National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reclamation demolished efr

  1. Workers Make History by Demolishing Manhattan Project Facilities |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Workers Make History by Demolishing Manhattan Project Facilities Workers Make History by Demolishing Manhattan Project Facilities February 16, 2016 - 1:45pm Addthis Once K-27 is demolished, it will mark the first-ever cleanup of an entire gaseous diffusion complex anywhere. | Office of Environmental Management video David Sheeley David Sheeley Editor/Writer For the first time in history, workers will complete the demolition and cleanup of an entire gaseous diffusion

  2. Workers Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site Workers Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site February 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Metals Plant is shown before workers removed panels from the structure ln 2012. The Metals Plant is shown before workers removed panels from the structure ln 2012. Workers remove panels from the Metals Plant in September 2012. Workers remove panels from the Metals Plant in September 2012. About half of the complex was demolished by the end of December 2012, ahead of

  3. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    near DP Road Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP Road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. November 1, 2012 The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the

  4. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    near DP Road Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP Road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. November 1, 2012 The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the

  5. Oak Ridge's EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower Oak Ridge's EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge’s K-1206 F Fire Water Tower falls into an empty field during a recent demolition project. Oak Ridge's K-1206 F Fire Water Tower falls into an empty field during a recent demolition project. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program recently demolished one of the most iconic structures at the East

  6. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    near DP road Excavation enclosures at MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. November 1, 2012 The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the

  7. EM Prepares to Demolish Most Hazardous Hanford Site Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – One of EM’s most complex risk-reduction projects is expected to wrap up in coming months as crews demolish a Cold War relic at the Hanford Site: the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP).

  8. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP Road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work...

  9. Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History Workers recently razed a facility used in the historic Project Pluto, the latest American Recovery and Reinvestment Act accomplishment helping clean up traces of past nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Recovery Act workers safely hauled the last demolition waste from the Pluto Disassembly Facility to disposal facilities Jan. 11.

  10. Workers Demolishing Significant Inactive Facility at Paducah Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Demolishing Significant Inactive Facility at Paducah Site Workers Demolishing Significant Inactive Facility at Paducah Site June 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis A panoramic view of the east end of the C-410 complex shows a rainbow forming as sunlight passes through vapor from misting machines used to suppress dust. A panoramic view of the east end of the C-410 complex shows a rainbow forming as sunlight passes through vapor from misting machines used to suppress dust. A

  11. Transgenic expression of the dicotyledonous pattern recognition receptor EFR in rice leads to ligand-dependent activation of defense responses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Bahar, Ofir; Thomas, Nicolas; Holton, Nicolas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ruan, Deling; Canlas, Patrick E.; Daudi, Arsalan; Petzold, Christopher J.; Singan, Vasanth R.; et al

    2015-03-30

    Plant plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect extracellular pathogen-associated molecules. PRRs such as Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21 are taxonomically restricted and are absent from most plant genomes. Here we show that rice plants expressing EFR or the chimeric receptor EFR::XA21, containing the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo)-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Treatment of EFR and EFR::XA21 rice leaf tissue with elf18 leads to MAP kinase activation, reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression. Although expression of EFR does not lead to robust enhanced resistancemore » to fully virulent Xoo isolates, it does lead to quantitatively enhanced resistance to weakly virulent Xoo isolates. EFR interacts with OsSERK2 and the XA21 binding protein 24 (XB24), two key components of the rice XA21-mediated immune response. Rice-EFR plants silenced for OsSERK2, or overexpressing rice XB24 are compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential feasibility of enhancing disease resistance in rice and possibly other monocotyledonous crop species by expression of dicotyledonous PRRs. Our results also suggest that Arabidopsis EFR utilizes at least a subset of the known endogenous rice XA21 signaling components.« less

  12. Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Facility Metro Wastewater Reclamation...

  13. Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site September 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A high-pressure water cannon is used to control dust for the demolition of the X-600 Steam Plant. A high-pressure water cannon is used to control dust for the demolition of the X-600 Steam Plant. One of three large smoke stacks comes down during the demolition. One of three large smoke stacks comes down during the

  14. Surface mine regulations complicate reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seltz-Patrash, A.

    1980-09-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 is a landmark environmental law intended to protect U.S. lands from stripmining effects. However, coal mine operators claim that some SMCRA regulations are misguidedcosting time and money, but yielding no substantial environmental benefit. Unlike other environmental acts, SMCRA details specifically the goals of reclamation and the methods that must be implemented to meet these goals. Coal industry representatives believe that this discourages innovation, promotes inefficiency by ignoring regional differences among sites, and results in unnecessary expense to the industry. Reclamation practices and progress among western coal mining companies are evaluated. (1 map, 5 photos)

  15. Rocky Flats 10 year plan: over 500 structures to be demolished

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, B.; Bengel, P.

    1997-03-01

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has prepared a Ten Year Plan (Plan) that demonstrates how the Site would achieve accelerated cleanup and rapidly reduce the risks the Site currently poses to its workers, the public, and the environment. A major element of the Plan is the decontamination and demolition of over 500 Site facilities, including all of the former nuclear production facilities, by the end of 2006. Facilities used for the storage of plutonium, treatment of low-level mixed waste, and several office building would remain until the plutonium is removed or there is no longer a need for the facility, in which case it would be demolished. While the Plan considers all aspects of the cleanup and closure, this paper focuses on the challenges posed by the removal of highly contaminated equipment and the demolition of structures. This paper describes near- term decommissioning projects as well as the long range plans and budgets. Cash flow ultimately controls schedule, and sharing of budget priorities among processing of special nuclear material, disposing of waste, and cleaning up the environment has to be juggled carefully to attain the goals of the Plan. The total cost of the Plan exceeds $5 billion, and over $1 billion will be spent on decommissioning activities. Following removal of the plutonium and the demolition of the plutonium storage and remaining Site facilities by the end of 2015, the cost to perform the long-term environmental monitoring at the Site is estimated to be $10 million per year.

  16. Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on...

  17. Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Facility Southside Water Reclamation Plant Sector...

  18. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  19. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  20. Mined land reclamation in Wisconsin since 1973

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Reclamation has long been recognized as an essential action necessary to mitigate the degradation of land caused by mining activities. But, it is only within the past several decades that reclamation has become an integral component of the mineral extraction process. While the Metallic Mining Reclamation Act (MMRA) was passed in 1973, Wisconsin is yet to enact comprehensive state-wide reclamation requirements for mining other than metallic minerals and the code for metallic mining has yet to establish procedures and standards for reclamation success, specifically revegetation and postmining land use. This study integrates several interdisciplinary methodologies including a history of reclamation; an inventory and status report of mined lands; a critique and comparison of existing reclamation policy with previous state and current federal reclamation policies; in-field case studies of revegetation parameters, procedures, and performance standards; and an economic analysis of reclamation technology. This study makes three major recommendations: (1) The metallic mining code should be amended to establish vegetation parameters, measuring methods, and performance standards for revegetation success similar to those contained in the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA); (2) The metallic mining code should be amended to resolve semantic loopholes by clearly defining the endpoints of terms such as restoration, reclamation, and rehabilitation and by utilizing the reclamation continuum as a planning tool for determining acceptable postmining land use alternatives; and (3) Mandatory statewide nonmetallic legislation should be enacted to strengthen the mineral resource management program in Wisconsin by systematically and uniformly regulating the mining and reclamation of nonmetallic minerals, the state's most important mineral resource.

  1. Bureau of Reclamation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    enough electricity to serve 3.5 million homes. Today, Reclamation is a contemporary water management agency with a Strategic Plan outlining numerous programs, initiatives and...

  2. How reclamation tests mechanical governors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agee, J.C.; Girgis, G.K.; Cline, R.

    1996-08-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation has developed its own equipment for testing mechanical-hydraulic governors for hydroelectric generators. The device, called a Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) Simulator, generates a three-phase voltage that will drive the governor ballhead motor at variable speed. Utilizing this equipment, most traditional governor tests can be completed with the generating unit dewatered. In addition, frequency response testing and other detailed analytical tests can be performed to validate governor models. This article describes the development and design of the equipment, and it also discusses its usage in a case study of events at Glen Canyon Dam.

  3. EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the Final...

  4. EIS-0480: Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service Notice...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Reclamation and National Park Service Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0480: Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service Notice of ...

  5. Geotechnical considerations in surface mine reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhn, A.K.

    1999-07-01

    Most attention in surface mine reclamation is given to agronomic soils and revegetation, but reclamation success depends on the geotechnical characteristics of the underlying earth. If the soil and rock that underline the surface are not stable, surface treatments lack the dependable foundation needed for them to succeed. Reclamation practioners need to understand those geotechnical considerations--material properties, structure, and processes--that affect stability. properties of rock and soil are altered by mining, and those altered materials together with water and processing waste form often-complex mixtures of materials that must be stabilized in reclamation. Surface mining alters existing landforms and creates new ones such as pit walls, spoil and waste rock piles, tailings impoundments, and earthfills. those structures need to be constructed or stabilized so that they can endure and support successful reclamation. processes that affect material properties and landforms include mechanical breakage, accelerated weathering, erosion, and mass movements. Mechanical breakage and the resulting accelerated weathering combine to change material properties, usually expressed as degraded strength, that can lead to instability of landforms. Erosion, especially that related to extreme storm events, and mass movements in the form of slop failures are the most problematic processes that must be taken into account in reclaiming mined lands. These geotechnical considerations are essential in successful reclamation, and practioners who overlook them may find their work literally sliding down a slippery slope.

  6. Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

    1990-06-01

    The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Breakout Session 2-A: The Future of Algae-Based Biofuels Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Tryg Lundquist, Associate Professor, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo PDF icon lundquist_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009557: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Algae ATP3

  8. Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Van Geet, O.

    2012-05-01

    Report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Report contains results from utility scale analysis and site visits, as well as facility scale screening and site visits.

  9. Illinois abandoned mined lands reclamation program: a progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmann, T.J.; Jenkusky, S.M.; Massie, S.

    1985-12-01

    The Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council (AMLRC), created in 1975, is responsible for the abatement of hazardous and environmental problems associated with pre-law abandoned coal mines throughout the State. The availability of federal funds for reclamation, through passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), greatly expanded the program. With funds provided through early cooperative agreements and current annual grants from the federal Office of Surface Mining (OSM), the State has reclaimed, or is currently reclaiming, 182 mine sites and has assisted OSM in the abatement of 67 emergency situations. This paper reviews the progress made by the AMLRC in dealing with the State's abandoned mine problems. Specifically, the numbers and types of problem sites reclaimed annually, their costs, and reclamation methods are identified. Progress of the program relative to the entire State's abandoned mine problems is reviewed. The effects of other reclamation factors, such as natural revegetation, remaining privately-funded reclamation, and secondary carbon recovery, on the overall scope of the State's program are also examined. General comments are made concerning grant preparation, State-OSM cooperation and AML-Inventory control. Selected reclamation projects and techniques are also discussed. 11 references, 3 tables.

  10. Manual for training reclamation inspectors in the fundamentals of hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, W.R.; Dyer, K.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    This handbook is intended to be a desk reference to help nonhydrologists achieve a basic understanding of hydrology as it relates to surface mining and reclamation. Surface coal mining and reclamation inspectors and other staff will find it useful in implementing regulatory programs. The handbook is not meant to be a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The handbook can be used in the training of surface-mining and reclamation inspectors, both Federal and State, and as a basic reference for inspectors in carrying out their assigned duties. The handbook describes clues and indicators of potential problems, suggests ways to prevent or mitigate them, and discusses various observation and sampling techniques.

  11. Bureau of Reclamation Small Conduit Hydropower Development and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Bureau of Reclamation Small Conduit Hydropower Development and Rural Jobs Act of 2013Legal...

  12. Enhanced cover methods for surface coal refuse reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, L.F.; Cargill, K.W.; McGarvie, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    Controlling acid rock drainage (ARD) can be a major component of surface mining reclamation. An enhanced reclamation cover system is being constructed to control infiltration of rain water and generation of ARD from coal-refuse disposal areas at a closed mine in southern Illinois. Development of the mine reclamation plan required consideration of ARD generation in coal refuse disposal areas located adjacent to an alluvial aquifer used for public water supply. An integrated site characterization was performed at the mine to provide information to develop and support the enhanced reclamation plan. The enhanced cover system is similar to covers required for municipal solid waste landfills by the Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle D regulations. The system comprises a graded and compacted gob layer, overlain by a compacted clay liner, and a protective soil cover. The results of infiltration modeling and analyses showed that the standard reclamation cover is effective in reducing infiltration by about 18 percent compared to an unreclaimed coal-refuse surface. The modeling results showed that the inhanced cover system should reduce infiltration by about 84 percent. The geochemical modeling results showed that the reduction in infiltration would help minimize ARD generation and contribute to an earlier reclamation of the mine site.

  13. Surface and groundwater management in surface mined-land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evoy, B.; Holland, M.

    1990-06-01

    This report provides information on surface water and groundwater management for use in the mined-land reclamation planning process in California. Mined-land reclamation, as defined by the California Surface Mining and Reclamation Act, is the combination of land treatments which prevent or minimize water degradation, air pollution, damage to aquatic or wildlife habitat, and erosion resulting from a surface mining operation. Surface water and groundwater management play an integral role in nearly every reclamation plan. Groundwater and surface water runoff (both onto and off of the site) must often be evaluated (1) to design flooding and erosion protection measures such as drainage channels, levees, culverts, or riprap; (2) to prepare and carry out a successful revegetation program; (3) to design stable final slopes; (4) to maximize potential available water for the operation and reclamation stages; (5) to prevent the discharge of contaminants from mine processes or from mined areas; and (6) to limit long-term leachate formation and movement from tailings, pit, or waste rock disposal areas. This report is a guide for mine operators, local government, planners, and plan reviewers.

  14. Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund - a view from the West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Congress created the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund (AML) in 1977 as part of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. The AML is funded by a special tax on coal mining. About one-third of AML fees will be paid by coal operators in the western states. The author examines the disbursement of AML funds under the Reagan Administration. He describes how the western state governments expected a generous portion of the AML funds for coal and non-coal reclamation, as well as community impact assistance projects in their states. Finally, the author shows how the Office of Surface Mining has largely frustrated the western expectations through its interpretation of the AML disbursement priorities.

  15. Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act: A Utah perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson, D.

    1989-01-01

    The authority to regulate the coal industry at the state level, under state statute and rules, the importance of the coal industry to the state, the importance of an environmentally sound regulatory program, and the benefit of a state-managed abandoned mine reclamation program, in short the ability of the state to manage its own natural resources, make state primacy a necessity, not an option. Implementation of SMCRA cannot be measured in the myriad of oversight statistics. Effectiveness means cost-effective, timely reclamation of abandoned sites; consistent, workable rules and regulatory practices; responsive program management; and compliance which is internalized in the mine's operations.

  16. Mccallum study area: resource and potential reclamation evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to collect baseline data for establishing reclamation objectives and lease stipulations. The report includes data on climate, biological and cultural resources, physiography, geology, coal resources, soil overburden, vegetation, and hydrology. The study area is within Moffat County in Colorado.

  17. Western surface mine permitting and reclamation. Volume 2. Contractor documents. Part B. Hydrologic evaluation and reclamation technologies for western surface coal mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The report presents an analysis of the hydrologic evaluation and reclamation technologies of western surface coal mining as they have evolved and advanced since passage of the Federal Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). The primary emphasis of the report is threefold, addressing: Hydrologic data used in the preparation and review of mining and reclamation plans. Analytical techniques used to predict and evaluate the hydrologic impacts of mining. Evaluation criteria used to determine the success of hydrologic restoration. The report also discusses special reclamation practices used to preserve and restore the essential hydrologic functions of alluvial valley floors.

  18. Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

    1990-02-01

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Approval of State and Indian Reclamation Program grants under Title IV of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977: final environmental import statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Approval of annual grant applications to states and Indian tribes is proposed in accordance with Title IV of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). The grants are financed through assessments for abandoned coal mine reclamation. Fund collections are to continue through 1992. Granting of all available funds would provide the maximum possible amount of money and promote the highest level of reclamation of mined areas. Health and safety hazards associated with unreclaimed mines would be lessened, and habitat for fish, wildlife, and vegetation would be enhanced significantly. Mining reclamation projects would require evacuation of residents in affected areas. Reclamation activities would create dust and sediments, degrading air quality and surface flows. Endangered bat species dwelling in mine openings would be displaced or destroyed due to mine closures.

  20. Federal oversight of alternative bond systems under SMCRA (Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beier, A.E.; McElfish, J.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) requires mine operators to post reclamation bonds before mining begins. The Federal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) has approved alternative bond systems in seven states. These systems, rather than requiring bond amounts at the full cost of reclamation, require operators to submit only a flat rate, acreage specific bond. Additional reclamation costs should be covered by a supplemental fund composed generally of permit fees, taxes, or penalties. In many cases, alternative bond systems fail to ensure that funds will be available to reclaim coal mined land in the event of operator default, as required by SMCRA. OSMRE needs to take a more active role in oversight of existing state alternative bond systems to ensure that reclamation occurs.

  1. EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy 70: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Windy Gap Firming Project, Colorado Download Document PDF icon EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement More Documents & Publications EIS-0370:

  2. EIS-0480: Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service Notice of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy 80: Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0480: Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam The Bureau of Reclamation and the National Park Service issued a notice of availability of a Draft EIS

  3. Economic feasibility analysis of water-harvesting techniques for mined-land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Marti, M.H.

    1981-07-01

    A water harvesting, agricultural production system, field tested as a means of reclaiming strip-mined land is described. Though the technical feasibility of the system is becoming increasingly apparent, economic feasibility and legal issues may determine its potential application. The purpose of this study is to explore the economic feasibility of the system and to provide information for use in assessing whether further investigation of water harvesting reclamation techniques is warranted. The economic feasibility of the PNL reclamation system hinges on whether its net benefits exceed those of conventional reclamation. This preliminary feasibility study assesses the net private benefits of each system using data for the Peabody Coal Company's Kayenta mine on the Black Mesa in Arizona. To compare the alternative reclamation systems, the present value of direct net benefits (income minus production and reclamation costs) is calculated for grazing (conventional reclamation) or for cropping (PNL reclamation). Three of the PNL system slope treatments have lower estimated total costs than conventional reclamation. The difference is $3895/acre for compacted slope, $3025/acre for salt-compacted slope and $2310/acre for crop-on-slope. These differences constitute a substantial cost advantage for the system on the basis of the present value of land reclamation and maintenance costs. The system also has advantages based on the estimated value of agricultural production capacity. Even the lowest yield levels considered for alfalfa, corn, and pinto beans had higher net present values than grazing.

  4. Promoting economic incentives for environmental protection in the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977: an analysis of the design and implementation of reclamation performance bonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, B.S.; Webber, D.J.

    1985-04-01

    This article examines the bonding system designed by the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) and some alternatives developed by several states in their regulatory programs. As well, it evaluates the systems for their potential to provide economic incentives for coal operators to engage in environmentally sound mining techniques throughout the duration of the mining activities. The first section of this article briefly reviews the SMCRA. The second section outlines the specific reclamation bonding provisions of the act. The third section analyzes economic incentives and their application to coal mining, and the fourth section more particularly evaluates the reclamation bonding provisions of the act as market based incentives. Finally, the article assesses the design of reclamation bonds and suggests modifications intended to provide greater incentives for coal producers to protect the environment. 132 references.

  5. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  6. Reclamation planning for abandoned mining subsidence lands in eastern China --- A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhenqi Hu; Hehe Gu

    1995-09-01

    China has a long history of coal mining and more than 96% of coal output is taken from underground mines each year. With the excavation of coal from underground, severe subsidence often results, which produces many subsidence lands. Since the Chinese government enacted a reclamation stipulation in 1989, many abandoned mining subsidence lands were produced before 1989. Therefore, reclamation of abandoned subsidence lands has become the focus of research activities in our country. This paper explores the principle and methods of reclamation planning for abandoned mining subsidence lands and presents a case study in eastern China. A 373 ha of abandoned mining subsidence land in Anhui province was selected as an experiment site. Since China is a developing country and land shortage is severe in this area, the high economic benefits from the reclaimed land was the final reclamation goal. Based on the topography of subsidence lands --- some parts of the abandoned lands were wetland or lake-like troughs, restoring farmlands and fishponds were chosen as post-reclamation land uses. The elevation of reclaimed lands was the key for restoring farmland successfully because of the high underground water level in this area, and the optimum fishpond size and side-slope design were the keys to reach high reclamation income. The HDP (Hydraulic Dredge Pump) reclamation technique was used for restoring farmland and creating fishpond. A farming and aquaculture plan for high economic benefits was also designed. This project will make farmers, who own the lands, richer through reclamation.

  7. Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    also an area that may not have received enough attention in the past, from both fiscal or environmental experts and their associated institutions."1 "To use market forces to drive...

  8. Thermal reclamation of used blast grit. Technology spotlight report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Naval shipyards and other domestic port facilities generate thousands of tons of used blast grit annually. There are also thousands of steel bridges in the United States on a repaint schedule that requires grit blasting for surface preparation. All the used grit, along with the paint residue it contains, is currently disposed of in landfills. Cleaning and recycling used blast grit is an attractive alternative. Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed a fluidized-bed sand calciner that is well suited for cleaning and recycling used blast grit. Essentially, IGT researchers applied a transfer/adaptation of fluidized-bed calcination originally developed for the reclamation of foundry sand. The calciner has a patented sloped-grid design that enhances the combustion of paint residues and promotes the isolation of reusable material.

  9. Setting the course for the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 focuses on ensuring reclamation of the land after mining by restoring land affected to a condition capable of supporting prior uses and sets up a program for reclaiming abandoned mined land to be financed by a tax on coal produced. This article discusses the landmark legal decisions which represent major efforts to limit the federal role in the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 through the Commerce Clause, the Tenth Amendment, and statutory interpretation.

  10. Implementing a program of cooperative federalism: The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.

    1989-01-01

    This article outlines the legislative history of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 and describes the forces that promoted a federalist arrangement of shared powers and responsibility for implementing the environmental reclamation provisions of the Act. The major components of the Act are reviewed and the Act is examined in terms of its general effectiveness in promoting reclamation as well as its contribution to the practice of American federalism and the capacity of state government to implement complex regulatory programs. The article concludes that SMCRA has had a positive impact in terms of improving state capabilities, expanding public involvement in decision making, and enhancing federal and state cooperation.

  11. Title 43 CFR 429 Use of Bureau of Reclamation Land, Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    29 Use of Bureau of Reclamation Land, Facilities, and Waterbodies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

  12. Reclamation fee on coal production: an example of federal regulatory taxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reese, C.E.

    1983-09-01

    The coal mining reclamation fee is part of the federal government's efforts to regulate the strip mining of coal and to use proceeds from the fee for land use and pollution control problems associated with abandoned mines. Authorized by the 1977 Surface Mining Contol and Reclamation Act rather than the Internal Revenue Code, the exaction is still shown to be both a regulatory and a severance tax. 41 references. (DCK)

  13. Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Check out this epic demolition video from the Hanford Site in Washington state. But its more than just great footage -- this represents important progress in the cleanup of the environmental legacy of one of America's most famous scientific undertakings -- the Manhattan Project.

  14. Development of a thermal reclamation system for spent blasting abrasive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, B.B.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rehmat, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    Abrasive blasting is the most economical method for paint removal from large surface areas such as the hulls and tanks of oceangoing vessels. Tens of thousands of tons of spent abrasive are generated annually by blasting operations in private and US Navy shipyards. Some of this material is classified as hazardous waste, and nearly all of it is currently being either stockpiled or disposed in landfills. The rapid decline in available landfill space and corresponding rise in landfill tipping fees pose a severe problem for shipyard operators throughout the US. This paper discusses the results of a research and development program initiated by the Institute of Gas Technology and supported by the US Navy to develop and test a fluidized-bed thermal reclamation system for spent abrasive waste minimization. Bench- and pilot-scale reclaimer tests and reclaimed abrasive performance tests are described along with the current status of a program to build and test a 5-ton/hour prototype reclaimer at a US Navy shipyard.

  15. Reclamation of acidic copper mine tailings using municipal biosolids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, M.T.; Thompson, T.L.; Bengson, S.A.

    1998-12-31

    Reclamation of copper mine tailings in a cost effective, successful, and sustainable manner is an ongoing area of evaluation in the arid southwest. A study was initiated in September, 1996 near Hayden, Arizona to evaluate the use of municipal biosolids for reclaiming acidic copper mine tailings (pH of 2.5 to 4.0). The main objectives of the study were to (1) define an appropriate level of biosolids application for optimum plant growth, and (2) evaluate the effects of green waste and lime amendments. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with four biosolid rates of 20, 70, 100 and 135 dry tons/acre, three amendment treatments (none, green waste, and green waste plus lime); with three replications. Non-replicated controls (no treatment, green waste only and lime only) were included for comparison. Shortly after biosolids incorporation to a depth of 10--12 inches, composite soil samples (0--12 inches) of each plot were taken. Biosolids incorporation increased the pH of the tailings (>5.75) and additional increases in pH were noted with lime application. In January 1997, the plots were seeded and sprinkler irrigation was commenced. A total of 4.47 inches of rainfall and 3.8 inches of irrigation were applied until harvest in May 1997. Data from the first growing season indicates optimum growth (>66 lbs/acre) at biosolids rates of 70--100 dry tons/acre. There was a significant positive effect on growth of green waste and lime amendments. Surface NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in biosolids amended plots were greatly reduced (from 23 to 6 mg/kg) by addition of green waste. There was no evidence for NO{sub 3}N leaching below 12 inches.

  16. Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s review of Atlas Corporation`s proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Highwall elimination and return to approximate original contour as required in the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The report covers the following issues concerning: highwall elimination, reclamation, and approximate original contour in surface-mining applications.

  18. H. R. 2095: Abandoned Mine Reclamation Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, October 25, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to reauthorize the collection of reclamation fees. This bill explains the additions to the Act relating to collection of interest on that portion of the fund not currently needed; the allocation of funds; the fund objectives; eligible lands and waters; state reclamation programs; voids and tunnels; emergency program; certification; and abandoned minerals and mineral materials mine reclamation fund.

  19. Application of a watershed computer model to assess reclaimed landform stability in support of reclamation liability release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.R.; Zevenbergen, L.W.; Cochran, J.

