isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing deposited product from a photochemical reactor used in the enrichment of .sup.196 Hg has been developed and shown to be effective for rapid re-cycling of the reactor system. Unlike previous methods relatively low temperatures are used in a gas and vapor phase process of removal. Importantly, the recovery process is understood in a quantitative manner so that scaling design to larger capacity systems can be easily carried out.

  15. SURFACTANT - POLYMER INTERACTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research is to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, adsorption and mobility control. Surfactant--polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation high adsorption and viscous/heterogeneity fingering. A mixture comprising a ''pseudo oil'' with appropriate surfactant and polymer has been selected to study micellar-polymer chemical flooding. The physical properties and phase behavior of this system have been determined. A surfactant-polymer slug has been designed to achieve high efficiency recovery by improving phase behavior and mobility control. Recovery experiments have been performed on linear cores and a quarter 5-spot. The same recovery experiments have been simulated using a commercially available simulator (UTCHEM). Good agreement between experimental data and simulation results has been achieved.

  16. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua-Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Totalmore »recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. Quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.« less

  17. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

  18. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Forthomme, Damien [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hause, Michael L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, Hua-Gen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dagdigian, Paul J. [John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Sears, Trevor J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Hall, Gregory E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Total recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. Quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.

  19. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haselton, Halsey H. (Knoxville, TN); Stirling, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  20. Important material considerations in INTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.A.; Mattas, R.F.; Smith, D.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of important material-related problems were identified and analyzed during the Phase-I study for INTOR. The first wall and divertor collector plate are subjected to severe normal and off-normal conditions. A melt layer is predicted to develop in a bare stainless steel wall under plasma disruptions. Graphite tiles will not melt but they introduce other serious uncertainties into the design. The design strategy for the divertor collector plate focused on separating the surface and high heat flux problems and on utilizing a novel mechanical design concept for attaching tungsten tiles to a stainless steel (or copper) heat sink.

  1. Important Trinity / NERSC-8 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important Trinity / NERSC-8 Documents

  2. IMPORTANCE OF SAFETY CULTURE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitalnik, J.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety Management has lately been considered by some Nuclear Regulatory agencies as the tool on which to concentrate their efforts to implement modern regulation structures, because Safety Culture was said to be difficult to monitor. However, Safety Culture can be assessed and monitored even if it is problematical to make Safety Culture the object of regulation. This paper stresses the feasibility and importance of Safety Culture Assessment based on self-assessment applications performed in several nuclear organizations in Latin America. Reasons and ownership for assessing Safety Culture are discussed, and relevant aspects considered for setting up and programming such an assessment are shown. Basic principles that were taken into account, as well as financial and human resources used in actual self-assessments are reviewed, including the importance of adequate statistical analyses and the necessity of proper feed-back of results. The setting up of action plans to enhance Safety Culture is the final step of the assessment program that once implemented will enable to establish a Safety Culture monitoring process within the organization.

  3. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  4. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  5. Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  6. Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  7. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  8. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman R. Morrow

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  9. Heat recovery and seed recovery development project: preliminary design report (PDR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkett, A. H.; Alexander, K. C.; Bolek, A. D.; Blackman, B. K.; Kurrle, P. E.; Tram, S. V.; Warren, A. M.; Ziobrowski, A. J.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary design and performance characteristics are described of the 20 MWt heat recovery and seed recovery (HRSR) system to be fabricated, installed, and evaluated to provide a technological basis for the design of commercial size HRSR systems for coal-fired open-cycle MHD power plants. The system description and heat and material balances, equipment description and functional requirements, controls, interfacing systems, and operation and maintenance are detailed. Appendices include: (1) recommended environmental requirements for compliance with federal and state of Tennessee regulations, (2) channel and diffuser simulator, (3) equipment arrangement drawings, and (4) channel and diffuser simulator barrel drawings. (WHK)

  10. Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA)); Khan, L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Yang, D. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering the coal fines which are currently disposed of with plant effluent streams in order to produce a fine clean coal product. This product can then be blended with the coarse clean coal from the preparation plant. Recovery of carbonaceous material from the effluent streams will be effected by means of Michigan Technological University's static tube flotation process in conjunction with pyrite depressants. This process has been successfully demonstrated on a number of coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the Btu value. The process parameters will be modified to accept preparation plant effluents in order to produce a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal product that at a minimum is compatible with the quality requirements of the plant clean coal. This report covers the first quarter of the project. The main activities during this period were the drafting of a project work plan and the collection of four coal preparation plant effluent samples for testing. Effluent slurry samples were collected from four operating preparation plants in Illinois and shipped to Michigan Technological University for experimental work.

