National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for recognition particle-receptor complex

  1. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print Monday, 27 February 2012 15:06 The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational

  2. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  3. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  4. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  5. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  6. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  7. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in ...

  8. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sign Up for GC Updates Sign Up for GC Updates The Office of the General Counsel maintains listservs and RSS feeds to keep the public up to date about recent actions and legal guidance. Please subscribe to these resources by following the instructions below: GC Hotline Listserv. The DOE General Counsel's Office operates an email hotline for legal questions related to the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA), including the State Energy Program (SEP), Energy Efficiency Conservation Block

  9. Structures of the Signal Recognition Particle Receptor From the Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus: Implications for the Targeting Step at the Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egea, P.F.; Tsuruta, H.; Leon, G.P.de; Napetschnig, J.; Walter, P.; Stroud, R.M.

    2009-05-18

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP {center_dot} magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP {center_dot} SR targeting complexes.

  10. Structure of the Human MutSa DNA Lesion Recognition Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren,J.; Pohlhaus, T.; Changela, A.; Iyer, R.; Modrich, P.; Beese, L.

    2007-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) ensures the fidelity of DNA replication, initiates the cellular response to certain classes of DNA damage, and has been implicated in the generation of immune diversity. Each of these functions depends on MutS{alpha} (MSH2{center_dot}MSH6 heterodimer). Inactivation of this protein complex is responsible for tumor development in about half of known hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer kindreds and also occurs in sporadic tumors in a variety of tissues. Here, we describe a series of crystal structures of human MutS{alpha} bound to different DNA substrates, each known to elicit one of the diverse biological responses of the MMR pathway. All lesions are recognized in a similar manner, indicating that diversity of MutS{alpha}-dependent responses to DNA lesions is generated in events downstream of this lesion recognition step. This study also allows rigorous mapping of cancer-causing mutations and furthermore suggests structural pathways for allosteric communication between different regions within the heterodimer.

  11. T cell receptor recognition of a 'super-bulged' major histocompatibility complex class I?bound peptide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tynan, Fleur E.; Burrows, Scott R.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Clements, Craig S.; Borg, Natalie A.; Miles, John J.; Beddoe, Travis; Whisstock, James C.; Wilce, Matthew C.; Silins, Sharon L.; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-07-20

    Unusually long major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted epitopes are important in immunity, but their 'bulged' conformation represents a potential obstacle to {alpha}{beta} T cell receptor (TCR)-MHC class I docking. To elucidate how such recognition is achieved while still preserving MHC restriction, we have determined here the structure of a TCR in complex with HLA-B*3508 presenting a peptide 13 amino acids in length. This complex was atypical of TCR-peptide-MHC class I interactions, being dominated at the interface by peptide-mediated interactions. The TCR assumed two distinct orientations, swiveling on top of the centrally bulged, rigid peptide such that only limited contacts were made with MHC class I. Although the TCR-peptide recognition resembled an antibody-antigen interaction, the TCR-MHC class I contacts defined a minimal 'generic footprint' of MHC-restriction. Thus our findings simultaneously demonstrate the considerable adaptability of the TCR and the 'shape' of MHC restriction.

  12. Binding and Recognition in the Assembly of an Active BRCA1/BARD1 Ubiquitin-Ligase Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzovic, Peter S.; Keeffe, Jennifer R.; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Keiko; Fox, David; Fukuda, Mamoru; Ohta, Tomohiko; Klevit, Rachel E.

    2003-05-13

    BRCA1 is a breast and ovarian cancer tumor suppressor protein that associates with BARD1 to form a RING/RING heterodimer. The BRCA1/BARD1 RING complex functions as an ubiquitin (Ub) ligase with activity substantially greater than individual BRCA1 or BARD1 subunits. By using NMR spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, we have mapped the binding site on the BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer for the Ub-conjugating enzyme UbcH5c. The results demonstrate that UbcH5c binds only to the BRCA1 RING domain and not the BARD1 RING. The binding interface is formed by the first and second Zn2+-loops and central -helix of the BRCA1 RING domain, a region disrupted by cancer-predisposing mutations. Unexpectedly, a second Ub-conjugating enzyme, UbcH7, also interacts with the BRCA1/BARD1 complex with similar affinity, although it is not active in Ub-ligase activity assays. Thus, binding alone is not sufficient for BRCA1-dependent Ub-ligase activity.

  13. Constraints within major histocompatibility complex class I restricted peptides: Presentation and consequences for T-cell recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodossis, Alex; Guillonneau, Carole; Welland, Andrew; Ely, Lauren K.; Clements, Craig S.; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Webb, Andrew I.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Mulder, Roger J.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Doherty, Peter C.; McCluskey, James; Purcell, Anthony W.; Turner, Stephen J.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-03-24

    Residues within processed protein fragments bound to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) glycoproteins have been considered to function as a series of 'independent pegs' that either anchor the peptide (p) to the MHC-I and/or interact with the spectrum of {alpha}{beta}-T-cell receptors (TCRs) specific for the pMHC-I epitope in question. Mining of the extensive pMHC-I structural database established that many self- and viral peptides show extensive and direct interresidue interactions, an unexpected finding that has led us to the idea of 'constrained' peptides. Mutational analysis of two constrained peptides (the HLA B44 restricted self-peptide (B44DP{alpha}-EEFGRAFSF)) and an H2-D{sup b} restricted influenza peptide (D{sup b}PA, SSLENFRAYV) demonstrated that the conformation of the prominently exposed arginine in both peptides was governed by interactions with MHC-I-orientated flanking residues from the peptide itself. Using reverse genetics in a murine influenza model, we revealed that mutation of an MHC-I-orientated residue (SSLENFRAYV {yields} SSLENARAYV) within the constrained PA peptide resulted in a diminished cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response and the recruitment of a limited pMHC-I specific TCR repertoire. Interactions between individual peptide positions can thus impose fine control on the conformation of pMHC-I epitopes, whereas the perturbation of such constraints can lead to a previously unappreciated mechanism of viral escape.

  14. Structural Basis of UV DNA-Damage Recognition by the DDB1-DDB2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recognition by the DDB1-DDB2 Complex Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural Basis of UV DNA-Damage Recognition by the DDB1-DDB2 Complex Ultraviolet (UV) ...

  15. Reporting and Recognition Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Recognition Template. Please submit your organization’s number of upgrades and associated benefits from fiscal year (FY) 2015 using this template by May 13, 2016 to bbresidentialnetwork@ee.doe.gov, or provide the information in another format, such as via email, a document, spreadsheet, graphic, or chart.

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory receives Star Status recognition for safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    excellence from Department of Energy LANL receives recognition for safety excellence Los Alamos National Laboratory receives Star Status recognition for safety excellence from Department of Energy Los Alamos becomes the largest site in the DOE complex to receive VPP Star Status. October 8, 2014 Officials from the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration joined Laboratory managers and employees at a VPP Star flag raising ceremony. Officials from the Department of

  17. Innovative Manufacturing Initiatives Recognition Day Agenda ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Manufacturing Initiatives Recognition Day Agenda imirecogitiondayagenda.pdf (76.67 KB) More Documents & Publications Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition ...

  18. Y-12 technology brings licensee recognition | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex technology brings ... Y-12 technology brings licensee recognition Posted: December 31, 2012 - 9:00am The pairing of an environmentally friendly solvent invented and patented by the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge with the business acumen of its licensee Scott Manley has gained recognition in two recent competitions. Manley owns RockinBoat LLC, a South Carolina start-up that in 2011 obtained sole commercial rights to manufacture and market the solvent RonJohn®. Teknikem,

  19. Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Innovative Manufacturing Initiative (IMI) Recognition Day (held in Washington, DC on June 20, 2012) showcased IMI projects selected by the Energy Department to help American manufacturers...

  20. George Washington Carver Recognition Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In commemoration of George Washington Carver’s life and work, Congress declared January 5 as George Washington Carver Recognition Day.

  1. Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Print Wednesday, 25 May 2005 00:00 Clostridal neurotoxins (CNTs) are...

  2. Employee Performance and Recognition Program - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31.1D, Employee Performance and Recognition Program by Lorrenda Buckner Functional areas: Employee Recognition, Performance Management The Order establishes requirements and...

  3. Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program The purpose of this program is to establish requirements and ...

  4. Recognition and Awards Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs DOE Human Resources Management Recognition and Awards Program About Us DOE Human Resources Management Division DOE Employment Recognition and ...

  5. Idaho National Laboratory receives national recognition for Small Business

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentoring Program Media contacts: Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 Idaho National Laboratory receives national recognition for Small Business Mentoring Program With the help of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds, the Idaho Cleanup Project continues work to protect the Snake River Plain Aquifer this week by injecting grout into 21 buried waste locations in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Department of Energy�s Idaho Site. The

  6. Reporting and Recognition Template | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reporting and Recognition Template Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and ... More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits ...

  7. Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Innovative Manufacturing Initiative (IMI) Recognition Day (held in Washington, DC on June 20, 2012) showcased IMI projects selected by the Energy Department to help American manufacturers dramatically increase the energy efficiency of their operations and reduce costs. Each project will advance transformational technologies and materials that can benefit a broad cross-section of the domestic economy. This event created a platform for inter-agency and industry networking and also raised awareness among congressional staff and private investors.

  8. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is unique among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-8 activity.

  9. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; et al

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is uniquemore » among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-8 activity.« less

  10. Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Print Clostridal neurotoxins (CNTs) are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic diseases botulism and tetanus. By...

  11. Reciprocal Recognition of Existing Personnel Security Clearances

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-07-20

    Provides direction for implementing actions required by the Office of Management and Budget memorandum, Reciprocal Recognition of Existing Personnel Security Clearances.

  12. Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day, Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry

  13. Mechanism and Substrate Recognition of 2-Hydroxyethylphosphonate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Mechanism and Substrate Recognition of ... Publication Date: 2011-09-20 OSTI Identifier: 1024499 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  14. Report: Employee Recruitment and Service Recognition

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Employee Recruitment and Service Recognition September 30, 2009 Submitted by the EMAB ... that are adaptable to EM's diversity and employee recruitment and retention initiatives. ...

  15. New Lab facility receives green building recognition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All Issues submit New Lab facility receives green building recognition The Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building is the first to achieve Leadership in Energy and ...

  16. Robotic CCD microscope for enhanced crystal recognition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Segelke, Brent W.; Toppani, Dominique

    2007-11-06

    A robotic CCD microscope and procedures to automate crystal recognition. The robotic CCD microscope and procedures enables more accurate crystal recognition, leading to fewer false negative and fewer false positives, and enable detection of smaller crystals compared to other methods available today.

  17. Structure of Fc[gamma]RI in complex with Fc reveals the importance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    complex with Fc reveals the importance of glycan recognition for high-affinity IgG binding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of FcgammaRI in complex with Fc ...

  18. Berkeley Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances Berkeley Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances September 17, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 ...

  19. Characterizing Loop Dynamics and Ligand Recognition in Human...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterizing Loop Dynamics and Ligand Recognition in Human- and Avian-Type Influenza ... Recognition in Human- and Avian-Type Influenza Neuraminidases via Generalized Born ...

  20. Cooperative control of vehicle swarms for acoustic target recognition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for acoustic target recognition by energy flows. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cooperative control of vehicle swarms for acoustic target recognition by energy flows. ...

  1. Y-12 Steam Plant Project Received National Recognition for Project...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Steam Plant Project Received National Recognition for Project Management Excellence March 23, 2011 Y-12 steam plant project receives national recognition for project management ...

  2. Lemelson Recognition and Mentoring Programme L RAMP | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lemelson Recognition and Mentoring Programme L RAMP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lemelson Recognition and Mentoring Programme (L-RAMP) Place: India Sector: Services Product:...

  3. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil; Martinez, Rubel Francisco

    2001-01-01

    A method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques.

  4. Webinar: Leadership Recognition with Housing Innovation Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Title: Leadership Recognition with Housing Innovation Awards             Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014Time: 12:00PM - 1:00 PM EST

  5. Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Print Wednesday, 25 May 2005 00:00 Clostridal neurotoxins (CNTs) are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic diseases botulism and tetanus. By inhibiting release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, for example, the neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum interferes with nerve impulses and causes a paralysis of respiratory and skeletal muscles that can cause

  6. Door latching recognition apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eakle, Jr., Robert F.

    2012-05-15

    An acoustic door latch detector is provided in which a sound recognition sensor is integrated into a door or door lock mechanism. The programmable sound recognition sensor can be trained to recognize the acoustic signature of the door and door lock mechanism being properly engaged and secured. The acoustic sensor will signal a first indicator indicating that proper closure was detected or sound an alarm condition if the proper acoustic signature is not detected within a predetermined time interval.

  7. Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day- Final Participant Listing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Participant listing for Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day held in Washington, D.C. on June 20, 2012

  8. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Y-12 National Security Complex

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - April 2012 | Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2012 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2012 April 2012 Evaluation to determine whether Y-12 National Security Complex is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. The Team conducted its review during April 10-19, 2012 to determine whether Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP

  9. Feature recognition applications in mesh generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tautges, T.J.; Liu, S.S.; Lu, Y.; Kraftcheck, J.; Gadh, R.

    1997-06-01

    The use of feature recognition as part of an overall decomposition-based hexahedral meshing approach is described in this paper. The meshing approach consists of feature recognition, using a c-loop or hybrid c-loop method, and the use of cutting surfaces to decompose the solid model. These steps are part of an iterative process, which proceeds either until no more features can be recognized or until the model has been completely decomposed into meshable sub-volumes. This method can greatly reduce the time required to generate an all-hexahedral mesh, either through the use of more efficient meshing algorithms on more of the geometry or by reducing the amount of manual decomposition required to mesh a volume.

