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1

Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirectLowDiscussion-4,611,201.00fiscal reform (EFR)

2

Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site February 22, 2011 - 5:44pm Addthis The stacks and support structures of the 284 West Power House at the...

3

LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs & GraduatesReducingLANL Demolishes First

4

Land Reclamation and the Resource Extraction Reclamation Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Environmental Protection's Mining Program is responsible for enacting and implementing regulations pertaining to land reclamation. The program primarily focuses on the reclamation...

5

Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Reclamation Division of the Public Service Commission is tasked with administering the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation. Specific regulations can be found in article 69-05.2 of...

6

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act authorizes the state to develop, adopt, issue and amend rules and regulations pertaining to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. These...

7

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Fossil-fuel Combustion By-products. Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation...

8

Rocky Flats 10 year plan: over 500 structures to be demolished  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has prepared a Ten Year Plan (Plan) that demonstrates how the Site would achieve accelerated cleanup and rapidly reduce the risks the Site currently poses to its workers, the public, and the environment. A major element of the Plan is the decontamination and demolition of over 500 Site facilities, including all of the former nuclear production facilities, by the end of 2006. Facilities used for the storage of plutonium, treatment of low-level mixed waste, and several office building would remain until the plutonium is removed or there is no longer a need for the facility, in which case it would be demolished. While the Plan considers all aspects of the cleanup and closure, this paper focuses on the challenges posed by the removal of highly contaminated equipment and the demolition of structures. This paper describes near- term decommissioning projects as well as the long range plans and budgets. Cash flow ultimately controls schedule, and sharing of budget priorities among processing of special nuclear material, disposing of waste, and cleaning up the environment has to be juggled carefully to attain the goals of the Plan. The total cost of the Plan exceeds $5 billion, and over $1 billion will be spent on decommissioning activities. Following removal of the plutonium and the demolition of the plutonium storage and remaining Site facilities by the end of 2015, the cost to perform the long-term environmental monitoring at the Site is estimated to be $10 million per year.

Evans, B. [Kaiser-Hill L.L.C., Rocky Flats, CO (United States); Bengel, P. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, L.L.C., Rocky Flats, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

None Available

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

11

Virginia Coal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation implements the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act and establishes a statewide regulatory program for reclamation following coal surface mining activities. The...

12

Argonne partners with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as...

13

Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe standards relevant to reclamation that must be followed both during and after the completion of mining in a given area. An operator who wishes to engage in nonmetallic...

14

Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources implements and enforces the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, as well as a statewide program to protect society and the...

15

Mined land reclamation by biological reactivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mine reclamation technique, developed in Europe, restores land to full productivity within two years without topsoil replacement. The method deliberately reestablishes within one year following mining, the required biological balance between microbes, enzymes, and trace elements in the rock spoil rather than waiting five or more years for natural processes to restore balance. The technique is called Biological Reactivation (BR). This paper discusses the feasibility of BR reclamation after surface mining operations in the US. Staff of the Ohio Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute completed an OSM-sponsored research project on BR in which physical and chemical tests characterized 140 spoil samples obtained from 10 surface mining operations. Test results indicated that Biological Reactivation technology could be effectively applied, at least in the test areas sampled within Appalachia. Preliminary estimates make clear that the new technique reduces reclamation costs on prime farmland by approximately 95% compared to topsoil segregation and replacement methods.

Gozon, J.S.; Konya, C.J.; Lukovic, S.S.; Lundquist, R.G.; Olah, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Land Reclamation Program annual report, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Argonne Land Reclamation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, is a joint effort of two Argonne divisions: Energy and Environmental Systems and Environmental Impact Studies. The program is carried out by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers and has three primary objectives: (1) to develop energy-efficient and cost-effective mining and reclamation techniques; (2) to assist industry in evaluating the viability of environmental regulations and demonstrating techniques to meet these regulations; and (3) to supply data and evaluation techniques to decisionmakers concerned with trade-offs between energy development and environmental quality. Six integrated field research sites have been established to address problems associated with surface mining operations. This program relies heavily on input from industry and has developed working arrangements with coal companies at each of the current mining sites. A major area of interest is the development of a ten-year environmental mining and reclamation research plan for the Assistant Secretary for Environment. The Land Reclamation Program assigns the highest priority to the transfer to users of information generated by its research.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Report contains results from utility scale analysis and site visits, as well as facility scale screening and site visits.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Van Geet, O.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates all surface mining activities for the extraction of coal. The Commission acts with the authority of the Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act,...