  11. The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soemarso, Christophorus

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure data. Consequently, reliable imbibition laboratory test data are required. The effects of relative permeability, water and gas, and capillary pressure on the ultimate gas recovery were also in- vestigated. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author' wishes... decrease in initial gas saturation when the desaturation process was used. So, in general, the residual gas saturation is higher when the test is obtained by the resaturation process. His findings supported Osoba s previous work showing that a...

  12. RMOTC - Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sale of Equipment and Materials DOE to Sell NPR-3 Testing Tomorrow's Technology Today RMOTC - Testing - From Lab to Industry, Moving Your Ideas Forward RMOTC provides a neutral,...

  13. Combustion processes in black liquor recovery: Analysis and interpretation of combustion rate data and an engineering design model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrick, W.J.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to develop computational models for predicting the combustion times for black liquor droplets in a recovery furnace environment. These models are needed as an important component of large-scale, global recovery boiler models. The work is divided into two tasks: interpretation of experimental black liquor single droplet combustion data from two laboratories; and formulation and evaluation of computational models for the stages of combustion of black liquor droplets. This report contains the results of the project. 109 refs., 64 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Common Questions Why should I soil test?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Common Questions Why should I soil test? Soil testing is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate nutrient imbalances and understand plant growth. The most important reason to soil test is to have a basis for intelligent application of fertilizer and lime. Testing also allows for growers and homeowners to maintain

  15. Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Blatchford, R.P.; Spears, R.B. [Spears and Associates, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook is intended to assist owners and operators of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations in acquiring some introductory knowledge of the various state agencies, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the many environmental laws, rules and regulations which can have jurisdiction over their permitting and compliance activities. It is a compendium of summarizations of environmental rules. It is not intended to give readers specific working details of what is required from them, nor can it be used in that manner. Readers of this handbook are encouraged to contact environmental control offices nearest to locations of interest for current regulations affecting them.

  16. Industrial Plate Exchangers Heat Recovery and Fouling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, P. H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (still)for separation of light oil from the wash oil,which is then returned to absorber tower.The debenzolised wash 0 0 oil is cooled indirectly to 20 C/30 C before returning to the absorber tower. This is toprevent condensation of water from the gas... Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981 -- c.O.G. LIGHT OIL SCRUBBER COKE OVEN GAS(C.O.G,J BENZINE COOLING WATER BENZOLISED ~WASH OILSTRIPPER CONVENTIONAL LIGHT OIL RECOVERY PLANT DEBENZOLISED WASH OIL / COOLING WATER...

  17. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  18. Plutonium recovery from carbonate wash solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.; Reif, D.J.; Chostner, D.F.; Holcomb, H.P.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodically higher than expected levels of plutonium are found in carbonate solutions used to wash second plutonium cycle solvent. The recent accumulation of plutonium in carbonate wash solutions has led to studies to determine the cause of that plutonium accumulation, to evaluate the quality of all canyon solvents, and to develop additional criteria needed to establish when solvent quality is acceptable. Solvent from three canyon solvent extraction cycles was used to evaluate technology required to measure tributyl phosphate (TBP) degradation products and was used to evaluate solvent quality criteria during the development of plutonium recovery processes. 1 fig.

  19. Enhanced oil recovery projects data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pautz, J.F.; Sellers, C.A.; Nautiyal, C.; Allison, E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project data base is maintained and updated at the Bartlesville Project Office of the Department of Energy. This data base provides an information resource that is used to analyze the advancement and application of EOR technology. The data base has extensive information on 1,388 EOR projects in 569 different oil fields from 1949 until the present, and over 90% of that information is contained in tables and graphs of this report. The projects are presented by EOR process, and an index by location is provided.

  20. material recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy9 EvaluationWHITE ROCK LOSmarit8recovery |

  1. Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for| Department ofRightsSmartManagement RecordsRecovery

  2. Laboratory awards final Recovery Act demolition contracts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratory DirectorsRecovery Act demolition

  3. Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Lab SubcontractoractiveLabRecovery

  4. RECOVERY ACT: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than FINAL Progress ReportRECOVERY ACT:

  5. Recovery Act: Demonstrating The Commercial Feasibility Of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8,Past Opportunities » Recovery

  6. Supercritical Recovery Systems LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co Ltd Place: Wuxi,Energy InformationRecovery

  7. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is not just to commercially produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production volumes and costs.