  10. Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Print Clostridal neurotoxins (CNTs) are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic diseases botulism and tetanus. By inhibiting release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, for example, the neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum interferes with nerve impulses and causes a paralysis of respiratory and skeletal muscles that can cause death. Researchers from Stanford University have now determined the first structure of a

  11. Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Print Clostridal neurotoxins (CNTs) are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic diseases botulism and tetanus. By inhibiting release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, for example, the neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum interferes with nerve impulses and causes a paralysis of respiratory and skeletal muscles that can cause death. Researchers from Stanford University have now determined the first structure of a

  12. Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Print Clostridal neurotoxins (CNTs) are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic diseases botulism and tetanus. By inhibiting release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, for example, the neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum interferes with nerve impulses and causes a paralysis of respiratory and skeletal muscles that can cause death. Researchers from Stanford University have now determined the first structure of a

  13. Event identification by acoustic signature recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many events of interest to the security commnnity produce acoustic emissions that are, in principle, identifiable as to cause. Some obvious examples are gunshots, breaking glass, takeoffs and landings of small aircraft, vehicular engine noises, footsteps (high frequencies when on gravel, very low frequencies. when on soil), and voices (whispers to shouts). We are investigating wavelet-based methods to extract unique features of such events for classification and identification. We also discuss methods of classification and pattern recognition specifically tailored for acoustic signatures obtained by wavelet analysis. The paper is divided into three parts: completed work, work in progress, and future applications. The completed phase has led to the successful recognition of aircraft types on landing and takeoff. Both small aircraft (twin-engine turboprop) and large (commercial airliners) were included in the study. The project considered the design of a small, field-deployable, inexpensive device. The techniques developed during the aircraft identification phase were then adapted to a multispectral electromagnetic interference monitoring device now deployed in a nuclear power plant. This is a general-purpose wavelet analysis engine, spanning 14 octaves, and can be adapted for other specific tasks. Work in progress is focused on applying the methods previously developed to speaker identification. Some of the problems to be overcome include recognition of sounds as voice patterns and as distinct from possible background noises (e.g., music), as well as identification of the speaker from a short-duration voice sample. A generalization of the completed work and the work in progress is a device capable of classifying any number of acoustic events-particularly quasi-stationary events such as engine noises and voices and singular events such as gunshots and breaking glass. We will show examples of both kinds of events and discuss their recognition likelihood.

  14. Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Print Clostridal neurotoxins (CNTs) are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic diseases botulism and tetanus. By inhibiting release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, for example, the neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum interferes with nerve impulses and causes a paralysis of respiratory and skeletal muscles that can cause death. Researchers from Stanford University have now determined the first structure of a

  15. Promiscuous Substrate Recognition in Folding and Assembly Activities of the Trigger Factor Chaperone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a molecular chaperone that binds to bacterial ribosomes where it contacts emerging nascent chains, but TF is also abundant free in the cytosol where its activity is less well characterized. In vitro studies show that TF promotes protein refolding. We find here that ribosome-free TF stably associates with and rescues from misfolding a large repertoire of full-length proteins. We identify over 170 members of this cytosolic Escherichia coli TF substrate proteome, including ribosomal protein S7. We analyzed the biochemical properties of a TF:S7 complex from Thermotoga maritima and determined its crystal structure. Thereby, we obtained an atomic-level picture of a promiscuous chaperone in complex with a physiological substrate protein. The structure of the complex reveals the molecular basis of substrate recognition by TF, indicates how TF could accelerate protein folding, and suggests a role for TF in the biogenesis of protein complexes.

  16. Pattern recognition with composite correlation filters designed with multi-object combinatorial optimization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Awwal, Abdul; Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.; Cuevas, Andres; Kober, Vitaly; Trujillo, Leonardo

    2014-10-23

    Composite correlation filters are used for solving a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. These filters are given by a combination of several training templates chosen by a designer in an ad hoc manner. In this work, we present a new approach for the design of composite filters based on multi-objective combinatorial optimization. Given a vast search space of training templates, an iterative algorithm is used to synthesize a filter with an optimized performance in terms of several competing criteria. Furthermore, by employing a suggested binary-search procedure a filter bank with a minimum number of filters can be constructed, formore » a prespecified trade-off of performance metrics. Computer simulation results obtained with the proposed method in recognizing geometrically distorted versions of a target in cluttered and noisy scenes are discussed and compared in terms of recognition performance and complexity with existing state-of-the-art filters.« less

  17. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    The CO-concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream.

  18. Frontal view reconstruction for iris recognition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bolme, David S; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2015-02-17

    Iris recognition can be accomplished for a wide variety of eye images by correcting input images with an off-angle gaze. A variety of techniques, from limbus modeling, corneal refraction modeling, optical flows, and genetic algorithms can be used. A variety of techniques, including aspherical eye modeling, corneal refraction modeling, ray tracing, and the like can be employed. Precomputed transforms can enhance performance for use in commercial applications. With application of the technologies, images with significantly unfavorable gaze angles can be successfully recognized.

  19. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, M.A.

    1999-08-31

    The CO-concentration in the H{sub 2} feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel stream. 4 figs.

  20. Automatic TLI recognition system, programmer`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the software of an automatic target recognition system (version 14), from a programmer`s point of view. The intent is to provide information that will help people who wish to modify the software. In separate volumes are a general description of the ATR system, Automatic TLI Recognition System, General Description, and a user`s manual, Automatic TLI Recognition System, User`s Guide. 2 refs.

  1. Berkeley Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances Berkeley Lab Climate Software Honored for Pattern Recognition Advances September 17, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov The Toolkit for Extreme Climate Analysis (TECA), developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to help climate researchers detect extreme weather events in large datasets, has been recognized for its achievements in solving large-scale pattern recognition problems. "TECA:

  2. Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A ... covers new technique that may make solar panel production less expensive The ...

  3. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to ... The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind ...

  4. WPN 03-5: Weatherization Assistance Program National Recognition Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide criteria and guidelines for the Weatherization Assistance Program's National Recognition Awards being presented at the 2003 National Weatherization Training Conference in Phoenix, Arizona.

  5. New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab Far from Silicon Valley, Descartes Labs aims to turn a national research facility's AI research into new ways of...

  6. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering proteinprotein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of second-site suppressors, where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in proteinprotein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to transplant existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous proteinprotein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domainpeptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous proteinprotein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing proteinprotein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  7. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  8. Y-12 Steam Plant Project Received National Recognition for Project

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Management Excellence | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Steam Plant Project Received National Recognition for Project Management Excellence March 23, 2011 Y-12 steam plant project receives national recognition for project management excellence. Y-12's Steam Plant Life Extension Project (SPLE) has received the Secretary of Energy's Project Management Improvement Award. Microsoft Office document icon NR-03-28

  9. albuquerque complex | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    albuquerque complex

  10. Substrate Recognition Strategy for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature 359, 832-835 (1992). Chen, Y. A., Scales, S. J., Patel, S. M., Doung, Y. C. & Scheller, R. H. SNARE complex formation is triggered by Ca2+ and drives membrane fusion. Cell...

  11. Automatic target recognition apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumgart, Chris W.; Ciarcia, Christopher A.

    2000-01-01

    An automatic target recognition apparatus (10) is provided, having a video camera/digitizer (12) for producing a digitized image signal (20) representing an image containing therein objects which objects are to be recognized if they meet predefined criteria. The digitized image signal (20) is processed within a video analysis subroutine (22) residing in a computer (14) in a plurality of parallel analysis chains such that the objects are presumed to be lighter in shading than the background in the image in three of the chains and further such that the objects are presumed to be darker than the background in the other three chains. In two of the chains the objects are defined by surface texture analysis using texture filter operations. In another two of the chains the objects are defined by background subtraction operations. In yet another two of the chains the objects are defined by edge enhancement processes. In each of the analysis chains a calculation operation independently determines an error factor relating to the probability that the objects are of the type which should be recognized, and a probability calculation operation combines the results of the analysis chains.

  12. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  13. Deconstructing the Peptide-MHC Specificity of T Cell Recognition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deconstructing the Peptide-MHC Specificity of T Cell Recognition Saturday, May 31, 2014 T Cell Figure Figure 1. Overlay of TCR-pMHC structures for 2B4 recognizing MCC (PDB ID: ...

  14. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition template and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil; Martinez, Rubel Francisco

    1999-01-01

    A method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques.

  15. Pattern Recognition and Image Analysis in Materials | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in new window) Pattern Recognition and Image Analysis in Materials Jim Grande 2012.09.25 Hi I'm Jim Grande and I've been working at GE Global Research in Niskayuna for over 33...

  16. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition template and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, G.C.; Martinez, R.F.

    1999-05-04

    A method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence is disclosed. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques. 30 figs.

  17. ZERH Webinar: Sales and Value Recognition of Zero Energy Ready...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ZERH Webinar: Sales and Value Recognition of Zero Energy Ready Homes December 18, 2014 12:00PM to 1:15PM EST GoToWebinar The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) ...

  18. WIPP Environmental Initiatives Earn DOE Recognition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M., October 29, 2012 – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently recognized four initiatives at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and more than 20 people for improvements in energy, water and fleet efficiency while reducing pollution and waste across the DOE complex.

  19. Helping New Mexico small businesses earns recognition for Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Lab employees Helping NM small businesses earns recognition for employees Helping New Mexico small businesses earns recognition for Los Alamos National Lab employees Don Quintana and Pulak Nath were recognized in an awards ceremony for providing their technical expertise and access to lab capabilities to help small businesses through the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program. November 10, 2015 Don Quintana (left) and Pulak Nath (right) after winning their Principal

  20. New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Excellence | Department of Energy Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for Environmental Excellence New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for Environmental Excellence April 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill, (575) 234-7270 U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office www.wipp.energy.gov CARLSBAD, N.M., April 30, 2013 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recognized by the New

  1. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Threading Method (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation

  2. National Lab Scientists Win Nobel Recognition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientists Win Nobel Recognition National Lab Scientists Win Nobel Recognition October 6, 2011 - 3:46pm Addthis Dr. Saul Perlmutter, who won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, heads the Supernova Cosmology Project at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It was this team along with the High-z Supernova Search Team which found evidence of the accelerating expansion of the universe. Dr. Saul Perlmutter, who won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, heads the Supernova Cosmology Project at Lawrence

  3. DOE Headquarters Receives Energy Star Recognition from EPA | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Headquarters Receives Energy Star Recognition from EPA DOE Headquarters Receives Energy Star Recognition from EPA July 9, 2008 - 2:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today accepted a plaque from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certifying the Department of Energy's (DOE) James Forrestal Headquarters Building as an ENERGY STAR® building. The Forrestal building uses 40 percent less energy than the average office building, saving taxpayers

  4. Searching for pulsars using image pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H.; Brazier, A.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Scholz, P.; Stovall, K.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; Ransom, S. M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Flanigan, J.; Rohr, M. E-mail: berndsen@phas.ubc.ca; and others

    2014-02-01

    In the modern era of big data, many fields of astronomy are generating huge volumes of data, the analysis of which can sometimes be the limiting factor in research. Fortunately, computer scientists have developed powerful data-mining techniques that can be applied to various fields. In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surveys by using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets—the PICS (Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interference by looking for patterns from candidate plots. Different from other pulsar selection programs that search for expected patterns, the PICS AI is taught the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The training candidates are collected from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) survey. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of image data with up to thousands of pixels. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its ∼9000 neurons. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability to recognize various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated with a large set of candidates from a different pulsar survey, the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. In this completely independent test, the PICS ranked 264 out of 277 pulsar-related candidates, including all 56 previously known pulsars and 208 of their harmonics, in the top 961 (1%) of 90,008 test candidates, missing only 13 harmonics. The first non-pulsar candidate appears at rank 187, following 45 pulsars and 141 harmonics. In other words, 100% of the pulsars were ranked in the top 1% of all candidates, while 80% were ranked higher than any noise or interference. The

  5. Non-Cooperative Facial Recognition Video Dataset Collection Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Marcia L.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Lombardo, Nicholas J.

    2013-08-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will produce a non-cooperative (i.e. not posing for the camera) facial recognition video data set for research purposes to evaluate and enhance facial recognition systems technology. The aggregate data set consists of 1) videos capturing PNNL role players and public volunteers in three key operational settings, 2) photographs of the role players for enrolling in an evaluation database, and 3) ground truth data that documents when the role player is within various camera fields of view. PNNL will deliver the aggregate data set to DHS who may then choose to make it available to other government agencies interested in evaluating and enhancing facial recognition systems. The three operational settings that will be the focus of the video collection effort include: 1) unidirectional crowd flow 2) bi-directional crowd flow, and 3) linear and/or serpentine queues.

  6. MicroChip Imager Module for Recognition of Microorganisms

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-01-01

    The MicroChip Reader for Cereus Group takes the table of intensities of hybridization signals produced by the MicroChip Imager software and evokes a series of steps designed to recognize the pattern of intensities specific to a particular Cereus subgroup. Seven subgroups of the Cereus group can be identified by particular features of their RNA sequence. The Reader also provides statistics documenting how well its conclusion is confirmed by the hybridization signals. At the user’s request,more » the Reader can list every recognition step utilized so that the user can verify the recognition process manually if desired.« less

  7. Detection and recognition of analytes based on their crystallization patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor; Bailey, Charles L.; Vsevolodov, Nikolai N.; Elliott, Adam

    2008-05-06

    The invention contemplates a method for recognition of proteins and other biological molecules by imaging morphology, size and distribution of crystalline and amorphous dry residues in droplets (further referred to as "crystallization pattern") containing predetermined amount of certain crystal-forming organic compounds (reporters) to which protein to be analyzed is added. It has been shown that changes in the crystallization patterns of a number of amino-acids can be used as a "signature" of a protein added. It was also found that both the character of changer in the crystallization patter and the fact of such changes can be used as recognition elements in analysis of protein molecules.

  8. WPN 05-6: Weatherization Assistance Program National Recognition Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide criteria and guidelines for the Weatherization Assistance Program’s National Recognition Awards being presented at the 2005 National Weatherization Training Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. These awards acknowledge outstanding contributions that advance the goals of WAP through individual or group achievement, inspiration, or innovation.