20

Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Railroad Commission of Texas is the regulatory authority for uranium surface mining. Law authorizes the Commission to assure that reclamation of mining sites is possible, to protect land owners...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

In situ soil reclamation by air stripping and sludge uptake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robin L. Autenrieth. A laboratory scale study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of an in-situ soil reclamation technique combining physical and biological processes. The methodology involves soil stripping of volatile... 3. Incineranon 4. Deep Well Injection B. Purpose of Remediation C. Objectives of the study II LlTERATURE REVIEW A. In-situ Techniques 1. Chemical Reactions 2, Biological Treatment 3. Air Stripping . 4. Thermal Treatment B. On...

Carden?osa-Mendoza, Mauricio

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Reclamation and groundwater restoration in the uranium milling industry: An assessment of UMTRCA, title II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978, Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) to regulate the disposal and reclamation of uranium mill tailings.This article examines the implementation of this legislation through eight cases of uranium mills in New Mexico, Wyoming, and Utah now being reclaimed. The eight cases examined here make up an important part of the total reclamation picture in the uranium milling industry.

Collins, J.D.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

AN EVALUATIONOF GEOTECHNICALANDHYDROLOGIC ASPECTSOF URANIUMMILL TAILINGS RECLAMATION IN THE USAANDCANADA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reclamation of inactive uranium mill tailings piles in the USA is currently in progress as part of a Federal remedial action program. Remedial work is done according to standards established by the Environmental Protec-tion Agency (EPA). Implementing the standards involves relocating the piles, if necessary, to suitable sites, and covering themwith a radon and infiltration control barrier and erosion resistant rock. A recent study in Canadadefines appropriate approaches to stabilization in Canadaof inactive uranium mill tailings piles. There are no legal standards governing such work in Canada. Generally the Canadian approach involves reduction of steep slopes, water control, sometimesa cover, and the establishment of a stable vegetation cover. Differences of approach in the two countries to remedial work reflect the differences in climate, population densities, vegetation, and the regulatory framework in each country. A recent evaluation of a less conservative approach to remedial action in the USA indicates that considerably increased probabilities of failure of the remedial works need to be accepted before a significant cost savings can be affected and therefore the conservative USA approach is generally reasonable and justifiable.

J. A. Caldwell; A. Macg Robertson; Steffen Robertson

28

Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s review of Atlas Corporation`s proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Reclamation planning and operation at the Mae Moh Lignite Mine, Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mae Moh Mine is a large open cut lignite mine situated in Northern Thailand. The mine produces lignite for coal fired power stations located adjacent to the mine. Current mine production is approximately 9 Mtpa providing lignite to eight power stations with a total output of 1,125 MW. The power development plan for Mae Moh provides for 19 power stations by the year 1999 which will require lignite production to be increased to 30.5 Mtpa and overburden will be mined at a rate approaching 300 Mtpa. Environmental management and reclamation planning at Mae Moh are major issues due to water quality impact and land use conflicts. This paper presents the key elements of the reclamation master plan and works strategy for progressive reclamation and water pollution control.

Miller, S.D. [Stuart D. Miller & Associates, Balmain (Australia); Teparat, C. [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Mae Moh (Thailand)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reclamation Rural Water Act 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reclamation Rural Water Act 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy 71 Reclamation Rural Water Act: Southwestern Navajo Rural Water Supply://wrri.nmsu.edu/publish/watcon/proc56/Black-Haws.pdf #12;Reclamation Rural Water Act 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy

Johnson, Eric E.