  8. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, S.

    2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is not just to produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

  9. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

    1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  10. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  11. Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

  12. The recovery of oil from carbonate reservoirs by fluid injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Dwayne Marvin

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hole 70 Neasured and Calculated Productivities Obtained on Wells Completed Through Perforations 39 Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil Throughf low for Stratified Reservoirs- lj. O Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil... index meas- ured on the wells is equal to ths productivity index estimated from cores, In reviewing the published work on the oil recovery by water in]ec- tion to be expected from non-oolitic carbonate formations, dependable methods of prediction...

  13. BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

  14. Incremental natural gas resources through infield reserve growth/secondary natural gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, R.J.; Levey, R.A.; Hardage, B.A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Infield Reserve Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project is to develop, test, and verify technologies and methodologies with near- to midterm potential for maximizing the recovery of natural gasfrom conventional reservoirs in known fields. Additional technical and technology transfer objectives of the SGR project include: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas gulf coast basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications to find secondary gas. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields. To transfer project results to a wide array of natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow units and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify incremental, or secondary, gas.

  15. Disaster Response and Recovery Webinar | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Health and Human Services to evaluate, assess, and mitigate the impacts of climate change on their disaster recovery and response programs. Under the Stafford Act,...

  16. Maine Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State Memo Maine has substantial natural resources, including wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  17. Oregon Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oregon has substantial natural resources, including wind, geothermal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  18. New Hampshire Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Memo New Hampshire has substantial natural resources, including wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  19. Idaho Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Memo Idaho has substantial natural resources, including wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  20. Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    has substantial natural resources, including solar, biomass , geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  1. Missouri Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act State Memo Missouri has substantial natural resources, including wind and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  2. South Dakota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dakota has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  3. Georgia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act State Memo Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  4. Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act State Memo Wisconsin has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)is making a meaningful down...

  5. Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 7, 2011 Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility RICHLAND, Wash. - Construction of the largest ground- water treatment facility at...

  6. RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Energy Recovery Systems...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Energy Recovery Systems and Controlling Exhaust Gases The typical internal combustion engine wastes about 30 percent of its chemical energy in the form of hot exhaust...

  8. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State - Updated November 2011 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards - By State - Updated November 2011 List of selections for the Smart Grid Investment...

  9. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Category Updated November 2011 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards - By Category Updated November 2011 List of selections for the Smart Grid Investment...

  10. West Virginia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    West Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the...

  11. Grant Guidance to Administer the American Recovery and Reinvestment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PROGRAM NOTICE 10-10: REPROGRAMMING TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FUNDS TO PROGRAM OPERATIONS Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)...

  12. Idaho Operations Office: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Update

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Provencher, Rick

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An update from Idaho National Laboratory, Rick Provencher addresses the progress that has been made due to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Bioenergy Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funds; the projects accelerate advanced biofuels RD&D, speed the deployment of commercialization of biofuels, and further the U.S....

  14. Nebraska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Memo Nebraska has substantial natural resources, including oil, coal, wind, and hydro electric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful...

  15. Recovery Act: Enhancing State Energy Assurance | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhancing State Energy Assurance Recovery Act: Enhancing State Energy Assurance States are using these funds to plan for energy supply disruption risks and vulnerabilities to...

  16. Virginia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act State Memo Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on...

  17. Utah Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act State Memo Utah has substantial natural resources, including oil, coal, natural gas, wind, geothermal, and solar power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  18. Mississippi Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mississippi has substantial natural resources, including biomass, oil, coal, and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on...

  19. Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    attended the meeting, where presenters commended the Recovery Act for accelerating Cold War cleanup at SRS and boosting employment and business in the local community. "I go out...

  20. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American...

  1. Iowa Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Memo Iowa has substantial natural resources, including wind power and is the largest ethanol producer in the United States. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  2. Minnesota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind power, and is a large ethanol producer. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  3. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Recovery Act: Geothermal Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recovery Act: Geothermal Data Aggregation: Submission of Information into the National Geothermal Data System, Final Report DOE Project DE-EE0002852 June 24, 2014 Geothermal...

  4. Enhanced oil recovery. Progress review, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details current research in the area of enhanced recovery of petroleum as sponsored by the DOE. Progress reports are provided for over thirty projects.

  5. Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the energy industry, and the general public with reliable information about industrial carbon sequestration and enhanced oil recovery." In the first phase of the research...

  6. LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM 02/11/2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mineral-webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis...

  7. High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    efficiency. The microturbine technology will maximize usable exhaust energy and achieve ultra-low emissions levels. High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery More...