    1995-09-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) instituted specific requirements for surface coal mine reclamation that included reclamation bonding and tied release of liability to achieving acceptable reclamation standards. Generally, such reclamation standards include successfully revegetating the site, achieving the approved postmine land use and minimizing disturbances to the prevailing hydrologic balance. For western surface coal mines the period of liability continues for a minimum of 10 years commencing with the last year of augmented seeding, fertilizing, irrigation or other work. This paper describes the methods and procedures conducted to evaluate the runoff and sediment yield response from approximately 2,700 acres of reclaimed lands at Peabody Western Coal Company`s (PWCC) Black Mesa Mine located near Kayenta, Arizona. These analyses were conducted in support of an application for liability release submitted to the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) for reclaimed interim land parcels within the 2,700 acres evaluated.

  20. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Scientific soundness and socio-economic realities in reclamation for habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, K.D.

    1997-12-31

    Reclamation projects must balance data requirements for scientifically-sound design with uncertainty and socio-economic constraints. Whether designing for physical stability, cultural benefits or ecological enhancements, the reclamation project can work with or fight natural processes (physical, chemical, biological). Projects which anticipate and design to fit natural processes have greater chances of success with lower short and long-term cost, and with achievement of a greater range of social objectives. However, the cost of anticipating natural processes (succession, geomorphic patterns, etc.) increases the budget allocation at the design stage in order to save on construction and maintenance. In southern Ontario, once design teams recognize that designing for an {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} natural condition is not feasible, they too often revert to conventional, single-objective approaches which compromise design integrity and social benefits. Case studies are reviewed with analysis of alternative approaches that seek to balance ranges of achievable objectives with cost allocation and scientific soundness.

  3. Reclamation Project Act of 1939 U.S.C. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reclamation Project Act of 1939 U.S.C. Reclamation Project Act of 1939 U.S.C. CITE: 42USCC12 TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485a TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485b TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485c TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485d TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485e TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485f TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485g TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485h TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485i TITLE 43--PUBLIC LANDS CITE: 43USC485j TITLE 43--PUBLIC

  4. Taxation of expenditures required by the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNally, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    There has been disagreement over whether the expenditures made by the mine operator to comply with the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 are characterized as capital or deductible expenses. An examination of expenditures made by mine operators during the life of a mine illustrates the dichotomy between deductible and capital expenditures in which special rules may override general capitalization rules to allow the mine operator to deduct a capital expenditure. This makes some expenditures difficult to categorize. Citing case law, the author treats expenditures for exploration and mining permits, performance bonds, and liability insurance. A new provision, section 468, allowing the current deduction for future reclamation and closing costs removed the uncertainty created by prior case law.

  5. Cost analysis of aerial photographic and satellite imagery for monitoring mined land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.E.; Buschur, J.P.

    1980-12-01

    Five sections of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 require information that is easily and efficiently obtainable by aerial photographic and remote sensing methods. Most states in which mining is important and to which the Act most specifically applies, maintain or have available to them aerial photographic or remotely sensed information of the type required. This information could be used to meet the requirements of the Act which call for monitoring reclamation progress, identifying land areas unsuitable for mining and determining land use prior to mining to name a few examples. At the regional scale, LANDSAT imagery of a scale of 1:250,000 provides a good combination of aerial coverage and detail for regional problem solving. At the local scale, such coverage as is provided by the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service through their aerial observation method of compliance technique can supply local, detailed information to meet site specific needs.

  6. Surface coal mining operations in two Oklahoma Counties raise questions about prime farmland reclamation and bond adequacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-08

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 allows prime farmland to be mined but requires the coal operator to reclaim it according to special reclamation standards. To be considered prime farmland, the soil must meet the Secretary of Agriculture's definition of prime soil and have historically been used for intensive agricultural purposes. In Oklahoma, the historical-use provision has generally been applied to lands that have been used for cropland for 5 of the preceding 10 years. GAO's review of mining activities in two Oklahoma counties showed that the land comprising 54 of the 58 mine permits issued since the act's passage contained some prime soil. None, however, required reclamation to prime farmland standards because landowners signed letters stating that the land had not been farmed for crops for five of the preceding 10 years. GAO also found that numerous sites in the two counties were abandoned by mining companies after the act was passed. Since abandonment, no reclamation has occurred on most of these sites. The Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining questions whether the bonds on the unreclaimed sites, if collected, will be adequate to do the necessary reclamation. Oklahoma's Department of Mines has taken action to increase bond amounts on newly-issued permits and on some older permitted areas in order to prevent future reclamation problems.

  7. McCallum study area: resource and potential reclamation evaluation: executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to collect baseline data for establishing reclamation objectives and lease stipulations. The report includes data on climate, biological and cultural resources, physiography, geology, coal resources, soil overburden, vegetation, and hydrology. The study area is within Moffat County in Colorado. The overall effect of mining on hydrology of the area should be minimal, primarily because only small areas of the basins will be mined.

  8. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Public participation under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977: a panoply of rights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    The public participation rights included in the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 are outlined. Described by some as intricate and complex enough to be a lawyer's dream, the act has nagging rules that may be incapable of serving citizens' rights. This is felt to be too harsh a judgement, however. The goals of an informed participating citizenry can be achieved if the rules are perceived to be aids rather than stumbling blocks. (DCK)

  12. Feasibility of automatic storage reclamation with concurrent program execution in a LISP environment. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassidy, K.G.

    1985-12-01

    Storage reclamation is the process of reclaiming discarded information and returning the memory space occupied by that discarded information to an available area or list in memory that is available to be utilized by programmers. This increased interest in storage reclamation is a result of the increasing use of list-processing environments. A list-processing environment is a system in which the language manipulates data structures called lists. In classical LISP implementations, program execution/computation continues until there is no more memory available (i.e., the free list of available cells has become exhausted). When this happens, user program(s) HALT and then storage reclamation, in the form of garbage collection, takes over. This halting of programs in the midst of their computation is not only frustrating to programmers and researchers but can also be of crucial importance in other applications. This thesis investigates the feasibility of allowing concurrent program execution with garbage collection. LISP has been selected because it has been estimated that typical LISP programs take 10%-30% of their processing time to perform garbage collection.

  13. Spoil handling and reclamation costs at a contour surface mine in steep slope Appalachian topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipper, C.E.; Hall, A.T.; Daniels, W.L.

    1985-12-09

    Accurate overburden handling cost estimation methods are essential to effective pre-mining planning for post-mining landforms and land uses. With the aim of developing such methods, the authors have been monitoring costs at a contour surface mine in Wise County, Virginia since January 1, 1984. Early in the monitoring period, the land was being returned to its Approximate Original Contour (AOC) in a manner common to the Appalachian region since implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). More recently, mining has been conducted under an experimental variance from the AOC provisions of SMCRA which allowed a near-level bench to be constructed across the upper surface of two mined points and an intervening filled hollow. All mining operations are being recorded by location. The cost of spoil movement is calculated for each block of coal mined between January 1, 1984, and August 1, 1985. Per cubic yard spoil handling and reclamation costs are compared by mining block. The average cost of spoil handling was $1.90 per bank cubic yard; however, these costs varied widely between blocks. The reasons for those variations included the landscape positions of the mining blocks and spoil handling practices. The average reclamation cost was $0.08 per bank cubic yard of spoil placed in the near level bench on the mined point to $0.20 for spoil placed in the hollow fill. 2 references, 4 figures.

  14. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Scratching the surface: State implementation of the Surface Mining Reclamation and Control Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheberle, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of the Surface Mining Reclamation and Control Act of 1977 has been criticized as sporadic, lackluster, and dependent upon the political proclivities of primacy states. This dissertation explores the effect of national-level and state-level variables on implementation patterns in Colorado, Wyoming, and Virginia. Surveys and personal interviews, combined with longitudinal analyses of implementation performances of the Office of Surface Mining and individual state agencies, provide the heart of the research data. The research findings suggest the importance of considering state variables when explaining implementation performance. Moreover, support for both national and state variables as important determinants of the implementation process are provided by the research results.

  16. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Legacy Uranium Mine Site Reclamation - Lessons Learned - 12384

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilpatrick, Laura E.; Cotter, Ed

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management is responsible for administering the DOE Uranium Leasing Program (ULP) and its 31 uranium lease tracts located in the Uravan Mineral Belt of southwestern Colorado (see Figure 1). In addition to administering the ULP for the last six decades, DOE has also undertaken the significant task of reclaiming a large number of abandoned uranium (legacy) mine sites and associated features located throughout the Uravan Mineral Belt. In 1995, DOE initiated a 3-year reconnaissance program to locate and delineate (through extensive on-the-ground mapping) the legacy mine sites and associated features contained within the historically defined boundaries of its uranium lease tracts. During that same time frame, DOE recognized the lack of regulations pertaining to the reclamation of legacy mine sites and contacted the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) concerning the reclamation of legacy mine sites. In November 1995, The BLM Colorado State Office formally issued the United States Department of the Interior, Colorado Bureau of Land Management, Closure/Reclamation Guidelines, Abandoned Uranium Mine Sites as a supplement to its Solid Minerals Reclamation Handbook (H-3042-1). Over the next five-and-one-half years, DOE reclaimed the 161 legacy mine sites that had been identified on DOE withdrawn lands. By the late 1990's, the various BLM field offices in southwestern Colorado began to recognize DOE's experience and expertise in reclaiming legacy mine sites. During the ensuing 8 years, BLM funded DOE (through a series of task orders) to perform reclamation activities at 182 BLM mine sites. To date, DOE has reclaimed 372 separate and distinct legacy mine sites. During this process, DOE has learned many lessons and is willing to share those lessons with others in the reclamation industry because there are still many legacy mine sites not yet reclaimed. DOE currently administers 31 lease tracts (11,017 ha) that collectively contain over 220 legacy (abandoned) uranium mine sites. This contrasts to the millions of hectares administered by the BLM, the U.S. Forest Service, and other federal, tribal, and state agencies that contain thousands of such sites. DOE believes that the processes it has used provide a practical and cost-effective approach to abandoned uranium mine-site reclamation. Although the Federal Acquisition Regulations preclude DOE from competing with private industry, DOE is available to assist other governmental and tribal agencies in their reclamation efforts. (authors)

  18. Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

  19. Evaluating mine reclamation habitats at the landscape level following mountain-top removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, S.N.

    1998-12-31

    Present-day regulations of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act were based largely on the technologies and mining methods of the late 1970`s. Thus reclamation management practices today may not fully address the landscape changes that are possible now from mountain-top removal and associated contour mining operations. This study has sought to evaluate the changes in human and natural resource systems associated with large-scale mining in the Coal River Valley region of south-central West Virginia. The Coal River Valley region was studied at a local to a landscape-scale using ground-level sampling, aerial photomaps and constructed GIS maps, starting from a site-specific-scale of natural and restored habitat types. Six watershed-drainage areas were selected for study. Three of these represented contour mining primarily and three other drainage areas encompassed mountain-top removal mining. Landscape components were characterized by overlaying slope, elevation and contour data from maps onto aerial photomaps. On-the-ground sampling was used to distinguish restoration habitat types. The site-specific measurements were obtained using transects placed across the man-made landforms (i.e., backfill, valleyfill, field, pond and drainage ditch) of the reclamation sites in each of the six watershed drainage areas. All of the measured sites had been revegetated with a seed mixture for a wildlife management plan and ranged in age from 2 to 12 years of vegetative growth at the time of the study. Percentage cover by herbaceous and woody species was determined in two-meter square quadrats placed mechanically along all transect lines to quantify the various site-specific vegetation types. Based on the site-specific evaluation, distinguishable habitats were found on each of the man-made landforms. The percentage of mountaintop removal habitats with non-native species has increased over the last decade. Percentages of total area mined in the region over thirty years were calculated, yielding a determination of changes in traditional land-uses.

  20. Assessing the impacts of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, U.

    1989-01-01

    Even a dozen years since the passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) there is little agreement on how well it has worked. The paper attempts to assess the impacts of SMCRA in six major surface coal producing states. Although it is not possible to make an unqualified overall national assessment, the evidence presented in the paper indicates that in many (but by no means all) cases, surface coal mining is now carried out in environmentally less destructive ways then before the Act. However, the accomplishments have fallen far short of expectations. The situation in some states has gotten worse than before the Act. Overall, the impact of the Act on the ground has been mixed and has depended on the rigor with which the Act has been implemented in individual coal states.

  1. State implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, C.E.; Davis, S.K.; Peacock, D.

    1989-01-01

    The implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) of 1977 in coal producing states is guided by a partial preemption policy approach that establishes a balance between federal and state decision-making authority. The usefulness of this approach is assessed by analyzing state enforcement actions in relation the institutional capacity of states to shoulder regulatory responsibilities and the propensity of the federal Office of Surface Mining (OSM) to oversee state enforcement actions and, if necessary, to undertake corrective action. The authors results indicated that state administration of SMCRA was constrained by the lack of effective federal oversight but was largely unaffected by interstate differences in political, economic, or administrative characteristics.

  2. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the six-acre tract of land to Los Alamos County. The metal structures, which resemble airplane hangars, were installed in 2010 to protect workers and the public from exposure...

  3. EM Begins Demolishing K-31 Gaseous Diffusion Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – EM's demolition of the K-31 Building at Oak Ridge’s East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) began Wednesday, marking the removal of the fourth of five gaseous diffusion buildings at the former uranium enrichment site.

  4. LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is also important to members of the Pueblo de San Ildefonso, whose sacred lands border the area. "We know that progress on cleanup at TA-54 means a lot to Northern New...

  5. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    site. Though much of the waste excavated from the landfill was soil and run-of-the-mill trash such as cardboard and discarded protective clothing, the excavation also uncovered the...

  6. 1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, Adam

    2013-08-30

    The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer™ is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer™ to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV – a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the developments made under this program have increased 1366 confidence that Direct Wafers can be produced for ~$0.10/W, still nearly 50% lower than current industry best practice. Wafer quality also steadily improved throughout the program, both in electrical performance and geometry. The improvements to electrical performance were achieved through a combination of optimized heat transfer during growth, reduction of metallic impurities to below 10 ppbw total metals, and lowering oxygen content to below 2e17 atoms/cc. Wafer average thickness has been reduced below 200µm with standard deviation less than 20µm. Measurement of spatially varying thickness shortly after wafer growth is being used to continually improve uniformity by adjusting thermal conditions. At the conclusion of the program, 1366 has developed strong relationships with four leading Tier1 cell manufactures and several have demonstrated 17% cell efficiency on Direct Wafer. Sample volumes were limited, with the largest trial consisting of 300 Direct Wafers, and there remains strong pull for larger quantities necessary for qualification before sales contracts can be signed. This will be the focus of our pilot manufacturing scale up in 2014.

  7. Assessment of landfill reclamation and the effects of age on the combustion of recovered municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forster, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarized the Lancaster county Solid Waste Management Authorities`s (LCSWMA)landfill reclamation activities, ongoing since 1991. All aspects have been analyzed from the manpower and equipment requirements at the landfill to the operational impacts felt at the LCSWMA Resource Recovery Facility (RRF) where the material is delivered for processing. Characteristics of the reclaimed refuse and soil recovered from trommeling operations are discussed as are results of air monitoring performed at the landfill excavation site and the RRF. The report also discusses the energy value of the reclaimed material and compares this value with those obtained for significantly older reclaimed waste streams. The effects of waste age on the air emissions and ash residue quality at the RRF are also provided. The report concludes by summarizing the project benefits and provides recommendations for other landfill reclamation operations and areas requiring further research.

  8. Surface mining and reclamation effects on flood response of watersheds in the central Appalachian Plateau region - article no. W04407

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrari, J.R.; Lookingbill, T.R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P.A.; Eshleman, K.N.

    2009-04-15

    Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km{sup 2} watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

  9. H. R. 4804: A bill to amend titles I, II, IV and V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, and to add a new title X, to encourage the remining and reclamation of abandoned mined lands by active mining operations, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, June 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Surface coal mining operations can be effective in the reclamation of abandoned mined lands and are being encouraged by the amendments to the existing Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The new section X - Remining spells out the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to enter into agreements with mining companies to use excess spoil from an active surface mine to reclaim an abandoned site, to develop a bond guarantee program whereby the operators may be compensated with reclamation bond credits for up to 80% of the reclamation costs incurred, and to make funds available on a matching basis to states or tribes to collect certain geologic and hydrologic data for watersheds or regions adversely affected by past coal mining abuses for the use of regulatory authorities to assist applicants for surface mining permits within such areas.

  10. Economic assessment of the impact on coal production due to enforcement of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Benefits report. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, T.N.; McOmber, R.M.; Roberts, J.M.

    1980-10-31

    The study assesses the major economic benefits and costs that are associated with the enforcement of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation ACt (SMCRA). The report addresses the benefits of surface coal mining and land reclamation that follow from the Act. As originally conceived, the study was to evaluate, preferably in monetary terms, the specific benefits and socio-economic impacts of SMCRA. However, it was apparent, in the course of the initial analysis, that historical evaluation of specific benefits and socio-economic/environmental impacts is complicated by the short time that SMCRA has been in operation. It was also apparent that development of substantive, and defensible, quantified estimates of benefits and impacts is hindered by the absence of a great deal of needed numerical data, and by incomplete understanding of the reclamation processes that the Act is intended to enhance. Rather than attempt to evaluate specific benefits and socio-economic/environmental impacts, the study evaluated existing research studies on the impacts of surface mining, land reclamation, and SMCRA, and evaluated existing data sources relevant to surface mining, land reclamation, and SMCRA.

  11. Proceedings of the 15. annual national meeting of the American Society for Surface Mining and Reclamation. Mining -- Gateway to the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Throgmorton, D.; Nawrot, J.; Mead, J.; Galetovic, J.; Joseph, W.

    1998-12-31

    The 124 papers of these proceedings are arranged under the following topical sections: Minerals education; Hydrology--Characterization and monitoring; Tailings--Reclamation; Reforestation; Mine drainage--Biogeochemical processes; Mine drainage--Treatment, general; Mine drainage--Passive treatment, wetlands; Mine drainage--Prediction and monitoring; Acid soils--Reclamation practices; Wildlife and fisheries habitat; Subsidence--Engineering practices and environmental effects; OSM acid forming materials mini workshops; RUSLE--Erosion prediction techniques on mined construction and reclaimed lands; IDNR wetlands technology transfer program; Mine planning and postmining land use; Vegetation establishment--Principles and practices; Vegetation establishment--Warm season grasses; Coal combustion by-products--General; Coal combustion by-products--Mine drainage treatment; and Prime farmland reclamation and mine soils management. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  12. H.R. 2372: A Bill to the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Amendments Act of 1995. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This report discusses a bill to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to minimize duplication in regulatory programs and to give States exclusive responsibility under approved States program for permitting and enforcement of the provisions of that Act with respect to surface coal mining and reclamation operations, and for other purposes.

  13. Walk-through survey report: Control technology for metal reclamation industries at East Penn Manufacturing Company Inc. , Lyon Station, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, R.M.

    1994-08-12

    A walk through survey was conducted at the East Penn Manufacturing Company (SIC-3341), Lyon Station, Pennsylvania to identify and evaluate potentially effective controls and work practices in the lead (7439921) reclamation industry. The facility was a secondary lead smelter which operated 7 days a week, and recycled about 20,000 batteries a day, primarily automobile batteries. The company employed automation, local exhaust ventilation, partial enclosures, and enclosed ventilation systems in the reverberatory furnace operations, blast furnace operations, and casting and refinery area to reduce employee exposure to lead. The arsenic (7440382) personal exposure time weighted averages ranged from 0.10 to 1.14 microg/cubic m in the industrial battery breaking area and ranged from nondetected to 6.16 microg/cubic m in the alloying/pots area.

  14. Abandoned mine lands: a mid-course review of the national reclamation program for coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    The Committee on Abandoned Mine Lands (CAML) analyzed how the U.S. Department of the Interior's (DOI) Office of Surface Mining (OSM) has and is administering the Title IV (Abandoned Mine Lands) Program of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. In the course of focusing on the effectiveness of the program, the Committee evaluated the program not only in terms of its probable accomplishments over its fifteen-year life, between 1977 and 1992, when the program statutorily ends, but also the magnitude and nature of the AML problems remaining to be remedied in the post-1992 period, if Congress decides to extend it. The Committee made nineteen recommendations about how OSM could improve the AML program's current effectiveness as well as prepare to assist Congress in reaching a decision to terminate or extend the program. Over the fifteen-year life of the program, some $3.3 billion will have been spent.

  15. Federal-state relations in the implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 not only established national performance standards and permitting procedures for the coal industry, but also provided for state primacy. The principle of state primacy is both simple and intuitively appealing. Because states do not have adequate resources to develop effective regulatory programs, the federal government would set up comprehensive procedures and criteria to guide the states in preparing their own plans. The obvious advantage of state primacy is that it provides for flexibility in implementation. Ultimately, state primacy is an experiment in cooperative federalism, a sharing of authority and responsibility between the states and the federal government to insure both the general welfare and sensitivity to local conditions. The history of surface mining regulation is instructive because it points out the pitfalls and promise of cooperative federalism as well as the critical role of the courts in making state primacy work.

  16. S. 943: A Bill to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to facilitate the use of abandoned mine reclamation fund moneys to replace water supplies that have been contaminated or diminished by coal mining practices. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred First Congress, First Session, May 9, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The bill describes mandatory and discretionary allocations of funds to a state or Indian reservation for the purpose of water reclamation. The stated objectives of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act are amended to allow 50 percent of a state's mandatory allocation to be used for the construction of public water treatment plants and distribution facilities to take the place of water supplies that have been contaminated as a result of coal practices undertaken prior to August 3, 1977, regardless of whether the contamination has been exacerbated by coal mining practices since that date, when construction would be more economical than repair of existing facilities.

  17. Adequacy of bonds to ensure reclamation of surface mines. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, June 26, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Jed Christensen, Director of the Office of Surface Mining's Reclamation and Enforcement Department, and Michael Gryschowiec of the General Accounting Office (GAO) were the principal witnesses at a hearing held to examine the effects of Section 509 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. At issue was the bonding program and unhappiness on the part of landowners who want their land restored and coal operators who are having difficulty obtaining bonds for reclamation. Gryschowiec described the GAO's review of the bonding system for funding reclamation, and its finding that existing bonds are inadequate. Christensen focused his testimony on efforts to improve the bonding process, including a bond estimating handbook, extensive oversight of State bonding and permitting procedures, and evaluation of the bond pooling system. Correspondence and statements submitted for the record follow the testimony.

  18. Analysis of alternative modifications for reducing backwater flooding at the Honey Creek coal strip-mine reclamation site in Henry County, Missouri. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Studies to determine the hydrologic conditions in mined and reclaimed mine areas, as well as areas of proposed mining, have become necessary with the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Honey Creek in Henry County, Missouri, has been re-routed to flow through a series of former strip mining pits which lie within the Honey Creek coal strip mine reclamation site. During intense or long duration rainfalls within the Honey Creek basin, surface runoff has caused flooding on agricultural land near the upstream boundary of the reclamation site. The calculated existing design discharge (3,050 cubic feet per second) water-surface profile is compared to the expected water-surface profiles from three assumed alternative channel modifcations within the Honey Creek study area. The alternative channel modifications used in these analyses include (1) improvement of channel bottom slope, (2) relocation of spoil material, and (3) improved by-pass channel flow conditions. The alternative 1, 2, and 3 design discharge increase will reduce the agricultural field current (1990) frequency of backwater flooding from a 3-year to a 6.5-year event.

  19. GrayQbTM Single-Faced Version 2 (SF2) Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) deployment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, J. R.; Immel, D. M.; Serrato, M. G.; Dalmaso, M. J.; Shull, D. J.

    2015-11-18

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in partnership with CH2M Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) deployed the GrayQbTM SF2 radiation imaging device at the Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) to assist in the radiological characterization of the canyon. The deployment goal was to locate radiological contamination hot spots in the PRF canyon, where pencil tanks were removed and decontamination/debris removal operations are on-going, to support the CHPRC facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) effort. The PRF canyon D&D effort supports completion of the CHPRC Plutonium Finishing Plant Decommissioning Project. The GrayQbTM SF2 (Single Faced Version 2) is a non-destructive examination device developed by SRNL to generate radiation contour maps showing source locations and relative radiological levels present in the area under examination. The Hanford PRF GrayQbTM Deployment was sponsored by CH2M Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) through the DOE Richland Operations Office, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO), DOE-RL IEWO- M0SR900210.

  20. S. 276: A Bill to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to improve control of acid mine drainage, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, February 2, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This bill amends the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to improve control of acid mine drainage. State use of funds is addressed.

  1. Economic assessment of the impact on coal production due to enforcement of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Cost report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-12

    The report summarizes the efforts made in the cost analysis portion of the 'Economic Assessment of the Impact on Coal Production Due to Enforcement of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) of 1977. The objective of the cost analysis portion of the study was to supplement the study's examination of the benefits of SMCRA with an analysis of the costs of SMCRA as based on industry experience and data. The analysis involved the development and field test of a methodology for constructing estimates of the costs of complying with regulations at individual surface coal mines.

  2. S. 3168: A Bill to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to improve control of acid mine drainage, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, August 11, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Act may be cited as the [open quotes]Acid Mine Drainage Abatement Act of 192[close quotes]. The purpose of this bill is to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to improve control of acid mine drainage, and for other purposes. The proposed amendments are listed.

  3. Surface coal mining in Alaska: an investigation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 in relation to Alaskan conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report was written in response to a mandate in section 708 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 which required the study of surface coal mining conditions in the State of Alaska, in order to determine which, if any, of the provisions of the Act should be modified with respect to surface coal mining operations in Alaska. The report discusses both surface mining and the surface effects of underground mining. The report examines not only the impact of mining at the site of operations but also the effects that extend beyond the mine itself, including effects on social institutions, the economy, the physical well-being of people, and the use of land. The report considers Alaska conditions primarily from the perspective of a potential increase in coal development, not of mining limited to meeting local needs of energy.

  4. Workers Demolish Reactor Support Facility as Part of River Corridor Contract

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office and cleanup contractor Washington Closure Hanford recently completed the cleanout and demolition of the last reactor support facility as part of the River Corridor Closure Contract.