  9. MSU student researcher gets major recognition with JLab assistantship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Mississippi State University) | Jefferson Lab MSU student researcher gets major recognition with JLab assistantship (Mississippi State University) External Link: http://www.msstate.edu/web/media/detail.php?id=5607 By jlab_admin on Mon, 2012-06-1

  10. Intelligent Facial Recognition Systems: Technology advancements for security applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beer, C.L.

    1993-07-01

    Insider problems such as theft and sabotage can occur within the security and surveillance realm of operations when unauthorized people obtain access to sensitive areas. A possible solution to these problems is a means to identify individuals (not just credentials or badges) in a given sensitive area and provide full time personnel accountability. One approach desirable at Department of Energy facilities for access control and/or personnel identification is an Intelligent Facial Recognition System (IFRS) that is non-invasive to personnel. Automatic facial recognition does not require the active participation of the enrolled subjects, unlike most other biological measurement (biometric) systems (e.g., fingerprint, hand geometry, or eye retinal scan systems). It is this feature that makes an IFRS attractive for applications other than access control such as emergency evacuation verification, screening, and personnel tracking. This paper discusses current technology that shows promising results for DOE and other security applications. A survey of research and development in facial recognition identified several companies and universities that were interested and/or involved in the area. A few advanced prototype systems were also identified. Sandia National Laboratories is currently evaluating facial recognition systems that are in the advanced prototype stage. The initial application for the evaluation is access control in a controlled environment with a constant background and with cooperative subjects. Further evaluations will be conducted in a less controlled environment, which may include a cluttered background and subjects that are not looking towards the camera. The outcome of the evaluations will help identify areas of facial recognition systems that need further development and will help to determine the effectiveness of the current systems for security applications.

  11. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  12. Sandia Paper Wins Recognition by the Transportation Research Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper Wins Recognition by the Transportation Research Board - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense

  13. Scanning Probe Microscopy with Spectroscopic Molecular Recognition - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Scanning Probe Microscopy with Spectroscopic Molecular Recognition Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL researchers developed an innovative imaging method that possesses the imaging capability of scanning near-field ultrasound holography and the chemical specificity of reverse photoacoustic spectroscopy. This imaging method can achieve chemical differentiation with nanometer resolution. DescriptionAtomic force

  14. SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee Recognition Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee Recognition Award - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy

  15. Antibody Recognition of the Influenza Hemagglutinin by Receptor Mimicry |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Antibody Recognition of the Influenza Hemagglutinin by Receptor Mimicry Sunday, November 30, 2014 There has been a long-standing interest in blocking agents against influenza entry, such as inhibitors that can target the receptor binding site on the hemagglutinin surface glycoprotein (HA) to prevent viral attachment to host cells. Molecules have been designed based on the sialic acid receptor, although with very little success since sialic acid only

  16. Idaho National Laboratory receives national recognition for Small Business

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentoring Program DOE-ID Tim Jackson, 208-526-8484 INL Misty Benjamin, 208-526-5940 Idaho National Laboratory receives national recognition for Small Business Mentoring Program IDAHO FALLS � The U.S. Department of Energy recognized Idaho National Laboratory as the 2009 Mentor of the Year for its commitment to mentoring small businesses. The DOE Mentor of the Year recognizes INL's Mentor-Prot�g� Program for enhancing the capabilities of small businesses to perform contracts and

  17. Conditional random fields for pattern recognition applied to structured data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, Tom; Skurikhin, Alexei

    2015-07-14

    Pattern recognition uses measurements from an input domain, X, to predict their labels from an output domain, Y. Image analysis is one setting where one might want to infer whether a pixel patch contains an object that is “manmade” (such as a building) or “natural” (such as a tree). Suppose the label for a pixel patch is “manmade”; if the label for a nearby pixel patch is then more likely to be “manmade” there is structure in the output domain that can be exploited to improve pattern recognition performance. Modeling P(X) is difficult because features between parts of the model are often correlated. Therefore, conditional random fields (CRFs) model structured data using the conditional distribution P(Y|X = x), without specifying a model for P(X), and are well suited for applications with dependent features. This paper has two parts. First, we overview CRFs and their application to pattern recognition in structured problems. Our primary examples are image analysis applications in which there is dependence among samples (pixel patches) in the output domain. Second, we identify research topics and present numerical examples.

  18. Conditional random fields for pattern recognition applied to structured data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burr, Tom; Skurikhin, Alexei

    2015-07-14

    Pattern recognition uses measurements from an input domain, X, to predict their labels from an output domain, Y. Image analysis is one setting where one might want to infer whether a pixel patch contains an object that is “manmade” (such as a building) or “natural” (such as a tree). Suppose the label for a pixel patch is “manmade”; if the label for a nearby pixel patch is then more likely to be “manmade” there is structure in the output domain that can be exploited to improve pattern recognition performance. Modeling P(X) is difficult because features between parts of the modelmore » are often correlated. Therefore, conditional random fields (CRFs) model structured data using the conditional distribution P(Y|X = x), without specifying a model for P(X), and are well suited for applications with dependent features. This paper has two parts. First, we overview CRFs and their application to pattern recognition in structured problems. Our primary examples are image analysis applications in which there is dependence among samples (pixel patches) in the output domain. Second, we identify research topics and present numerical examples.« less

  19. Structural Basis for Ligand Recognition and Discrimination of a Quorum-quenching Antibody

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Garner, Amanda L.; Flack, Caralyn E.; Mee, Jenny M.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Janda, Kim D.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2011-09-16

    In the postantibiotic era, available treatment options for severe bacterial infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have become limited. Therefore, new and innovative approaches are needed to combat such life-threatening infections. Virulence factor expression in S. aureus is regulated in a cell density-dependent manner using 'quorum sensing,' which involves generation and secretion of autoinducing peptides (AIPs) into the surrounding environment to activate a bacterial sensor kinase at a particular threshold concentration. Mouse monoclonal antibody AP4-24H11 was shown previously to blunt quorum sensing-mediated changes in gene expression in vitro and protect mice from a lethal dose of S. aureus by sequestering the AIP signal. We have elucidated the crystal structure of the AP4-24H11 Fab in complex with AIP-4 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution to determine its mechanism of ligand recognition. A key GluH95 provides much of the binding specificity through formation of hydrogen bonds with each of the four amide nitrogens in the AIP-4 macrocyclic ring. Importantly, these structural data give clues as to the interactions between the cognate staphylococcal AIP receptors AgrC and the AIPs, as AP4-24H11 {center_dot} AIP-4 binding recapitulates features that have been proposed for AgrC-AIP recognition. Additionally, these structural insights may enable the engineering of AIP cross-reactive antibodies or quorum quenching vaccines for use in active or passive immunotherapy for prevention or treatment of S. aureus infections.

  20. Hot Cell Complex Building

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Based on the safety and functional requirements, starting from existing layout and existing safety analyses, the first step of the Hot Cell Complex Building Engineering Contract ...

  1. Space-time complexity in solid state models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    In this Workshop on symmetry-breaking it is appropriate to include the evolving fields of nonlinear-nonequilibrium systems in which transitions to and between various degrees of ''complexity'' (including ''chaos'') occur in time or space or both. These notions naturally bring together phenomena of pattern formation and chaos and therefore have ramifications for a huge array of natural sciences - astrophysics, plasmas and lasers, hydrodynamics, field theory, materials and solid state theory, optics and electronics, biology, pattern recognition and evolution, etc. Our particular concerns here are with examples from solid state and condensed matter.

  2. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA Duplication Revealed in New Beginnings DNA Duplication Revealed in New Beginnings April 3, 2012 - 9:36am Addthis The DNA replication origin recognition complex (ORC) is a six-protein machine with a slightly twisted half-ring structure (yellow). ORC is proposed to wrap around and bend approximately 70 base pairs of double stranded DNA (red and blue). When a replication initiator Cdc6 (green) joins ORC, the partial ring is now complete and ready to load another protein onto the DNA. This last

  3. Health monitoring display system for a complex plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ridolfo, Charles F.; Harmon, Daryl L.; Colin, Dreyfuss

    2006-08-08

    A single page enterprise wide level display provides a comprehensive readily understood representation of the overall health status of a complex plant. Color coded failure domains allow rapid intuitive recognition of component failure status. A three-tier hierarchy of displays provide details on the health status of the components and systems displayed on the enterprise wide level display in a manner that supports a logical drill down to the health status of sub-components on Tier 1 to expected faults of the sub-components on Tier 2 to specific information relative to expected sub-component failures on Tier 3.

  4. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  5. Electrochemical Behavior of Disposable Electrodes Prepared by Ion Beam Based Surface Modification for Biomolecular Recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdem, A.; Karadeniz, H.; Caliskan, A.; Urkac, E. Sokullu; Oztarhan, A.; Oks, E.; Nikolayev, A.

    2009-03-10

    Many important technological advances have been made in the development of technologies to monitor interactions and recognition events of biomolecules in solution and on solid substrates. The development of advanced biosensors could impact significantly the areas of genomics, proteomics, biomedical diagnostics and drug discovery. In the literature, there have recently appeared an impressive number of intensive designs for electrochemical monitoring of biomolecular recognition. Herein, the influence of ion implanted disposable graphite electrodes on biomolecular recognition and their electrochemical behaviour was investigated.

  6. Proposal for the development of 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Gregory; Hoff, Jim; Kwan, Simon; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Ted; Ramberg, Erik; Todri, Aida; Yarema, Ray; Demarteua, Marcel,; Drake, Gary; Weerts, Harry; /Argonne /Chicago U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2010-10-01

    Future particle physics experiments looking for rare processes will have no choice but to address the demanding challenges of fast pattern recognition in triggering as detector hit density becomes significantly higher due to the high luminosity required to produce the rare process. The authors propose to develop a 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM) chip for HEP applications, to advance the state-of-the-art for pattern recognition and track reconstruction for fast triggering.

  7. Face recognition system and method using face pattern words and face pattern bytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-12-23

    The present invention provides a novel system and method for identifying individuals and for face recognition utilizing facial features for face identification. The system and method of the invention comprise creating facial features or face patterns called face pattern words and face pattern bytes for face identification. The invention also provides for pattern recognitions for identification other than face recognition. The invention further provides a means for identifying individuals based on visible and/or thermal images of those individuals by utilizing computer software implemented by instructions on a computer or computer system and a computer readable medium containing instructions on a computer system for face recognition and identification.

  8. Sales and Value Recognition for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar, Sales and Value Recognition for Zero Energy Ready Home, presented in December 2014. Watch the presentation.

  9. Volume Decomposition and Feature Recognition for Hexahedral Mesh Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GADH,RAJIT; LU,YONG; TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

    1999-09-27

    Considerable progress has been made on automatic hexahedral mesh generation in recent years. Several automatic meshing algorithms have proven to be very reliable on certain classes of geometry. While it is always worth pursuing general algorithms viable on more general geometry, a combination of the well-established algorithms is ready to take on classes of complicated geometry. By partitioning the entire geometry into meshable pieces matched with appropriate meshing algorithm the original geometry becomes meshable and may achieve better mesh quality. Each meshable portion is recognized as a meshing feature. This paper, which is a part of the feature based meshing methodology, presents the work on shape recognition and volume decomposition to automatically decompose a CAD model into meshable volumes. There are four phases in this approach: (1) Feature Determination to extinct decomposition features, (2) Cutting Surfaces Generation to form the ''tailored'' cutting surfaces, (3) Body Decomposition to get the imprinted volumes; and (4) Meshing Algorithm Assignment to match volumes decomposed with appropriate meshing algorithms. The feature determination procedure is based on the CLoop feature recognition algorithm that is extended to be more general. Results are demonstrated over several parts with complicated topology and geometry.

  10. Directed evolution of FLS2 towards novel flagellin peptide recognition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Helft, Laura; Thompson, Mikayla; Bent, Andrew F.

    2016-06-06

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wild type Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targetedmore » approach generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. As a result, these studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets.« less

  11. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  12. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben A. Abagyan, PhD

    2004-04-15

    OAK-B135 DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR and R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. the authors have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR and R process. The significant achievements of this project include: (1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR and R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR and R; (2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; (3) Important improvement of macromolecular docking technology and its application to predict the DNA-Protein complex conformation; (4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; (5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; and (6) Producing 14 research papers (10 published and 4 in preparation).

  14. Conformational Melding Permits a Conserved Binding Geometry in TCR Recognition of Foreign and Self Molecular Mimics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-03-16

    Molecular mimicry between foreign and self Ags is a mechanism of TCR cross-reactivity and is thought to contribute to the development of autoimmunity. The {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 recognizes the foreign Ag Tax from the human T cell leukemia virus-1 when presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. In a possible link with the autoimmune disease human T cell leukemia virus-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, A6 also recognizes a self peptide from the neuronal protein HuD in the context of HLA-A2. We found in our study that the complexes of the HuD and Tax epitopes with HLA-A2 are close but imperfect structural mimics and that in contrast with other recent structures of TCRs with self Ags, A6 engages the HuD Ag with the same traditional binding mode used to engage Tax. Although peptide and MHC conformational changes are needed for recognition of HuD but not Tax and the difference of a single hydroxyl triggers an altered TCR loop conformation, TCR affinity toward HuD is still within the range believed to result in negative selection. Probing further, we found that the HuD-HLA-A2 complex is only weakly stable. Overall, these findings help clarify how molecular mimicry can drive self/nonself cross-reactivity and illustrate how low peptide-MHC stability can permit the survival of T cells expressing self-reactive TCRs that nonetheless bind with a traditional binding mode.

  15. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G.; Buchanan, J. Michael; Stryker, Jeffrey M.; Wax, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  16. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    1998-01-01

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching.

  17. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Ng, L.C.

    1998-03-17

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching. 35 figs.