  8. EM Recovery Act Press Releases | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    July 1, 2011 DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last...

  9. Energy Secretary Chu Announces $6 Billion in Recovery Act Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced 6 billion in new funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to accelerate environmental...

  10. Sandia Energy - Upcoming Publication on Recovery Strategies for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disruptions during recovery periods instead of the minimizing makespan (time to repair completion) that traditional project scheduling approaches use. This alternative approach...

  11. From the hills to the mountain. [Oil recovery in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, J.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The oil reserves at Elk Hills field, California, are listed as amounting to 835 million bbl. There is 12 times that amount lying in shallow sands in the San Joaquin Valley, although the oil is much heavier and requires more refining before use. Improved recovery techniques have enabled higher rates of recovery for heavy oil than in the past. Some of these techniques are described, including bottom-hole heating, steam injection, and oil mining. Bottom-hole heating alone raised recovery rates for heavy oil to 25%, and steam injection raised rates to 50%. It is predicted that oil mining may be able to accomplish 100% recovery of the heavy oil.

  12. arachnoid cyst recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R4-Recovery Fehlerklassifikation 12;3 Zweistufige Speicherhierarchie . . . C A D DBMS-Puffer A in der Datenbank (auf Platte) geschrieben werden force - genderte...

  13. affecting molybdenite recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R4-Recovery Fehlerklassifikation 12;3 Zweistufige Speicherhierarchie . . . C A D DBMS-Puffer A in der Datenbank (auf Platte) geschrieben werden force - genderte...

  14. aqueous scrap recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R4-Recovery Fehlerklassifikation 12;3 Zweistufige Speicherhierarchie . . . C A D DBMS-Puffer A in der Datenbank (auf Platte) geschrieben werden force - genderte...

  15. Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    million Recovery Act project completed safely and on schedule, workers demolished 160 towers as tall as 120 feet that were used to operate the X-533 Electrical Switchyard....

  16. Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study 14: Alternate Water Sources,...

  17. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Caterpillar Inc. 2002deerhopmann.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat...

  18. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. 2003deeralgrain.pdf...

  19. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery with a 10% fuel economy improvement without increasing emissions. deer09yang2.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  20. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and...

  1. Solid Waste Disposal Resource Recovery Facilities Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes local governing bodies to form joint agencies to advance the collection, transfer, processing of solid waste, recovery of resources, and sales of recovered resources in...

  2. natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

  3. Willows Aid Flood Recovery in Los Alamos Desert

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Associate Directorate of Environmental Programs (ADEP) has been busy with various flood recovery activities since last fall. 

  4. International considerations associated with economic planning for recovery from a generalized disaster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.W.; Hill, L.J.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses international economic considerations in planning for recovery from a generalized disaster, including the geographical dispersion of economic activity and the importance of the US dollar in international trade. The discussion includes real trade issues and international monetary considerations or financial considerations, emphasizing the relationship between the two. Included in the discussion of international monetary considerations are the causes, consequences, and resolution of six historical financial crises which are used as analogues for planning for restoration of the international monetary system. Additionally, the foundation of the multinational enterprise and its possible roles in recovery are addressed. Although the report addresses several specific disaster scenarios and appropriate policy responses in reaction to them, a number of important general policy guidelines were discussed. First, international cooperation and coordination are of paramount importance in restoring the effective functioning of the international monetary system. Second, a policy of fixed exchange rates in the aftermath of an international disaster is ill-advised. Third, except for commodities crucial to national defense, domestic import and export controls cannot be justified. Fourth, the extent of real trade reduction during a conflict has widespread financial---as well as real---repercussions. The United States probably could withstand real trade disruptions during a conflict more successfully than many of its current trading partners. Finally, multinational enterprises might be important institutions in recovery from both real and monetary standpoints, acting as the international conduit for capital flows, trade flows, and in more serious disasters, price signals and international monetary and financial reconstruction. 91 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. Thermal processes for heavy oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, A.K.; Sarathi, P.S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This status report summarizes the project BE11B (Thermal Processes for Heavy Oil Recovery) research activities conducted in FY93 and completes milestone 7 of this project. A major portion of project research during FY93 was concentrated on modeling and reservoir studies to determine the applicability of steam injection oil recovery techniques in Texas Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoirs. In addition, an in-depth evaluation of a steamflood predictive model developed by Mobil Exploration and Production Co. (Mobil E&P) was performed. Details of these two studies are presented. A topical report (NIPER-675) assessing the NIPER Thermal EOR Research Program over the past 10 years was also written during this fiscal year and delivered to DOE. Results of the Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoir simulation studies indicated that though these reservoirs can be successfully steamflooded and could recover more than 50% of oil-in-place, steamflooding may not be economical at current heavy oil prices. Assessment of Mobil E&P`s steamflood predictive model capabilities indicate that the model in its present form gives reasonably good predictions of California steam projects, but fails to predict adequately the performance of non-California steam projects.