  5. Proceedings of the international land reclamation and mine drainage conference and third international conference on the abatement of acidic drainage. Volume 4: Abandoned mine lands and topical issues -- SP 06D-94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Volume 4 of these proceedings is divided into the following sections: Subsidence--Reclamation, characterization (6 papers); Subsidence--Structural response (7); Abandoned mine land studies (6); Mine Hydrology--Topical issues (4); Mine waste--Topical issues (6); Policy issues (6); Miscellaneous poster session (14); and Abstracts (17). 53 papers dealing with or applicable to coal mining have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  6. Report on the emergency response to the event on May 14, 1997, at the plutonuim reclamation facility, Hanford Site, Richland,Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoop, D.S.

    1997-08-20

    On the evening of May 14,1997, a chemical explosion Occurred at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) in the 200 West Area(200-W) of the Hanford Site. The event warranted the declaration of an Alert emergency, activation of the Hanford Emergency Response Organization (BRO), and notification of offsite agencies. As a result of the emergency declaration, a subsequent evaluation was conducted to assess: 9 the performance of the emergency response organization o the occupational health response related to emergency activities o event notifications to offsite and environmental agencies. Additionally, the evaluation was designed to: 9 document the chronology of emergency and occupational health responses and environmental notifications connected with the explosion at the facility 0 assess the adequacy of the Hanford Site emergency preparedness activities; response readiness; and emergency management actions, occupational health, and environmental actions 0 provide an analysis of the causes of the deficiencies and weaknesses in the preparedness and response system that have been identified in the evaluation of the response a assign organizational responsibility to correct deficiencies and weaknesses a improve future performance 0 adjust elements of emergency implementing procedures and emergency preparedness activities.

  7. Accident investigation board report on the May 14, 1997, chemical explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility, Hanford Site,Richland, Washington - final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerton, R.E.

    1997-07-25

    On May 14, 1997, at 7:53 p.m. (PDT), a chemical explosion occur-red in Tank A- 109 in Room 40 of the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (Facility) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, approximately 30 miles north of Richland, Washington. The inactive processing Facility is part of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). On May 16, 1997, Lloyd L. Piper, Deputy Manager, acting for John D. Wagoner, Manager, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), formally established an Accident Investigation Board (Board) to investigate the explosion in accordance with DOE Order 225. 1, Accident Investigations. The Board commenced its investigation on May 15, 1997, completed the investigation on July 2, 1997, and submitted its findings to the RL Manager on July 26, 1997. The scope of the Board`s investigation was to review and analyze the circumstances of the events that led to the explosion; to analyze facts and to determine the causes of the accident; and to develop conclusions and judgments of need that may help prevent a recurrence of the accident. The scope also included the application of lessons learned from similar accidents within DOE. In addition to this detailed report, a companion document has also been prepared that provides a concise summary of the facts and conclusions of this report, with an emphasis on management issues (DOE/RL-97-63).

  8. Tenth anniversary of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Testimony was heard from representatives from the Society of American Archeology, the Office of Surface Mining and Reclamation Enforcement, the Office of Environmental Energy Management of Pennsylvania, National Wildlife Federation, Sierra Club, Western Organizations of Resource Councils, Southwest Research and Information Center, West Virginia Highlands Conservancy, Illinois South Project, Concern About Water Loss Due to Mining, Mountain Stream Monitors, Citizens Organized Against Longwalling, Environmental Policy Institute, Kentucky Fair Tax Coalition, Save Our Cumberland Mountains, Navajo Nation, several coal mining companies, the National Coal Association, and Small Coal Operator Advisory Council. Prepared statements from all witnesses plus additional materials are included.

  9. Amend Section 402 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Mineral Resources Development and Production of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on S. 643, March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Jed D. Christensen of the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Department of the Interior, was the principal witness at a hearing on S. 643, which amends the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The amendment would allow states to set aside as much as 10% from the reclamation trust fund to apply to abandoned sites. Senators speaking in favor of the bill reported problems with obtaining home loans and insurance due to subsidence from abandoned sites. Christensen supported the bill in principle, but noted possible problems with handling interest and the actual transfer of the money. He also noted a possible breakdown in regulation with the current wording of the bill. Additional material submitted for the record from representatives and officials of the State of Wyoming follows the text of S. 643 and the testimony of the five witnesses.

  10. Land reclamation beautifies coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coblentz, B.

    2009-07-15

    The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

  11. H. R. 4053: A Bill to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the remining of certain abandoned coal mine lands. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, February 21, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the remining of certain abandoned coal mine lands. The bill describes definitions; state remining insurance programs; state self-sustaining remining insurance fund; penalties and enforcement; special rules applicable to remining operations; and abandoned coal refuse and disposal piles.

  12. S. 1768: A Bill to amend title V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to assist small surface coal mine operators, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, October 18, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    If the probable total annual production at all locations of a coal surface mining operator does not exceed 300,000 tons, the cost of the following activities, required by subsections of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, will be assumed by the regulatory authority upon written request: determination of hydrologic consequences, development of cross-section maps and plans, geologic drilling and statement of results of test borings and core samplings, collection of archeological information, pre-blast surveys, collection of site-specific resource information and production of protection and enhancement plans for fish and wildlife habitats, and the collection and analysis of geological and hydrologic data.

  13. Chemical reclamation of scrap rubber. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, G.C.; Chan, S.M.; Culberson, O.L.; Perona, J.J.; Larsen, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual, commercial-scale plant design was formulated for processing 22,500 t/yr of scrap rubber tires to hydrocarbon fuel gases, oils, petrochemicals (principally ethylene and aromatic liquids), and carbon black. The process is based upon molten salt (zinc chloride) pyrolysis of the rubber, and pyrolysis data obtained in a bench-scale flow apparatus. An economic assessment of the plant was made in terms of late 1979 dollars, for ranges in scrap tire costs and prices for the principal products: carbon black and the fuel gases and oil. Profitability at these 1979 costs and prices is somewhat modest by chemical processing industry standards for new processes, but any increases in energy and carbon black prices would cause favorable changes in this assessment.

  14. Land use and value after reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, W.R.

    1998-12-31

    This presentation discusses the process of analyzing the size and condition of producing land parcels concerning management and income relationships, tract location, and soil and water conservation structures. It reviews production schemes for crops such as corn, soybeans, wheat, alfalfa hay, and warm season grasses, as well as use for recreation. Management of tenants and leases is discussed concerning evaluation of crop share leases, cash renting, custom farming, and tenant selection. Factors involving subsidence due to underground mining by longwall or room and pillar extraction are discussed. Issues related to planning for and management of taxes, long-term improvements, and other land costs are presented.

  15. Thermal reclamation of spent blasting abrasive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, B.G. ); Thomas, W.; Adema, C. )

    1990-01-01

    Abrasive blasting media is used to remove anticorrosive and antifoulant coatings from the hulls and tanks of US Navy ships. The total production of paint-contaminated spent abrasives from the eight US. Navy shipyards ranges from 75,000 to 100,000 tons per year. Most of this spent abrasive is disposed in landfills. Organic paint binders and heavy metals are present in the spent abrasives in concentrations sufficient to classify them as hazardous wastes in some states. In an effort to avoid the rising costs an long-term environmental liability associated with landfilling this waste, the US Navy has investigated various methods of reclaiming spent abrasives for reuse in hull- and tank-blasting operations. This paper discusses the results of a research and development project conducted under the Navy's Hazardous Waste Minimization Program to test a fluidized-bed sloped-grid (FBSG) reclaimer to determine if it could be used to recycle spent abrasive. Thirty tons of abrasive were processed and a product meeting military specifications for new abrasives was reclaimed. Blasting performance was also comparable to new abrasives. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

    2011-06-06

    Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

  17. Reclamation of urban stormwater. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, R.

    1993-01-01

    Rainfall runoff becomes contaminated as it passes over urban land. Billions of gallons of water can be recovered for beneficial uses if urban stormwater is properly controlled and treated. The Storm and Combined Sewer Program of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development has continuously supported the development and demonstration of stormwater control systems and treatment processes. Water quality of the treated storm runoff can meet the required standards for subpotable usage. Current urban stormwater control and treatment technology are discussed, leading to the feasibility of urban stormwater reuse for various purposes in industry, irrigation and recreation. A hypothetical case study illustrating the cost effectiveness of reclaiming urban stormwater for complete industrial supply is presented.

  18. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Africa, New Zealand (but not designed for nutrient removal). 9 Typical Electro-Mechanical Treatment Plant 10 Aeration Basins with Air Blowers Sludge Settling Tanks -100,000 0...

  19. H. R. 3385: A bill to amend title V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to assist small surface coal mine operators, and for other purposes, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, September 24, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    For surface coal mines with less than an annual production of 300,000 tons, the cost of the following activities shall be assumed by the regulatory authority upon request of the operator in connection with a permit application: determination of probable hydrologic consequences required by law; development of cross-section maps and plans required; geologic drilling and statement of results of test borings and core samplings required; collection of archeological information required; pre-blast surveys; collection of site-specific resource information and production of protection and enhancement plans for fish and wildlife habitats and other environmental values required; collection and analysis of geological and hydrologic data requested by the operator. If annual production during the 12 months immediately following the date on which the operator is issued a surface coal mining and reclamation permit exceeds 300,000 tons, the operator is required to reimburse the regulatory authority for the cost of the service rendered.

  20. Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-03-08

    A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

  1. Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.

    1994-01-01

    A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities: Flaming Gorge, Folsom, Glen Canyon, Grand Coulee, Hoover and Shasta. ... In 2010, ORISE conducted an exercise at Shasta Dam, which spans California's Sacramento ...

  3. Reclamation Project Act of 1939 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Act of 1939Legal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1939 Legal Citation 43 USC 485 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

  4. Potential highwall use by raptors in coal mine reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waage, B.

    1990-12-31

    In 1982, Western Energy Company`s Rosebud Mine, located in southeastern Montana, received legal exception, {open_quotes}a first{close_quotes} in Montana to leave a standing mine highwall extending a native bluff. This bluff extension stands 110 feet high and 900 feet long. Normally, all highwalls by law are reduced to a 5:1 slope. This legal exception was accomplished with the support of several governmental agencies and was justified on the highwalls potential value for raptors. Enhancement measures undertaken on the highwall included the construction of three artificial eryies and the release of young prairie falcons (Falco mexicanus) employing hacking methods of the Peregrine Fund. The hack is now in its fourth year with a total of 46 young falcons having been released. Opportunities exist for creating a more diverse habitat for raptors and other cliff obligate species on reclaimed mine lands in the west. It is believed that this practical approach should be explored.

  5. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  6. Microsoft Word - LL-ULS reclamation.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1,000 pounds per acre of Granular Humate is recommended for harsh sites. At one site, cattle were used to amend poor soils. After hand-broadcasting seed, cattle were brought onto...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Central_Plateau_Inner_Zone.ppt [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Plutonium Finishing Plant -- 317M Central Plateau Inner Zone (10 sq. mi.) ( q ) * U Plant Canyon - Demolish 5 remaining - Demolish 5 remaining ancillary facilities -...

  8. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plutonium Finishing Plant Hoisting and Rigging Hoisting and Rigging Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6

  9. Transgenic expression of the dicotyledonous pattern recognition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. ...

  10. Hanford's Recovery Act Payments Jump Past $1 Billion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and research. * Demolished 56 facilities, which reduces surveillance and maintenance costs. * Completed expansion of Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facil- ity...

  11. Demolition of 232-Z

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    In 2006, workers demolished a building that had been one of the most contaminated facilities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant

  12. Microsoft Word - Approved TOC Contract Management Plan 10_27...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... decommissioning, and demolishing excess facilities; placing former production reactors in ... commercial nuclear power reactor, the ... of contractor status and progress ...

  13. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Goodrich-Mahoney; Paul Ziemkiewicz

    2006-07-19

    This is the third quarter progress report of Phase II of a three-phase project to develop and evaluate the efficacy of developing multiple environmental market trading credits on a partially reclaimed surface mined site near Valley Point, Preston County, WV. Construction of the passive acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment system was completed but several modifications from the original design had to be made following the land survey and during construction to compensate for unforeseen circumstances. We continued to collect baseline quality data from the Conner Run AMD seeps to confirm the conceptual and final design for the passive AMD treatment system.

  14. 24 - Comment from Texas Mining and Reclamation Association (TMRA).pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  15. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

    2009-12-31

    This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private land—including abandoned mined lands—is dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

  16. Safety problems of water-development works designed for land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shchedrin, V. N.; Kosichenko, Yu. M.

    2011-11-15

    A safety declaration is a fundamental document assuring the safety of water-development works, their correspondence to safety criteria, the design, and active technical regulations and rules.

  17. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Letter Reclamation of Asset Metals 070909.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    July 9, 2009 Inés R. Triay Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy, EM-1 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Assistant Secretary Triay: On January 12, 2000, the Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the free release of volumetrically contaminated metals pending a decision by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on establishment of national standards. The NRC continues to review this issue, and the moratorium remains in effect.

  18. King Coal vs. Reclamation: federal regulation of mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, C.E.; Duffy, R.J.

    2009-10-15

    This research focuses on the regulatory politics of mountaintop removal mining for coal within the Appalachian states of West Virginia and Kentucky. Based on Administrative Presidency concepts suggesting that chief executives seek more control and influence over agency program decisions, this article analyzes President George W. Bush's efforts to promote the development of coal resources within these states despite statutory constraints posed by federal environmental laws. The analysis demonstrates that President Bush effectively achieved his energy production goals by combining the use of discretionary authority with staff controls, executive orders, and regulatory initiatives to lessen industry compliance costs with environmental regulatory requirements.

  19. In-situ biological reclamation of contaminated ground water. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fant, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Four triaxial permeability devices were designed and constructed for use in the Environmental Engineering Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology. These devices were used to determine how time and changing permeants affected a soil sample's hydraulic conductivity. Also the attenuation of the priority pollutant, 2,4-dichlorophenol, was studied. Two areas were looked at concerning attenuation, microbial degradation and adsorption. Microbes were grown in the laboratory and then placed into the soil samples. A permeant containing the pollutant, an oxidant, and nutrients was then passed through the soil sample with the microbes. The effects on the effluent concentration were then studied. Two breakthrough curves and two isotherm tests were run in an attempt to distinguish between microbial decay and adsorptive attenuation. Results of the attenuation studies unfortunately were inconclusive, but valuable knowledge was gained on the operation of and experimental procedures with the triaxial permeability devices.

  20. Transgenic expression of the dicotyledonous pattern recognition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo)-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. ...

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cocooning K East Reactor Cocooning K East Reactor Congressman Hastings and Congressman Shimkus Tanks Farms and WTP Tour Congressman Hastings and Congressman Shimkus Tanks Farms and WTP Tour Congressman Norm Dicks' Hanford Tour Congressman Norm Dicks' Hanford Tour D Area Field Remediation D Area Field Remediation Deep Vadose Zone Deep Vadose Zone Deep Vadoze Zone Initiative Deep Vadoze Zone Initiative Demolishing K East Water Structures Demolishing K East Water Structures Demolishing Support

  2. Deactivation and Decommissioning | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation and Decommissioning TA-21-286 being demolished TA-21-286 being demolished The EM-LA Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Team is dedicated to demolishing, deactivating and disposing material from historical buildings at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Current workscope is focused on Technical Area 21 (TA-21), one of the early sites of the Manhattan Project and Cold War-era work conducted at LANL. TA-21 was the location of the

  3. Microsoft Word - S07730_1st Qtr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... A Annual Inspection Checklist, Maps, and Photographs ... Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) (DOE 2007a). ... building met free release criteria, and it was demolished by ...

  4. LANL reaches waste shipment milestone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "The repository has a proven record of safe and secure operations." As remaining drums are shipped, the Laboratory is demolishing unused storage facilities in a multiyear...

  5. Beryllium Facilities & Areas - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlled Facilities that have been Demolished Outdoor Areas where Beryllium Contamination has been Identified Hanford Projects and Facilities - Descriptions Former Hanford...

  6. Workers Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – In recent weeks, the look of Hanford site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant has changed as crews removed or demolished eight buildings surrounding it.

  7. Reclamation of water contaminated with fuel system icing inhibitor: Phase 1, Literature review and information compilation. [281 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Stirling, K.Q.; Whisman, M.L.; Bhan, O.K.

    1988-02-01

    The volume of water that must be removed from an aviation turbine fuel storage tank can be as much as 15,000 to 20,000 gallons per year from a fuel tank of moderate capacity. If each fuel storage facility has 10 fuel storage tanks, a total water volume of 200,000 gallons per terminal per year is a reasonable estimate. Some terminals generate as much as one million gallons per year of FSII contaminated wastewater. In the past, this FSII/water mixture was released from time to time into diked areas around the storage tank where it evaporated or penetrated underlying media. A host of recent studies that have shown these glycol ethers to be toxic now make this practice questionable based on both vapor inhalation toxicity and potential groundwater contamination. The ensuing narrative sections contain a summary of the data and information that have been compiled as a result of computerized literature searches, personal contacts with government and industry representatives knowledgeable in the field of FSII, and contact with vendors of equipment and processes with some applicability to achieving the goals of this research. Our recommendations for the subsequent bench-scale testing phase are included and are based upon this literature compilation and review. If the second phase yields a technically and economically attractive solution, a third phase will follow to implement concept verification studies. 281 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Collaboration and Communication: DOE and Navajo Nation Tour Uranium Mine Reclamation Sites to Share Expertise and Experiences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2014, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) and LM Support (LMS) contractor site managers, along with Navajo Nation technical staff, visited five reclaimed...

  9. Waste acid detoxification and reclamation: Summary of bench-scale tests for FY 1986 and FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, T.L.

    1987-09-01

    Processes to reduce the volume, quantity, and toxicity of metal-bearing waste acid are being demonstrated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Two precipitation processes and a distillation process are being developed to minimize waste from fuel fabrication operations, which comprise a series of metal-finishing operations. Waste process acids such as HF-HNO/sub 3/, etch solutions containing Zr as a major metal impurity, and HNO/sub 3/ strip solution containing Cu as a major metal impurity are detoxified and reclaimed by concurrently precipitating heavy metals and regenerating acid for recycle. Acid from a third waste acid stream generated from chemical milling operations will be reclaimed using distillation. This stream comprises HNO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing U as the major metal impurity. Distillation allows NO/sub 3//sup -/ to be displaced by SO/sub 4//sup -2/ in metal salts; free HNO/sub 3/ is then vaporized from the U-bearing sulfate stream. Uranium can be recovered from the sulfate stream in a downstream precipitation step. 10 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Definitions - R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computer system with logs and indices to track the condition of the system. Reclamation See U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. reclamation The restoration of land to resemble its...

  11. EIS-0389: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    facilities in Trinity County, California. The U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) participated in...

  12. First Quarter Financial Report - 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the operation and maintenance costs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan Facilities. Northwest...

  13. 2010sr18.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuesday, May 25, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 292-2484 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov SRS Demolishes Massive Cooling Tower, Continues Progress on Environmental Footprint Reduction (Aiken, S.C.) - The Savannah River Site's (SRS) massive K Cooling Tower was safely demolished today as part of the Site-wide Footprint Reduction Initiative funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). As the second-largest cooling tower to be demolished worldwide, the 450 foot-tall and

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Central_Plateau_Outer_Zone.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outer Zone Th t f th C t l Pl t i b t 65 il The outer zone of the Central Plateau is about 65 square miles. Recovery Act funding will be used in this area to support shrinking the active footprint of cleanup to as little as 10 square miles in the center of the site. Work will consist mainly of demolishing facilities and remediating waste sites. Central Plateau, Outer Zone (~65 sq. mi.) * 200 North Area * Demolish spent fuel C o C o * Demolish spent fuel transfer storage facilities (212 N/P/R) *

  15. CX-008767: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE also proposes to demolish a small shed and replace the site's wastewater treatment system with a new, more cost effective subsurface discharge-to-drainfield system. PDF icon ...

  16. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  17. CX-011627: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The proposed action is to perform utility isolations, re-route of the fire systems, pipe support installations associated with the demolishment of Building 9744, and removal of the ...

  18. DOE Awards Contract for Building K-33 Demolition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE awards LATA-Sharp Remediation Services a fixed-price task order valued at $51 million to demolish K-33. The project is expected to be complete by March 1, 2012.

  19. Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tug from a piece of heavy equipment, the last bit of the 24th building crashed to the ground. The final building demolished under the Recovery Act program at Los Alamos...

  20. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.23 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E-Area Trailer and Handy House Demolition and Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 0520... Demolish and Dispose of Shed Located East of Test Reactor Area-607 CX(s) Applied: B1.23 ...

  1. DQO Summary Report for 105-N/109-N Interim Safe Storage Project Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Lee

    2005-09-15

    The DQO summary report provides the results of the DQO process completed for waste characterization activities for the 105-N/109-N Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project including decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities for six associated buildings.

  2. CX-011645: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolish State Police Radio Tower at West Hackberry CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 12/10/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  3. Media Contact: For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    yards of grout will be placed inside the canyon cells and supporting galleries, rooms, tunnels and piping. Finally, the upper section of the canyon will be demolished prior to...

  4. Recovery Act Project at Y-12 Meets Another Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building 9220, the second of four buildings within Y-12's Biology Complex, was demolished. The completed work eliminates another unneeded facility at Y-12 and eliminates the risk associated with the deteriorated facility.

  5. From Flour to Grits, a Water-Powered Mill Keeps on Grinding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By 1913, the old mill had become structurally unsound and was demolished and later rebuilt. The family also replaced the water wheel with more efficient twin hydropower turbine and generator units,...

  6. CX-013683: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolish and Dispose of Shed Located East of Test Reactor Area-607 CX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 04/03/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  7. DOE Awards More than $16 Million for Recovery Act Cleanup at ORNL

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Recovery Act, DOE awards $16.8 million contract to for environmental cleanup operations at ORNL. Under this contract, EM will demolish 34 facilities in the ORNL central campus area.

  8. CX-005882: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolish Cottages Formerly Utilized as Summer Housing Identified as Building 368, Units 1 - 30CX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 05/19/2011Location(s): Brookhaven, New YorkOffice(s): Science, Brookhaven Site Office

  9. EERE Success Story—From Flour to Grits, a Water-Powered Mill Keeps on Grinding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By 1913, the old mill had become structurally unsound and was demolished and later rebuilt. The family also replaced the water wheel with more efficient twin hydropower turbine and generator units,...

  10. LM FIMS Database | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FIMS Database LM FIMS Database January 8, 2013 - 1:06pm Addthis A road is improved at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site. A road is improved at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site. A building is demolished at the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. A building is demolished at the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. An innovative cool roof installation increased energy efficiency at the Fernald Preserve, Ohio, offsite administrative building. An innovative cool roof installation increased

  11. Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Demolition Work Progresses Toward Goal of Completing Cleanup Los Alamos Demolition Work Progresses Toward Goal of Completing Cleanup January 14, 2016 - 12:20pm Addthis The sewage treatment facility before demolition. The sewage treatment facility before demolition. Debris from the sewage treatment facility. Debris from the sewage treatment facility. Site of the demolished sewage treatment facility. Site of the demolished sewage treatment facility. The sewage treatment

  12. Cleanup Progress Report - 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Cleanup Progress Report - 2013 Read about EM's accomplishments across the Oak Ridge Reservation in 2013. Some of the stories include: East Tennessee Technology Park Last standing section of K-25 Building being demolished K-27 Building being prepared for demolition Iconic ETTP Fire Water Tower demolished Efforts under way to commemorate the K-25 site Oak Ridge National Laboratory 3026 hot cells facility downgraded and maintained in surveillance and maintenance mode Upgrade of 4500 Area Gaseous

  13. Workers Complete Demolition at Historic Los Alamos Site | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Workers Complete Demolition at Historic Los Alamos Site Workers Complete Demolition at Historic Los Alamos Site October 7, 2015 - 3:00pm Addthis Workers demolish a former radiologically contaminated warehouse at a historic Los Alamos site. Workers demolish a former radiologically contaminated warehouse at a historic Los Alamos site. The Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Federal Integrated Project Team gathers in front of the building known as 21-286 before its

  14. November 2015 Newsletter - Los Alamos Field Office Legacy Cleanup |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy November 2015 Newsletter - Los Alamos Field Office Legacy Cleanup November 2015 Newsletter - Los Alamos Field Office Legacy Cleanup November 30, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis TA-21-286 being demolished TA-21-286 being demolished Safety Safety and health record for October is clean Safe storage plan for nitrate salts has been completed and implemented. Contracts/Acquisition Removing concrete at the airport landfill Los Alamos Legacy Cleanup Bridge Contract commenced October 1

  15. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 20, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    final Recovery Act demolition contracts April 20, 2010 Two small businesses will demolish Cold War-era complex LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 20, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory today announced it has awarded its final two demolition contracts under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The two winning bidders will each demolish a portion of the remaining unused buildings at the Lab's historic Technical Area 21. ARSEC Environmental, LLC of White Rock, NM, received a $2 million task

  16. Project Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Management Project Management Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds. Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds. EM CAPITAL PORTFOLIO EM is tasked with solving the large scale, technically challenging risks and hazardous conditions posed by the

  17. Demolition Progresses at Berkeley Laboratory | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Demolition Progresses at Berkeley Laboratory Demolition Progresses at Berkeley Laboratory March 31, 2016 - 12:40pm Addthis Demolition Progresses at Berkeley Laboratory BERKELEY, Calif. - EM recently demolished three structures at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as it remediates an area of the Northern California campus that played an active role in groundbreaking science following World War II. The cleanup objective is to demolish seven buildings remaining in the "Old Town"

  18. Los Alamos Dynamics Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Los Alamos Demolition Work Progresses Toward Goal of Completing Cleanup Los Alamos Demolition Work Progresses Toward Goal of Completing Cleanup January 14, 2016 - 12:20pm Addthis The sewage treatment facility before demolition. The sewage treatment facility before demolition. Debris from the sewage treatment facility. Debris from the sewage treatment facility. Site of the demolished sewage treatment facility. Site of the demolished sewage treatment facility. The sewage

  19. Hanford Blog Archive - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2010 October 29, 2010 PHOTO GALLERY: See photos of Hanford workers demolishing more than six football fields worth of concrete at K West 380,000 square feet of concrete structures demolished October 29, 2010 PRESS RELEASE: TPA Agencies Sign On For Major Changes Governing Hanford's Central Plateau Agencies Agree To Integration of Soil, Facility, and Groundwater Cleanup Milestones at Hanford October 28, 2010 Contractor Recovery Act Update This newsletter is published by CH2M HILL Plateau

  20. Hanford Blog Archive - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2011 December 14, 2011 PRESS RELEASE: Hanford's Critical Mass Lab Demolished One of the most hazardous facilities at Hanford was demolished by contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company following two years of safety preparations December 13, 2011 PRESS RELEASE: Hanford Waste Treatment Plant completes concrete design for largest facility The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Project recently issued the final design detailing the structural concrete for the Pretreatment Facility. The

  1. Hanford Blog Archive - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2013 February 27, 2013 PHOTO GALLERY: 300 Area North Cleaned Up 98 Facilities Demolished, 58 Waste Sites Remediated February 27, 2013 300 Area North Section Cleaned Up 98 Facilities Demolished; 58 Waste Sites Remediated February 26, 2013 B Reactor Tour Registration Opens March 2 Families with children above the age of 12, along with middle schools and high schools, are invited to sign up for the coveted tour slots. February 25, 2013 Registration Starts Soon for 2013 Hanford Site Public

  2. 1st Quarter 2016 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2015 1st quarter 2016 Anfield Resources Inc. Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Standby Standby EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating- Processing Alternate Feed Operating- Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 Undeveloped Undeveloped Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Pinon Ridge

  3. 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: May 5, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Anfield Resources Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating- Processing Alternate Feed Operating- Processing Alternate Feed Operating- Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain

  4. DOE Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) * EFRC five-year funding amount includes total support for the lead institution plus its participating institutions. The planned five-year funding estimates for non-Recovery Act awards are subject to FY 2010 to FY 2013 appropriations. ** Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. August 6, 2009 Page 1 of 7 Lead Institution Location State EFRC Name EFRC Director 5-Yr. Funding* EFRC Objective Arizona State University** Tempe AZ EFR

  5. Quarterly Financial Report - 3rd quarter - 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the operation and maintenance costs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Fish and Wildlife) for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan...