31

Solid waste reclamation and recycling: Tires. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, management, economic analysis, and environmental impacts of reclamation and recycling of scrap tires. The design and evaluation of recycling processes are examined. Recycled products for use in construction materials, embankment fills, fuel supplements, and material substitutions are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Solid waste reclamation and recycling: Tires. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, management, economic analysis, and environmental impacts of reclamation and recycling of scrap tires. The design and evaluation of recycling processes are examined. Recycled products for use in construction materials, embankment fills, fuel supplements, and material substitutions are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 8598 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater reclamation in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 85­98 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater membrane processes for reclamation and reuse of wastewater in future space missions was evaluated and used in estimating the specific energy cost of treating the wastewater generated in space. The weight

35

A reclamation approach for mined prime farmland by adding organic wastes and lime to the subsoil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface mined prime farmland may be reclaimed by adding organic wastes and lime to subsoil thus improving conditions in root zone. In this study, sewage sludge, poultry manure, horse bedding, and lime were applied to subsoil (15-30 cm) during reclamation. Soil properties and plant growth were measured over two years. All organic amendments tended to lower the subsoil bulk density and increase organic matter and total nitrogen. Liming raised exchangeable calcium, slightly increased pH, but decreased exchangeable magnesium and potassium. Corn ear-leaf and forage tissue nitrogen, yields, and nitrogen removal increased in treatments amended with sewage sludge and poultry manure, but not horse bedding. Subsoil application of sewage sludge or poultry manure seems like a promising method in the reclamation of surface mined prime farmland based on the improvements observed in the root zone environment.

Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and implications for habitat reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain was assessed during 1992 to 1995 using a combination of feeding observations and scat analysis. Feeding observation data (1993 through 1995) showed that tortoises fed on a wide variety of items. The most frequently eaten items were forbs and annual grasses. These two forage groups comprised more than 90% of all bites taken. Analysis of scat (1992 and 1993) also showed that grasses and forbs were the most common groups, making up more than 80% of the composition of scat. Yearly differences between proportions of species in the diet were observed and were most likely attributable to differences in plant productivity, which is linked to rainfall patterns. Non-native species were an important component of the diet in all years, accounting for 13 to 50% of all bites observed and 6 to 24% of scat contents. A list of all items encountered in the diet is provided. To facilitate reclamation of desert tortoise habitat disturbed by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, native forage species that should be included in reclamation seed mixes, when feasible, were identified. Although shrubs make up only a small proportion of the diet, they should also be included in reclamation efforts because they provide habitat structure. Tortoise cover sites, and microhabitats amenable to seed germination and seedling establishment. In addition, non-native species should not be planted on reclaimed sites and, if necessary, sites should be recontoured and soil compaction reduced prior to planting.

Rakestraw, D.L.; Holt, E.A.; Rautenstrauch, K.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Abstract--An all-day tour to observe arid land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

participants were introduced to the U. S. Department of En- ergy reclamation programs for the Yucca Mountain of Energy must study and characterize Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for long-term underground-disturbance conditions. The Reclamation Program of the Yucca Mountain Project Since limited information exists pertaining

39

Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended to serve as guidance, or to supplement EPA or other agency environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-1 Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended, it is an outline of practices which may or have been used for uranium site restoration. Mining reclamation for uranium mining sites. The existence of bonding requirements and/or financial guarantees in the cases where

40

ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

Gary D. Kronrad

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Plutonium discharges to the sanitary sewer: Health impacts at the Livermore Water Reclamation Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the largest discharger of sewage treated by the Livermore Water Reclamation (LWRP), contributing approximately 7% by volume of the LWRP influent LILNL operations, as potential sources both of industrial pollutants and radioactivity, are therefore of particular concern to the LWRP. For this reason, LLNL has maintained vigorous wastewater discharge control and monitoring programs. In particular, the monitoring program has demonstrated that, except in a few rare instances, the concentration of contaminants in LLNL effluent have always remained below the appropriate regulatory standards. The exceptions have generally been due to inadvertent discharges of metals-bearing solutions produced by metal plating or cleaning operations.

Balke, B.K.