  6. "Smart" Multifunctional Polymers for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles McCormick; Andrew Lowe

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent recommendations made by the Department of Energy, in conjunction with ongoing research at the University of Southern Mississippi, have signified a need for the development of 'smart' multi-functional polymers (SMFPs) for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes. Herein we summarize research from the period of September 2003 through March 2007 focusing on both Type I and Type II SMFPs. We have demonstrated the synthesis and behavior of materials that can respond in situ to stimuli (ionic strength, pH, temperature, and shear stress). In particular, Type I SMFPs reversibly form micelles in water and have the potential to be utilized in applications that serve to lower interfacial tension at the oil/water interface, resulting in emulsification of oil. Type II SMFPs, which consist of high molecular weight polymers, have been synthesized and have prospective applications related to the modification of fluid viscosity during the recovery process. Through the utilization of these advanced 'smart' polymers, the ability to recover more of the original oil in place and a larger portion of that by-passed or deemed 'unrecoverable' by conventional chemical flooding should be possible.

  7. Study seeks to boost Appalachian gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashland Exploration Inc. and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are trying to find ways to increase gas recovery in the Appalachian basin. They are working together to investigate Mississippian Berea sandstone and Devonian shale in a program designed to achieve better understanding and improved performance of tight natural gas formations in the area. This paper reports that three wells on Ashland Exploration acreage in Pike County, Ky., are involved in the research program. Findings from the first two wells will be used to optimize evaluation and completion of the third well. The first two wells have been drilled. Drilling of the third well was under way at last report. Ashland Exploration has been involved with GRI's Devonian shale research since 1988. GRI's initial focus was on well stimulation because Devonian shale wells it reviewed had much lower recoveries than could be expected, based on estimated gas in place. Research during the past few years was designed to improve the execution and quality control of well stimulation.

  8. Phase behavior and oil recovery investigations using mixed and alkaline-enhanced surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; French, T.R.; Noll, L.A.; Munden, S.A.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an evaluation of different mixed surfactant and alkaline-enhanced surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several mixed surfactant systems have been studies to evaluate their oil recovery potential as well as improved adaptability to different ranges of salinity, divalent ion concentrations, and temperature. Several combinations of screening methods were used to help identify potential chemical formulations and determine conditions where particular chemical systems can be applied. The effects of different parameters on the behavior of the overall surfactant system were also studied. Several commercially available surfactants were tested as primary components in the mixtures used in the study. These surfactants were formulated with different secondary as well as tertiary components, including ethoxylated and non-ethoxylated sulfonates and sulfates. Improved salinity and hardness tolerance was achieved for some of these chemical systems. The salinity tolerance of these systems were found to be dependent on the molecular weight, surfactant type, and concentration of the surfactant components.

  9. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1995--June 9, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, L.A.; Sippel, M.A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  10. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1994--June 9, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.; Zinke, S.; Magruder, G.; Eby, D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  11. Ultrasonic reactor for the recovery of bitumen from tar sand: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunger, J.W.; Miller, J.D.; Johnson, S.A.