  6. 1st Quarter Financial Report - February 1, 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the operation and maintenance costs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Fish and Wildlife) for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan...

  7. Quarterly Financial Report - 2nd quarter - 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the operation and maintenance costs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Fish and Wildlife) for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan...

  8. NSD Methodology Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of Reclamation: Michael Pulskamp U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Frankie Green ... Nature Ranking for Fish ......

  9. Student ENG 505 - Energy Technologies Systems and Applications: Plasma

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gasification for Energy Production and Material Reclamation. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Student ENG 505 - Energy Technologies Systems and Applications: Plasma Gasification for Energy Production and Material Reclamation. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Student ENG 505 - Energy Technologies Systems and Applications: Plasma Gasification for Energy Production and Material Reclamation. Abstract not provided. Authors: Avery, Rosemary ; Fazio, Walter Chapman ; Myerly,

  10. Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, L.

    1981-11-05

    A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

  11. Idaho Site Workers Continue to Finish D&D Cleanup Projects Under Budget |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Site Workers Continue to Finish D&D Cleanup Projects Under Budget Idaho Site Workers Continue to Finish D&D Cleanup Projects Under Budget November 16, 2015 - 12:10pm Addthis Workers demolish a sodium processing facility just north of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II’s silver dome at the Idaho Site. Workers demolish a sodium processing facility just north of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II's silver dome at the Idaho Site. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - CH2M-WG

  12. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 1, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP road November 1, 2012 Work is beginning this week LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 1, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory is about to begin demolishing the metal enclosures used to cover the excavation and cleanup of a decades-old waste disposal site at the historic Technical Area 21. Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. The project brings the Laboratory

  13. Forward Thinking of Employees at Hanford Site Helps in Accelerated Cleanup

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Forward Thinking of Employees at Hanford Site Helps in Accelerated Cleanup Forward Thinking of Employees at Hanford Site Helps in Accelerated Cleanup April 27, 2016 - 12:15pm Addthis An ancillary building in the H Reactor Area is among many in the soil and groundwater program that was demolished ahead of schedule. An ancillary building in the H Reactor Area is among many in the soil and groundwater program that was demolished ahead of schedule. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's

  14. Surface mining: State management of abandoned mine land funds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 promotes the reclamation of areas severely damaged in the past by coal mining operations. GAO reviewed the reclamation programs in Colorado, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wyoming and found that they implemented financial control procedures and practices to ensure that the expenditures of reclamation funds are proper. Only one state, however, is complying with all related grant payment, audit, and inventory requirements. The states are generally reclaiming eligible, high priority projects as required under the act and are managing their reclamation projects in compliance with federal requirements.

  15. Demolition Begins on Hanford’s Historic Plutonium Vaults- Plutonium Finishing Plant on track to meet regulatory milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) began demolishing a vault complex that once held stores of plutonium for the U.S. nuclear weapons program at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

  16. Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Evaluation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has evaluated alternatives for demolishing the buildings at the Portsmouth Site. Two remedial alternatives were developed for consideration. This Proposed Plan describes the required no-action alternative (Alternative 1) and a D&D alternative (Alternative 2). The preferred alternative is Alternative 2, controlled demolition of the process buildings and complex facilities.

  17. CX-003243: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolish Building 51 at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Dispose of Materials According to Classification as Hazardous or Clean Construction DebrisCX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 08/05/2010Location(s): New YorkOffice(s): Brookhaven Site Office

  18. Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford’s Skyline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) will use explosives to demolish several structures near the center of the Hanford Site on two separate days – February 18 and March 4

  19. Advocate - Issue 50 - April 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 - April 2013 Advocate - Issue 50 - April 2013 The stories from this issue include: Chair's Commentary Reservation Update Legacy Waste North Tower Demolished ATSDR Meets in Oak Ridge Profile: Dave Hemelright New Members PDF icon Advocate_April2013 More Documents & Publications ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report Cleanup Progress Report -

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, New Fairfield, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This LEED Platinum home was built on the site of a 60-year-old bungalow that was demolished. It boasts views of Candlewood Lake, a great deal of daylight, and projected annual energy savings of almost $3,000. This home was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  1. Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-02

    Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

  2. Port Graham Community Biomass Heat Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Community Biomass Heat Project Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DE- EE0005637 Patrick Norman, Port Graham Village Council and Charles Sink, Chugachmiut What is the project Who and where we are Nanwalek Tale of two grants DOE EFRE DE-EE0005637 * Start Date 6/1/2012 * End Date 12/31/2014 * Revision Date 9/10/2012 * Richmond Engineering, Inc./ Charles Nash Forestry Consulting hired 6/13/2014 AEA Grant # 7040061 * Start Date 7/1/2011 * End Date 12/31/2013 * Revision Date 2/1/2013 * ChenaPower,

  3. Attempt to extract the preformation probability of. cap alpha. cluster at the surface of heavy nuclei by means of. cap alpha. -transfer reactions leading to the continuum states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Shu-wei; Wu Guo-hua; Miao Rong-zhi; Han Fei

    1983-07-01

    The method of parametrization of an EFR-DWBA overlap integral developed by T. Udagawa and T. Tamura et al./sup 1/ is improved. Using the improved method we have fitted the experimental double differential energy spectrum of the /sup 8/Be cluster coming from the reaction /sup 208/Pb(/sup 12/C, /sup 8/Be) /sup 212/Po leading to the continuum states and extracted the preformation probability of the ..cap alpha.. cluster at the surface of the /sup 212/Po nucleus. Within the range of calculation error, the result is in agreement with that extracted from fitting the experimental data of ..cap alpha.. decay.

  4. EIS-0380: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Windy Gap Firming Project, Colorado Download Document PDF icon EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement More Documents & Publications EIS-0370: Record of

  5. This fact sheet describes wetlands in and around Monticello,...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Reclamation will emphasize the restoration of wetland functions, minimization of erosion, and prevention of weed encroachment. The affected Monticello wetlands will be restored in ...

  6. Agencies Publish Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The remaining fractional percentages are on lands managed by the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, or by the ...

  7. STATEMENT FOR THE RECORD SCOTT CARPENTER ADMINISTRATOR SOUTHWESTERN...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    YEAR 2017 BUDGETS OF THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, THE NATIONAL OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION AND THE POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS Mr. ...

  8. FAC 04-08 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Material: FAC 04-08PermittingRegulatory GuidanceSupplemental Material Abstract Sets forth BOR's Lease of Power Privilege process. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published...

  9. EA-1736: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  10. Federal Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower/Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Participating Agencies Resources MOU Related Resources Hydropower Resources Assessment at Existing Reclamation Facilities An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered...

  11. FAC 04-08, Appendix D | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Power Privilege. Provides overview of standard lease of power privilege rate methodology. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2015 DOI Not...

  12. LOPP Formal Request for Development Example | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Material Abstract Example LOPP Formal Request for Development letter. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2014 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  13. LOPP Example Acceptance Letter | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    letter regarding selection of preliminary lessee for lease of power privilege. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2015 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  14. 1992 Memorandum of Understanding between the Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    between the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. LOPP Proposal Checklist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of specific proposal requirements for lease of power privilege proposals. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2015 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  16. FAC 04-08, Appendix C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appendix CPermittingRegulatory GuidanceSupplemental Material Abstract Appendix to Bureau of Reclamation manual for issuing Leases of Power Privilege. Provides example of a...

  17. LOPP Federal Register Example Document | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GuidanceSupplemental Material Abstract Example LOPP federal register notice. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2015 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  18. Lease of Power Privilege Flowchart: Dam Request Through Award...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regulatory GuidanceSupplemental Material Abstract Flowchart provided by Bureau of Reclamation describing the process for obtaining a lease of power privilege from...

  19. FAC 04-08, Appendix B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appendix BPermittingRegulatory GuidanceSupplemental Material Abstract Appendix to Bureau of Reclamation manual for issuing Leases of Power Privilege. Provides overview of...

  20. EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  1. EA-1736: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for the reclamation of waste heat in mechanical heat engines ... from frying pans to internal combustion engine spark plugs and heat sinks on integrated circuit boards. ...

  3. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Plants November 7, 2007 Example ADG Installations - Wastewater Treatment Plants z Metro Wastewater Reclamation District in Denver, Colorado - 7 MW of electricity produced from ...

  4. AFD-081125-014.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... A Correspondence B Pollution Emissions Calculations for Construction ... and 1-1 Treatment System, United States Air Force and Clark County Water Reclamation ...

  5. EIS-0202: Umatilla Basin Project Planning Report and Final Environmental Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposed support for the Bureau of Reclamation proposal to assist in restoration of the Umatilla River anadromous fishery.

  6. FCRPS Definitions (hydro/fcrps)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Reclamation (USBR). Portion of Cost Allocated to Power The cost allocated to the power generating portion of hydro projects. Flood control, navigation, and irrigation are...

  7. Adams County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado Access Venture Partners Energy Generation Facilities in Adams County, Colorado Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Places in Adams County, Colorado...

  8. STATEMENT OF MR. MARK A. GABRIEL ADMINISTRATOR WESTERN AREA POWER...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Western markets and delivers reliable cost-based hydro power and related services from 56 Federal hydroelectric power plants owned and operated by the Bureau of Reclamation, the ...

  9. C:\\Document Files\\05-2225\\05-2225 - Final Corrected.wpd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... applicable federal and state standards and requirements. ... The LMP includes a land reclamation program that addresses ... Radiation is and has been a natural part of the environment ...

  10. EA-1037-FEA-1995.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... requirements, outlined in Mineral Rules and Regulations of the Colorado Mined Land Reclamation Board (Colorado Department of Natural ... grazing permittees, and oil and gas lessees. ...

  11. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 2,"Chief ...

  12. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 2,"Palo ...

  13. Pittsburgh research center program of research. A summary of research in progress during fiscal years 1995-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, J.N.; Sacks, H.K.

    1996-12-31

    Contents: Advanced Mining Systems; Control of Mine Drainage and Liquid Wastes; Solid Waste Management and Subsidence; Abandoned Mined Land Reclamation Research; and Publications.

  14. Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites ... PREACTIVITY AND RECLAMATION SURVEY REPORTS FOR FIVE TONOPAH TEST RANGE EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE ...

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-n | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    agreements required by Reclamation for access to and site activities on lands and maintenance of the project so that the physical structures and authorized purposes, including...

  16. BPA-2015-00456-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation, as members of the Hydro- Optimization Team. Therefore, we currently estimate the completion of your request...

  17. Federal Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower/Federal Inland...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    information see Participating Agencies. Army Corps of Engineers Bonneville Power Administration Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Reclamation Department of Energy Environmental...

  18. EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SUMMARY The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and California Department of Water Resources are jointly preparing an EIS...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regulatory Commission (FERC),Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) provide guidance on...

  20. the Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration deposited 12, 535,000 to the reclamation fund in the United States Treasury for the ac- count of Columbia Basin Project, Yakima Project...

  1. U. 5. COLUMBIA RIVER POWER SYS1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration deposited 12,800,000 to the reclamation fund in the United States Treasury for the account of Columbia Basin Project, Yakima Project...

  2. Managements Discussion and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Reclamation, one nonfederal nuclear plant and some small nonfederal resources. BPA supplies about one-third of the electric power used in the Northwest. BPA also operates...

  3. Interior Board of Land Appeals | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shelf, and the conduct of surface coal mining operations under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. Located within the Department's Office of Hearings and Appeals,...

  4. Microsoft Word - induspmt.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    because of performance bond issued to the facility by the appropriate Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) authority has been released, or except for area of...

  5. RepoRt B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and develop emergency backup systems. Biological Opinion Under the Endangered Species Act, BPA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and the Bureau of Reclamation...

  6. Property:EZFeed/JurisdictionDesc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) + statewide Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) + statewide Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials Program...

  7. ORISE: Operations Support and Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012 Bureau of Reclamation Emergency Management Issues Special Interest Group Golden Guardian Joint Information Center Preventing Nuclear Smuggling Program Training and Technology...

  8. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  9. CX-001383: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1383: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001383: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 212 Electron Microscopy Improvements CX(s) Applied: B2.1 Date: 04/05/2010 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office This project will demolish the existing heating, ventilating, and air conditoning (HVAC) systems within the D Wing of Building 212 (Electron Microscopy Area). Included in this demolition are 5-fancoil units and associated duct work, and duct work missing boxes.

  10. Cleanup Progress Report - 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Cleanup Progress Report - 2010 In this issue, learn about EM's accomplishments in 2010 across the Oak Ridge Reservation. There are many more stories contained within the issue, but here are some of the highlights from each site. East Tennessee Technology Park K-25 Building West Wing Demolished Contaminated Surface Water, Groundwater at ETTP Addressed Reindustrialization Program Continues Effort to Privatize ETTP Oak Ridge National Laboratory Demolition Completed at 3026 C&D Six Facilities

  11. Cleanup Progress Report - 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Cleanup Progress Report - 2011 In this issue, learn about EM's accomplishments in 2011 across the Oak Ridge Reservation. There are many more stories contained within the issue, but here are some of the highlights from each site. East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Selects New Cleanup Contractor K-25 East Wing Demolition Begins K-33 Building Demolished Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2000 Complex Demolition Completed Bethel Valley Burial Ground Remediation Completed Bethel Valley Groundwater

  12. Cleanup Progress Report - 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Cleanup Progress Report - 2014 Read about EM's accomplishments across the Oak Ridge Reservation in 2014. Some of the stories include: East Tennessee Technology Park K-25 Building demolished K-31 demolition begins Progress continues on commemorating the K-25 Site Parcels transferred as ETTP Reindustrialization progresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste handling plan approved for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility Prep work continues for U-233 disposition Y-12 National Security Complex

  13. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9-E Critical Mass Laboratory Demolition Contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company demolished the 209-E Criticality Facility in late 2011 following two years of preparations that included removing contaminated equipment, removing 11 highly contaminated tanks and two subsurface tanks, and cleaning up asbestos piping.The 9,000-square-foot former laboratory was one of the most contaminated of the 118 buildings the contractor has removed since its contract began in 2008. Search Search Search

  14. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 15

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Workers check instrumentation that will be used for sodium treatment as part of an effort to demolish the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory. Idaho Falls, Idaho - The success of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the only national lab overseen directly by the DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), de- pends heavily on the cleanup mission under way there. DOE's commitment to INL's cleanup and waste management was reinforced with the

  15. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 20

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - The skyline of Los Alamos was changed forever when 24 old buildings and structures were demol- ished with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. "Our most significant accomplishment of 2010 was the suc- cessful completion of the decontamination and demolition of 24 old buildings and structures at Technical Area 21," said Al Chaloupka, project director of building demolition at Technical Area (TA-21). "In addition to demolishing these old buildings, the

  16. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 28

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Certainty of Safety: Unexpected Discovery Slows Excavation LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - A major wildfire that closed the Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than a week and soil with higher than expected contamination levels slowed excavation efforts at the Lab's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) site at the eleventh-hour. The Lab received $212 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding to decontaminate and demolish 24 Cold War buildings, install 16 groundwater monitoring wells and

  17. Cleanup Progresses at the Office of River Protection | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 Cleanup Progress Report - 2010 In this issue, learn about EM's accomplishments in 2010 across the Oak Ridge Reservation. There are many more stories contained within the issue, but here are some of the highlights from each site. East Tennessee Technology Park K-25 Building West Wing Demolished Contaminated Surface Water, Groundwater at ETTP Addressed Reindustrialization Program Continues Effort to Privatize ETTP Oak Ridge National Laboratory Demolition Completed at 3026 C&D Six Facilities

  18. Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tower, S.E.

    2000-07-01

    The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

  19. Y-12 makes the world safer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration demos former utilities and maintenance facility Friday, September 26, 2014 - 1:05pm The Y-12 National Security Complex recently completed another improvement in its site infrastructure with the demolition of Building 9744, a former utilities and maintenance facility occupying more than 9,000 square feet. Despite structural issues and waste disposal concerns, the facility was safely demolished nearly two months ahead of schedule. The demolition proved challenging due

  20. Stack Characterization System Development and Testing (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Stack Characterization System Development and Testing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stack Characterization System Development and Testing Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as the rest of the U.S. Department of Energy community, has numerous off-gas stacks that need to be decommissioned, demolished, and packaged for disposal. Disposal requires a waste disposition determination phase. Process knowledge typically makes a worst-case scenario decision

  1. Audit Report: OAS-M-14-11 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 Audit Report: OAS-M-14-11 September 18, 2014 Follow-Up on the Management of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Project The Department of Energy's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), located at the Hanford Site in Washington State, became a highly contaminated nuclear facility while processing plutonium for the nation's nuclear arsenal for approximately 40 years. In 2008, the Department awarded CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) a contract to decontaminate and demolish PFP. Completion of

  2. BWXTymes October 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 WHAT' S INSIDE Expose your talents 2 Applying gets easier 4 Volunteers make their marks 6 The Y-12 National Security Complex achieved a different type of milestone recently with the demolition of Building 9738: A million square feet of buildings have been demolished since Y-12's Infrastructure Reduction program began in 2001. This achievement equates to more than 250 buildings or structures being removed from the operating footprint. National Nuclear Security Administration Senior Program

  3. Next Big Idea coming September 14-15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newsletters Newsletters December 31, 2015 Sewage Treatment Facility at TA-21 before demolition December 2015 Newsletter - Los Alamos Field Office Legacy Cleanup December 2015 Newsletter - Los Alamos Field Office Legacy Cleanup November 30, 2015 TA-21-286 being demolished November 2015 Newsletter - Los Alamos Field Office Legacy Cleanup November 2015 Newsletter - Los Alamos Field Office Legacy Cleanup

    Newsletters Newsletters The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy newsletters

  4. In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is an effective decommissioning practice offering a safe and environmentally-favorable alternative to completely demolishing a facility and transporting its debris elsewhere for disposal. Regulatory approval to decommission a facility through ISD is authorized primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency under

  5. LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals March 8, 2010 More than 136 tons of metal saved from demolished buildings LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 9, 2009-Los Alamos National Laboratory announced today that Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have recovered more than 136 tons of recyclable metal since work began last year, largely due to the skill of heavy equipment operators and efforts to gut the buildings before they come down. Some 106 tons of metal came

  6. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, June 29, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory this

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site June 29, 2010 Local small business starts demolition of world's first plutonium processing facility LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, June 29, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory this week began demolishing a cluster of 65-year-old buildings that once housed the world's first full-scale plutonium processing line. The work is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which is helping advance and accelerate cleanup efforts around the Department of

  7. Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recovery Act-funded demolition completed Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition The building was the largest of the 24 demolished at LANL's historic Technical Area 21. January 19, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of

  8. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Office of Environmental Management Presented to the Secretary Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Technology Development for Environmental Management July 15, 2014 www.energy.gov/EM 2 Safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons production and Federal Government- sponsored nuclear energy research Mission of Office of Environmental Management www.energy.gov/EM 3 EM Operations TREAT EXCAVATE DEMOLISH TRANSPORT EM is a federal program with a wide range of

  9. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Facility Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Executive Overview 2011 Edition U.S. Department Of Energy K-25, Oak Ridge (844,000 ft 2 demolished) K Cooling Tower, Savannah River safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management D&D Program Map - Executive Overview 6/13/2011 1

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 Budget Overview for Cleanup Caucus Dave Huizenga Acting Assistant Secretary Environmental Management March 27, 2014 Click to edit Master title style Click to edit Master subtitle style www.energy.gov/EM 2 EM Cleanup Program: Remediates the Environmental Legacy of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Complex BUILD & TREAT EXCAVATE DEMOLISH SAFEGUARD TRANSPORT EM is an operational federal program, performing a wide variety of tasks to clean up the environmental legacy of the U.S. nuclear weapons

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and FY15 Budget Overview Jack Craig Acting Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management April 23, 2014 Click to edit Master title style Click to edit Master subtitle style www.energy.gov/EM 2 EM Cleanup Program: Remediates the Environmental Legacy of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Complex BUILD & TREAT EXCAVATE DEMOLISH SAFEGUARD TRANSPORT EM is an operational federal program, performing a wide variety of tasks to clean up the environmental legacy of the U.S. nuclear

  12. Y-12 demos former utilities and maintenance facility | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration demos former utilities and maintenance facility Friday, September 26, 2014 - 1:05pm The Y-12 National Security Complex recently completed another improvement in its site infrastructure with the demolition of Building 9744, a former utilities and maintenance facility occupying more than 9,000 square feet. Despite structural issues and waste disposal concerns, the facility was safely demolished nearly two months ahead of schedule. The demolition proved challenging due

  13. Categories for CSES Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations 11/5/2015, Line Emission from High Z Multiply Ionized Ions Influenced by Dielectric Recombination and Polarization at the University of Nevada, Reno 10/19/2015, Scientific research related to the Predictive Science Strategic Academic Alliances Program II (PSAAP) at University of California, Santa Barbara 10/16/2015, Demolish eight temporary, modular structures at the Old Agent Operations Western Command and build a new building 9/3/2015,

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Columbia_River_Corridor_Rev_2_v2.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Columbia River Corridor The Columbia River Corridor projects selected for Recovery A t f di i l d d li hi f iliti di ti Act funding include demolishing facilities, remediating waste sites, and containing and treating contamination in groundwater. The projects support completing cleanup along the Columbia River and shrinking the active area of cleanup to the center of the Hanford Site (the Central Plateau) by 2015 1 of the Hanford Site (the Central Plateau) by 2015. May 2009 Shrinking the

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - RL HAB PFP1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bryan Foley, Department of Energy Richland Operations Office September 2015 2 Progress Update - September 2015 Original Remaining Processing Equipment (e.g., glove boxes) Removed or Ready for Removal during Demolition 238 5 Pencil Tanks Removed 52 0 Plutonium Finishing Plant Overall Progress To Date Progress Through August 30: * 95 percent large pieces of processing equipment (e.g., glove boxes, laboratory vent hoods) removed * 64 of 81 facilities demolished/removed from the PFP complex 3

  16. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stacy Charboneau May 2015 2 2 Hanford Cleanup Overview Three Components * River Corridor * Central Plateau * Tank Waste Cleanup Work * Treat contaminated groundwater * Demolish facilities * Remove buried waste, contaminated soil near Columbia River for safe disposal away from river * Retrieve underground tank waste * Treat waste for safe disposal 3 3 Economic Benefits to Washington * Hanford Budget is about $2.2 billion per year * 8,948 total DOE and contractor employees * DOE prime contractors

  17. DQO Summary Report for 324 and 327 Building Hot Cells D4 Project Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Lee

    2006-02-06

    This data quality objective (DQO) summary report provides the results of the DQO process conducted for waste characterization activities for the 324 and 327 Building hot cells decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities. This DQO summary report addresses the systems and processes related to the hot cells, air locks, vaults, tanks, piping, basins, air plenums, air ducts, filters, an adjacent elements that have high dose rates, high contamination levels, and/or suspect transuranic waste, which will require nonstandard D4 techniques.

  18. Lab begins demolition of Cold War-era buildings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demolition begins of cold War-Era buildings Lab begins demolition of Cold War-era buildings More than 165,000 square feet of former research, production, and office buildings will be demolished. December 1, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National

  19. Microsoft Word - OST-15-002-Old-AOWC-Determination

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    HEDP 12-001-015 National Nuclear Security Administration Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: Old AOWC Rebuild Project Program or Field Office: NNSA/OST Location(s) (City/County/State): Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, NM Proposed Action Description: The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Secure Transportation (OST) proposes to demolish eight temporary, modular structures at the Old Agent Operations Western Command (AOWC) and build a new

  20. Project Manager Ned Sauthoff Talks About US ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy & Guidance Documents Project Management Policy & Guidance Documents << Return to Directives & Documents | Proceed to Publications & Documents >> Document Type Function

    Publications & Documents Project Management Publications & Documents << Return to Directives & Documents | Proceed to Policy & Guidance >> Filter by Source Filter by Topic

    Project Management Project Management Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust

  1. Environmental Programs: Status of Work and Current Priorities for FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Patricia

    2012-08-17

    Presentation outline is: Mission/overview, Regulatory framework, Current status of cleanup, Shift in priorities to address highest risk, Removal of above-ground waste, Continued focus on protecting water resources, and Priorities for fiscal year 2013. LANL's Environmental Mission is to: (1) Repack and ship legacy transuranic waste containers; (2) Investigate and remediate Cold War (legacy) hazardous and radioactive waste areas; (3) Demolish unused buildings; (4) Disposition solid waste from Laboratory operations; and (5) Lifecycle cost nearly $3 billion.

  2. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2008 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of eighteen buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site that were demolished in Fiscal Year 2008. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  3. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2009 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Skwarek

    2010-01-27

    This report summarizes the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of seven facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2009. The D4 of these facilities included characterization; engineering; removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials; equipment removal; utility disconnection; deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure; and stabilization or removal of slabs and foundations. This report also summarizes the nine below-grade slabs/foundations removed in FY09 of buildings demolished in previous fiscal years.