  18. Novel DNA packaging recognition in the unusual bacteriophage N15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feiss, Michael; Geyer, Henriette; Klingberg, Franco; Moreno, Norma; Forystek, Amanda; Maluf, Nasib Karl; Sippy, Jean

    2015-08-15

    Phage lambda's cosB packaging recognition site is tripartite, consisting of 3 TerS binding sites, called R sequences. TerS binding to the critical R3 site positions the TerL endonuclease for nicking cosN to generate cohesive ends. The N15 cos (cos{sup N15}) is closely related to cos{sup λ}, but whereas the cosB{sup N15} subsite has R3, it lacks the R2 and R1 sites and the IHF binding site of cosB{sup λ}. A bioinformatic study of N15-like phages indicates that cosB{sup N15} also has an accessory, remote rR2 site, which is proposed to increase packaging efficiency, like R2 and R1 of lambda. N15 plus five prophages all have the rR2 sequence, which is located in the TerS-encoding 1 gene, approximately 200 bp distal to R3. An additional set of four highly related prophages, exemplified by Monarch, has R3 sequence, but also has R2 and R1 sequences characteristic of cosB–λ. The DNA binding domain of TerS-N15 is a dimer. - Highlights: • There are two classes of DNA packaging signals in N15-related phages. • Phage N15's TerS binding site: a critical site and a possible remote accessory site. • Viral DNA recognition signals by the λ-like bacteriophages: the odd case of N15.

  19. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Corneillie, Todd M.; Xu, Jide

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  20. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  1. Subtle Changes in Peptide Conformation Profoundly Affect Recognition of the Non-Classical MHC Class I Molecule HLA-E by the CD94?NKG2 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoare, Hilary L.; Sullivan, Lucy C.; Clements, Craig S.; Ely, Lauren K.; Beddoe, Travis; Henderson, Kate N.; Lin, Jie; Reid, Hugh H.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2008-03-31

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule that binds peptides derived from the leader sequences of other HLA class I molecules. Natural killer cell recognition of these HLA-E molecules, via the CD94-NKG2 natural killer family, represents a central innate mechanism for monitoring major histocompatibility complex expression levels within a cell. The leader sequence-derived peptides bound to HLA-E exhibit very limited polymorphism, yet subtle differences affect the recognition of HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 receptors. To better understand the basis for this peptide-specific recognition, we determined the structure of HLA-E in complex with two leader peptides, namely, HLA-Cw*07 (VMAPRALLL), which is poorly recognised by CD94-NKG2 receptors, and HLA-G*01 (VMAPRTLFL), a high-affinity ligand of CD94-NKG2 receptors. A comparison of these structures, both of which were determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution, revealed that allotypic variations in the bound leader sequences do not result in conformational changes in the HLA-E heavy chain, although subtle changes in the conformation of the peptide within the binding groove of HLA-E were evident. Accordingly, our data indicate that the CD94-NKG2 receptors interact with HLA-E in a manner that maximises the ability of the receptors to discriminate between subtle changes in both the sequence and conformation of peptides bound to HLA-E.

  2. Reducing Configuration Complexity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ams AG 2015 Reducing Configuration Complexity The contribution of chipscale integrated solutions Tom Griffiths Sr. Marketing Manager ams AG November 2015 © ams AG 2015 Agenda Architecture of IoT smart lighting Importance of the sensors The puzzle pieces Focus on adoption (turn... key...) A quick case study Industry's to-do list (an opinion) © ams AG 2015 Page 3 The Opportunity of Smart Lighting "Sufficient" light 24x7 Worker Productivity Decorative Use Utilitarian Lights Following in

  3. New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab" July 30, 2015 Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab Far from Silicon Valley, Descartes Labs aims to turn a national research facility's AI research into new ways of understanding the world...The company in question is Descartes Labs, and there's a very good reason why it's in Los Alamos. It aims to commercialize image-recognition

  4. Map of the State Recognition of the Auxiliary Power Weight Exemption |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Map of the State Recognition of the Auxiliary Power Weight Exemption Map of the State Recognition of the Auxiliary Power Weight Exemption † Allows the 400-lb exemption by enforcement policy rather than by law and has legislation in process to allow the 400-lb exemption by law § Allows the 400-lb exemption by law and a 550-lb exemption takes effect on October 1, 2014 State Recognition of the Auxiliary Power Weight Exemption to GVW Limit: 23 CFR 658.17(n) Does not

  5. DOE Challenge Home Gaining Recognition as a Leader Webinar (Text Version) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Challenge Home Gaining Recognition as a Leader Webinar (Text Version) DOE Challenge Home Gaining Recognition as a Leader Webinar (Text Version) Below is a text version of the webinar titled "Gaining Recognition as a Leader," originally presented in May 2013. In addition to this text version of the audio, you can access a recording of the webinar. Sam Rashkin: Slide 1: This is about the DOE Challenge Home as a way for builders to be recognized a leader.

  6. Cyclodextrin supramolecular assemblies: Energy migration prompted by molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikramenou, Z.; Nocera, D.G.

    1993-12-31

    New photoactive supramolecular assemblies featuring a cyclodextrin modified with a Eu{sup 3+}{contained_in}aza crown ether have been synthesized. The inclusion of a light harvesting guest (LHG) in the cyclodextrin is heralded by light emission for the Eu{sup 3+} center. The authors attribute the enhancement of the europium emission to an absorption-energy transfer-emission process from the aromatic donors in the cavity of cyclodextrin to the Eu{sup 3+} ion residing in the appended aza macrocycle. Different conformations of the aza attached to the cyclodextrin have been designed. The efficiency of the migration process from the LHG to the Eu{sup 3+} ions is intimately related to the structure of the supramolecular assembly as well as to the nature of the LHG. Hydrophobic recognition of the guest by the CD is cooperative with its interaction to the metal ion. This paper will show that specificity in binding coupled with shorter distances for energy transfer results in much brighter luminescence from the cyclodextrin supramolecule.

  7. Sandia Cognitive Rsch. Environ.: Associative Network and Situation Recognition C

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-12-11

    The software implements core elements of the SCORE Cognitive Framework. This Associative Network and Situation Recognition core is implemented in the Umbra simulation and modular software framework, which is C++-based. An instance of the cognitive framework “kernel” is implemented as a network of Umbra modules (Gottlieb, et al, 2002) comprising a Concepts Database, an Associative Network, a Situation Recognizer, a Comparator, and a Situations-Concept Driver. At initialization, these modules load the data files that togethermore » specify all the components of a particular cognitive model, such as concept declarations, situation declarations, spreading activation weights, and situation-cue-patterns. The software also includes a Discrepancy Detector class for detecting, overtime, discrepancies between instances of situations and occurrences of actions, A Discrepancy Detector can be incorporated into a system that includes, in addition to the network of modules above, software that monitors when a user performs an action and that passes this information to the Discrepancy Detector module, At initialization, the Discrepancy Detector module in such a system reads in data file specifying action declarations, the expectations of action instances due to a situation instance, and actions that should be considered discrepant when an instance is not expected. The figure below illustrates a prototype system incorporating a Discrepancy Detector module.« less

  8. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  9. Sulfate Recognition by Persistent Crystalline Capsules with Rigidified Hydrogen Bonding Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custelcean, Radu; Remy, Priscilla; Jiang, Deen; Bonnesen, Peter V; Moyer, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    electivity is a fundamental property of pervasive importance in chemistry and biology as reflected in phenomena as diverse as membrane transport, catalysis, sensing, adsorption, complexation, and crystallization. Although the key principles of complementarity and preorganization governing the binding interactions underlying such phenomena were delineated long ago, truly profound selectivity has proven elusive by design in part because synthetic molecular architectures are neither maximally complementary for binding target species nor sufficiently rigid. Even if a host molecule possesses a high degree of complementarity for a guest species, it all too often can distort its structure or even rearrange its conformation altogether to accommodate competing guests. One approach taken by researchers to overcome this challenge has been to devise extremely rigid molecules that bind species within complementary cavities. Although examples have been reported to demonstrate the principle, such cases are not generally of practical utility, because of inefficient synthesis and often poor kinetics. Alternatively, flexible building blocks can be employed, but then the challenge becomes one of locking them in place. Taking a cue from natural binding agents that derive their rigidity from a network of molecular interactions, especially hydrogen bonding, we present herein an example of a crystalline, self-assembled capsule that binds sulfate by a highly complementary array of rigidified hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). Although covalent or self-assembled capsules have been previously employed as anion hosts, they typically lack the strict combination of complementarity and rigidity required for high selectivity. Furthermore, the available structural data for these systems is either restricted to a limited number of anions of similar size and shape, or varies significantly from one anion to another, which hampers the rationalization of the observed selectivity. We have been employing

  10. Structural Basis of Ubiquitin Recognition by the Ubiquitin-associated (UBA) Domain of the Ubiquitin Ligase EDD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, G.; Nguyen, L; Lin, T; De Crescenzo, G; Park, M; Gehring, K

    2007-01-01

    EDD (or HYD) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the family of HECT (homologous to E6-AP C terminus) ligases. EDD contains an N-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, which is present in a variety of proteins involved in ubiquitin-mediated processes. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), NMR titrations, and pull-down assays to show that the EDD UBA domain binds ubiquitin. The 1.85{angstrom} crystal structure of the complex with ubiquitin reveals the structural basis of ubiquitin recognition by UBA helices {alpha}1 and {alpha}3. The structure shows a larger number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds than observed in previous UBA/ubiquitin complexes. Two of these involve ordered water molecules. The functional importance of residues at the UBA/ubiquitin interface was confirmed using site-directed mutagenesis. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements show that the EDD UBA domain does not have a strong preference for polyubiquitin chains over monoubiquitin. This suggests that EDD binds to monoubiquitinated proteins, which is consistent with its involvement in DNA damage repair pathways.

  11. Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V.; Kung, Jennifer E.; Gumperz, Jenny; Adams, Erin J.

    2014-10-02

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted {alpha}1 helix resulting in an open A pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-{angstrom} displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d-LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint on CD1d-LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3{alpha} loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3{beta} and J{beta} segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells.

  12. Antibody Recognition of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Hemagglutini...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    H1N1 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Antibody Recognition of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin ...

  13. Method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-05-02

    A method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes that are substantially free of the reaction materials used to produce the radiopharmaceutical complex is disclosed. The method involves admixing in a suitable first solvent in a container a target seeking ligand or salt or metal adduct thereof, a radionuclide label, and a reducing agent for said radionuclide, thereby forming said radiopharmaceutical complex; coating the interior walls of the container with said pharmaceutical complex; discarding the solvent containing by-products and unreacted starting reaction materials; and removing the radiopharmaceutical complex from said walls by dissolving it in a second solvent, thereby obtaining said radiopharmaceutical complex substantially free of by-products and unreacted starting materials.

  14. Visual Empirical Region of Influence (VERI) Pattern Recognition Algorithms

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-05-01

    We developed new pattern recognition (PR) algorithms based on a human visual perception model. We named these algorithms Visual Empirical Region of Influence (VERI) algorithms. To compare the new algorithm's effectiveness against othe PR algorithms, we benchmarked their clustering capabilities with a standard set of two-dimensional data that is well known in the PR community. The VERI algorithm succeeded in clustering all the data correctly. No existing algorithm had previously clustered all the pattens inmore » the data set successfully. The commands to execute VERI algorithms are quite difficult to master when executed from a DOS command line. The algorithm requires several parameters to operate correctly. From our own experiences we realized that if we wanted to provide a new data analysis tool to the PR community we would have to provide a new data analysis tool to the PR community we would have to make the tool powerful, yet easy and intuitive to use. That was our motivation for developing graphical user interfaces (GUI's) to the VERI algorithms. We developed GUI's to control the VERI algorithm in a single pass mode and in an optimization mode. We also developed a visualization technique that allows users to graphically animate and visually inspect multi-dimensional data after it has been classified by the VERI algorithms. The visualization technique that allows users to graphically animate and visually inspect multi-dimensional data after it has been classified by the VERI algorithms. The visualization package is integrated into the single pass interface. Both the single pass interface and optimization interface are part of the PR software package we have developed and make available to other users. The single pass mode only finds PR results for the sets of features in the data set that are manually requested by the user. The optimization model uses a brute force method of searching through the cominations of features in a data set for features that produce

  15. Visual Empirical Region of Influence (VERI) Pattern Recognition Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-05-01

    We developed new pattern recognition (PR) algorithms based on a human visual perception model. We named these algorithms Visual Empirical Region of Influence (VERI) algorithms. To compare the new algorithm's effectiveness against othe PR algorithms, we benchmarked their clustering capabilities with a standard set of two-dimensional data that is well known in the PR community. The VERI algorithm succeeded in clustering all the data correctly. No existing algorithm had previously clustered all the pattens in the data set successfully. The commands to execute VERI algorithms are quite difficult to master when executed from a DOS command line. The algorithm requires several parameters to operate correctly. From our own experiences we realized that if we wanted to provide a new data analysis tool to the PR community we would have to provide a new data analysis tool to the PR community we would have to make the tool powerful, yet easy and intuitive to use. That was our motivation for developing graphical user interfaces (GUI's) to the VERI algorithms. We developed GUI's to control the VERI algorithm in a single pass mode and in an optimization mode. We also developed a visualization technique that allows users to graphically animate and visually inspect multi-dimensional data after it has been classified by the VERI algorithms. The visualization technique that allows users to graphically animate and visually inspect multi-dimensional data after it has been classified by the VERI algorithms. The visualization package is integrated into the single pass interface. Both the single pass interface and optimization interface are part of the PR software package we have developed and make available to other users. The single pass mode only finds PR results for the sets of features in the data set that are manually requested by the user. The optimization model uses a brute force method of searching through the cominations of features in a data set for features that produce the

  16. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  17. SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) is a secured supercomputing facility that supports the calculation, modeling, simulation, and visualization of complex nuclear weapons data in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program. The 300,000-square-foot, vault-type building features an unobstructed 43,500-square-foot computer room, which is an open room about three-fourths the size of a football field. The Strategic Computing

  18. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Perrenoud, Ben C.

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  19. Complex Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-04-16

    After a century of study, scientists have come to the realization that the ordinary matter made of atoms is a minority in the universe. In order to explain observations, it appears that there exists a new and undiscovered kind of matter, called dark matter, that is five times more prevalent than ordinary matter. The evidence for this new matter’s existence is very strong, but scientists know only a little about its nature. In today’s video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about an exciting and unconventional idea, specifically that dark matter might have a very complex set of structures and interactions. While this idea is entirely speculative, it is an interesting hypothesis and one that scientists are investigating.