1993-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Uranium Revitalization and Tailings Reclamation Act of 1986. Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, September 20, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

S. 1004 authorizes and directs the Energy Secretary to establish a program to provide for reclamation and other remedial actions with respect to mill tailings at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The committee recommends passage with an amendment to both the text and the title. The purpose of the bill is to ensure an adequate long-term supply of domestic uranium and enrichment capacity, to establish a viable industry, and to expedite the financing for reclamation. The report summarizes the legislative background, gives a section-by-section analysis, presents additional and minority views, and outlines necessary changes in existing law.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Re-water: More complicated than just toilet-to-tap, water reclamation helps sustain thirsty cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fall 2011 tx H2O 25 Story by Leslie Lee Timeline of Droughts in Texas TWDB adopts Water for Texas 2007, the state water plan. Hurricane Ike moves ashore near Galveston on September 12 with maximum sustained winds around 110 mph, making... losses at $4.1 billion, with $1.9 billion in North Texas alone. The city of El Paso maintains four water reclamation plants. Drought Drought RE-WATER More complicated than just toilet-to-tap, water reclamation helps sustain thirsty cities 26 tx H...

Lee, Leslie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Legacy Uranium Mine Site Reclamation - Lessons Learned - 12384  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management is responsible for administering the DOE Uranium Leasing Program (ULP) and its 31 uranium lease tracts located in the Uravan Mineral Belt of southwestern Colorado (see Figure 1). In addition to administering the ULP for the last six decades, DOE has also undertaken the significant task of reclaiming a large number of abandoned uranium (legacy) mine sites and associated features located throughout the Uravan Mineral Belt. In 1995, DOE initiated a 3-year reconnaissance program to locate and delineate (through extensive on-the-ground mapping) the legacy mine sites and associated features contained within the historically defined boundaries of its uranium lease tracts. During that same time frame, DOE recognized the lack of regulations pertaining to the reclamation of legacy mine sites and contacted the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) concerning the reclamation of legacy mine sites. In November 1995, The BLM Colorado State Office formally issued the United States Department of the Interior, Colorado Bureau of Land Management, Closure/Reclamation Guidelines, Abandoned Uranium Mine Sites as a supplement to its Solid Minerals Reclamation Handbook (H-3042-1). Over the next five-and-one-half years, DOE reclaimed the 161 legacy mine sites that had been identified on DOE withdrawn lands. By the late 1990's, the various BLM field offices in southwestern Colorado began to recognize DOE's experience and expertise in reclaiming legacy mine sites. During the ensuing 8 years, BLM funded DOE (through a series of task orders) to perform reclamation activities at 182 BLM mine sites. To date, DOE has reclaimed 372 separate and distinct legacy mine sites. During this process, DOE has learned many lessons and is willing to share those lessons with others in the reclamation industry because there are still many legacy mine sites not yet reclaimed. DOE currently administers 31 lease tracts (11,017 ha) that collectively contain over 220 legacy (abandoned) uranium mine sites. This contrasts to the millions of hectares administered by the BLM, the U.S. Forest Service, and other federal, tribal, and state agencies that contain thousands of such sites. DOE believes that the processes it has used provide a practical and cost-effective approach to abandoned uranium mine-site reclamation. Although the Federal Acquisition Regulations preclude DOE from competing with private industry, DOE is available to assist other governmental and tribal agencies in their reclamation efforts. (authors)

Kilpatrick, Laura E. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado 80021 (United States); Cotter, Ed [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado 81503 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

On-Demand Node Reclamation and Replacement for Guaranteed Area Coverage in Long-lived Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an important and challenging problem in sensor network design. Recently, Tong et al. have proposed a node replacement and reclamation (NRR) strategy, and designed an adaptive rendezvous-based two-tier scheduling of energy that a solar cell can harvest is proportional to its surface area, but it is infeasible to equip

Zhang, Wensheng

47

The US uranium revitalization, Tailings Reclamation and Enrichment Act, Title 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 4, 1987, the US Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources reported out to the Senate bill number S.1846 (Uranium Revitalization, Tailings Reclamation and Enrichment Act of 1987). In early 1988, the bill was reintroduced as S.2097, withut some of its earlier provisions that had caused jurisdictional conflict with the Senate Finance Committee. One of the deleted provisions comprised most of Title I of S.1846, dealing primarily with establishing a fee on the use of imported uranium by US utilities. These provisions were reintroduced by amendment on the floor of the Senate on March 30, 1988. In a key vote, a motion to block the reintroduction of the deleted provisions was defeated by a 47-45 margin. The full bill S.2097, again with uranium import provisions, was subsequently passed by a vote of 62-28 in the Senate. The bill now goes to the US House of Representatives for its consideration.