  4. CX-012065: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    627: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011627: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9744 Utility Isolations Project CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office The proposed action is to perform utility isolations, re-route of the fire systems, pipe support installations associated with the demolishment of Building 9744, and removal of the associated waste. This activity will require excavation. PDF icon CX-011627.pdf More Documents &

  5. EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Preliminary Environmental Assessment EA-1913: Preliminary Environmental Assessment Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by BPA to fund the modification of an existing IDFG trout hatchery near Springfield, Idaho, to provide a facility that would be capable of rearing up to 1 million Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles. Modifications would include demolishing several existing structures,

  6. Hanford Blog Archive - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2014 August 12, 2014 NEWS RELEASE: Contractor Removes More Than 650 Pounds of Contamination from Groundwater For a second year in a row, and four months ahead of schedule, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company exceeded the Department of Energy's annual goal. August 11, 2014 NEWS RELEASE: Workers Creating Demolition Zone at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant Over the last few weeks, the look of Hanford's main plutonium plant has changed as crews have removed or demolished eight buildings

  7. Categorical Exclusion Determinations | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Counsel / National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) / NEPA Reading Room Categorical Exclusion Determinations 5/12/2016, Demolish all structures, pavement, concrete, and utilities associated with Department of Energy operations at the NC-135 Site on Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico 4/28/2016, Financial assistance to several University and Institutions for the Stewardship Science Academic Alliance (SSAA) 4/20/2016, Financial and technical assistance to the South

  8. Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate and High Temperature Waste

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reclamation - Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Energy Storage Energy Storage Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate and High Temperature Waste Reclamation Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication LBNL Commercial Analysis Report (682 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Researchers at Berkeley Lab

  9. S. 528: A bill to amend title V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to assist small surface coal mine operators, and for other purposes, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The bill provides financial assistance to surface mining operations which will not exceed 300,000 tons annual production. The cost of the following activities shall be assumed by the regulatory authority upon request of the operator in connection with a permit application: determination of probable hydrologic consequences; the development of cross-section maps and plans; geologic drilling and statement of results of test borings; collection of archeological information; pre-blast surveys; collection of site-specific resource information and production of protection and enhancement plans for fish and wildlife habitats; and the collection and analysis of geological and hydrologic data requested by the operator.

  10. Paramont's Black Bear No. 4 mine does it right, again

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanda, A.

    2007-07-15

    The Paramont Coal Company Virginia, LLC, a subsidiary of Alpha Natural Resources, recently won the '2007 overall award for excellence in mining and reclamation from the Virginia Division of Mined Land Reclamation and the Virginia Mining Association. Coal People Magazine recently visited Black Bear No. 4 mine where a settling pond was being removed and stream bed placed to drain the area, part of the 451-acre award winning reclamation project. The article recounts discussions with mining engineers about the company's operations with emphasis on the Black Bear No. 4 mine. Black Bear No. 1 mine won five state and national awards last year for conservation and land management practices. 8 photos.

  11. CX-005744: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Reclamation Facilities Blower ReplacementsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 05/04/2011Location(s): Scottsdale, ArizonaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. CX-008145: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation of Decommissioned Batteries, Test Satellites, and Facilities CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1 Date: 08/06/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  13. CX-006675: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation of T-2-14CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1Date: 12/07/2009Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  14. 05684ArcticLakes | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    behind ice road construction is that, unlike gravel roads, they leave little or no trace behind and require no mitigation or reclamation activities once they are no longer used. A...

  15. CX-002923: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Project in Lease Tract C-G-27, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28, B1.3Date: 06/25/2010Location(s): Mesa County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  16. 1,"Chuck Lenzie Generating Station","Natural gas","Nevada Power...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Reclamation",1039.4 4,"Tracy","Natural gas","Sierra Pacific Power Co",897.6 5,"Harry Allen","Natural gas","Nevada Power Co",654 6,"Silverhawk","Natural gas","Nevada Power ...

  17. EIS-0480: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, AZ Two agencies of the Department of Interior, the Bureau of Reclamation and the National Park ...

  18. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. ...

  19. CX-005738: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Mesa Reclamation Blower UnitsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 05/04/2011Location(s): Mesa, ArizonaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  20. CX-006711: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation of Decommissioned Batteries, Test Satellites, and FacilitiesCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1Date: 08/06/2011Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  1. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-14 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18...

  2. BPA-2014-01120-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, or the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, regarding or relating in any way to: (a) the Independent Scientific...

  3. BPA-2014-00662-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 U.S.C. 552. You requested: 1) Any documents that explain how BPA, the COE and the Bureau of Reclamation considered Mr. Raver's sworn testimony about Albeni Falls and how it...

  4. BPA-2014-00662-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you clarified your request to: 1) Any documents that explain how BPA, the COE and the Bureau of Reclamation considered Mr. Raver's sworn testimony about Albeni Falls and how it...

  5. CX-003331: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects on Slick Rock Lease Tract C-SR-II, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 07/30/2010Location(s): San Miguel County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  6. CX-003332: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects on Wedding Bell Mountain Lease Tract C-WM-17, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 07/30/2010Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  7. CX-006691: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation of Pits and BoxesCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.26, B6.1Date: 11/12/2010Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  8. CX-001899: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    XLD Reject ReclamationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/20/2010Location(s): IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  9. CX-005871: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Mesa Reclamation Blower UnitsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 05/16/2011Location(s): Mesa, ArizonaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  10. Follow-Up on the Management of the Plutonium Finishing Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... visiting on cell-phones for several hours. * Crane malfunctions in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility at PFP: The 65-year old crane is a "single point failure" for the preferred ...

  11. CX-006695: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation of WellsitesCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1Date: 08/06/2011Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  12. Departments of Energy and Interior Announce $26.6 Million in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... support system tests of innovative, low-head hydropower technologies at non-powered hydro facilities and sites owned by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation. ...

  13. CX-006654: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    B-1-28 Test Site ReclamationCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.28, B6.1Date: 11/16/2009Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  14. CX-003333: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Reclamation Projects in Lease Tract C-G-26, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 07/30/2010Location(s): Mesa County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  15. Humbolt Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Humbolt Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Humbolt Project Published U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for...

  16. CX-002918: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects in Energy Fuels Lease Tracts 19A and 20, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 06/25/2010Location(s): Uravan, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  17. BPA-2015-00273-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in consultation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation and US Fish and Wildlife Service on the effects of the operation and maintenance of the Federal...

  18. CX-006591: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Invasive Species Removal and Reclamation in Gold Eagle Mining, IncorporatedCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.20Date: 08/24/2011Location(s): San Miguel County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  19. Nevada Division of Environmental Protection | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pollution Control 2 Bureau of Air Quality Planning 3 Bureau of Mining Regulation & Reclamation 4 Bureau of Safe Drinking Water 5 Bureau of Water Pollution Control 6 Bureau of...

  20. CX-006649: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    T-2-11 Skim Box ReclamationCX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 10/14/2009Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  1. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wtd. Avg. Int. 7.4% Bureau of Reclamation Appropriations 510 Wtd. Avg. Int. 7.1% Power Marketing Transmission Bonds Issued to Treasury 1,854 Wtd. Avg. Int. 7.3% Bureau of...

  2. Vantage Pomona Heights | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lands, and federal lands managed by the BLM, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the U.S. Army - Joint Base Lewis McChord-Yakima Training Center (JBLM-YTC), as well as State of...

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Supply 6,560 Wtd. Avg. Int. 6.2% Bonds Issued to Treasury 796 Wtd. Avg. Int. 6.8% Bureau of Reclamation Appropriations 565 Wtd. Avg. Int. 7.1% Power Marketing...

  4. EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

  5. Uranium Leasing Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    » Uranium Leasing Program Uranium Leasing Program Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado LM currently manages the Uranium Leasing Program and continues to administer 31 lease tracts, all located within the Uravan Mineral Belt in southwestern Colorado. Twenty-nine of these lease tracts are actively held under lease and two tracts have been placed in inactive status indefinitely. Administrative duties include ongoing

  6. Cleaning Up the Hanford River Corridor and Improving Site Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stacy Charboneau, Manager February 3, 2016 2 3 Continue Cleanup of the Central Plateau * Plutonium Finishing Plant - Grouted Plutonium Reclamation Facility canyon floor - Working on last glove box (HA-9A) - Respiratory equipment Removal of high-hazard glove box in progress Grouting canyon floor in Plutonium Reclamation Facility 4 K Basin Sludge Transfer * External, independent review of cost and schedule completed * Plan for 2016 - Continue installing equipment in K West Reactor basin and annex

  7. Determining the research needs of the surface coal mining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zell, L.M.

    1982-12-01

    This paper reveals avenues open to the coal industry to help gain technology and research information needed to meet the requirements of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. It discusses projects of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Coal Mining and the Mining and Reclamation Council of America (MARC) to help meet the environmental needs as well as the coal industry needs.

  8. Technical evaluation of topsoil substitution practices and handling of potential acid/toxic-forming materials in Texas. Special study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Texas State program approved by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) allows that selected overburden materials may, if justified, be substituted for topsoil in mined land reclamation. The report presents the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement's (OSM's) findings regarding the practice of topsoil substitution under the approved Texas program and related reclamation problems with potential minesoil acidification. The purpose of the study was not to determine whether the substitution of overburden for topsoil should be approved or disapproved on any specific mine or soil series in Texas. The report presents a summary of pertinent technical considerations that need to be addressed in permit approvals for surface coal mines which (1) may encounter potentially acid/toxic-forming materials during mining or (2) intend to substitute overburden for topsoil as a plant growth material. The report summarizes the results of a special study OSM conducted to evaluate the technical basis and justification for reclamation plans and the substitution of overburden for topsoil as a plant growth material suitable for the reclamation of coal mines.

  9. Issue framework for potential 100-N advice (lead Issue Manager: Engstrom

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    framework for potential 100-N advice (lead Issue Manager: Engstrom) Background information The 100-N area is the last of the 100 Area, River Corridor, RI/FS and Proposed Plans for submittal. The 100-N area consists of two Decision Units, NR-1, which is the source unit, and NR-2, the groundwater unit. There are 234 facilities, of which 76% have been demolished, and there are 175 waste sites and four RCRA TSD sites. Of these waste sites, 18 have been cleaned up and 78 have been scheduled for start

  10. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Boiler Demolition Contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company used American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding to demolish the second of two 50,000-square-foot, coal-burning power houses in Hanford's 200 Area. CH2M HILL had used explosives in February 2011 to lower the 284-W exhaust chimneys, filter structures and a water tower. Crews also removed asbestos insulation from the building. Heavy equipment knocked over the facility's large boilers in September 2011. Search Search Search

  11. Technical Area 21

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Area 21 Technical Area 21 Technical Area 21 was the site of chemical research for refining plutonium and plutonium metal production from 1945 to 1978. August 1, 2013 Technical Area 21 in 2011 Technical Area 21 in 2011 Technical Area 21 (TA-21), also known as DP Site was the site of chemical research for refining plutonium and plutonium metal production from 1945 to 1978. Between 2008 and 2011, MDAs B, U, and V were excavated and removed. 24 buildings were demolished in 2010 and 2011

  12. U.S. Navy Moanalua Terrace Housing Project, Oahu, Hawaii | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Navy Moanalua Terrace Housing Project, Oahu, Hawaii U.S. Navy Moanalua Terrace Housing Project, Oahu, Hawaii Photo of the Moanalua Terrace U.S. Navy Housing Project on Oahu, Hawaii Moanalua Terrace is a U.S. Navy housing project on Oahu, Hawaii. At this site the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which were being rebuilt in four phases. The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction projects was an

  13. U.S., Ohio Approve Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site D&D Plans |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy , Ohio Approve Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site D&D Plans U.S., Ohio Approve Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site D&D Plans July 30, 2015 - 3:00pm Addthis The Portsmouth Site’s large process buildings and other facilities are shown here. The Portsmouth Site's large process buildings and other facilities are shown here. PIKETON, Ohio - The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) and DOE have agreed to a plan to demolish the massive, iconic

  14. U007_Plateau_Training_Records_System-PIA.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy , Ohio Approve Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site D&D Plans U.S., Ohio Approve Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site D&D Plans July 30, 2015 - 3:00pm Addthis The Portsmouth Site’s large process buildings and other facilities are shown here. The Portsmouth Site's large process buildings and other facilities are shown here. PIKETON, Ohio - The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) and DOE have agreed to a plan to demolish the massive, iconic

  15. 2015 Cleanup Progress

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OREM-15-2526 leanup Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Regional Community P 2015 C rogress 2 About the Cover Wildlife is as much a part of the East Tennessee Technology Park landscape as the buildings and structures that are being demolished. The Tennessee Urban Forestry Council has designated a stretch of land near a remediated ETTP pond as a certified arboretum. The cover photo shows two tree swallows that nest in the birdhouses erected near the pond. 1 Message from the EM Manager Department of

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to deactivate and demolish structural components on 13 support facilities at the Paducah Site. The support buildings are aging and are no longer needed. The 13 support buildings are as follows: an office building (C-212), security structures (C-212-A, C-215, C-216, and C-229), storage facilities (C-601-D, C-616-G, C-746-A, C-746-B, and C-746-M), and ancillary facilities (C-408 Truck Scale, C-633-6 Filter Building, and C-801 Bus Shelter). Facilities would be

  17. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-D4 Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-036

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-02-23

    The 1607-D4 Septic System was a septic tank and tile field that received sanitary sewage from the 115-D/DR Gas Recirculation Facility. This septic system operated from 1944 to 1968. Decommissioning took place in 1985 and 1986 when all above-grade features were demolished and the tank backfilled. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  18. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-D-3, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-033

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-05-09

    Decommissioning and demolition of the 132-D-3 site, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1986. Decommissioning included removal of equipment, water, and sludge for disposal as radioactive waste. The at- and below-grade structure was demolished to at least 1 m below grade and the resulting rubble buried in situ. The area was backfilled to grade with at least 1 m of clean fill and contoured to the surrounding terrain. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  19. Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. B. Culp

    2007-01-26

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

  20. Lessons from the Bevatron Accelerator Demolition - 12191

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkins, Joseph; Cronin, Robert

    2012-07-01

    The Bevatron accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is the first DOE accelerator to be demolished. While there are many lessons learned from its demolition, this paper focuses on the following lessons learned that may be useful for other D and D projects: bounding project scope to ensure success, hazards mapping for focused characterization and remediation, establishing radiological evaluation criteria, and forecasting activation products. With D and D of many DOE accelerators likely to occur in the near future, these lessons learned should be considered in planning those projects. These lessons learned are likely to be applicable to other D and D projects as well. (authors)

  1. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

  2. RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.; SMITH, B.A.

    2006-02-09

    A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.

  3. Flexible stainless steel hose liner used to rehab drain pipe for seal gates and outlet tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, S.J.; Monsanto, R. )

    1993-08-01

    Not unlike other dams, the Bureau of Reclamation's 6,500-MW Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State has a large amount of embedded piping, conduits, and drains. Typically, these features were constructed of ductile iron, cast iron, or carbon steel materials. Over the years, excessive internal corrosion of the drains for 102-inch ring seal gates and outlet tubes created leaks that required attention. Reclamation performed a number of temporary repairs before it became evident that the drain system must be rehabilitated. After considering several alternatives for rehabilitation, Reclamation selected stainless steel flexible hose liners for the job. Reclamation is satisfied with the performance of the stainless steel flexible hose liner. The total cost for installing the liners for nine drain lines (for three outlet tubes) was $15,000. Of that, materials cost $7,500, and labor and overhead cost $7,500. The inserts themselves cost from $640 for an 18-foot by 6-inch section. While this was not the least expensive option, it was the best choice for this job. The procedure will be repeated for other outlet tubes at Grand Coulee. Information used in this rehabilitation is being made available to other Reclamation projects.

  4. Public views of reclaiming an abandoned coal mine: the Macoupin County project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, J. R.

    1980-07-01

    An abandoned underground coal mine waste area in Macoupin County, Illinois, has been reclaimed for demonstration and research purposes near the city of Staunton. According to federal law, end uses of reclaimed coal mines must be determined in part by local concerns. This study examined local residents' preferences for land uses and their social and economic evaluations of reclamation at the Macoupin County site. Personal interviews with 119 residents revealed preferences for recreational use of the demonstration area; however, responses were probably influenced by prior awareness of land-use intentions. Generally, very positive evaluations of the reclamation were received. Willingness to pay for reclamation appears to be linked to fulfillment of desired recreational uses on the site and socioeconomic status of the respondent. In general, the research results provide further evidence that the value of abatement of environmental damage from mining is recognized and supported in economic terms at the public level.

  5. Reforesting Appalachia`s coal lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopps, M.

    1994-11-01

    Currently, in those four states` primary coal counties, some 5,000 to 6,000 acres are surface-mined each year. Since 1977, when Congress passed the landmark Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA), coal-mining companies have been required to refill the cuts they make and return the earth`s surface to approximately its original contours. Reclamation here means to aggressively-and literally-lay the groundwork for future cultivation of these lands. SMCRA calls for detailed reclamation plans before mining takes place, backed later by evaluations of how vegatation progresses up until the time of bond release-five years after mining ends. And though SMCRA has succeeded in improving the aesthetic appeal of post-mined sites, it does nothing to ensure that the most appropriate land use will be implemented for the long run.

  6. Managing water temperatures below hydroelectric facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.L.; Vermeyen, T.B.; O`Haver, G.G.

    1995-05-01

    Due to drought-related water temperature problems in the Bureau of Reclamation`s California Central Valley Project in the early 1990`s, engineers were forced to bypass water from the plants during critical periods. This was done at considerable cost in the form of lost revenue. As a result, an alternative method of lowering water temperature was developed and it has successfully lowered water temperatures downstream from hydroelectric facilities by using flexible rubber curtains. This innovative technology is aiding the survival of endangered fish populations. This article outlines the efforts and discusses the implementation of this method at several hydroelectric facilities in the area.

  7. S. 210: This Act may be referred to as the Comprehensive Uranium Act of 1991, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, January 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would establish the United States Enrichment Corporation to operate the Federal uranium enrichment program on a profitable and efficient basis in order to maximize the long term economic value to the US, provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry, and provide a Federal contribution for the reclamation of mill tailings generated pursuant to Federal defense contracts at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The bill describes congressional findings; definitions, establishment of corporation, and purposes; corporate offices; powers and duties of the corporation; organization, finance, and management; licensing, taxation, and miscellaneous provisions; decontamination and decommissioning; and uranium security and tailing reclamation.

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO{sub 2} in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel` ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  9. Probable new type of reaction mechanism: Double. cap alpha. direct transfer process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Shu-wei; Wu Guo-hua; Miao Rong-zhi; Han Fei

    1983-10-01

    It is assumed that /sup 8/Be consists of two ..cap alpha.. particles which are close to each other in configuration space. A spectroscopic density of /sup 8/Be cluster in the residue nuclei is then obtained, which is proportional to the square of the preformation probability of ..cap alpha.. particle at nuclear surface. Using the improved method of parametrization of EFR-DWBA overlap integral,/sup 1//sup en-dash//sup 2/ we calculate the double differential energy spectra and angular distributions of ..cap alpha.. particles for the reactions /sup 209/Bi (/sup 12/C, ..cap alpha..) /sup 217/Fr and extract the preformation probability of ..cap alpha.. particle at the surface of /sup 217/Fr nuclei from fitting the experimental data. The agreement within the range of calculation error between the preformation probabilities extracted from transfer reactions and ..cap alpha.. decay suggests that the reaction /sup 209/Bi(/sup 12/C, ..cap alpha..) /sup 217/Fr may be explained as a double ..cap alpha.. direct transfer process.

  10. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

  11. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  12. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

    2007-09-17

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

  13. Facility deactivation and demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cormier, S.L.; Adamowski, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    Today an improperly closed facility can be a liability to its owner, both financially and environmentally. A facility deactivation program must be planned and implemented to decrease liabilities, minimize operating costs, seek to reuse or sell processes or equipment, and ultimately aid in the sale and/or reuse of the facility and property whether or not the building(s) are demolished. These programs should be characterized within the deactivation plan incorporating the following major categories: Utility Usage; Environmental Decontamination; Ongoing Facility Management; Property Management/Real Estate Issues. This paper will outline the many facets of the facility deactivation and demolition programs implemented across the country for clients in the chemical, automotive, transportation, electronic, pharmaceutical, power, natural gas and petroleum industries. Specific emphasis will be placed on sampling and analysis plans, specification preparation, equipment and technologies utilized, ``how clean is clean`` discussions and regulatory guidelines applicable to these issues.

  14. Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in New Pilot Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Des Moines Metropolitan Wastewater Reclamation Authority (WRA) and Des Moines Water Works have committed to participate in the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program as the first members of a new program pilot. SEP recognizes facilities that meet the ISO 50001 global energy management standard and demonstrate improved energy performance.

  15. CX-002920: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects in Jo Dandy Lease Tract C-JD-7, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28, B1.3Date: 06/25/2010Location(s): Naturita, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  16. Operation of Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Hare, K.

    1995-12-31

    The final environmental impact statement (EIS) on the operation of Glen Canyon Dam was filed with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the Bureau of Reclamation on March 21, 1995. The poster display depicts this highly complex EIS process and its results.

  17. Pollution solution. From the Landsat -- a satellite for all seasons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The video shows how Landsat`s remote sensing capabilities can aid in resolving environmental quality problems. The satellite can locate and monitor strip mining operations to facilitate land reclamation programs. The satellite helps solve some meteorological mysteries by taking the path of airborne pollution. It can also monitor the course of industrial wastes and garbage dumped into lakes, rivers, and coastal areas.

  18. Oil shale mining processing, uses, and environmental impacts. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning oil shale mining and retorting, uses, and related environmental aspects. References discuss pyrolyzed, gasified, and combusted oil shales. Product yields and oil quality, socioeconomic impacts, exploration, reclamation of mined lands, and waste disposal are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. CX-006484: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects in Energy Fuels Resources Lease Tracts C-AM-19 and C-AM-20, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.28Date: 07/26/2011Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  20. Natural gas applications in waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarman, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is engaged in several projects related to the use of natural gas for waste management. These projects can be classified into four categories: cyclonic incineration of gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes; fluidized-bed reclamation of solid wastes; two-stage incineration of liquid and solid wastes; natural gas injection for emissions control. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Wastewater treatment. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment for the treatment of industrial (except mining) effluent streams. Consideration is given to the removal, reclamation, and recycling of various trace metals, heavy-metals, hydrocarbons, and oily wastewaters to meet regulatory agency discharge or inplant reuse standards. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Wastewater treatment. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment for the treatment of industrial (except mining) effluent streams. Consideration is given to the removal, reclamation, and recycling of various trace metals, heavy-metals, hydrocarbons, and oily wastewaters to meet regulatory agency discharge or inplant reuse standards. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Wastewater treatment. (Latest citations from the COMPENDEX database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment for the treatment of industrial (except mining) effluent streams. Consideration is given to the removal, reclamation, and recycling of various trace metals, heavy-metals, hydrocarbons, and oily wastewaters to meet regulatory agency discharge or inplant reuse standards. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Wastewater treatment. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment for the treatment of industrial (except mining) effluent streams. Consideration is given to the removal, reclamation, and recycling of various trace metals, heavy-metals, hydrocarbons, and oily wastewaters to meet regulatory agency discharge or inplant reuse standards. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Shrinking the trash heap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillis, A.M.

    1992-02-01

    This article evaluates uses of composted solid wastes. Uses are described for agriculture, horticulture, silviculture, for soil amendments and for land reclamation projects. Researchers are exploring problems related to the availability and toxicity of metals in the compost and the effects of these metals in the food supply. Consumer acceptance has been the major drawback to successful marketing of the product.

  6. FMC Presentation November

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    47,325 292,636 345,945 338,267 59,093 7 Bureau of Reclamation 13,546 89,005 119,891 132,391 16,760 8 Corps of Engineers 30,116 206,967 215,700 215,700 29,982 9 Long-term...

  7. Coal mining in the United States: SMCRA`s successful blueprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, K.L.

    1997-06-01

    In his forward in Night Comes to the Cumberlands, former Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall observed that Caudill`s constructive proposals for rehabilitation of the coal counties {open_quotes}will take deep concern by people in Washington and Frankfort to bring them to fruition.{close_quotes} Deep concern for the impacts that poorly regulated surface coal mining were having on the human and natural environment animated a decade-long struggle to establish national policy for surface coal mining. The result was the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, P.L. 95-97 (SMCRA). Enacted to implement a national framework for regulating the environmental effects of surface coal mining, the law established a national program for controlling environmental impacts and ensuring the reclamation of lands affected by surface mining activity. From the perspective of nearly two decades, most observers would conclude that SMCRA is an example of successful policy implementation. Few national environmental laws have succeeded as well in terms of on-the-ground results: coal production has increased dramatically and industry has made significant gains in productivity while incorporating environmental and reclamation requirements in its daily operations, lowering the cost of reclamation and environmental protection. This article discusses and evaluates the SMCRA and its effect on surface coal mining. 2 tabs.

  8. Ninety-ninth coal report of Illinois, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Illinois Department of Mines and Minerals for the year 1980. This report includes production, employment, and casulty figures for underground and surface mines; the annual report of the Division of Land Reclamation and the annual report of the Division of Oil and Gas. (DP)

  9. Coal mine wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the characterization, environmental aspects, and engineering studies of coal mining refuse. Topics include disposal strategies, materials usage, and revegetation and reclamation programs. Appropriate legislation, and surveys performed at specific mining sites are also presented. Water pollution aspects of coal wastes are not covered in this report. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

  11. National inventory of abandoned mine land problems: an emphasis on health, safety, and general welfare impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honea, R.B.; Baxter, F.P.