  20. Cadmium complexation with bisulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, F.; Tessier, A.

    1999-12-01

    The authors have used in situ dialysis to measure the solubility of CdS(s) in sulfidic solutions. The solubility product for the reaction CdS(s) + H{sup +} {l{underscore}reversible} Cd{sup 2+} + HS{sup {minus}} at 25 C and 1 atm was found to be 10{sup {minus}14.15{+-}0.06} and 10{sup {minus}14.40{+-}0.03} for a crystalline product and to be 10{sup {minus}14.15{+-}0.06} for two precipitates, respectively. They show that the solubility of these three solids at various pH values and sulfide concentrations can be reproduced adequately by the following four bisulfide complexes: CdHS{sup +}, Cd(HS){sub 2}, Cd(HS){sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and Cd(HS){sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}; the log K{sub n} values for the general equation Cd{sup 2+} + nHS{sup {minus}} {r{underscore}reversible} Cd(HS){sub n}{sup 2{minus}n} are 7.38 {+-} 0.68, 14.43 {+-} 0.01, 16026 & 0.58, and 18.43 {+-} 0.05, respectively. The species CdOHS{sup {minus}}, which has been reported previously, does not explain their experimental results. Calculations using estimated concentrations of organic ligands (humic substances and organic thiols) known to be present in natural waters indicate that sulfide complexes largely dominate Cd speciation in natural waters at {Sigma}S(-II) {ge} 10{sup {minus}6} M.

  1. Unraveling a Hotspot for TCR Recognition on HLA-A2: Evidence Against the Existence of Peptide-independent TCR Binding Determinants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagnon, Susan J.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Clemens, John R.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Turner, Richard V.; Damirjian, Marale; Biddison, William E.; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-07-19

    T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide takes place in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, which accounts for approximately two-thirds of the peptide/MHC buried surface. Using the class I MHC HLA-A2 and a large panel of mutants, we have previously shown that surface mutations that disrupt TCR recognition vary with the identity of the peptide. The single exception is Lys66 on the HLA-A2 {alpha}1 helix, which when mutated to alanine disrupts recognition for 93% of over 250 different T cell clones or lines, independent of which peptide is bound. Thus, Lys66 could serve as a peptide-independent TCR binding determinant. Here, we have examined the role of Lys66 in TCR recognition of HLA-A2 in detail. The structure of a peptide/HLA-A2 molecule with the K66A mutation indicates that although the mutation induces no major structural changes, it results in the exposure of a negatively charged glutamate (Glu63) underneath Lys66. Concurrent replacement of Glu63 with glutamine restores TCR binding and function for T cells specific for five different peptides presented by HLA-A2. Thus, the positive charge on Lys66 does not serve to guide all TCRs onto the HLA-A2 molecule in a manner required for productive signaling. Furthermore, electrostatic calculations indicate that Lys66 does not contribute to the stability of two TCR-peptide/HLA-A2 complexes. Our findings are consistent with the notion that each TCR arrives at a unique solution of how to bind a peptide/MHC, most strongly influenced by the chemical and structural features of the bound peptide. This would not rule out an intrinsic affinity of TCRs for MHC molecules achieved through multiple weak interactions, but for HLA-A2 the collective mutational data place limits on the role of any single MHC amino acid side-chain in driving TCR binding in a peptide-independent fashion.

  2. National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Completes W69 Dismantlement

  3. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  4. Nonisostructural complex oxide heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Franklin J. Ramanathan, Shriram

    2014-07-01

    The authors present an overview of the fundamentals and representative examples of the growth of epitaxial complex oxide thin films on structurally dissimilar substrates. The authors will delineate how the details of particular crystal structures and symmetry of different oxide surfaces can be employed for a rational approach to the synthesis of nonisostructural epitaxial heterostructures. The concept of oxygen eutaxy can be widely applied. Materials combinations will be split into three categories, and in all cases the films and substrates occur in different crystal structures: (1) common translational and rotational symmetry between the film and substrate planes; (2) translational symmetry mismatch between the substrates and films that is distinct from a simple mismatch in lattice parameters; and (3) rotational symmetry mismatch. In case (1), in principle single-crystalline thin films can be attained despite the films and substrates possessing different crystal structures. In case (2), antiphase boundaries will be prevalent in the thin films. In case (3), thin-film rotational variants that are joined by tilt boundaries will be present. Diffraction techniques to determine crystallographic alignment and epitaxial variants are discussed, and transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate extended defects in the thin films will also be reviewed. The authors end with open problems in this field regarding the structure of oxide interfaces that can be topics for future research.

  5. Molecular Recognition: Preparation and Characterization of Two Tripodal Anion Receptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokri, Alireza; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2014-03-01

    Two new tripodal hydroxyl-based anion receptors (1 and 2) are reported and their molecular complexes with Cl, H2PO4 , and OAc along with the (M1) ion of 1 were characterized by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy in the gas phase and by binding constant determinations in four solvents (i.e., CDCl3, CD2Cl2, CD3COCD3, and CD3CN). An intramolecular hydrogen bond network (HBN) in hexaol 1 was found to diminish its binding whereas the triol 2 is the strongest aliphatic hydroxyl-based receptor to date.

  6. Complex oxides: Intricate disorder

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro

    2016-02-29

    In this study, complex oxides such as pyrochlores have a myriad of potential technological applications, including as fast ion conductors and radiation-tolerant nuclear waste forms. They are also of interest for their catalytic and spin ice properties. Many of these functional properties are enabled by the atomic structure of the cation sublattices. Pyrochlores (A2B2O7) contain two different cations (A and B), typically a 3+ rare earth and a 4+ transition metal such as Hf, Zr, or Ti. The large variety of chemistries that can form pyrochlores leads to a rich space in which to search for exotic new materials. Furthermore,more » how cations order or disorder on their respective sublattices for a given chemical composition influences the functional properties of the oxide. For example, oxygen ionic conductivity is directly correlated with the level of cation disorder — the swapping of A and B cations1. Further, the resistance of these materials against amorphization has also been connected with the ability of the cations to disorder2, 3. These correlations between cation structure and functionality have spurred great interest in the structure of the cation sublattice under irradiation, with significant focus on the disordering mechanisms and disordered structure. Previous studies have found that, upon irradiation, pyrochlores often undergo an order-to-disorder transformation, in which the resulting structure is, from a diffraction point of view, indistinguishable from fluorite (AO2) (ref. 3). Shamblin et al. now reveal that the structure of disordered pyrochlore is more complicated than previously thought4.« less

  7. Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Y-12 National Security Complex Home Nuclear Deterrence Global Security Naval Reactors Partnerships Security News Search form Search... Search Latest News | CNS, UT chemical...

  8. CD94-NKG2A Recognition of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E Bound to an HLA Class I Leader Sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie,E.; Clements, C.; Lin, J.; Sullivan, L.; Johnson, D.; Huyton, T.; Heroux, A.; Hoare, H.; Beddoe, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the heterodimeric CD94-NKG2 natural killer (NK) receptor family is a central innate mechanism by which NK cells monitor the expression of other HLA molecules, yet the structural basis of this highly specific interaction is unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structure of CD94-NKG2A in complex with HLA-E bound to a peptide derived from the leader sequence of HLA-G. The CD94 subunit dominated the interaction with HLA-E, whereas the NKG2A subunit was more peripheral to the interface. Moreover, the invariant CD94 subunit dominated the peptide-mediated contacts, albeit with poor surface and chemical complementarity. This unusual binding mode was consistent with mutagenesis data at the CD94-NKG2A-HLA-E interface. There were few conformational changes in either CD94-NKG2A or HLA-E upon ligation, and such a 'lock and key' interaction is typical of innate receptor-ligand interactions. Nevertheless, the structure also provided insight into how this interaction can be modulated by subtle changes in the peptide ligand or by the pairing of CD94 with other members of the NKG2 family. Differences in the docking strategies used by the NKG2D and CD94-NKG2A receptors provided a basis for understanding the promiscuous nature of ligand recognition by NKG2D compared with the fidelity of the CD94-NKG2 receptors.

  9. Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spun Off From A Government Lab" (Not) just your typical Lab spin off Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab" Far from Silicon Valley, Descartes Labs aims to turn a national research facility's AI research into new ways of understanding the world. July 30, 2015 Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab" Descartes Labs cofounders Mark

  10. Structural basis for recognition of hemi-methylated DNA by the SRA domain of human UHRF1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Li, Yanjun; Duan, Shili; Bronner, Christian; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2008-11-17

    Epigenetic inheritance in mammals is characterized by high-fidelity replication of CpG methylation patterns during development. UHRF1 (also known as ICBP90 in humans and Np95 in mouse) is an E3 ligase important for the maintenance of global and local DNA methylation in vivo. The preferential affinity of UHRF1 for hemi-methylated DNA over symmetrically methylated DNA by means of its SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain and its association with the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) suggests a role in replication of the epigenetic code. Here we report the 1.7 {angstrom} crystal structure of the apo SRA domain of human UHRF1 and a 2.2 {angstrom} structure of its complex with hemi-methylated DNA, revealing a previously unknown reading mechanism for methylated CpG sites (mCpG). The SRA-DNA complex has several notable structural features including a binding pocket that accommodates the 5-methylcytosine that is flipped out of the duplex DNA. Two specialized loops reach through the resulting gap in the DNA from both the major and the minor grooves to read the other three bases of the CpG duplex. The major groove loop confers both specificity for the CpG dinucleotide and discrimination against methylation of deoxycytidine of the complementary strand. The structure, along with mutagenesis data, suggests how UHRF1 acts as a key factor for DNMT1 maintenance methylation through recognition of a fundamental unit of epigenetic inheritance, mCpG.

  11. EA-2010: Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Complex Improvements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gradient Synchrotron Complex Improvements at Brookhaven National Laboratory; Upton, New York EA-2010: Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Complex Improvements at Brookhaven ...

  12. Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building ...

  13. Haem Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus NEAT Domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-01

    Successful pathogenic organisms have developed mechanisms to thrive under extreme levels of iron restriction. Haem-iron represents the largest iron reservoir in the human body and is a significant source of iron for some bacterial pathogens. NEAT (NEAr Transporter) domains are found exclusively in a family of cell surface proteins in Gram-positive bacteria. Many NEAT domain-containing proteins, including IsdA in Staphylococcus aureus, are implicated in haem binding. Here, we show that overexpression of IsdA in S. aureus enhances growth and an inactivation mutant of IsdA has a growth defect, compared with wild type, when grown in media containing haem as the sole iron source. Furthermore, the haem-binding property of IsdA is contained within the NEAT domain. Crystal structures of the apo-IsdA NEAT domain and in complex with haem were solved and reveal a clathrin adapter-like beta-sandwich fold with a large hydrophobic haem-binding pocket. Haem is bound with the propionate groups directed at the molecular surface and the iron is co-ordinated solely by Tyr(166). The phenol groups of Tyr(166) and Tyr(170) form an H-bond that may function in regulating haem binding and release. An analysis of IsdA structure-sequence alignments indicate that conservation of Tyr(166) is a predictor of haem binding by NEAT domains.

  14. Reducing the size of a data base by using pattern-recognition techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clapp, N.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An on-line surveillance system at a nuclear power plant samples data and calculates the power spectral density. A method of reducing the amount of stored data by screening the data using a pattern recognition technique was developed. The system stores only the spectra that differ from normal, plus the corresponding plant operating conditions. 7 figures.

  15. COMPLEX NETWORKS IN CLIMATE SCIENCE: PROGRESS, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinhaeuser, Karsten J K; Chawla, Nitesh; Ganguly, Auroop R

    2010-01-01

    Networks have been used to describe and model a wide range of complex systems, both natural as well as man-made. One particularly interesting application in the earth sciences is the use of complex networks to represent and study the global climate system. In this paper, we motivate this general approach, explain the basic methodology, report on the state of the art (including our contributions), and outline open questions and opportunities for future research. Datasets and systems that can be represented as interaction networks (or graphs), broadly defined as any collection of interrelated objects or entities, have received considerable attention both from a theoretical viewpoint as well as various application domains; examples include the analysis of social networks, chemical interactions between proteins, the behavior of financial markets, and many others. Recently, the study of complex networks - that is, networks which exhibit non-trivial topological properties - has permeated numerous fields and disciplines spanning the physical, social, and computational sciences. So why do networks enjoy such broad appeal? Briefly, it is their ability to serve at once as a data representation, as an analysis framework, and as a visualization tool. The analytic capabilities in particular are quite powerful, as networks can uncover structure and patterns at multiple scales, ranging from local properties to global phenomena, and thus help better understand the characteristics of complex systems. We focus on one particular application of networks in the earth sciences, namely, the construction and analysis of climate networks. Identifying and analyzing patterns in global climate is an important task of growing scientific, social, and political interest, with the goal of deepening our understanding of the complex processes underlying observed phenomena. To this end, we make the case that complex networks offer a compelling perspective for capturing the dynamics of the climate

  16. Complexity, action, and black holes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-04-18

    In an earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" we conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the `Wheeler-DeWitt' patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  17. Plastic Deformations in Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durniak, C.; Samsonov, D.

    2011-04-29

    Complex plasmas are macroscopic model systems of real solids and liquids, used to study underdamped dynamics and wave phenomena. Plastic deformations of complex plasma crystals under slow uniaxial compression have been studied experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the lattice becomes locally sheared and that this strain is relaxed by shear slips resulting in global uniform compression and heat generation. Shear slips generate pairs of dislocations which move in opposite directions at subsonic speeds.

  18. Bike to work | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in recognition of National Bike Month. From left to right: Jay Snyder, Uvalde Mendez, Stephen Charles, Todd Mills, Susan Baker, David Mosby and Libby Clemens take advantage of...