NONE

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Is the coal industry worth protecting? an examination of the effects of competing advocacy coalitions on implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) of 1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IS THE COAL INDUSTRY WORTH PROTECTING? AN EXAMINATION OF THE EFFECTS OF COMPETING ADVOCACY COALITIONS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SURFACE MINING CONTROL AND RECLAMATION ACT (SMCRA) OF 1977 A Dissertation by MICHAEL SEAN PENNINGTON... PROTECTING? AN EXAMINATION OF THE EFFECTS OF COMPETING ADVOCACY COALITIONS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SURFACE MINING CONTROL AND RECLAMATION ACT (SMCRA) OF 1977 A Dissertation by MICHAEL SEAN PENNINGTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Pennington, Michael Sean

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the structures. "Workers will wear protective clothing and follow approved safety procedures throughout this project," said project manager Stephani Swickley. "To make sure...

50

1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer™ is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer™ to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV – a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the developments made under this program have increased 1366 confidence that Direct Wafers can be produced for ~$0.10/W, still nearly 50% lower than current industry best practice. Wafer quality also steadily improved throughout the program, both in electrical performance and geometry. The improvements to electrical performance were achieved through a combination of optimized heat transfer during growth, reduction of metallic impurities to below 10 ppbw total metals, and lowering oxygen content to below 2e17 atoms/cc. Wafer average thickness has been reduced below 200µm with standard deviation less than 20µm. Measurement of spatially varying thickness shortly after wafer growth is being used to continually improve uniformity by adjusting thermal conditions. At the conclusion of the program, 1366 has developed strong relationships with four leading Tier1 cell manufactures and several have demonstrated 17% cell efficiency on Direct Wafer. Sample volumes were limited, with the largest trial consisting of 300 Direct Wafers, and there remains strong pull for larger quantities necessary for qualification before sales contracts can be signed. This will be the focus of our pilot manufacturing scale up in 2014.

Lorenz, Adam [1366 Technologies] [1366 Technologies

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Use of explosives to demolish multistory steel frame buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2. 14 Muttifkior Firing Plan for a Typical Buikling 2. 15 Shaped Charge Placement on a Column Section . 2. 16 Column Attack, Showing Column Explosive Cuts and Kicker Charge . 2. 17 Preparation of Column Splice Plates in a Welded Connection . 2.... 18 Preparation of Column Splice Plates in a Riveted or Bolted Connection 2. 19 Column Cutting Schedule . 3. 1 Internal Cabling Showing Typical Column to Column Cabling . 3. 2 Cabling, From Corner Wall to Column 30 32 36 38 42 50 55 . 57...

Landry, Charles Vernon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

Microsoft Word - Workers Demolishing Last Inactive Facility at...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure contaminated with asbestos and a low-level radioactive chemical compound called uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). With an original footprint of almost five acres - roughly...

53

EM Begins Demolishing K-31 Gaseous Diffusion Building | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement || Department of Energy EISA

54

Workers Demolish Reactor Support Facility as Part of River Corridor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energyof Energy This webinarJanuary 1, 2012

55

Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca MatulkaDeliveryUpdated November 2011LAS VEGAS -

56

Oak Ridge's EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAMOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCO T H E D I R RidgeOak

57

Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto History |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department09Jersey ForDakotaWisconsinDepartment of

58

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space Combined Routes12thnear DP Road

59

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space Combined Routes12thnear DP Roadnear DP

60

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space Combined Routes12thnear DP Roadnear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Workers Demolishing Significant Inactive Facility at Paducah Site |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.|Sindhu Jagadamma Women @Telecom (DraftWorkerDepartment

62

Workers Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject isNovember 07, 2007WhatJenniferWork PlanDepartmentWorkers