    1984-07-01

    In 1977 Congress passed the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, which provided for the abatement of abandoned mine land (AML) problems through a reclamation program funded by a severance tax on current mining. AML was defined as any land, including associated buildings, equipment, and affected areas, that was no longer being used for coal mining by August 1977. This act also created the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) in the Department of the Interior to administer the AML program and to assume other regulatory and research responsibilities. This report documents the design, implementation, and results of a National inventory of the most serious problems associated with past mining practices. One of the objectives of the Inventory was to help OSM and the participating states locate, identify, and rank AML problems and estimate their reclamation costs. Other objectives were to encourage states and Indian tribes to collect such data and to provide OSM with the information necessary to guide its decision-making processes and to quantify the progress of the reclamation program. Because only limited funds were available to design and implement the National inventory and because the reclamation fund established by the Act may never be sufficient to correct all AML problems, OSM has focused on only the top-priority problems. It is stressed that this is not an inventory of AML features but rather an inventory of AML impacts. It should be noted that the data and analysis contained in this report are based on a data collection effort conducted by the states, Indian tribes, and OSM contractors between 1979 and mid-1982.

  12. Pre-conceptual design study of ASTRID core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varaine, F.; Marsault, P.; Chenaud, M. S.; Bernardin, B.; Conti, A.; Sciora, P.; Venard, C.; Fontaine, B.; Devictor, N.; Martin, L.; Scholer, A. C.; Verrier, D.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project at CEA, core design studies are performed at CEA with the AREVA and EDF support. At the stage of the project, pre-conceptual design studies are conducted in accordance with GEN IV reactors criteria, in particularly for safety improvements. An improved safety for a sodium cooled reactor requires revisiting many aspects of the design and is a rather lengthy process in current design approach. Two types of cores are under evaluation, one classical derived from the SFR V2B and one more challenging called CFV (low void effect core) with a large gain on the sodium void effect. The SFR V2b core have the following specifications: a very low burn-up reactivity swing (due to a small cycle reactivity loss) and a reduced sodium void effect with regard to past designs such as the EFR (around 2$ minus). Its performances are an average burn-up of 100 GWd/t, and an internal conversion ratio equal to one given a very good behavior of this core during a control rod withdrawal transient). The CFV with its specific design offers a negative sodium void worth while maintaining core performances. In accordance of ASTRID needs for demonstration those cores are 1500 MWth power (600 MWe). This paper will focus on the CFV pre-conceptual design of the core and S/A, and the performances in terms of safety will be evaluated on different transient scenario like ULOF, in order to assess its intrinsic behavior compared to a more classical design like V2B core. The gap in term of margin to a severe accident due to a loss of flow initiator underlines the potential capability of this type of core to enhance prevention of severe accident in accordance to safety demonstration. (authors)

  13. Effects of placement method on geotechnical behavior of hydraulic fill sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.M.; Shen, C.K.; Leung, D.H.K.; Mitchell, J.K.

    1999-10-01

    Results of an investigation of the geotechnical behavior of a hydraulic sand placed at a land reclamation site in Hong Kong are presented and interpreted. The study was conducted to aid in developing guidelines for quality control of hydraulic landfill placement. The work described consisted of: (1) field investigations; (2) static and cyclic triaxial testing; and (3) calibration chamber tests to study the cone penetration test versus D, relationships for marine sands obtained from the reclamation sites. The results of this study clearly indicate that the placement technique is the single most important factor controlling the geotechnical behavior of a given type of sand when placed as a hydraulic fill. The weakest zone is generally located just beneath the water level where fill deposition is placed by pipeline discharge.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of environmental issues on the use of peat as an energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R.; Richardson, S.; Walters, A.; Boesch, L.; Thomson, W.; Irons, J.

    1980-03-14

    A study to characterize the environmental issues, that would arise from an extensive peat utilization program has been initiated. The objectives of this preliminary report are to: identify the environmental issues and potential problems; examine the significance of issues in the geographical regions where peat use could be developed; and establish a methodology by which issues can be resolved or clarified through future coordinated private, state, and federal programs. An overview of peat development including discussions on conversion technologies, extraction and harvesting procedures, and land reclamation is presented. Environmental concerns are in the areas of water resources and quality, air quality, health and safety issues, solid waste management, and land reclamation. The general environmental issues, resource availability, and attitudes associated with potential peat development in ten states, containing an estimated 90 percent of US peat resources were described. The ten states reviewed are Alaska, Minnesota, Michigan, Maine, North and South Carolina, Wisconsin, New York, Florida, and Louisiana. (DMC)

  15. Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Lorenz; R. Lal

    2007-12-31

    This research project was aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of RMS and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. Restoration of disturbed land is followed by the application of nutrients to the soil to promote the vegetation development. Reclamation is important both for preserving the environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. Since reclamation treatments have significant influence on the rate of soil development, a study on subplots was designed with the objectives of assessing the potential of different biosolids on soil organic C (SOC) sequestration rate, soil development, and changes in soil physical and water transmission properties. All sites are owned and maintained by American Electric Power (AEP). These sites were reclaimed by two techniques: (1) with topsoil application, and (2) without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover.

  16. Remining to reclaim abandoned mined lands: Virginia`s initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipper, C.E.; Lambert, B.

    1998-12-31

    Abandoned Mined Lands (AML) are lands that were mined prior to implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) in 1977, but were inadequately reclaimed. Re-mining of AML is being conducted on a routine basis by coal-mining operations in eastern states such as Virginia. Re-mining is a potentially important means of reclaiming AML. However, under current policies, re-mining operations often fail to permit and reclaim priority 1, 2, and 3 AML, especially those areas which present the most severe environmental problems. This paper describes policy issues which affect the potential for AML reclamation by re-mining operations in mountainous mining areas, such as Virginia; efforts underway in Virginia which seek to resolve those issues; and progress achieved to date under that initiative.

  17. PRB mines mature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-08-15

    Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

  18. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super recycled water: quenching computers January 30, 2014 Conserving, recycling and "super purifying" wastewater, plus recycling waste to replace concrete We know water is a precious resource, and fortunately we've created novel ways to use wastewater. In fact, at the Lab we reuse water up to seven times. Currently, we're recycling about 300,000 gallons of industrial wastewater daily at the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility (SERF), treating it onsite it rather than discharging it

  19. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2012 This issue features successful practices from recent NEPA reviews and current Council on Environmental Quality initiatives promoting efficient NEPA compliance. Articles in this issue include: Keys to Managing an Expanded NEPA Workload Recent NEPA Reviews Ilustrate Lessons Learned NEPA Order Revision Incorporates Public Review of EAs Bureau of Reclamation Updates NEPA Handbook CEQ Expands NEPA Modernization Activities CEQ Draft Guidance Promotes

  20. Microsoft Word - 4.16.13 Final SEPA Testimony

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER AND POWER COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES April 16, 2013 EXAMINING THE PROPOSED FISCAL YEAR 2014 SPENDING, PRIORITIES AND THE MISSIONS OF THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, THE FOUR POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS AND THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY' ' ' 'S WATER PROGRAM 2 Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, I am Kenneth Legg, Administrator of the Southeastern Power Administration (Southeastern). I appreciate

  1. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. EIS-0370: Windy Gap Firming Project, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Reclamation, Great Plains Region), with DOE's Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct new water storage reservoir capacity southwest of Loveland, Colorado. Western has jurisdiction over the transmission line that would be relocated if the proposed action is implemented and would market additional power that may be generated as a result of the project.

  3. Hanford Facility Beryllium Fact Sheet Building Number/Name:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    36Z Plutonium Reclamation Building June 30, 2004 February 9, 2012 CHPRC Kristy Kimmerle, CIH PAST OPERATIONS Beryllium brought in facility: YES Form of beryllium: VARIES Period of beryllium operations (dates): Start: 1973 End: 2004 Location(s) in facility that contained beryllium materials: Miscellaneous Treatment (MT) gloveboxes MT-1, MT-3, MT-4, MT-5, MT-6 and the connecting conveyor glovebox in Room 41. These enclosures and downstream ventilation systems in Room 26 are indicated with a

  4. ScaLAPACK

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River Site NNSA operates facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to supply and process tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen that is a vital component of nuclear weapons. SRS loads tritium and non-tritium reservoirs; including reclamation of previously used tritium reservoirs, receipt, packing and shipping of reservoirs; recycling, extraction, and enrichment of tritium gas and laboratory operations. SRS also plays a critical role in NNSA's nonproliferation missions. SRS is run by

  5. Trinity - ASC's First Advanced Technology System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trinity Trinity - ASC's First Advanced Technology System Next-generation computing! LANL is decreasing its use of city/well water for cooling towers and using water from LANL's Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility (SERF). NNSA's ASC Program has given permission to the Los Alamos and Sandia Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES) Project to release the request for proposal (RFP) for the Trinity system. The procurement of Trinity is a joint procurement with the DOE Office of Science to

  6. Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program Administration and Habitat Projects, Annual Progress Report, Project Period: Program Administration: January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997 Habitat Projects: January 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, Cecilia; Kuchenbecker, Lyle; Perry, Patty

    1998-10-28

    This agreement provided funding for operation and administration of the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program including staffing of an Executive Director, Program Planner, and clerical personnel. The contract covers maintaining program services, project planning, subwatershed plans (CRMP's), public involvement and education, interagency coordination/clearing house, monitoring, and technical support activities that have taken place in the Grande Ronde basin. Cost-share has been received from the Bureau of Reclamation and the Governor's Watershed Enhancement Board.

  7. Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill, 1996. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, June 20, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    The report addresses H.R. 1905 a bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996. The bill supplies funds for water resources development programs and related activities of the Dept. of Army, Civil Functions - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program, the Department of Interior`s Bureau of Reclamation, and for certain Department of Energy`s energy research activities. The report includes comments on various programs.

  8. Energy and Water Development Appropriation Bill, 1995. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, June 23, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The report addresses H.R. 4506 a bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995. The bill supplies funds for water resources development programs and related activities of the Dept. of Army, Civil Functions - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program, the Department of Interior`s Bureau of Reclamation, and for certain Department of Energy`s energy research activities. The report includes comments on various programs.

  9. Making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 4, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The report addresses H.R. 4506 a bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995. The bill supplies funds for water resources development programs and related activities of the Dept. of Army, Civil Functions - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program, the Department of Interior`s Bureau of Reclamation, and for certain Department of Energy`s energy research activities. The report includes comments on various programs.

  10. 4-16-13_Christopher_Turner FT HNR

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OF CHRISTOPHER M. TURNER ADMINISTRATOR SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER AND POWER COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES APRIL 16, 2013 EXAMINING THE PROPOSED FISCAL YEAR 2014 SPENDING, PRIORITIES AND THE MISSIONS OF THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, THE FOUR POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS AND THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S WATER PROGRAM Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to share

  11. Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan DEIS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Executive Summary U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region National Park Service, Intermountain Region December 2015 Cover photo credits: Title bar: Grand Canyon National Park Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon National Park Glen Canyon Dam: T.R. Reeve High-flow experimental release: T.R. Reeve Fisherman: T. Gunn Humpback chub: Arizona Game and Fish Department Rafters: Grand Canyon National Park Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan December 2015

  12. Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan DEIS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan Environmental Impact Statement PUBLIC DRAFT Volume 1-Chapters 1-8 U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region National Park Service, Intermountain Region December 2015 Cover photo credits: Title bar: Grand Canyon National Park Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon National Park Glen Canyon Dam: T.R. Reeve High-flow experimental release: T.R. Reeve Fisherman: T. Gunn Humpback chub: Arizona Game and Fish Department Rafters: Grand

  13. EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011.

  14. Summary: Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement: DOE/EIS 0472-D, March 2013

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary: Draft ULP PEIS March 2013 COVER SHEET 1 2 3 Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: The cooperating agencies are U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), 6 Bureau of Land Management (BLM); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); Colorado 7 Department of Transportation (CDOT); Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety 8 (CDRMS); Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW); Mesa County Commission; Montrose County 9 Commission; San Juan County Commission;

  15. Overview of Western's Interconnected Bulk Electric System

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Western's Interconnected Bulk Electric System Western Area Power Admin. Objectives * Describe Western Area Power Administration Region and Facilities Overview * Explain Fundamentals of Electricity, Power Transformers and Transmission Lines * Discuss Overview of the Bulk Electric System (BES) * Objectives Review Western's Service Area Western marketing areas and offices 3 Wholesale Power Services * Markets 10,479 MW from 56 Federal hydropower projects owned by Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) , Army

  16. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

  17. EA-2030: Middle Entiat River Habitat Restoration Project; Chelan County, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, is preparing an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to improve native fish habitat quality and quantity along a 4-mile section of the Entiat River and improve floodplain function by reconnecting the river with historic side channels and placing logs to direct river flow into side channels and onto the floodplain.

  18. JCS PHEV System Development | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program | Department of Energy Representatives from the Des Moines Metropolitan WRA and Des Moines Water Works sign the SEP agreement. The Des Moines Metropolitan Wastewater Reclamation Authority (WRA) and Des Moines Water Works have committed to participate in the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program as the first members of a new program pilot. SEP recognizes facilities that meet the ISO 50001 global energy management standard and demonstrate improved energy performance. A third-party

  19. STATEMENT FOR THE RECORD MR. KENNETH E. LEGG ADMINISTRATOR SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FOR THE RECORD MR. KENNETH E. LEGG ADMINISTRATOR SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER, POWER AND OCEANS COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 22, 2016 EXAMINING THE MISSIONS AND IMPACTS OF THE PRESIDENT'S PROPOSED FISCAL YEAR 2017 BUDGETS OF THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, THE NATIONAL OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, AND THE POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS Mr. Chairman and

  20. STATEMENT FOR THE RECORD SCOTT CARPENTER ADMINISTRATOR SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FOR THE RECORD SCOTT CARPENTER ADMINISTRATOR SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER, POWER & OCEANS COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 22, 2016 EXAMINING THE MISSIONS AND IMPACTS OF THE PRESIDENT'S PROPOSED FISCAL YEAR 2017 BUDGETS OF THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, THE NATIONAL OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION AND THE POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS Mr. Chairman and

  1. STATEMENT OF CLAUDIA ANDREWS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STATEMENT OF CLAUDIA ANDREWS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER, POWER AND OCEANS COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 22, 2016 EXAMINING THE MISSIONS AND IMPACTS OF THE PRESIDENT'S PROPOSED FISCAL YEAR 2017 BUDGETS OF THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION AND THE POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS Mr. Chairman,

  2. Land application uses of dry FGD by-products. [Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.A.; Beeghly, J.H.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains three separate monthly reports on the progress to use flue gas desulfurization by-products for the land reclamation of an abandoned mine site in Ohio. Data are included on the chemical composition of the residues, the cost of the project, as well as scheduling difficulties and efforts to allay the fears of public officials as to the safety of the project. The use of by-products to repair a landslide on State Route 541 is briefly discussed.

  3. Biological sludge stabilization reactor evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbitt, R.A.; Bowen, P.T.; Smith, P.E.

    1998-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion was chosen as the means to stabilize primary and thickened waste activated sludge for a 0.88 m{sup 3}/s (20 mgd) advanced wastewater reclamation facility. Two stage digestion was proposed to produce Class B sludge. Reactor shape was an important variable in design of the first stage digestion. Evaluation of conventional and egg shaped anaerobic digesters was performed. Based on the economic and non-economic criteria analysis, egg shaped reactors were selected.

  4. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs): Remediation for wastewater. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning wastewater contamination by volatile organic materials and the technology for reclamation. Remediation techniques discussed include use of activated carbon, activated sludge, oxidation, scrubbing, vapor stripping, biodegradation, and other degradative treatments. Articles include remediation of soils contaminated by volatile wastes. The citations examine a variety of compounds, including aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum wastes, chlorinated organics, and other volatile materials. (Contains a minimum of 215 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. END POINT IMPLEMENTATION EXAMPLES End Point Implementation Examples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    POINT IMPLEMENTATION EXAMPLES End Point Implementation Examples General Cleanup Decontamination Decisions Control of Contamination Nuclear Material Residuals Structures and Roofs Electrical Systems Ventilation Fire Protection Systems Drainage, Sumps, and Flood Protection Process Systems and Equipment Utility and Service Systems and Equipment Gloveboxes, Hot Cells, and Hoods Worker Support and Protection during Post-Deactivation S&M Disposal, Reclamation, or Sale of Commodities General

  6. Marine Energy Technology Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings of the 2 nd Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2014 April 15-18, 2014, Seattle, WA FIELD MEASUREMENT TEST PLAN TO DETERMINE EFFECTS OF HYDROKINETIC TURBINE DEPLOYMENT ON CANAL TEST SITE IN YAKIMA, WA, USA Budi Gunawan 1 , Jesse Roberts, Ann Dallman, Vincent Neary Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, U.S. Shane Grovue Instream Energy Systems Vancouver, BC, CA Josh Mortensen, Bryan Heiner US Bureau of Reclamation Denver, CO, U.S. 1 Corresponding author:

  7. John Seaman | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seaman Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home John Seaman Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-0977 office (803) 725-3309 fax seaman(at)uga.edu Dr. Seaman's research interests include a number of active agricultural and environmental research areas: the land application of animal waste and coal combustion by-products; solute and contaminant transport modeling; reclamation of Cr(VI) contaminated aquifers and soils; in situ contaminant

  8. Restoration of abandoned mine lands through cooperative coal resource evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskins, D.M.; Smith, M.

    1996-12-31

    The public reclamation cost of reclaiming all of Pennsylvania`s abandoned mine lands is estimated at $15 billion. Drainage from abandoned mines poses another $5 billion water pollution clean-up problem. Although it is unlikely that public reclamation alone could ever tackle these problems, much can be done to alleviate the nuisances through the remining of previously mined areas to recover remaining reserves, restore the land and improve water quality in the same process. Remining of priority areas is encouraged through a new Pennsylvania policy which provides incentives to mining companies. One incentive, initiated under Pennsylvania`s comprehensive mine reclamation strategy, is to identify and geologically map reminable coal resources in selected watersheds, and then to expedite mine permitting in these watersheds. At present, two such priority watersheds, Little Toby Creek in Elk County and Tangascootak Creek in Clinton County, are the focus of geologic map compilation based on recent quadrangle mapping, or new, directed, geologic mapping, including new research core drilling to establish the geologic stratigraphic framework. In order to maximize environmental benefits the comprehensive mine reclamation strategy identifies watersheds which are affected by acid mine drainage (AMD), but that are reasonably capable of restoration, if sufficient coal reserves remain. Pennsylvania`s geochemical quality database of rock overburden, in combination with detailed coal resource mapping by the Pennsylvania Geological Survey, and the cooperation of coal companies and leaseholders, is being used by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to identify and design remining projects which will not only allow the recovery of coal resources, but will also improve the water quality through a variety of innovative mining techniques.

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Chain and Cable Co - CT 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chain and Cable Co - CT 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Chain and Cable Co (CT.15 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bridgeport , Connecticut CT.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.15-1 Site Operations: Research and development involving uranium metal reclamation. CT.15-1 CT.15-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantity of materials and short duration of

  10. EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and California Department of Water Resources are jointly preparing an EIS/Environmental Impact Report that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Bay Delta Conservation Plan for restoring and protecting water supply reliability, water quality, and ecosystem health. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency.

  11. H. R. 4053: This Act may be cited as the Coalfield Environment Enhancement Act of 1990. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, July 11, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the remining of certain abandoned coal mine lands. After defining the necessary terms, the bill describes the right of states to establish a State Remining Insurance Program, insurance coverage, bonds, the determination of unanticipated event or condition, the State Remining Insurance Fund, source of funding and interest and premiums, penalties and enforcement, conforming amendments, special rules applicable to remining operations, and abandoned coal refuse piles.

  12. Environmental regulation of coal mining. SMCRA`s Second Decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElfish, J.M.; Beier, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    If you find yourself involved in the workings of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), let ELI`s guide take you through SMCRA`s second decade. Environmental Regulation of Coal mining: SMCRA`s Second Decade gives you a clear picture of SMCRA`s statutory and regulatory requirements, and identifies the key policy disputes and problems that will be confronted in the years ahead.

  13. H. R. 1078: This Act may be cited as the National Coal and Extractive Energy Strategy Act of 1991, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, February 21, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 and the Mineral Leasing Act to promote the production of coal and other extractive energy sources. Sections of the bill describe the following: coal remining; metallurgical coal development; coal bed methane developments; Federal coal leasing amendments; Federal mineral receipts management; coalfield assistance, restoration and enhancement; and Federal onshore oil and gas leasing amendments.

  14. OSM's reforestation initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyce, J.S.

    1999-07-01

    Implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) has discouraged reforestation in some situations where reforestation would be desirable. OSM is engaged in an initiative to increase the amount of mined land reclaimed to forest where appropriate. The authors are seeking to determine those elements of the Federal/State regulator programs that discourage reforestation and find ways to offset these impacts. Potential factors militating against reforestation are identified and possible solutions are discussed.

  15. P&RA CoP TE Mtg Attendees List _2014-12-23.xlsx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Western's Interconnected Bulk Electric System Western Area Power Admin. Objectives * Describe Western Area Power Administration Region and Facilities Overview * Explain Fundamentals of Electricity, Power Transformers and Transmission Lines * Discuss Overview of the Bulk Electric System (BES) * Objectives Review Western's Service Area Western marketing areas and offices 3 Wholesale Power Services * Markets 10,479 MW from 56 Federal hydropower projects owned by Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) , Army

  16. Super recycled water: quenching computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super recycled water: quenching computers Super recycled water: quenching computers New facility and methods support conserving water and creating recycled products. Using reverse osmosis to "super purify" water allows the system to reuse water and cool down our powerful yet thirsty computers. January 30, 2014 Super recycled water: quenching computers LANL's Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, key to reducing the Lab's discharge of liquid. Millions of gallons of industrial

  17. Cristina Negri talks about phytoremediation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cristina Negri talks about phytoremediation Share Description Phytoremediation is the use of plants and trees to remove or neutralize contaminants in polluted soil or water. Speakers M. Cristina Negri Duration 1:56 Topic Community Site environmental protection Site waste management Environment Biology Environmental biology Terrestrial ecology Environmental science & technology Land reclamation Water quality Video ID http://youtu.be/WDGkBpsVjtc Credit Argonne National Laboratory

  18. Argonne OutLoud: Changing the bio-energy equation (April 12, 2012) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Changing the bio-energy equation (April 12, 2012) Share Description Argonne OutLoud public lecture series. Episode 1: Argonomist Cristina Negri talks about phytoremediation for polluted soil and water. Speakers Cristina Negri Duration 00:55:11 Topic Community Education Outreach Environment Environmental science & technology Land reclamation Water quality Video ID http://youtu.be/vlMUJOs4vh0 Credit Argonne National Laboratory Cristina Negri

  19. EIS-0370: Windy Gap Firming Project; North Central Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Reclamation, Great Plains Region), with DOE's Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct new water storage reservoir capacity southwest of Loveland, Colorado. Western has jurisdiction over the transmission line that would be relocated if the proposed action is implemented and would market additional power that may be generated as a result of the project.

  20. Method for describing and evaluating coal mine wastes for coal recovery: a case history from the historical longwall district in the northeastern Illinois coal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.

    1984-12-01

    A method for describing and evaluating coal mine wastes evolved in 1982 from studies at more than 100 historic longwall mine sites conducted by the Illinois State Geological Survey and partially funded by the Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council (IAMLRC). The primary purpose was to locate and identify different types of waste materials at these sites and to evaluate them for future reclamation. The method which involves geologic characterization, sampling, standard analyses, and evaluation tests, can be used to determine the potential of a mine waste deposit for secondary recovery of coal. It yields data relating to three factors involved in secondary recovery: quality (ash content, heating value), quantity (recoverable tonnages), and the net effect of the recovery operation (product value relative to operations costs; social and environmental assets relative to liabilities). The longwall study did not directly address the question of recoverable tonnages of coal but provided information that can be used to make this evaluation, minimize the amount of drilling required for accurate forecasts of profitability, and measure the economic and environmental benefits of secondary recovery steps in a reclamation plan.

  1. Establishment and growth of experimental grass species mixtures on coal mine sites reclaimed with municipal biosolids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halofsky, J.E.; McCormick, L.H.

    2005-05-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 requires that coal mine sites in the United States be reclaimed to establish vegetative cover that is diverse, native, and capable of plant succession. However, there is a question as to whether vegetation established on coal mine sites reclaimed with biosolids is diverse and capable of plant succession. The influx of nutrients with the addition of biosolids leads to long-term dominance by early-successional species, most notably grasses, and consequently, a low establishment of woody and volunteer species. Additionally, many grass species commonly planted in reclamation have aggressive growth habits that lead to their dominance in coal mine plant communities. The establishment and growth of selected grass mixes was evaluated to determine whether alternative grass mixes would be less competitive with woody and volunteer species as compared to commonly used grass mixes. Percent vegetative cover, species richness, and the survival of direct-seeded woody species were assessed for each treatment grass mixture. It was found that Poa compress and a mixture of P. compress, Panicum virgatum, and Trifolium repens provided adequate coverage while still allowing the highest species richness and survival of woody species. Use of these species mixtures in coal mine reclamation with biosolids in the eastern United States would likely lead to establishment of a more species-rich plant community with a greater woody species component while still providing erosion control and site protection.

  2. Handbook on procedures for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orellana, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    This handbook establishes and presents for the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM) a comprehensive, logical set of procedures for implemeting the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). (a) the legal framework with which OSM must comply is detailed in title I of NEPA, as amended. This handbook discusses responsibilities under title I and the following additional requirements resulting from NEPA; Section 2 of Executive Order 11514, Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality, as amended by Executive Order 11991; The regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing the procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508); The final procedures of the Department of the Interior (DOI) implementing NEPA (516 DM 1-7); and OSM's draft appendix to the above DOI procedures. (b) OSM is responsible for the implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), (30 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.). SMCRA has specific environmental protection performance standards designed to protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of surface coal mining operations and to reclaim mined areas left without adequate reclamation within these standards. As a Federal agency making decisions that affect the human environment, OSM must comply with NEPA.