  19. Comparing Shape and Texture Features for Pattern Recognition in Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsam, S; Kamath, C

    2004-12-10

    Shape and texture features have been used for some time for pattern recognition in datasets such as remote sensed imagery, medical imagery, photographs, etc. In this paper, we investigate shape and texture features for pattern recognition in simulation data. In particular, we explore which features are suitable for characterizing regions of interest in images resulting from fluid mixing simulations. Three texture features--gray level co-occurrence matrices, wavelets, and Gabor filters--and two shape features--geometric moments and the angular radial transform--are compared. The features are evaluated using a similarity retrieval framework. Our preliminary results indicate that Gabor filters perform the best among the texture features and the angular radial transform performs the best among the shape features. The feature which performs the best overall is dependent on how the groundtruth dataset is created.

  20. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

    2001-06-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  1. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

    2000-06-01

    Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  2. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  3. Security training symposium: Meeting the challenge: Firearms and explosives recognition and detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    These conference proceedings have been prepared in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Security Training Symposium on Meeting the Challenge -- Firearms and Explosives Recognition and Detection,'' November 28 through 30, 1989, in Bethesda, Maryland. This document contains the edited transcripts of the guest speakers. It also contains some of the speakers' formal papers that were distributed and some of the slides that were shown at the symposium (Appendix A).

  4. OSTIblog Articles in the speech recognition Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information speech recognition Topic Watch More Science Videos - Now with Closed Captioning by Brian Hitson 26 Aug, 2013 in Products and Content Scientific videos just became even more plentiful and even more accessible through OSTI's multimedia search tool ScienceCinema. Over a three-month period and with the help of a wonderful summer intern working alongside OSTI staff, we have added 560 new science videos to ScienceCinema from DOE Labs. Now,

  5. A learning-pattern recognition system for static-line-loading security assessment of power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    The methodologies explored in this dissertation address the topic static-line-loading security using a learning pattern recognition approach. A basic issue in the pattern recognition approach is to determine if, indeed, the patterns of power system behavior are separable in terms of secure and insecure classes. Class separability is studied from the viewpoint of both intraset clustering and interset dispersion using feature extraction methodologies. While interset dispersion is examined only to the extent of whether or not it exists, no specific attempts are made to optimize the dispersion through feature selection methodologies. The properties of pattern vectors to exhibit intraset clustering and interset dispersion are explored using two different techniques. These techniques are the Karhunen-Loeve Expansion Method which does not assume any specific statistical distribution for the patterns, and the Minimum Entropy Method which assumes patterns that exhibit Gaussian distributions. Although both methods are fundamentally based on the concept of entropy minimization, the transformational properties that yield clustering are distinctly different. The differences are due to assumptions made regarding the statistical distributions of patterns representing system behavior. The application of patterns based on engineering heuristics and a priori knowledge of the system behavior is shown to provide enhanced classification power in the pattern recognition system. Results for several test systems are documented. The feasibility of utilizing mathematical pattern recognition techniques as a primary information processing system for security assessment and a means to subsequently induce learning is demonstrated. As such, a framework for the development of decision making tools with subsequent inputs to rule-based expert systems is speculated in a learning environment.

  6. Albuquerque Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Our Locations Albuquerque Complex The Albuquerque Complex provides responsive business, technical, financial, legal, and management advice and services to successfully ...

  7. Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading Authors: Liu, Xin ; ...

  8. Critical role of iodination for T cell recognition of thyroglobulin in experimental murine thyroid autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champion, B.R.; Rayner, D.C.; Byfield, P.G.H.; Page, K.R.; Chan, C.T.J.; Roitt, I.M.

    1987-12-01

    The authors have used two clonotypically distinct thyroglobulin (Tg)-specific, I-A/sup k/-restricted monoclonal T cell populations to investigate the role of thyroid peroxidase-catalyzed iodination in Tg recognition by autorreactive T cells. The results showed that these T cells could recognize Tg only it was sufficiently iodinated. Unlike normal mouse Tg, noniodinated mouse Tg was unable to induce significant thyroid lesions but could trigger the production of Tg autoantibodies. In these experiments, the importance of T cell recognition of iodination-related epitopes was emphasized by the inability of serum antibodies to distinguish Tg on the basis of iodine content, whether they were induced with normal or noniodinated Tg. Therefore, thyroid peroxidase-dependent modification of Tg would appear to be central to its recognition by autoreactive T cells and hence its capacity to induce autoimmune thyroid lesions. Proliferative responses of the Tg-specific T cell clone was assessed by the incorporation of (/sup 125/I) deoxyuridine. Anti-Tg antibody activity was determined by radioimmunoassay.

  9. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Petoud, Stephane; Xu, Jide

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  10. Rational design of a split-Cas9 enzyme complex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wright, Addison V.; Sternberg, Samuel H.; Taylor, David W.; Staahl, Brett T.; Bardales, Jorge A.; Kornfeld, Jack E.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-02-23

    Cas9, an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease found in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) bacterial immune systems, is a versatile tool for genome editing, transcriptional regulation, and cellular imaging applications. Structures of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 alone or bound to single-guide RNA (sgRNA) and target DNA revealed a bilobed protein architecture that undergoes major conformational changes upon guide RNA and DNA binding. To investigate the molecular determinants and relevance of the interlobe rearrangement for target recognition and cleavage, we designed a split-Cas9 enzyme in which the nuclease lobe and α-helical lobe are expressed as separate polypeptides. The lobes do not interactmore » on their own, the sgRNA recruits them into a ternary complex that recapitulates the activity of full-length Cas9 and catalyzes site-specific DNA cleavage. The use of a modified sgRNA abrogates split-Cas9 activity by preventing dimerization, allowing for the development of an inducible dimerization system. We propose that split-Cas9 can act as a highly regulatable platform for genome-engineering applications.« less

  11. Rational design of a split-Cas9 enzyme complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Addison V.; Sternberg, Samuel H.; Taylor, David W.; Staahl, Brett T.; Bardales, Jorge A.; Kornfeld, Jack E.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-02-23

    Cas9, an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease found in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) bacterial immune systems, is a versatile tool for genome editing, transcriptional regulation, and cellular imaging applications. Structures of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 alone or bound to single-guide RNA (sgRNA) and target DNA revealed a bilobed protein architecture that undergoes major conformational changes upon guide RNA and DNA binding. To investigate the molecular determinants and relevance of the interlobe rearrangement for target recognition and cleavage, we designed a split-Cas9 enzyme in which the nuclease lobe and ?-helical lobe are expressed as separate polypeptides. The lobes do not interact on their own, the sgRNA recruits them into a ternary complex that recapitulates the activity of full-length Cas9 and catalyzes site-specific DNA cleavage. The use of a modified sgRNA abrogates split-Cas9 activity by preventing dimerization, allowing for the development of an inducible dimerization system. We propose that split-Cas9 can act as a highly regulatable platform for genome-engineering applications.

  12. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  13. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3? end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  14. Developement of 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deputch, G.; Hoff, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Olsen, J.; Ramberg, E.; Wu, Jin-Yuan; Yarema, R.; Shochet, M.; Tang, F.; Demarteau, M.; /Argonne /INFN, Padova

    2011-04-13

    Many next-generation physics experiments will be characterized by the collection of large quantities of data, taken in rapid succession, from which scientists will have to unravel the underlying physical processes. In most cases, large backgrounds will overwhelm the physics signal. Since the quantity of data that can be stored for later analysis is limited, real-time event selection is imperative to retain the interesting events while rejecting the background. Scaling of current technologies is unlikely to satisfy the scientific needs of future projects, so investments in transformational new technologies need to be made. For example, future particle physics experiments looking for rare processes will have to address the demanding challenges of fast pattern recognition in triggering as detector hit density becomes significantly higher due to the high luminosity required to produce the rare processes. In this proposal, we intend to develop hardware-based technology that significantly advances the state-of-the-art for fast pattern recognition within and outside HEP using the 3D vertical integration technology that has emerged recently in industry. The ultimate physics reach of the LHC experiments will crucially depend on the tracking trigger's ability to help discriminate between interesting rare events and the background. Hardware-based pattern recognition for fast triggering on particle tracks has been successfully used in high-energy physics experiments for some time. The CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at the Fermilab Tevatron is an excellent example. The method used there, developed in the 1990's, is based on algorithms that use a massively parallel associative memory architecture to identify patterns efficiently at high speed. However, due to much higher occupancy and event rates at the LHC, and the fact that the LHC detectors have a much larger number of channels in their tracking detectors, there is an enormous challenge in implementing pattern recognition

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Complex Wide Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Complex Wide Agreements Sandia National Laboratories utilizes complex wide agreements to leverage the annual spending, to yield lower prices, and to provide cost savings to the complex. The Complex agreements utilized by Sandia National Laboratories include: Supply Chain Management Center (SCMC) agreements Integrated Contractor Purchasing TEAM (ICPT) General Services Administration (GSA)

  16. Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-14

    EMCAS is a model developed for the simulation and analysis of electricity markets. As power markets are relatively new and still continue to evolve, there is a growing need for advanced modeling approaches that simulate the behavior of electricity markets over time and how market participants may act and react to the changing economic, financial, and regulatory environments in which they operate. A new and rather promising approach applied in the EMCAS software is tomore » model the electricity market as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation scheme. With its unique combination of various novel approaches, the Agent Based Modeling System (ABMS) provides the ability to capture and investigate the complex interactions between the physical infrastructures (generation, transmission, and distribution) and the economic behavior of market participants that are a trademark of the newly emerging markets.« less

  17. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Qiang, E-mail: qiangweibeihua@163.com [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Xie, Cheng-jun [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Liu, Hong-jun [School of Information Engineering, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China); Li, Yan-hui [The Library, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China)

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  19. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  20. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. KTM Experimental Complex Project Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tazhibayeva, I.L.; Azizov, E.A.; Krylov, V.A.; Shkolnik, V.S.; Velikhov, E.P.; Obysov, N.A.; Tukhvatulin, Sh.T.; Tikhomirov, L.N.; Shestakov, V.P.; Filatov, O.G

    2005-04-15

    A review of KTM experimental complex project status, which is aimed the creation of a Kazakhstani spherical tokamak for study and tests materials and components of future fusion reactors. Revised basic parameters of the KTM facility and ground of the changes taking into account new plasma core geometry, new design of vacuum chamber and modified magnetic system, transport sluice and movable divertor devices, and additional RF-heating system are presented here.

  3. Single-Molecule Dynamics Reveals Cooperative Binding-Folding in Protein Recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jin; Lu, Qiang N.; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-07-01

    The study of associations between two biomolecules is the key to understand molecular recognition and function. Molecular function is often thought to be determined by the underlying structures. Here, combining single molecule study of protein binding with an energy landscape inspired microscopic model, we found strong evidences that bio-molecular recognition is determined by flexibilities in addition to structures. Our model is based on coarse grained molecular dynamics performed on the residue level with the energy function biased towards the native binding structure (Go model). With our model, the underlying free energy landscape of the binding can be explored. Two distinct conformational states as free energy minimum, one with partially folding of CBD and significant binding of CBD to CDC42, and another with native folding of CBD and native binding of CBD to CDC42, are clearly seen. This shows the binding process proceeds with significant interface binding of CBD with CDC42 first without complete folding of CBD. Finally binding and folding are coupled with each other cooperatively to reach the native binding state. The single molecule experimental finding of the dynamic fluctuations between the loosely bound and closely bound conformational states can be identified with theoretically calculated free energy minimum and quantitatively explained in our model as a result of binding associated with large conformational changes. Theoretical predictions have identified certain key residues for binding which are consistent with mutational experiments. The combined study provides a test ground for fundamental mechanisms as well as insights into design and further explorations on biomolecular recognition with large conformational changes.

  4. Protein superfamily members as targets for computer modeling: The carbohydrate recognition domain of a macrophage lectin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenkamp, R.E.; Aruffo, A.; Bajorath, J.

    1996-12-31

    Members of protein superfamilies display similar folds, but share only limited sequence identity, often 25% or less. Thus, it is not straightforward to apply standard homology modeling methods to construct reliable three-dimensional models of such proteins. A three-dimensional model of the carbohydrate recognition domain of the rat macrophage lectin, a member of the calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin superfamily, has been generated to illustrate how information provided by comparison of X-ray structures and sequence-structure alignments can aid in comparative modeling when primary sequence similarities are low. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Methods and apparatus for non-acoustic speech characterization and recognition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F.

    1999-01-01

    By simultaneously recording EM wave reflections and acoustic speech information, the positions and velocities of the speech organs as speech is articulated can be defined for each acoustic speech unit. Well defined time frames and feature vectors describing the speech, to the degree required, can be formed. Such feature vectors can uniquely characterize the speech unit being articulated each time frame. The onset of speech, rejection of external noise, vocalized pitch periods, articulator conditions, accurate timing, the identification of the speaker, acoustic speech unit recognition, and organ mechanical parameters can be determined.

  6. Material behavior under complex loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breuer, H.J.; Raule, G.; Rodig, M.

    1984-09-01

    Studies of material behavior under complex loading form a bridge between standard material testing methods and the stress analysis calculations for reactor components at high temperatures. The aim of these studies is to determine the influence of typical load change sequences on material properties, to derive the equations required for stress analyses, to carry out tests under multiaxial conditions, and to investigate the structural deformation mechanisms of creep buckling and ratcheting. The present state of the investigations within the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor materials program is described, with emphasis on the experimental apparatus, the scope of the program, and the initial results obtained.

  7. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan L. Sessler

    2007-09-21

    The major thrust of this project, led by the University of Kansas (Prof. Kristin Bowman-James), entails an exploration of the basic determinants of anion recognition and their application to the design, synthesis, and testing of novel sulfate extractants. A key scientific inspiration for the work comes from the need, codified in simple-to-appreciate terms by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory component of the team (viz. Dr. Bruce Moyer), for chemical entities that can help in the extractive removal of species that have low solubilities in borosilicate glass. Among such species, sulfate anion, has been identified as particularly insidious. Its presence interferes with the vitrification process, thus rendering the remediation of tank waste from, e.g., the Hanford site far more difficult and expensive. The availability of effective extractants, that would allow for the separation of separating sulfate from the major competing anions in the waste, especially nitrate, could allow for pre-vitrification removal of sulfate via liquid-liquid extraction. The efforts at The University of Texas, the subject of this report, have thus concentrated on the development of new sulfate receptors. These systems are designed to increase our basic understanding of anion recognition events and set the stage for the development of viable sulfate anion extractants. In conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) members of the research team, several of these new receptors were studied as putative extractants, with two of the systems being shown to act as promising synergists for anion exchange.