    1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A bench scale ultrasonic reactor was designed for testing to determine its feasiblity for enhancing the dissolution and extraction of bitumen from Utah tar sands using both solvent and water as a liquid medium for dissolution and extraction and to compare the results. The ultrasonic reactor did not significantly enhance dissolution of bitumen into the sovlent. Ultrasonic energy did appear to enhance intraparticle diffusion in consolidated tar sand. The rate of disengagement of the bitumen from the sand in hot water extraction was slightly enhanced and a continuous flow unit may show promise for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands. Assuming that high recovery efficiency can be obtained, the energy requirements for the ultrasonic reactor did not appear to be prohibitive. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Methane recovery from coalbeds project. Monthly progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress made on the Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project (MRCP) is reported in the Raton Mesa Coal Region. The Uinta and Warrior basin reports have been reviewed and will be published and delivered in early December. A cooperative core test with R and P Coal Company on a well in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was negotiated. In a cooperative effort with the USGS Coal Branch on three wells in the Wind River Basin, desorption of coal samples showed little or no gas. Completed field testing at the Dugan Petroleum well in the San Juan Basin. Coal samples showed minimal gas. Initial desorption of coal samples suggests that at least a moderate amount of gas was obtained from the Coors well test in the Piceance Basin. Field work for the Piceance Basin Detailed Site Investigation was completed. In the Occidental Research Corporation (ORC) project, a higher capacity vacuum pump to increase CH/sub 4/ venting operations has been installed. Drilling of Oxy No. 12 experienced delays caused by mine gas-offs and was eventually terminated at 460 ft after an attempt to drill through a roll which produced a severe dog leg and severely damaged the drill pipe. ORC moved the second drill rig and equipment to a new location in the same panel as Oxy No. 12 and set the stand pipe for Oxy No. 13. Drill rig No. 1 has been moved east of the longwall mining area in anticipation of drilling cross-panel on 500 foot intervals. Waynesburg College project, Equitable Gas Company has received the contract from Waynesburg College and has applied to the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission for a new tariff rate. Waynesburg College has identified a contractor to make the piping connections to the gas line after Equitable establishes their meter and valve requirements.

  13. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keller, A.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test`s ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  14. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with emphasis; (6) detailed study of CH4-CO2 exchange as a unique alternative to recover CH4 gas while sequestering CO2; (7) the relevance of fines in otherwise clean sand sediments on gas recovery and related phenomena such as fines migration and clogging, vuggy structure formation, and gas-driven fracture formation during gas production by depressurization.

  15. Special Report on The Department of Energy's Acquisition Workforce and its Impact on Implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Signed by the President on February 17, 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) seeks to strengthen the U.S. economy through the creation of new jobs, aiding State and local governments with budget shortfalls, and investing in the long-term health of the Nation's economic prosperity. Under the Recovery Act, the Department of Energy will receive approximately $40 billion for various energy, environmental, and science programs and initiatives. To have an immediate stimulative impact on the U.S. economy, the Department's stated goal is to ensure that these funds are spent as expeditiously as possible, without risking transparency and accountability. Given the Department's almost total reliance on the acquisition process (contracts, grants, cooperative agreements, etc.) to carry out its mission, enhanced focus on contract administration and, specifically, the work performed by Federal acquisition officials is of vital importance as the unprecedented flow of funds begins under the Recovery Act.

  16. Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash: pilot plant scale evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C.; Olivares, J.; Coca, P. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, a hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) has been tested at pilot plant scale. The pilot plant flowsheet comprised a first stage of water leaching of FA, and a subsequent selective recovery of the germanium from the leachate by solvent extraction method. The solvent extraction method was based on Ge complexation with catechol in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-catechol complex (Ge(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup 2-}) with an extracting organic reagent (trioctylamine) diluted in an organic solvent (kerosene), followed by the subsequent stripping of the organic extract. The process has been tested on a FA generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The paper describes the designed 5 kg/h pilot plant and the tests performed on it. Under the operational conditions tested, approximately 50% of germanium could be recovered from FA after a water extraction at room temperature. Regarding the solvent extraction method, the best operational conditions for obtaining a concentrated germanium-bearing solution practically free of impurities were as follows: extraction time equal to 20 min; aqueous phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5; stripping with 1 M NaOH, stripping time equal to 30 min, and stripping phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5. 95% of germanium were recovered from water leachates using those conditions.

  17. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Keller, A.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  18. A Full Key Recovery Attack on HMAC-AURORA-512

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Full Key Recovery Attack on HMAC-AURORA-512 Yu Sasaki NTT Information Sharing Platform.yu@lab.ntt.co.jp Abstract. In this note, we present a full key recovery attack on HMAC- AURORA-512 when 512-bit secret keys is 2259 AURORA-512 operations, which is significantly less than the complexity of the exhaustive search

  19. Model-Driven Business Process Recovery , Terence C. Lau2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Ying

    Model-Driven Business Process Recovery Ying Zou1 , Terence C. Lau2 , Kostas Kontogiannis3 , Tack. In this paper, we propose a model-driven business process recovery framework that captures the essential-to-date linkage between business tasks and their implementation in source code, we propose a model-driven business

  20. Homology based algorithm for disaster recovery in wireless networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Homology based algorithm for disaster recovery in wireless networks A. Vergne, I. Flint, L for disaster recovery of wireless networks. We consider a damaged wireless network presenting coverage holes the performances between each other and with known methods. I. INTRODUCTION Wireless networks are present