  3. PREPARATION OF U-PLANT FOR FINAL DEMOLITION AND DISPOSAL - 12109E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FARABEE OA; HERZOG B; CAMERON C

    2012-02-16

    The U-Plant is one of the five major nuclear materials processing facilities at Hanford and was chosen as a pilot project to develop the modalities for closure of the other four facilities at Hanford and the rest of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The remedy for this facility was determined by a Record of Decision (ROD) pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). That remedy was to 'Close in Place - Partially Demolished Structure'. The U-Plant facility is identified as the 221-U Building and is a large, concrete structure nominally 247m (810 ft) long, 20 M (66 ft) wide and 24 m (77 ft) high with approximately 9 m (30 ft) being below grade level. It is a robust facility with walls ranging from 0.9 m to 2.7 m (3 ft to 9 ft) thick. One large room extends the entire length of the building that provides access to 40 sub-grade processing cells containing tanks, piping and other components. The work breakdown was divided into three major deliverables: (1) Tank D-10 Removal: removal of Tank D-10, which contained TRU waste; (2) Equipment Disposition: placement of contaminated equipment in the sub-grade cells; and (3) Canyon Grouting: grouting canyon void spaces to the maximum extent practical. A large number of pieces of contaminated equipment (pumps, piping, centrifuges, tanks, etc) from other facilities that had been stored on the canyon operating floor were placed inside of the sub-grade cells as final disposition, grouted and the cell shield plug reinstalled. This action precluded a large volume of waste being transported to another burial site. Finally, {approx}19,000 m3 ({approx}25,000 yd3) of grout was placed inside of the cells (in and around the contaminated equipment), in the major galleries. the ventilation tunnel, the external ventilation duct, and the hot pipe trench to minimize the potential for void spaces and to reduce the mobility, solubility, and/or toxicity of the grouted waste. The interim condition of the facility is 'cold and dark'. Upon availability of funding the structure will have contamination fixative applied to all contaminated surfaces and may be explosively demolished, with the remaining structure buried under an engineered barrier.

  4. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100 centimeters squared (cm2) beta/gamma. Removable beta/gamma contamination levels seldom exceeded 1,000 dpm/100 cm2, but, in railroad trenches on the reactor pad containing soil on the concrete pad in front of the shield wall, the beta dose rates ranged up to 120 milli-roentgens per hour from radioactivity entrained in the soil. General area dose rates were less than 100 micro-roentgens per hour. Prior to demolition of the reactor shield wall, removable and fixed contaminated surfaces were decontaminated to the best extent possible, using traditional decontamination methods. Fifth, large sections of the remaining structures were demolished by mechanical and open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). Mechanical demolition methods included the use of conventional demolition equipment for removal of three main buildings, an exhaust stack, and a mobile shed. The 5-foot (ft), 5-inch (in.) thick, neutron-activated reinforced concrete shield was demolished by CED, which had never been performed at the NTS.

  5. Progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gills, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R.

    2007-07-01

    Belgoprocess started the industrial decommissioning of the main process building of the former EUROCHEMIC reprocessing plant in 1990, after completion of a pilot project in which two buildings were emptied and decontaminated to background levels. The remaining structures were demolished and the concrete debris was disposed of as industrial waste and green field conditions restored. The Eurochemic reprocessing plant operated from 1966 to 1974 to process fuel from power reactors and research reactors. The main building is a large concrete structure, comprising a surface area of 55,000 m{sup 2}, concrete volume 12,500 m{sup 3}, and 1,500 Mg of metal components. The building is divided into multiple cells. About 106 individual cell structures have to be dismantled, involving the removal and decontamination of equipment from each cell, the decontamination of the cell walls, ceilings and floors, the dismantling of the ventilation system. Most of the work involves hands-on operations under protective clothing tailored to each specific task. Tool automation and automatic positioning systems are successfully applied. In view of the final demolition of the main process building, the main process building is divided into three parts - each part is isolated from the others. In the middle of 2008, after the removal of the NDA-IPAN/GEA installation, the eastern part will be demolished. The paper presents a status overview of the decommissioning and decontamination activities at the main process building of the former Eurochemic reprocessing plant on the nuclear site of Dessel in Belgium. The specific BELGOPROCESS approach will be highlighted, in which the decommissioning activities are carried out on an industrial scale with special emphasis on cost minimisation, the use of technology on an industrial representative scale and the specific alpha contamination of equipment and building surfaces, requiring that the decommissioning work is done with adequate protective clothing. Also specific breathing and cooling air systems have been provided to allow the operators to carry out the decommissioning tasks in acceptable working conditions. (authors)

  6. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

  7. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  8. Release and disposal of materials during decommissioning of Siemens MOX fuel fabrication plant at Hanau, Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, Werner; Baumann, Roland

    2007-07-01

    In September 2006, decommissioning and dismantling of the Siemens MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Hanau were completed. The process equipment and the fabrication buildings were completely decommissioned and dismantled. The other buildings were emptied in whole or in part, although they were not demolished. Overall, the decommissioning process produced approximately 8500 Mg of radioactive waste (including inactive matrix material); clearance measurements were also performed for approximately 5400 Mg of material covering a wide range of types. All the equipment in which nuclear fuels had been handled was disposed of as radioactive waste. The radioactive waste was conditioned on the basis of the requirements specified for the projected German final disposal site 'Schachtanlage Konrad'. During the pre-conditioning, familiar processes such as incineration, compacting and melting were used. It has been shown that on account of consistently applied activity containment (barrier concept) during operation and dismantling, there has been no significant unexpected contamination of the plant. Therefore almost all the materials that were not a priori destined for radioactive waste were released without restriction on the basis of the applicable legal regulations (chap. 29 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance), along with the buildings and the plant site. (authors)

  9. Carbon dioxide and global climate change: The birth and arrested development of an idea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, F.B.

    1996-12-31

    G.S. Callendar (1897--1964) is regarded the originator of the modern theory of carbon dioxide and global climate change. However, this paper shows that the theory was developed and became well accepted during the nineteenth century. Carbon dioxide was discovered by Black in 1752. From 1820 to 1890 a steadily growing number of measurements of its atmospheric concentration were made using steadily improving techniques; the average results fell from around 500 ppm in 1820 to about 300 ppm in 1890. By the end of the following decade the greenhouse theory of global climate change seemed widely accepted. However in 1900 and 1901 Aangstroem appeared to demolish the theory when he reported that changes in the carbon dioxide level can have little effect because of the overlap of the water and carbon dioxide spectral bands. At a stroke, all interest in the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels seemed to disappear, although during the 1920s and 1930s a few workers resumed the work but for reasons unconnected to climate change. Over the next thirty years the writers of authoritative textbooks dismissed the theory of carbon dioxide and climate change as an example of misguided speculation. Then in 1938 Callendar`s first paper appeared, reviving the theory which had lain forgotten for nearly forty years.

  10. Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) system. Final report, October 1995--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This report describes the results of Phase 2 efforts to develop a Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) System for the detection of semivolatile organic contaminants on concrete, transite, and metal surfaces. The characterization of equipment and building surfaces for the presence of contaminants as part of building decontamination and decommissioning activities is an immensely large task of concern to both government and industry. Because of the high cost of hazardous waste disposal, old, contaminated buildings cannot simply be demolished and scrapped. Contaminated and clean materials must be clearly identified and segregated so that the clean material can be recycled or reused, if possible, or disposed of more cheaply as nonhazardous waste. DOE has a number of sites requiring surface characterization. These sites are large, contain very heterogeneous patterns of contamination (requiring high sampling density), and will thus necessitate an enormous number of samples to be taken and analyzed. Characterization of building and equipment surfaces will be needed during initial investigations, during cleanup operations, and during the final confirmation process, increasing the total number of samples well beyond that needed for initial characterization. This multiplicity of information places a premium on the ability to handle and track data as efficiently as possible.

  11. Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E.

    2008-01-15

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) system and had to be imported into a GIS framework. Since the data is maintained in a different format in CAD, import into GIS involved several spatial processing steps to convert various geometric shapes present in the CAD data to self-closing polygons. The polygons represent facility footprints in plan or map view. Once these were successfully imported and converted, building identifier attributes from the CAD had to be associated with the appropriate polygons in GIS. Attributes are stored as graphical information in a CAD system and are not 'attached' to a building in a relational sense. In GIS, attributes such as building names, building area, hazards, or other descriptive information, must be associated or related to the spatial polygon representing a particular building. This spatial relationship between building polygons and the descriptive attribute information is very similar to relating tables of information in a relational database in which each table record has a unique identifier that can be used to join or relate that table to other tables of information present in the database. The CAD building identifiers were imported into the GIS and several spatial processing steps were used to associate building polygons with the correct identifiers. These spatial steps involved determining the intersection of and nearest identifiers with each building polygon in the GIS. Automating this process in GIS saved a significant amount of time. Once a current and geographically correct representation of the infrastructure data had been created in GIS, field-engineering teams collected information for each facility. This information included the building area, radiological hazards and the associated area, industrial hazards such as asbestos or mercury, structure type (e.g. hardened, industrial, nuclear), annual surveillance and monitoring cost, and other engineering data. The facility engineering data was used in a simple model to determine the rough-order-of-magnitude cost for decontaminating and demolishing each facility. Finally, the engineering and cost data was linked to the GIS model so that this data could be rapidly displayed and analyzed in its geographic context. Once the GIS representing SRS infrastructure and associated descriptive attribute information was developed, detailed maps depicting the future status of all site facilities were created. These maps display the relationship between known waste units and buildings that will be decommissioned and demolished. Cost and hazard information was also depicted illustrating areas and facilities that could present a particular demolition challenge. Although the GIS was quite helpful as an engineering and planning tool, its real power was evident in communicating the impact of the facilities disposition plan to senior management and other stakeholders.

  12. K-25 D and D Challenges - 12170

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidam, Greg [Bechtel National, Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the K-25 former gaseous diffusion plant provides lessons learned applicable to other D and D projects in the DOE Complex. The 175,000- square-meter, 1.6-kilometer-long building is contaminated with highly enriched uranium (HEU), Tc-99, trace quantities of other fission products, asbestos, PCBs, and other hazardous wastes. Safety challenges include deteriorated electrical systems, significant structural degradation, and criticality and exposure risks. The project completely revised the D and D approach after a worker fell through an operating floor and was seriously injured. For protection from deteriorated building conditions, the project reduced the number of workers in the facility, limited their hours in the building, and installed nets and barriers to protect them from falls through weakened floors and from falling material. The new plan involved removing high-risk components, removing motors and compressors, and demolishing the building from the outside with heavy equipment with most of the piping and components inside the building during demolition. The team provided temporary electrical power; reconfigured the criticality alarm system; upgraded security; performed sampling and analysis to locate and characterize HEU deposits and Tc-99; and, to establish 'criticality incredible' conditions, conducted a nondestructive assay program and injected foam into equipment and piping as a contamination fixative. (authors)

  13. Concrete Dust Suppression System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The improved technology is a water-based dust suppression system for controlling concrete dust generated by demolition equipment, in this case a demolition ram. This demonstration was performed to assess the effectiveness of this system to (1) minimize the amount of water used to suppress potentially contaminated dust, (2) focus the water spray on the dust-generating source and (3) minimize the dust cloud generated by the demolition activity. The technology successfully reduced the water required by a factor of eight compared to the traditional (baseline) method, controlled the dust generated, and permitted a reduction in the work force. The water spray can be focused at the ram point, but it is affected by wind. Prior to the use of this dust control system, dust generated by the demolition ram was controlled manually by spraying with fire hoses (the baseline technology). The improved technology is 18% less expensive than the baseline technology for the conditions and parameters of this demonstration, however, the automated system can save up to 80% versus the baseline whenever waste water treatment costs are considered. For demolishing one high-walled room and a long slab with a total of 413 m{sup 3} (14,580 ft{sup 3}) of concrete, the savings are $105,000 (waste water treatment included). The improved technology reduced the need for water consumption and treatment by about 88% which results in most of the savings.

  14. Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation2011-2014 Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom, M. S.; Fischer, M. L.; Biraud, S. C.; Billesbach, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this field campaign, we used eddy covariance towers to quantify carbon, water, and energy fluxes from a pasture and a wheat field that were converted to switchgrass. The U.S. Department of Energy is investing in switchgrass as a cellulosic bioenergy crop, but there is little data available that could be used to develop or test land surface model representations of the crop. This campaign was a collaboration between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Unfortunately, in 2011, Oklahoma had one of the most severe droughts on record, and the crop in one of the switchgrass fields experienced almost complete die-off. The crop was replanted, but subsequent drought conditions prevented its establishment. Then, in April 2012, a large tornado demolished the instruments at our site in Woodward, Oklahoma. These two events meant that we have some interesting data on land response to extreme weather; however, we were not able to collect continuous data for annual sums as originally intended. We did observe that, because of the drought, the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 was much lower in 2011 than in 2010. Concomitantly, sensible heat fluxes increased and latent heat fluxes decreased. These conditions would have large consequences for land surface forcing of convection. Data from all years were submitted to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Data Archive, and the sites were registered in AmeriFlux.

  15. Environmental geophysics of the Pilot Plant on the west branch of Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.; Benson, M.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-05-01

    Plans to demolish and remediate the Pilot Plant complex in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground have served to initiate a series of nonintrusive, environmental-geophysical studies. The studies are assisting in the location and identification of pipes, tanks, trenches, and liquid waste in the subsurface. Multiple databases have been integrated to provide support for detection of underground utilities and to determine the stratigraphy and lithology of the subsurface. The studies were conducted within the double security fence and exterior to the double fence, down gradient toward the west branch of Canal Creek. To determine if contaminants found in the creek were associated with the Pilot Plant, both the east and west banks were included in the study area. Magnetic, conductivity, inductive emf, and ground-penetrating-radar anomalies outline buried pipes, trenches, and various pieces of hardware associated with building activities. Ground-penetrating-radar imagery also defines a paleovalley cut 30 ft into Potomac Group sediments of Cretaceous age. The paleovalley crosses the site between Building E5654 and the Pilot Plant fence. The valley is environmentally significant because it may control the pathways of contaminants. The Pilot Plant complex was used to manufacture CC2 Impregnite and incapacitating agents; it also served as a production facility for nerve agents.

  16. Contamination source review for Building E1489, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billmark, K.A.; Hayes, D.C.; Draugelis, A.K.

    1995-09-01

    This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to document the results of a contamination source review of Building E1489 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) in Maryland. This report may be used to assist the U.S. Army-in planning for the future use or disposition of this building. The review included a historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, and geophysical investigation. The field investigations were performed in 1994-1995. Building E1489 located in J-Field on the Gunpowder Peninsula in APG`s Edgewood Area housed a power generator that supplied electricity to a nearby observation tower. Building E1489 and the generator were abandoned in 1974, demolished by APG personnel and removed from real estate records. A physical inspection and photographic documentation of Building E1489 were completed by ANL staff during November 1994. In 1994, ANL staff conducted geophysical surveys in the immediate vicinity of Building E1489 by using several nonintrusive methods. Survey results suggest the presence of some underground objects near Building E1489, but they do not provide conclusive evidence of the source of geophysical anomalies observed during the survey. No air monitoring was conducted at the site, and no information on underground storage tanks associated with Building E1489 was available.

  17. Decommissioning and Dismantling of Liquid Waste Storage and Liquid Waste Treatment Facility from Paldiski Nuclear Site, Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvas, M.; Putnik, H.; Johnsson, B.

    2006-07-01

    The Paldiski Nuclear Facility in Estonia, with two nuclear reactors was owned by the Soviet Navy and was used for training the navy personnel to operate submarine nuclear reactors. After collapse of Soviet Union the Facility was shut down and handed over to the Estonian government in 1995. In co-operation with the Paldiski International Expert Reference Group (PIERG) decommission strategy was worked out and started to implement. Conditioning of solid and liquid operational waste and dismantling of contaminated installations and buildings were among the key issues of the Strategy. Most of the liquid waste volume, remained at the Facility, was processed in the frames of an Estonian-Finnish co-operation project using a mobile wastewater purification unit NURES (IVO International OY) and water was discharged prior to the site take-over. In 1999-2002 ca 120 m{sup 3} of semi-liquid tank sediments (a mixture of ion exchange resins, sand filters, evaporator and flocculation slurry), remained after treatment of liquid waste were solidified in steel containers and stored into interim storage. The project was carried out under the Swedish - Estonian co-operation program on radiation protection and nuclear safety. Contaminated installations in buildings, used for treatment and storage of liquid waste (Liquid Waste Treatment Facility and Liquid Waste Storage) were then dismantled and the buildings demolished in 2001-2004. (authors)

  18. Making the transition to automation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, D.J. )

    1992-10-01

    By 1995, the Bureau of Reclamation's hydropower plant near Hungry Horse, Montana, will be remotely operated from Grand Coulee dam (about 300 miles away) in Washington State. Automation at Hungry Horse will eliminate the need for four full-time power plant operators. Between now and then, a transition plan that offers employees choices for retraining, transferring, or taking early retirement will smooth the transition in reducing from five operators to one. The transition plan also includes the use of temporary employees to offset risks of reducing staff too soon. When completed in 1953, the Hungry Horse structure was the world's fourth largest and fourth highest concrete dam. The arch-gravity structure has a crest length of 2,115 feet; it is 3,565 feet above sea level. The four turbine-generator units in the powerhouse total 284 MW, and supply approximately 1 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity annually to the federal power grid managed by the Bonneville Power Administration. In 1988, Reclamation began to automate operations at many of its hydro plants, and to establish centralized control points. The control center concept will increase efficiency. It also will coordinate water movements and power supply throughout the West. In the Pacific Northwest, the Grand Coulee and Black Canyon plants are automated control centers. Several Reclamation-owned facilities in the Columbia River Basin, including Hungry Horse, will be connected to these centers via microwave and telephone lines. When automation is complete, constant monitoring by computer will replace hourly manual readings and equipment checks. Computers also are expected to increase water use efficiency by 1 to 2 percent by ensuring operation for maximum turbine efficiency. Unit efficiency curves for various heads will be programmed into the system.

  19. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

  20. Regeneration of kaolin mined lands to maximize loblolly pine growth and wildlife habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEvoy, K.E.; Morris, L.A.; Hendrick, R.L.; Ogden, E.A.

    1999-07-01

    Compliance with the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 and Georgia Surface Mining Act of 1968 requires that land equal in area to each year's disturbance by reclaimed and a vegetative cover established. Approximately 60% of kaolin mined areas are reclaimed to pine forest. Current methods of reclamation after grading involve fertilization, seeding with a cover crop of grass and legumes, followed by planting of tree seedlings. Restrictive soil physical conditions, a lack of organic matter and nutrients, and competition by cover crop species can reduce survival and growth of loblolly pine seedlings. Also, current cover crop species have only marginal value for wildlife. In this research, the authors evaluated alternative methods of reforestation that (1) control erosion while providing greater benefits for wildlife and reduced competition with loblolly pine seedlings, (2) ameliorate adverse soil physical conditions through deeper tillage (subsoiling vs. disk harrowing), and (3) improve spoil fertility and structure by application of a composted paper mill by-product. Results from field trials indicate control of erosion by wildlife grasses is comparable to seed mixtures currently used in the industry. Subsoiling and disking both had ameliorative effects on soil physical properties with seedling survival at 92% and 88% respectively, compared to 45% of the surrounding area. Composted paper mill by-product served as an additional source of organic matter, nutrients, and protective mulch, thereby enhancing seedling growth as well as ameliorating pine seedlings mulched with the paper mill compost was greater than twice the size of seedlings grown under current reclamation practices.

  1. Factors affecting the failure of copper connectors brazed to copper bus bar segments on a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator at Grand Coulee Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atteridge, D.G.; Klein, R.F.; Layne, R.; Anderson, W.E.; Correy, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    On March 21, 1986, the United States Bureau of Reclamation experienced a ground fault in the main parallel ring assembly of Unit G19 - a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator - at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington. Inspection of the unit revealed that the ground fault had been induced by fracture of one or more of the copper connectors used to join adjacent segments of one of the bus bars in the north half of the assembly. Various experimental techniques were used to detect and determine the presence of cracks, crack morphology, corrosion products, and material microstructure and/or embrittlement. The results of these inspections and recommendations are given. 7 refs., 27 figs.

  2. Integrated automation of the New Waddell Dam performance data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, L.R.; Fields, P.E.

    1999-07-01

    New Waddell Dam, a key feature of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Central Arizona Project, had elements of its dam safety data acquisition system incorporated into the design and construction. The instrumentation array is a reflection of the dam's large size and foundation complexity. Much of the instrumentation is automated. This automation was accomplished while maintaining independent communication connections to major divisions of the instrument array. Fiber optic cables are used to provide high Quality data, free from voltage surges that could originate in a nearby powerplant switchyard or from lightning. The system has been working well but there are concerns with a lack of continued equipment manufacturer support.

  3. EA-2022: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Reclamation (Montana Area Office), with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Upper Great Plains Region) as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to develop a 9.4 megawatt hydroelectric project at the existing Helena Valley Pumping Plant site at Canyon Ferry Dam on the Missouri River near Helena, Montana. The new hydropower generator would interconnect to Western’s transmission system at an existing transmission line originating at Canyon Ferry Dam.

  4. H. R. 5162: a bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1987, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, July 15, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The bill assigns monetary levels to appropriations for energy and water development projects for fiscal year 1987. Title I deals with the civilian activities of the Corps of Engineers concerning rivers and harbors, flood control, beach erosion, and related purposes. Title II covers the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation, and Title III covers activities of DOE. Separate sections of Title III deal with energy supply, research, and development and with power marketing administrations. Title IV addresses independent agencies, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The final Title covers general provisions and exclusions from funding.

  5. EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS/Environmental Impact Report was prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region) and the Contra Costa Water District to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enlarge the existing Los Vaqueros Reservoir in Contra Costa County, California. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Western) was a cooperating agency because it has jurisdiction over transmission facilities that were expected to be relocated under the proposed action. Based on project changes, however, Western has no action and therefore will not adopt the EIS or issue a ROD.

  6. EIS-0479: North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage Project; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Reclamation and California Department of Water Resources are jointly preparing an environmental impact statement/environmental impact report (EIS/EIR) for the proposed North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage (NODOS) project, pursuant to the CALFED Bay-Delta Program Programmatic EIS/EIR Record of Decision. The NODOS EIS/EIR will evaluate potential environmental impacts of offstream surface water storage projects in the upper Sacramento River Basin. If the project is implemented, DOE’s Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency, could provide power to project facilities and could market hydropower generated by the project.

  7. Firefighting and fire prevention: Facilities instructions, standards and techniques. Volume 5-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, H.E.

    1992-02-01

    The operation and maintenance personnel around a powerplant, pumping plant, or other Reclamation establishment are not presumed to be firefighters, but occasionally their duties may make it necessary for them to fight fires. The purpose of this volume is to supply them with fundamental facts which may prove valuable in such an emergency and acquaint them with the use, care, and testing of firefighting equipment. It is assumed that operation and maintenance personnel are familiar with the common safety practices in connection with fire prevention and general safety around electrical equipment. This volume is designed to help improve the work along these lines.

  8. Extracellular bioreduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chidambaram, Devicharan; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2012-04-17

    A method for processing environmental or industrial samples to remove, reclaim or otherwise reduce the level of chemical species present in the sample that act as redox active species. The redox active species is kept in a waste chamber and is separated from an aqueous bacterial culture that is held in a culture chamber. The waste chamber and the culture chamber are separated by a porous membrane through which electron transfer can occur but through which the aqueous bacterial culture cannot pass. The redox active species substantially remains in the waste chamber and is in non-contact with the aqueous bacterial culture during the process of removal, reduction or reclamation.

  9. President Obama Signs Two Bills to Boost Small Hydropower Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy President Obama Signs Two Bills to Boost Small Hydropower Projects President Obama Signs Two Bills to Boost Small Hydropower Projects August 14, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis President Obama on August 9 signed into law two bills aimed at boosting development of small U.S. hydropower projects. The bills, H.R. 267, the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act, and H.R. 678, the Bureau of Reclamation Small Conduit Hydropower Development and Rural Jobs Act, are expected to help unlock

  10. Cleaning Up the Hanford River Corridor and Improving Site Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doug Shoop, Deputy Manager April 13, 2016 2 3 Continue Cleanup of the Central Plateau * Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) - Completed last glove box (HA-9A) - Re-sequenced high-hazard work at PFP to focus on one project at a time using "Level B" suits - Grouted Plutonium Reclamation Facility canyon floor, began decontaminating walls Glove box HA-9A before (left) and after (right) Vacuuming "strongbacks" (left) and painting canyon floor (right) 4 K Basin Sludge Transfer * All

  11. EA-1948: Gila-North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project, Yuma County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Western) prepared this EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild and upgrade two parallel 4.8-mile transmission lines between the Gila and North Gila Substations and take actions in support of portions of Arizona Public Service’s construction of a new, 12.8 mile 230-kV transmission line between North Gila and a proposed substation in Yuma County, Arizona. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are cooperating agencies.

  12. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY09 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2009-10-22

    This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2009 (FY09) for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps or USACE], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS).

  13. QER- Comment of Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As SMUD is the largest preference power customer of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) we purchase a substantial amount of electric energy from Western and we are very concerned about the rising costs. Specifically, we have concerns and question regarding the restoration programs on the Central Valley Project that are administered by the United States Bureau of Reclamation. SMUD would like to respectfully request that a review be conducted to address the current sharing of Restoration Fund Charges between Power and Water Customers of the Central Valley Project.

  14. CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.K. Shukla; R. Lal

    2005-04-01

    Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOM in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 2003 (R03-G), in 1973 (R73-F), in 1969 (R69-G), in 1962 (R62-G and R62-F) and in 1957 (R57-F). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and the three under forest cover since reclamation. Three bulk soil samples were collected from each site from three landscape positions (upper; middle, and lower) for 0-15 and 15-30 cm depths. The samples were air dried and using wet sieving technique were fractionated into macro (> 2mm), meso (2-0.25 mm) and microaggregate (0.25-0.053 mm). These fractions were weighted separately and water stable aggregation (WSA) and geometric mean (GMD) and mean weight (MWD) diameters of aggregates were obtained. The soil C and N concentrations were also determined on these aggregate fractions. Analysis of mean values showed that in general, WSA and MWD of aggregates increased with increasing duration since reclamation or age of reclaimed soil for all three landscape positions and two depths in sites under continuous grass. The forest sites were relatively older than grass sites and therefore WSA or MWD of aggregates did not show any increases with age since reclamation. The lower WSA in R57-F site than R73-F clearly showed the effect of soil erosion on aggregate stability. Higher aggregation and aggregate diameters in R73-F than R62-F and R57-F also showed the importance of reclamation with topsoil application on improving soil structure. Soil C and N concentrations were lowest for the site reclaimed in year 2003 in each aggregate fraction for both depths. The higher C and N concentrations each aggregate size fraction in older sites than the newly reclaimed site demonstrated the sequestration potential of younger sites.