  8. A Case for Molecular Recognition in Nuclear Separations: Sulfate Separation from Nuclear Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Bowman-James, Kristin; Day, Victor W.; Kang, S.O.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the case for molecular-recognition approaches for sulfate removal from radioactive wastes via the use of anion-sequestering systems selective for sulfate, using either liquid liquid extraction or crystallization. Potential benefits of removing sulfate from the waste include improved vitrification of the waste, reduced waste-form volume, and higher waste-form performance, all of which lead to potential cleanup schedule acceleration and cost savings. The need for sulfate removal from radioactive waste, especially legacy tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, is reviewed in detail and primarily relates to the low solubility of sulfate in borosilicate glass. Traditional methods applicable to the separation of sulfate from radioactive wastes are also reviewed, with the finding that currently no technology has been identified and successfully demonstrated to meet this need. Fundamental research in the authors laboratories targeting sulfate as an important representative of the class of oxoanions is based on the hypothesis that designed receptors may provide the needed ability to recognize sulfate under highly competitive conditions, in particular where the nitrate anion concentration is high. Receptors that have been shown to have promising affinity for sulfate, either in extraction or in crystallization experiments, include hexaurea tripods, tetraamide macrocycles, cyclo[8]pyrroles, calixpyrroles, and self-assembled urea-lined cages. Good sulfate selectivity observed in the laboratory provides experimental support for the proposed molecular-recognition approach.

  9. Design Molecular Recognition Materials for Chiral Sensors, Separtations and Catalytic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, S.; Nenoff, T.M.; Provencio, P.; Qiu, Y.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Thoma, S.G.; Zhang, J.

    1998-11-01

    The goal is the development of materials that are highly sensitive and selective for chid chemicals and biochemical (such as insecticides, herbicides, proteins, and nerve agents) to be used as sensors, catalysts and separations membranes. Molecular modeling methods are being used to tailor chiral molecular recognition sites with high affinity and selectivity for specified agents. The work focuses on both silicate and non-silicate materials modified with chirally-pure fictional groups for the catalysis or separations of enantiomerically-pure molecules. Surfactant and quaternary amine templating is being used to synthesize porous frameworks, containing mesopores of 30 to 100 angstroms. Computer molecukw modeling methods are being used in the design of these materials, especially in the chid surface- modi~ing agents. Molecular modeling is also being used to predict the catalytic and separations selectivities of the modified mesoporous materials. The ability to design and synthesize tailored asymmetric molecular recognition sites for sensor coatings allows a broader range of chemicals to be sensed with the desired high sensitivity and selectivity. Initial experiments target the selective sensing of small molecule gases and non-toxic model neural compounds. Further efforts will address designing sensors that greatly extend the variety of resolvable chemical species and forming a predictive, model-based method for developing advanced sensors.

  10. Recognition of chromatin by the plant alkaloid, ellipticine as a dual binder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Majumder, Parijat; Chakraborty, Payal; Jana, Kuladip; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2015-07-10

    Recognition of core histone components of chromatin along with chromosomal DNA by a class of small molecule modulators is worth examining to evaluate their intracellular mode of action. A plant alkaloid ellipticine (ELP) which is a putative anticancer agent has so far been reported to function via DNA intercalation, association with topoisomerase II and binding to telomere region. However, its effect upon the potential intracellular target, chromatin is hitherto unreported. Here we have characterized the biomolecular recognition between ELP and different hierarchical levels of chromatin. The significant result is that in addition to DNA, it binds to core histone(s) and can be categorized as a ‘dual binder’. As a sequel to binding with histone(s) and core octamer, it alters post-translational histone acetylation marks. We have further demonstrated that it has the potential to modulate gene expression thereby regulating several key biological processes such as nuclear organization, transcription, translation and histone modifications. - Highlights: • Ellipticine acts a dual binder binding to both DNA and core histone(s). • It induces structural perturbations in chromatin, chromatosome and histone octamer. • It alters histones acetylation and affects global gene expression.

  11. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  12. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arunava; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Yu, Choongho; Scullin, Matthew L.; Huijben, Mark

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  13. Complex Flow Workshop Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complex Flow Workshop Report Complex Flow Workshop Report A discussion on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales. complex_flow_workshop_report.pdf (7.35 MB) More Documents & Publications Atmosphere to Electrons: Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting Summary Report

  14. Complex Management Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for the NNSA Albuquerque Complex facilities including: building and grounds maintenance; construction; security; supply and warehouse operations; office moves; and ...

  15. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  16. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  17. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    DiVincenzo, David [IBM Watson Research Center

    2009-09-01

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  18. Clay complexes support HDS catalyst.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, C. L.; Carrado, K.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-01-01

    Hydroprocessing represents a crucial component of petroleum refining operations both in terms of environmental and economic considerations. Regulations concerning maximum amount of sulfur content of gasoline and emissions of sulfur-oxide compounds upon combustion are becoming more and more stringent. One 1994-2000 focus of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been the development of catalysts for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). Typical HDS catalysts are comprised of Co-Mo sulfides or Ni-Mo sulfides on an alumina support. Modification of the pore structure of the support has generated great attention among researchers. Most desulfurization test reactions have used dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the model compound to test various configurations of support material with Co-Mo-S and Ni-Mo-S catalysts. In this testing, the desired product would be biphenyl and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). A competing reaction creates cyclohexylbenzene by saturating one aromatic ring prior to desulfurization. Ring saturation requires more costly hydrogen and is not desirable. Fortunately, a more effective catalyst for adding hydrogen at the sulfur site with hydrogenating the aromatic rings has been found. However, this has only been tested on DBT. HDS uses various types of catalysts to add hydrogen to reduce unwanted sulfur compounds. Typically this requires expensive, high-pressure, high-temperature equipment to produce the environmentally friendly low-sulfur fuels. ANL scientists identified several new desulfurization catalysts with improved HDS activity and selectivity. From these new catalysts, it may be possible to achieve HDS processing at lower temperature and pressure. The catalysts used for HDS at ANL are various clay complexes. Natural clays have a history of use in the hydroprocessing industry since they are abundant and inexpensive. ANL's approach is to create synthetic organo-clay complexes (SOCC). An advantage of SOCCs is that the pore size and distribution can be controlled by

  19. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian

  20. Evolution of I-SceI Homing Endonucleases with Increased DNA Recognition Site Specificity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2013-09-18

    Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-bp target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C:G{sub +4} base pair for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} base pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A:T{sub +4} were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A:T{sub +4} or the C:G{sub +4} base pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C:G{sub +4} recognition site included small side-chain substitutions at G100 and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} target are 4- to 11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C:G{sub +4} target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed -36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C:G{sub +4} substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease.

  1. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Glen A.

    1993-01-01

    Method for simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts int he pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert int he common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed. In other preferred

  2. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  3. Software Complexity Threatens Performance Portability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamblin, T.

    2015-09-11

    Modern HPC software packages are rarely self-contained. They depend on a large number of external libraries, and many spend large fractions of their runtime in external subroutines. Performance portability depends not only on the effort of application teams, but also on the availability of well-tuned libraries. At most sites, the burden of maintaining libraries is shared by code teams and facilities. Facilities typically provide well-tuned default versions, but code teams frequently build with bleeding-edge compilers to achieve high performance. For this reason, HPC has no “standard” software stack, unlike other domains where performance is not critical. Incompatibilities among compilers and software versions force application teams and facility staff to re-build custom versions of libraries for each new toolchain. Because the number of potential configurations is combinatorial, and because HPC software is notoriously difficult to port to new machines [3, 7, 8], the tuning effort required to support and maintain performance-portable libraries outstrips the available manpower at most sites. Software complexity is a growing obstacle to performance portability for HPC.

  4. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

  5. Deconstructing the Peptide-MHC Specificity of T Cell Recognition | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Deconstructing the Peptide-MHC Specificity of T Cell Recognition Saturday, May 31, 2014 T Cell Figure Figure 1. Overlay of TCR-pMHC structures for 2B4 recognizing MCC (PDB ID: 3QIB), 2B4 recognizing 2A (PDB ID: 4P2O), 226 recognizing MCC (PDB ID: 3QIU), 226 recognizing MCC K99E (PDB ID: 3QIW), 5cc7 recognizing 5c1 (PDB ID: 4P2R), and 5cc7 recognizing 5c2 (PDB ID: 4P2Q), all presented by I-Ek. Despite considerable differences in peptide sequence for 2A, 5c1,

  6. Fast transient security evaluation of power systems by using pattern recognition techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhtari, S.

    1983-01-01

    A power system is a dynamic system. The reaction of a power network to the same set of disturbances is different for various initial equilibrium states. For a given set of contingencies, some of the initial equilibrium states are stable and some of them are unstable. The purpose of this dissertation is to identify if a given operating conditions of the system is stable (secure) or unstable (insecure) for certain disturbances by using real time data. The time required for on-line security analysis can be reduced if pattern recognition techniques are employed. The use of a pattern recognition technique in on-line transient security analysis of power systems is examined. Load magnitudes are treated as random variables with an assumed statistical distribution having a standard deviation of 10%. The simulation technique is applied, off-line, to check system security for the defined set of contingencies. For each initial system condition, the potentially good variables are identified. The number of variables is reduced and variables with the highest discriminatory power are identified. Two decision rules are then developed by using Generalized Square Distance and K-Nearest Neighbor classification techniques. Next, the performance of each classifier is evaluated by using two risk estimating techniques, Jackknife Risk Estimation and Independent Test Risk estimation. The best classifier is identified. Finally, using this classifier, a computer program is developed. This program is capable of predicting, on-line, the security and insecurity of the given power system for any initial system condition within the range defined for the training set. The important features of this program are its accuracy, speed, adaptability and up-dating scheme.

  7. Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators | Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fermilab's Accelerator Complex photo Fermilab's accelerator complex comprises seven particle accelerators and storage rings. It produces the world's most powerful, high-energy neutrino beam and provides proton beams for various experiments and R&D programs. Fermilab's accelerator complex delivers high-intensity neutrino beams and provides optimal beam for a broad range of new and existing experiments, including the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, Muon g-2 and Mu2e. Fermilab's

  8. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  9. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxidation of light paraffins and olefins, as well as the partial oxidation of methanol. We present HAADF-STEM investigations of various complex oxide phases and show that...

  10. Expertise | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex has more than 60 years of experience in the production, handling, packaging, transportation and accountability of nuclear materials. In conducting this...

  11. Stochastic Optimization of Complex Systems (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: SC0002587 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: University of ... Subject: 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING optimization, stochastic methods, complex systems ...

  12. Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, R.M.

    1996-05-30

    This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

  13. A brief history of the Biology Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex Most of the "Biology" buildings were constructed in early 1945 and were built as expansion capability for the uranium preparation operations being conducted across the...

  14. Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This page intentionally blank i Complex-Wide Review of DOE's Radioactive Waste Management ... 1.8 Demonstrated Progress in Radioactive Waste Management ......

  15. Manhattan Project: F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX Hanford Engineer Works, 1945 Resources > Photo Gallery Plutonium production area, Hanford, ca. 1945 The F Reactor plutonium production ...

  16. Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes but also for f-element chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanoparticles and devices. ...

  17. NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between Cyclodextrins and the Neurotoxin Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NMR ...

  18. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, G.A.

    1993-06-15

    A method for the simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert in the common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed.

  19. ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, P. L.

    2007-06-25

    This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

  20. Agent-based modeling of complex infrastructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    North, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructures and infrastructure interdependencies. The CAS model agents within the Spot Market Agent Research Tool (SMART) and Flexible Agent Simulation Toolkit (FAST) allow investigation of the electric power infrastructure, the natural gas infrastructure and their interdependencies.

  1. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  2. Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review emrgtech21_lee_040413.pdf (1.5 MB) More Documents & Publications Window Daylighting Demo High Performance Window Attachments Fenestration Software Tools

  3. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY AROMATIC DITHIOCARBAMATE COMPLEXING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-08-11

    A selective complexing organic solvent extraction process is presented for the separation of uranium values from an aqueous nitric acid solution of neutron irradiated thorium. The process comprises contacting the solution with an organic aromatic dithiccarbamaie and recovering the resulting urancdithiccarbamate complex with an organic solvent such as ethyl acetate.

  4. Structural and Biophysical Studies of the Human IL-7/IL-7R[alpha] Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, Craig A.; Dohm, Julie A.; Walsh, Scott T.R.; (OSU); (UPENN)

    2009-03-06

    IL-7 and IL-7R{alpha} bind the {gamma}{sub c} receptor, forming a complex crucial to several signaling cascades leading to the development and homeostasis of T and B cells. We report that the IL-7R{alpha} ectodomain uses glycosylation to modulate its binding constants to IL-7, unlike the other receptors in the {gamma}{sub c} family. IL-7 binds glycosylated IL-7R{alpha} 300-fold more tightly than unglycosylated IL-7R{alpha}, and the enhanced affinity is attributed primarily to an accelerated on rate. Structural comparison of IL-7 in complex to both forms of IL-7R{alpha} reveals that glycosylation does not participate directly in the binding interface. The SCID mutations of IL-7R{alpha} locate outside the binding interface with IL-7, suggesting that the expressed mutations cause protein folding defects in IL-7R{alpha}. The IL-7/IL-7R{alpha} structures provide a window into the molecular recognition events of the IL-7 signaling cascade and provide sites to target for designing new therapeutics to treat IL-7-related diseases.

  5. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  6. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman-James, Kristin; Wilson, George S.; Moyer, Bruce

    2002-06-04

    This project involves the design and synthesis of receptors for anions of environmental importance, including emphasis on high level and low activity waste. Polyammonium macrocycles as receptors and nitrate as target anion were the focus of the first phase of this project. A second phase involved the synthesis of lipophilic amide based receptors in order to increase the potential for obtaining workable receptors for both separations and sensing applications on site. In the renewal of this project, anions have been extended especially to include selective recognition and binding of sulfate. A three tier approach was employed: I. Design, synthesis, and physical and structural characterization of receptors; II. Examination of the technique known as ITIES, Interface Between Two Immiscible Electrolyte Solutions, as an analytical probe for anion analysis; and III. Separations studies using lipophilic amide receptors for anion binding done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by Bruce Moyer. The result of this program will impact a variety of needs of the Environmental Science Management Program in both sensing and separations areas.

  7. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2005-09-26

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  8. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce a.; Bostick, Debra A.; Fowler, Christopher J.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Ruas, Alexandre; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Haverlock, Tamara J.; Llinares, Jose M.; Hossain, Alamgir; Kang, S. O.; Bowman-James, Kristin; Shriver, James A.; Marquez, Manuel; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2005-09-22

    The major thrust of this project led by the University of Kansas (Prof. Kristin Bowman-Jones) entails the exploration of the principles of recognition and separation of sulfate by the design, synthesis, and testing of novel sulfate extractants. A key science need for the cleanup of tank wastes at Hanford has been identified in developing methods to separate those bulk waste components that have low solubilities in borosilicate glass. Sulfate has been identified as a particularly difficult and expensive problem in that its concentration in the waste is relatively high, its solubility in glass is especially low, and it interferes with the performance of both vitrification equipment and the glass waste form. The new extractants will be synthesized by the University of Kansas and the University of Texas, Austin. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is subjecting the new extractants to experiments that will determine their properties and effectiveness in separating sulfate from the major competing anions in the waste, especially nitrate. Such experiments will entail primarily liquid-liquid extraction. Current efforts focus on exciting new systems in which the anion receptors act as synergists for anion exchange.

  9. Proposed docking interface between peptidoglycan and the target recognition domain of zoocin A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yinghua; Simmonds, Robin S.; Timkovich, Russell

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Peptidoglycan added to zoocin rTRD perturbs NMR resonances around W115. •Simulations predict docking to a shallow surface groove near W115. •The docking interface is similar to mammalian antibody–antigen sites. •EDTA binds to a distinct surface site. -- Abstract: A docking model is proposed for the target recognition domain of the lytic exoenzyme zoocin A with the peptidoglycan on the outer cell surface of sensitive bacterial strains. Solubilized fragments from such peptidoglycans perturb specific backbone and side chain amide resonances in the recombinant form of the domain designated rTRD as detected in two-dimensional {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N correlation NMR spectra. The affected residues comprise a shallow surface cleft on the protein surface near W115, N53, N117, and Q105 among others, which interacts with the peptide portion of the peptidoglycan. Calculations with AutoDock Vina provide models of the docking interface. There is approximate homology between the rTDR-peptidoglycan docking site and the antigen binding site of Fab antibodies with the immunoglobin fold. EDTA was also found to bind to rTRD, but at a site distinct from the proposed peptidoglycan docking site.

  10. Visual language recognition with a feed-forward network of spiking neurons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Craig E; Garrett, Kenyan; Sottile, Matthew; Shreyas, Ns

    2010-01-01

    An analogy is made and exploited between the recognition of visual objects and language parsing. A subset of regular languages is used to define a one-dimensional 'visual' language, in which the words are translational and scale invariant. This allows an exploration of the viewpoint invariant languages that can be solved by a network of concurrent, hierarchically connected processors. A language family is defined that is hierarchically tiling system recognizable (HREC). As inspired by nature, an algorithm is presented that constructs a cellular automaton that recognizes strings from a language in the HREC family. It is demonstrated how a language recognizer can be implemented from the cellular automaton using a feed-forward network of spiking neurons. This parser recognizes fixed-length strings from the language in parallel and as the computation is pipelined, a new string can be parsed in each new interval of time. The analogy with formal language theory allows inferences to be drawn regarding what class of objects can be recognized by visual cortex operating in purely feed-forward fashion and what class of objects requires a more complicated network architecture.

  11. ICDF Complex Operations Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Waste Management Plan functions as a management and planning tool for managing waste streams generated as a result of operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected remedy presented in the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision for the operation of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. This plan identifies the types of waste that are anticipated during operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. In addition, this plan presents management strategies and disposition for these anticipated waste streams.

  12. Spin Glasses: Old and New Complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, D. L.

    2011-09-22

    Spin glasses are disordered magnetic systems that exhibit a variety of properties that are characteristic of 'complex systems'. After a brief review of the systems themselves, I will discuss how spin glass concepts have found use in and, in some cases, further advanced areas such as computer science, biology, and other fields: what one might term 'old complexity'. I will then turn to a discussion of more recent concepts and ideas that have flowed from studies of spin glasses, and using these introduce a proposal for a kind of 'new complexity'.

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_BRIAN_HORN_NRC and DOE recognition May 13 2014.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 Recognitions Brian Horn, NRC Pete Dessaules, DOE/NNSA NRC requirements for Inventory Reporting and Reconciliation  Report Inventory to NMMSS * < 30 days - IAEA selected facilities, Cat-1 sites * < 45 days - Cat-2 sites * < 60 days - Reactors, Cat-3 sites, >350 gram licensees * Prior to March 31 st - licensees authorized < 350 grams fissile * As of Sept. 30 th - Foreign obligated source material holdings  Reconcile inventory with NMMSS within 30 days of submission 2

  14. Using the automata processor for fast pattern recognition in high energy physics experiments—A proof of concept

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael H. L. S. Wang; Cancelo, Gustavo; Green, Christopher; Guo, Deyuan; Wang, Ke; Zmuda, Ted

    2016-06-25

    Here, we explore the Micron Automata Processor (AP) as a suitable commodity technology that can address the growing computational needs of pattern recognition in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. A toy detector model is developed for which an electron track confirmation trigger based on the Micron AP serves as a test case. Although primarily meant for high speed text-based searches, we demonstrate a proof of concept for the use of the Micron AP in a HEP trigger application.

  15. Using the automata processor for fast pattern recognition in high energy physics experiments. A proof of concept

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael H. L. S. Wang; Cancelo, Gustavo; Green, Christopher; Guo, Deyuan; Wang, Ke; Zmuda, Ted

    2016-06-25

    Here, we explore the Micron Automata Processor (AP) as a suitable commodity technology that can address the growing computational needs of pattern recognition in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. A toy detector model is developed for which an electron track confirmation trigger based on the Micron AP serves as a test case. Although primarily meant for high speed text-based searches, we demonstrate a proof of concept for the use of the Micron AP in a HEP trigger application.

  16. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 331.1C, Chg 3, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The revision incorporates recommendations from the FY12 National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relation's "Goals-Engagement-Accountability-Results (GEAR)" report and program requirements currently contained in the DOE Supervisory/Non-Supervisory Employee Performance Management and Recognition Desk Reference (Desk Reference) such as the DOE Monetary Awards Scale, as well as program requirements that have been established via memoranda since the Order was revised in October 2010.

  17. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 331.1C Chg 3, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-03-20

    The revision incorporates recommendations from the FY12 National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relation's "Goals-Engagement-Accountability-Results (GEAR)" report and program requirements currently contained in the DOE Supervisory/Non-Supervisory Employee Performance Management and Recognition Desk Reference (Desk Reference) such as the DOE Monetary Awards Scale, as well as program requirements that have been established via memoranda since the Order was revised in October 2010.

  18. Nuclear Advances | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The scope of research and development at the Y-12 National Security Complex has widened from a single-focus World War II defense mission to a panoply of explorations and ...

  19. Y-12 National Security Complex Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists the major projects completed at the Y-12 National Security Complex.

  20. EM Corporate Performance Measures- Complex Wide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The corporate (i.e., relating to the entire DOE-EM complex) measures are tracked in the context of the total measure (life-cycle) necessary to complete cleanup of each site, as well as the EM...

  1. Intermediate-Valence Tautomerism in Decamethylytterbocene Complexes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In contrast to Cp*sub 2 Yb(bipy) and other substituted-bipy complexes, the nature of both the ground state and the first excited state are altered by changing the position of the ...

  2. Triamine chelants, their derivatives, complexes and conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troutner, David E.; John, Christy S.; Pillai, Maroor R. A.

    1995-01-01

    A group of functionalized triamine chelants and their derivatives that form complexes with radioactive metal ions are disclosed. The complexes can be covalently attached to a protein or an antibody or antibody fragment and used for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. The chelants are of the formula: ##STR1## wherein n, m, R, R.sup.1, R.sup.2 and L are defined in the specification.

  3. Complex fragment emission from hot compound nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental evidence for compound nucleus emission of complex fragments at low energies is used to interpret the emission of the same fragments at higher energies. The resulting experimental picture is that of highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion processes which decay statistically. In particular, complex fragments appear to be produced mostly through compound nucleus decay. In the appendix a geometric-kinematic theory for incomplete fusion and the associated momentum transfer is outlined. 10 refs., 19 figs.

  4. SEPARATION PROCESS USING COMPLEXING AND ADSORPTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spedding, J.H.; Ayers, J.A.

    1958-06-01

    An adsorption process is described for separating plutonium from a solution of neutron-irradiated uranium containing ions of a compound of plutonium and other cations. The method consists of forming a chelate complex compound with plutoniunn ions in the solution by adding a derivative of 8- hydroxyquinoline, which derivative contains a sulfonic acid group, and adsorbing the remaining cations from the solution on a cation exchange resin, while the complexed plutonium remains in the solution.

  5. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY SECONDARY XANTHATE COMPLEXING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-09-01

    A method is described for separating and recovering uranium values contained in an acidic aqueous solution together with thorium or protactinium values. In accordance with the invention, the acidic solution containing uranium in the uranyl form is contacted with an organic xanthate. The xanthate forms a urano-xanthate complex but is substantially non-reactive with thorium and protactinium. The urano-xanthate complex is recovered by organic solvent extraction.

  6. Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multiconfigurational Ground States and Open-Shell Singlet Formation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes: Multiconfigurational Ground States and Open-Shell Singlet Formation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes: Multiconfigurational Ground States and Open-Shell Singlet Formation Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e., intermediate valence) and

  7. Phase distribution in complex geometry conduits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Lopez de Bertodano, M.; Jones, O.C. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Some of the most important and challenging problems in two-phase flow today have to do with the understanding and prediction of multidimensional phenomena, in particular, lateral phase distribution in both simple and complex geometry conduits. A prior review paper summarized the state-of-the-art in the understanding of phase distribution phenomena, and the ability to perform mechanistic multidimensional predictions. The purpose of this paper is to update that review, with particular emphasis on complex geometry conduit predictive capabilities.

  8. Triamine chelants, their derivatives, complexes and conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troutner, D.E.; John, C.S.; Pillai, M.R.A.

    1995-03-07

    A group of functionalized triamine chelants and their derivatives that form complexes with radioactive metal ions are disclosed. The complexes can be covalently attached to a protein or an antibody or antibody fragment and used for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. The chelants are of the formula, as shown in the accompanying diagrams, wherein n, m, R, R{sup 1}, R{sup 2} and L are defined in the specification.

  9. Foliated breccias in the active Portuguese Bend landslide complex, California: bearing on melange genesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larue, D.K.; Hudleston, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    The active portion of the Portuguese Bend landslide complex is approximately 3 km/sup 2/ in area and 30-50 m thick. Measured displacement rates range from less than one to greater than 30 mm/day on different parts of the landslide, with total displacements over the last 30 yrs ranging from about 10 to greater than 150 m. Six types of breccia, each locally with a foliated matrix, were recognized in the active landslide complex and are absent outside the landslide complex. Slide-body breccias are of two types, the first formed by extensional fracturing during bulk pure shear at the top of the landslide (slide-top breccia) and the second by flow of tuffaceous shales and fracture of embedded siliceous shales during simple shear deep in the landslide to the basal decollement (slide-bottom breccias). Slide-margin breccias, also in simple shear, are produced on the lateral margins of individual slide blocks accompanying wrench-fault motion. Other breccias (fault-ramp breccias) are formed during motion over ramps. Colluvial deposits within tension gashes (crack-fill breccias) and at the toe of the slide (slide-toe breccias) represent a fifth breccia type. Diapirs originating from over-pressured zones at the slide base also contain breccia. Recognition of different breccia types in ancient rocks would be difficult, because fabrics in the different types are similar. Foliations are defined by: scaly cleavage, compositional banding and color banding (in shear zones), stretched mud clasts, and aligned hard grains. Foliated breccias are synonymous with melanges. The authors regard the six breccia types described herein as representing the principal types of melange that occur in ancient accretionary settings.

  10. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2004-06-30

    In this project, now completing its third year of its second renewal period, a collaborative project involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of North Texas has been addressing outstanding questions regarding the separation of the bulk sodium constituents of alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit of this research is a major reduction in the volume of radioactive tank waste, obviating the building of expensive new tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. As a general approach, principles of ion recognition are being explored toward discovery and basic understanding of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium salts from waste-like matrices. Questions being addressed pertain to applicable extraction equilibria and how extraction properties relate to extractant structure. Progress has included the elucidation of the promising concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction (PHE), demonstration of crown-ether synergized PHE, demonstration of combined sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate separation, and synthesis of novel ditopic receptors for ditopic PHE. In future efforts (pending renewal), a thermochemical study of PHE relating extractant acidity to extraction strength is proposed, and this study will be extended to systems containing crown ethers, including proton-ionizable ones. A series of crown ethers will be synthesized for this purpose and to investigate the extraction of bulk sodium salts (e.g., nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate), possibly in combination with sodium hydroxide. Simple proof-of-principle tests with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent designs that have desirable properties. In view of the upcoming milestone of completion of the second renewal period, this report will, in addition to providing a summary of the past year's progress, summarize all of the work completed since the start of this project.