  15. Issues relating to overlapping Federal and state responsibilities for the oversight of the Surface Mining Law. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 26, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The hearing was called regarding the responsibilities of the state and Federal government in administering the Federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. With mining taking place in 27 states under a variety of conditions and practices, the Act encourages the states to assume primacy responsibility for regulating coal mining. Once a state's plan is approved, the Federal role becomes one of oversight. This hearing examines Pennsylvania's programs and what happens when there is a disagreement between state and Federal authorities. Testimony is presented from 12 witnesses, representing coal companies, electric power companies, Sierra Club, National Wildlife Federation, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, and West Virginia.

  16. Acid mine drainage: Balancing environmental protection and mining realities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgill, B.J. Jr.; Poland, K.B.

    1995-12-31

    A major environmental concern leading to the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) was the degradation of streams and waterways from discharges of acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from coal mining operations. Although SMCRA and its regulatory scheme contains specific provisions addressing the drainage of acidic water from mine sites, as do various other agencies statutes and regulations, AMD from active and abandoned mines remains a major environmental problem in the Appalachian region. The formation of acidic water during coal mining operations is pervasive and some believe impossible to prevent.

  17. Are surface coal mine sediment ponds working

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poe, M.L.; Betson, R.P.

    1985-12-09

    Flowrates and storm generated water quality data were collected at sedimentation ponds on four surface mines in the states of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and West Virginia. The water quality data were analyzed for suspended solids and settleable solids content, and particle size distribution. The results were compared to the effluent limitations guidelines for total suspended solids as promulgated under the Clean Water Act for Coal Mining Point Source Category and adopted under the Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 and the resulting state regulatory programs. 3 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  18. Environmental regulation of coal mining, SMCRA`s second decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElfish, J.M.; Beier, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This controversial book examines environmental regulation of coal mining in the United States over the 1979-1989 period. The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) established federal regulation of the environmental effects of coal mining. The permanent regulatory program implementing SMCRA was initiated in 1979. This book looks at the first ten years of SMCRA, seeking to draw lessons from experience that will improve regulation, so that the objectives of the law may be achieved in SMCRA`s second decade.

  19. H. R. 3052: This Act may be cited as the Coal Field Water Protection and Replacement Act, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the protection of water resources during coal mining operations. Sections of the bill describe probable hydrologic consequences; surface and ground water monitoring plan; performance bonds; protection of water resources for permit approval; effect of underground coal mining operations; inspection and monitoring; penalty for failure of representative of Secretary or state regulatory authority to carry out certain duties; release of performance bond; water rights and replacement; regulations; and state programs.

  20. Mineral planning in Great Britain and its relevance to the American mining industry. Final report, 1 December 1980-31 May 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saperstein, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    In the United States, approval of surface coal mine permits became more complex with the imposition of certain additional and relatively untested requirements by the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Sections of the Act contain substantial pre-mining land-use planning requirements. The British system has been chosen for comparative study. All mining permits are granted in Great Britain within an overall land-use planning system. The British planning system is summarized with emphasis placed on minerals. Although planning systems are a well-described subject, little documentation addresses the special problems of mining companies. The first study helps to fill this gap.

  1. Surface mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This paper reports on a GAO study of attorney and expert witness fees awarded as a result of litigation brought under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. As of March 24, 1989, a total of about $1.4 million had been awarded in attorney fees and expenses - about $1.3 subject to the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, a comparison of its features with provisions of ERISA showed that the plan differed from ERISA provisions in areas such as eligibility, funding, and contribution limits.

  2. Regulating for the long term: SMCRA and acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    With the passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), regulators and industry representatives expected to solve the problem of pollution of the Nation`s waterways caused by acidic discharges from coal mines. Eighteen years after the passage of SMCRA, hard issues of predicting, regulating and treating acid mine drainage remain. Acid mine drainage is most common in the coal seams of the Midwest and Appalachia: Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Illinois, and Tennessee. This article discusses regulation of coal mines and acid mine drainage for the long term.

  3. Acid mine drainage: Common law, SMCRA, and the Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrich, C.

    1995-12-31

    Acid mine drainage is a major problem related to coal mining which, if unabated, can severely damage the aquatic environment. Damage resulting from acid mine drainage was first addressed by common law and riparian principles. As societal laws changed, common law principles alone could not effectively control this problem. Preventing and controlling pollution including acid mine drainage are important goals of the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act (SMCRA) and the Clean Water Act (CWA). This article examines how common law, SMCRA, and the CWA address the acid mine drainage issue independently, and how improvements in the control of acid mine drainage can be achieved.

  4. State of Illinois 1982 annual coal, oil and gas report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This data compilation contains statistics from the coal industry and petroleum industry of Illinois. Data are given on the production, accidents, explosives, and mechanization of coal mines. Metal mines are only briefly described. The report from the Division of Oil and Gas contains data on oil well completions, oil wells plugged, water input wells, and salt water and waste disposal wells. The results of hearings in the division are included. The Land Reclamation Division reports data on permits and acreage affected by surface mining of coal, limestone, shale, clay, sand, and gravel. 2 figures, 76 tables.

  5. Mitigation of Hexavalent Chromium in Storm Water Resulting from Demolition of Large Concrete Structure at the East Tennessee Technology Park - 12286

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britto, Ronnie; Brown, Bridget; Hale, Timothy B.; Hensley, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert T.; Patel, Madhu; Emery, Jerry A.; Gaston, Clyde; Queen, David C.

    2012-07-01

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding was provided to supplement the environmental management program at several DOE sites, including the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Demolition of the ETTP K-33 Building, the largest building to be demolished to date in Oak Ridge, was awarded to LSRS in FY-2010 under the ARRA program. The K-33 building was an 82 foot tall 2-story structure covering approximately 32 acres. Once this massive building was brought down to the ground, the debris was segregated and consolidated into piles of concrete rubble and steel across the remaining pad. The process of demolishing the building, tracking across concrete debris with heavy equipment, and stockpiling the concrete rubble caused it to become pulverized. During and after storm events, hexavalent chromium leached from the residual cement present in the large quantities of concrete. Storm water control measures were present to preclude migration of contaminants off-site, but these control measures were not designed to control hexavalent chromium dissolved in storm water from reaching nearby receiving water. The following was implemented to mitigate hexavalent chromium in storm water: - Steel wool was distributed around K-33 site catch basins and in water pools as an initial step in addressing hexavalent chromium. - Since the piles of concrete were too massive and unsafe to tarp, they were placed into windrows in an effort to reduce total surface area. - A Hach colorimetric field meter was acquired by the K-33 project to provide realtime results of hexavalent chromium in site surface water. - Three hexavalent chromium treatment systems were installed at three separate catch basins that receive integrated storm water flow from the K-33 site. Sodium bisulfite is being used as a reducing agent for the immobilization of hexavalent chromium while also assisting in lowering pH. Concentrations initially were 310 - 474 ppb of hexavalent chromium in surface water at the out-falls that discharge to nearby receiving water. After implementation of the actions described above, concentrations of hexavalent chromium have been effectively reduced to less than 25 ppb at the out-falls. The LSRS team completed demolition of K-33 five months ahead of schedule, and debris removal was completed three months ahead of schedule. A total of 164,000 tons of steel and concrete from the building demolition, accounting for 13,000 shipments, were disposed to the EMWMF. Because of the high toxicity of hexavalent chromium at low concentrations, hexavalent chromium had to be controlled at ppb levels. Hexavalent chromium contaminant concentrations were successfully reduced by over 90% in surface water discharged from the K-33 demolition site into nearby receiving water. Initial efforts of wind-rowing debris piles and obtaining real-time hexavalent chromium measurements to focus initiatives coupled with placement of steel wool in pools or catch basins had some effectiveness. More significant reductions were obtained as the debris piles were removed/disposed in EMWMF, and treatment of surface water with sodium bisulfite in integrated manholes occurred. (authors)

  6. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  7. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The presence of contaminated uranium mill tailings adjacent to the city of Gunnison has been a local concern for many years. The following issues were identified during public meetings that were held by the DOE prior to distribution of an earlier version of this EA. Many of these issues will require mitigation. Groundwater contamination; in December 1989, a herd of 105 antelope were introduced in an area that includes the Landfill disposal site. There is concern that remedial action-related traffic in the area would result in antelope mortality. The proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road may restrict antelope access to their water supply; a second wildlife issue concerns the potential reduction in sage grouse use of breeding grounds (leks) and nesting habitat; the proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road would cross areas designated as wetlands by US Army Corps of Engineers (COE); the proposed disposal site is currently used for grazing by cattle six weeks a year in the spring. Additional concerns were stated in comments on a previous version of this EA. The proposed action is to consolidate and remove all contaminated materials associated with the Gunnison processing site to the Landfill disposal site six air miles east of Gunnison. All structures on the site (e.g., water tower, office buildings) were demolished in 1991. The debris is being stored on the site until it can be incorporated into the disposal cell at the disposal site. All contaminated materials would be trucked to the Landfill disposal site on a to-be-constructed haul road that crosses BLM-administered land.

  8. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  9. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  10. History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980`s. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history.

  11. UPDATE HANFORD SITE D & D PROGRAMS ACCELERATE EXPAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-04-22

    A large, new decontamination and decommissioning organization targeted toward rapid, focused work on aging and highly contaminated structures was formed at the DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington state in autumn 2003. Managed by prime contractor Fluor Hanford, the new organization has made significant progress during its first six months. Under the direction of Mike Lackey, who recently joined Fluor from the Portland General Electric Trojan Plant, the Fluor Hanford D&D organization is tackling the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and is nearly finished demolishing the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility. In addition, the D&D organization is progressing through the development and public comment phases of its required environmental permitting, planning work and procurement services to D&D three other Hanford facilities: 224-T and 224-B Plutonium Concentration Facilities, and the U Plant radiochemical processing facility. It is also planning and beginning to D&D the spent fuel handling areas of the Site's 100-K Reactor Area. The 586-square mile Hanford Site, the oldest plutonium production center in the world, served as the ''workhorse'' of the American nuclear defense arsenal from 1944 through 1989. Hanford produced the special nuclear material for the plutonium cores of the Trinity (test) and Nagasaki explosions, and then went on to produce more than half of the weapons plutonium ever manufactured by the United States, and about one-fourth of that manufactured worldwide. As a result, Hanford, the top-secret ''Paul Bunyan'' in the desert, is one of the most contaminated areas in the world. Its cleanup agreement with state and federal regulators, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement,'' celebrates its 15th anniversary this spring, at a time when operations dealing with unstable plutonium leftovers, corroded spent fuel, and liquids wastes in single-shelled tanks conclude. As these crucial jobs are coming to an end, D&D has gained traction as a central Site mission.

  12. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

    2000-01-12

    Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

  13. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  14. Agricultural, industrial and municipal waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    It is right that consideration of the environment is of prime importance when agricultural and industrial processes are being developed. This book compiles the papers presented at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers conference. The contents include: The use of wastes for land reclamation and restoration; landfill, an environmentally acceptable method of waste disposal and an economic source of energy; control of leachate from waste disposal landfill sites using bentonite; landfill gas migration from operational landfill sites, monitoring and prevention; monitoring of emissions from hazardous waste incineration; hazardous wastes management in Hong Kong, a summary of a report and recommendations; the techniques and problems of chemical analysis of waste waters and leachate from waste tips; a small scale waste burning combustor; energy recovery from municipal waste by incineration; anaerobic treatment of industrial waste; a review of developments in the acid hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes; reduction of slag deposits by magnesium hydroxide injection; integrated rural energy centres (for agriculture-based economies); resource recovery; straw as a fuel in the UK; the computer as a tool for predicting the financial implications of future municipal waste disposal and recycling projects; solid wastes as a cement kiln fuel; monitoring and control of landfill gas; the utilization of waste derived fuels; the economics of energy recovery from municipal and industrial wastes; the development and construction of a municipal waste reclamation plant by a local authority.

  15. Old-field plant succession on the Pajarito Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxx, T.; Mullen, M.; Salisbury, M.; Tierney, G.

    1997-10-01

    Eight fallow historic fields of the ponderosa pine and pinon-juniper cover types were surveyed to determine species composition and distribution. The purpose of the study was to understand plant succession on old fields as related to mechanically manipulated sites such as material disposal areas (MDAs). Additionally, the authors wanted a listing of species on disturbed lands of the Pajarito Plateau to aide in the reclamation planning of MDAs using native species. They also wanted to determine if any species could be used as an indicator of disturbance. The eight historic fields were all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, and had been abandoned in 1943. Two sites were within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory and were studied both in 1982 and 1993. The study provides a description of each of the field sites, historic information about the homesteads from patent applications, a photographic record of some of the sites, and a listing of species found within each field. The study showed that there were 78 different plant species found on disturbed sites. Of these 78 species, 23 were found to be dominant on one or more of the MDAs or old fields. Although, the disturbance history of each site is imperfectly known, the study does provide an indication of successional processes within disturbed sites of the Pajarito Plateau. Additionally, it provides a listing of species that will invade disturbed sites, species that may be used in site reclamation.

  16. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  17. Stand characteristics and productivity potential of Indiana surface mines reclaimed under SMCRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groninger, J.W.; Fillmore, S.D.; Rathfon, R.A.

    2006-06-15

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) addresses a wide range of environmental concerns. However, its impacts on forest stand development and productive potential have only recently been investigated. We surveyed the vegetation and forest productivity on 22 surface mine sites throughout the coal-bearing region of Indiana that were reclaimed to forest cover under the provisions of SMCRA 7-14 years prior to sampling. Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) and green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) were the most widely occurring tree species. Tall fescue and goldenrod were the most widely occurring nonarborescent species. Median site index (base age 50 for black oak) was 30 ft. Although satisfying forest cover stocking requirements for bond release, these reclaimed surface mines almost always displayed a level of productivity far below those of native forests typical of this region. Reclamation techniques differing from those used on these study sites are needed to restore forest productivity to surface-mined lands while still complying with SMCRA.

  18. Concepts and criteria for evaluating topsoil substitutes: The Texas experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askenasy, P.; Senkayi, A.L.; Joseph, W.L.

    1997-12-31

    Presented in this paper are: (1) historical background, (2) Federal and State regulatory basis and authority, and (3) justification for selected criteria and parameters which are currently used to evaluate the quality of topsoil-substitute materials and postmine soils in Texas. The specific parameters and concepts discussed include (1) acid- and toxic-forming materials (AFM and TFM), (2) quantification procedures for AFM and TFM, (3) procedures used to identify topsoil substitutes that are {open_quotes}equal to or more suitable than{close_quotes} existing premine native soils, and (4) current interpretations of what is meant by {open_quotes}the best available material to support revegetation{close_quotes} of surface-mined areas. To support these interpretations, reference is made throughout the paper to relevant sections of the (1) Texas Coal Mining Regulations (TCMR), (2) Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA), and (3) Federal regulations promulgated by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) to implement SMCRA. The success of the Texas reclamation program, as indicated by the quality of the reclaimed soils is also discussed. This success is partly attributed to the rigorous application of the quantification concepts and parameters discussed in this paper.

  19. Cost impact of discretionary alternatives. OSM Permanent Regulations 30 CFR, Chapter 7. Volume 1. Executive Summary and methodology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-11

    The report was prepared by D'Appolonia Consulting Engineers, Inc. (D'Appolonia) for the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM) to assess the probable impacts on coal production costs of numerous discretionary issues involved in drafting the permanent regulations for implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (the Act). The results of the engineering cost study were used directly in OSM's Regulatory Analysis (RA) developed in compliance with Executive Order 12044. The final RA was published in March 1979 and is available from the OSM. The report details those analyses conducted by D'Appolonia and used in the RA. The results of the study are not meant to reflect the complete cost or economic impact of the Act or the resulting OSM regulations. The results do provide a basis for evaluating the relative impact of the various alternatives considered by OSM during development of the permanent regulatory program. The discretionary issues analyzed in the report pertain to both surface and underground mining activities. The volume presents the general methods of approach and final results of the study, while Volumes II and III present the individual analyses of each issue for surface and underground mines, respectively.

  20. Cumulative hydrologic impact assessments on surface-water in northeastern Wyoming using HEC-1; a pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.J.; Eastwood, D.C.; Anderson, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 requires that areas in which multiple mines will affect one watershed be analyzed and the cumulative impacts of all mining on the watershed be assessed. The purpose of the subject study was to conduct a cumulative hydrologic impact assessment (CHIA) for surface-water on a watershed in northeastern Wyoming that is currently being impacted by three mines. An assessment of the mining impact`s affect on the total discharge of the watershed is required to determine whether or not material damage to downstream water rights is likely to occur as a result of surface mining and reclamation. The surface-water model HEC-1 was used to model four separate rainfall-runoff events that occurred in the study basin over three years (1978-1980). Although these storms were used to represent pre-mining conditions, they occurred during the early stages of mining and the models were adjusted accordingly. The events were selected for completeness of record and antecedent moisture conditions (AMC). Models were calibrated to the study events and model inputs were altered to reflect post-mining conditions. The same events were then analyzed with the new model inputs. The results were compared with the pre-mining calibration. Peak flow, total discharge and timing of flows were compared for pre-mining and post-mining models. Data were turned over to the State of Wyoming for assessment of whether material damage to downstream water rights is likely to occur.

  1. Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining should more fully recover or eliminate its costs of regulating coal mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-28

    The Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM) is spending about $65 million annually to implement regulatory program requirements of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The act requires the regulatory authority, whether OSM or that of a state with an OSM-approved program, to charge fees to mining operators for reviewing, enforcing, and administering coal mine operating permits and authorizes that the amount of such fees can fully recover costs. The OSM and states assess certain fees, but the fees recover only a small portion of their program costs. GAO found that if OSM and states fully recovered their regulatory costs, OSM could save over $50 million a year and the impact on coal demand and production would be minimal. GAO recommends that the Secretary of the Interior collect fees that fully recover OSM's regulatory costs, phase out or substantially reduce financial assistance to states, and encourage states to fully recover their own costs.

  2. Small surface coal mine operators handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tourbier, J.T.; Westmacott, R.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to interpret the Regulations of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-87) (hereafter referred to as the Act) as they affect the operators of small surface coal mines. Further, the purpose of this handbook is to make it easier for the small operator to compare his operation with the act in order to determine compliance with the regulations. Part 795 of the Regulations deals specifically with the Small Operator Assistance Program. This program relieves the operator of the cost of carrying out certain hydrologic and geologic analyses required by the Regulations. The emphasis of this handbook is on the protection of water resources during mining and reclamation operations. As almost all the operations in surface mining directly or indirectly affect water the authors have included some operations which may only marginally affect water quality or hydrology. Anthracite mining, lignite mining, coal processing, refuse disposal, and slurry disposal are not covered in this handbook.

  3. Revised financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center

    2011-01-11

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western whileothers resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $23 million.

  4. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-04-21

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a ''without experiments'' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were $11.9 million.

  5. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2011-08-22

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

  6. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

  7. Precision welding cuts downtime at Grand Coulee Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Light, S.; White, E.

    1997-03-01

    The three large 700-MW generators at Grand Coulee Dam--originally built and installed by Canadian General Electric in the late 1970s--are being upgraded using precision welding techniques and leading edge installation technology. These generators suffered from numerous water leaks at and around the bar water connections, resulting in a significant number of forced repair outages that were increasing in frequency. The US Bureau of Reclamation, in conjunction with the Bonneville Power Administration, decided to overhaul these machines. The design from Siemens Power Corp. provided state-of-the-art materials and included a rating increase from 700 to 805 MW, which would make these three machines the highest output single-unit hydrogenerators in the world. The upgrade was to be accomplished with only the replacement of the stator components; there would be no changes to the rotating element. The cost for all three machines is approximately $27.5 million. This project is described in this paper.

  8. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-09-01

    This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

  9. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on air quality and noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, K.C.; Chang, Y.S.; Rabchuk, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Western Area Power Administration, which is responsible for marketing electricity produced at the hydroelectric power-generating facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation on the Upper Colorado River, has proposed changes in the levels of its commitment (sales) of long-term firm capacity and energy to its customers. This report describes (1) the existing conditions of air resources (climate and meteorology, ambient air quality, and acoustic environment) of the region potentially affected by the proposed action and (2) the methodology used and the results of analyses conducted to assess the potential impacts on air resources of the proposed action and the commitment-level alternatives. Analyses were performed for the potential impacts of both commitment-level alternatives and supply options, which include combinations of electric power purchases and different operational scenarios of the hydroelectric power-generating facilities.

  10. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Wei, Yaxing; Kao, Shih-Chieh

    2012-04-01

    fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

  11. Energy and Water Development Appropriation Bill, 1985. Report submitted by the Committee on Appropriations U. S. Senate, to the Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, June 5, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Committee report on H.R. 5653 includes suggested amendments and information on the recommended changes in energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1985. Title I of the bill supplies funds for civilian projects of the Army Corps of Engineers; Title II, for reclamation projects of the Department of the Interior; Title III, for DOE defense, research, regulatory, geothermal, nuclear waste, power marketing, and uranium supply and enrichment activities; and Title IV, for independent agencies, including the Appalachian Regional Commission, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The committee's recommendation of nearly $15.4 billion is $99.6 million below the budget estimates. The report covers information gathered during 17 hearing sessions, and represents a unanimous recommmendation by the committee.

  12. H. R. 2959: a bill to amend making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1986, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, July 10, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The fiscal year 1986 appropriations bill for energy and water development covers projects of the Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of the Interior (DOI), the Department of Energy, and independent agencies. Title I funds the civilian work on rivers and harbors and for the control of floods and beach erosion performed under the Department of Defense, while Title II funds the Bureau of Reclamation and emergency funds used by DOI. Title III funds DOE activities in energy supply, research, and development, which includes uranium supply and enrichment, nuclear waste disposal, and atomic energy defense activities. It also covers the power marketing administrations, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and loan guarantee programs for geothermal and other energy development.

  13. H. R. 5162: an act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 197, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, July 25, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The appropriations cited in this bill use funds in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated for energy and water development programs during fiscal year 1987. The funds are to be available to the Corps of Engineers for projects involving rivers and harbors, flood control beach erosion, and other related purposes. The bill allocates funds for specific projects in each category. Title II allocates funds for the administration and operation of the Bureau of Reclamation and for emergency and special funds. Title II allocates funds for DOE activities in the purchase, construction, and acquisition of plant and capital equipment and other expenses associated with research and development of energy supply and power marketing. Title IV covers independent agencies, including the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Valley Authority.

  14. Management of sewage sludge and ash containing radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmaier, J. T.; Aiello, K.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J.-J.; Chiu, W. A.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhart, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A. B.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Yu, C.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Environmental Science Division; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. EPA; N.J. Dept of Environmental Protection; NRC

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 50% of the seven to eight million metric tonnes of municipal sewage sludge produced annually in the US is reused. Beneficial uses of sewage sludge include agricultural land application, land reclamation, forestry, and various commercial applications. Excessive levels of contaminants, however, can limit the potential usefulness of land-applied sewage sludge. A recently completed study by a federal inter-agency committee has identified radioactive contaminants that could interfere with the safe reuse of sewage sludge. The study found that typical levels of radioactive materials in most municipal sewage sludge and incinerator ash do not present a health hazard to sewage treatment plant workers or to the general public. The inter-agency committee has developed recommendations for operators of sewage treatment plants for evaluating measured or estimated levels of radioactive material in sewage sludge and for determining whether actions to reduce potential exposures are appropriate.

  15. A decision analysis method for selection of waste minimization process options for TRU mixed material at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.E.; Dustin, D.F.

    1994-02-01

    When plutonium production operations were halted at the Rocky Flats Plant, there remained a volume of material that was retained in order that its plutonium content could be reclaimed. This material, known as residue, is transuranic and mixed transuranic material with a plutonium content above what was called the ``economic discard limit,`` or EDL. The EDL was defined in terms of each type of residue material, and each type of material is given an Item Description Code, or IDC. Residue IDCs have been grouped into general category descriptions which include plutonium (Pu) nitrate solutions, Pu chloride solutions, salts, ash, metal, filters, combustibles, graphite, crucibles, glass, resins, gloves, firebrick, and sludges. Similar material exists both below and above the EDL, with material with the (previous) economic potential for reclamation of plutonium classified as residue.

  16. Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

    1985-02-01

    A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

  17. Health assessment for Seymour Recycling Corporation, Seymour, Indiana, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IND040313017. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-02

    The Seymour Recycling Corporation site (number 57 on the National Priorities List) is located approximately two miles southwest of Seymour, Indiana. From the very early 1970s to 1980, the site was operated as a processing center for waste chemicals. Distillation was the major method of product reclamation with as many as 11 columns operating simultaneously. Overall environmental monitoring has identified more than 70 contaminants on-site within soil and aquifer samples. The shallow and deep aquifers exhibit both on-site and off-site contamination. The existence of the surface clay cap and fencing to restrict access has removed direct contact as an exposure route for remaining on-site contaminants. The existence of the surface cap should also be preventing contaminant-laden dust from moving off-site.

  18. A jewel in the desert: BHP Billiton's San Juan underground mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-12-15

    The Navajo Nation is America's largest native American tribe by population and acreage, and is blessed with large tracks of good coal deposits. BHP Billiton's New Mexico Coal Co. is the largest in the Navajo regeneration area. The holdings comprise the San Juan underground mine, the La Plata surface mine, now in reclamation, and the expanding Navajo surface mine. The article recounts the recent history of the mines. It stresses the emphasis on sensitivity to and helping to sustain tribal culture, and also on safety. San Juan's longwall system is unique to the nation. It started up as an automated system from the outset. Problems caused by hydrogen sulfide are being tackled. San Juan has a bleederless ventilation system to minimise the risk of spontaneous combustion of methane and the atmospheric conditions in the mine are heavily monitored, especially within the gob areas. 3 photos.

  19. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

  20. Characterization of seven United States coal regions. The development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimer, R.L.; Adams, M.A.; Jurich, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    This report characterizes seven United State coal regions in the Northern Great Plains, Rocky Mountain, Interior, and Gulf Coast coal provinces. Descriptions include those of the Fort Union, Powder River, Green River, Four Corners, Lower Missouri, Illinois Basin, and Texas Gulf coal resource regions. The resource characterizations describe geologic, geographic, hydrologic, environmental and climatological conditions of each region, coal ranks and qualities, extent of reserves, reclamation requirements, and current mining activities. The report was compiled as a basis for the development of hypothetical coal mining situations for comparison of conventional and terrace pit surface mining methods, under contract to the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023, entitled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.