63

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to hazardous and radiological contamination while excavating and packaging contaminated debris and soil from of a highly successful environmental cleanup project at Material Disposal Area B," said Ed Worth, federal project manager #12;- 2 - with the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office. "We

64

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Town of Hague landfill reclamation study: Research ways to increase waste heating value and reduce waste volume. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitored composing was studied as a method for reducing the quantity of waste requiring disposed from a landfill reclamation project. After each of two re-screening steps, composted {open_quotes}soil{close_quotes} from a single long windrow of varying depths and moisture content was subjected to analytical testing to determine its suitability to remain as backfill in a reclaimed landfill site. The remaining uncomposted waste was combusted at a waste-to-energy facility to determine if Btu values were improved. Results indicate that a full-scale composting operation could result in a net decrease of approximately 11 percent in disposal costs. The Btu value of the reclaimed waste was calculated to be 4,500 to 5,000 Btu/lb. The feasibility of composting reclaimed waste at other landfill reclamation projects will depend upon site-specific technical and economic factors, including size and nature of the organic fraction of the waste mass, local processing costs, and the cost of waste disposal alternatives.

Salerni, E. [SSB Environmental Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Aging of Development: the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project (STRP) in South Korea and Sustainable Development of the Two Townships in and out of the STRP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is the biggest tideland reclamation project in the world (the STRP) sustainable? Since 1991, the STRP which aims at converting mudflats into 401 km2 farmland and industrial complex has been carried out in the southwestern coast of South Korea. I...

Choi, In Huck

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Decommissioning and reclamation of the Beaverlodge uranium mine-mill operation: Current status of the transition phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition phase monitoring at the decommissioned Canadian Beaverlodge Operation commenced in July, 1985. This phase refers to the period of time between completion of reclamation, and formal regulatory approval to abandon the site. At present, nine water quality stations are being monitored on an on-going basis along with 11 radon air quality stations. The data collected are in agreement with the original model predictions submitted to regulatory agencies to proceed with decommissioning (11). Total loadings to the environment have been less that they were during the operation phase which conforms with one of the principle requirements. During the past eight years, four areas have required additional remedial work due to the settling of cover material, erosion, piping of tailings through a surface cover and increases in the downstream (Greer Lake) Ra-226 concentrations, comparable to the upstream discharge from the waste management control point.

Phillips, R.L.J. [Cameco Corporation, Saskatoon (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

MORA: an Energy-Aware Slack Reclamation Scheme for Scheduling Sporadic Real-Time Tasks upon Multiprocessor Platforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we address the global and preemptive energy-aware scheduling problem of sporadic constrained-deadline tasks on DVFS-identical multiprocessor platforms. We propose an online slack reclamation scheme which profits from the discrepancy between the worst- and actual-case execution time of the tasks by slowing down the speed of the processors in order to save energy. Our algorithm called MORA takes into account the application-specific consumption profile of the tasks. We demonstrate that MORA does not jeopardize the system schedulability and we show by performing simulations that it can save up to 32% of energy (in average) compared to execution without using any energy-aware algorithm.

Nelis, Vincent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Reduced pressure and temperature reclamation of water using the GE Integrated Water-waste Management System for potential space flight application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEM FOR POTENTIAL SPACE FLIGHT APPLICATION A Thesis by HASAN IMTIAZ CHOWDHURY Approved as to style and content by: G. P. Peterson (Chair of Committee) T. D. Rogers (Member) R. D. pence (Member) W. Bradley (Head of Department) December... 1989 ABSTRACT Reduced Pressure and Temperature Reclamation of Water Using the GE Integrated Water-waste Management System for Potential Space Flight Application. (December 1989) Hasan Imtiaz Chowdhury, B. S. , Prairie View AlkM University Chair...

Chowdhury, Hasan Imtiaz

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

CURRENT STATUS AND RECLAMATION PLAN OF FORMER URANIUM MINING AND MILLING FACILITIES AT NINGYO-TOGE IN JAPAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) conducted research and development projects on uranium exploration in Japan from 1956 to 1987. Several mine facilities, such as waste rock yards and a mill tailing pond, were retained around Ningyo-toge after the projects ended. Although there is no legal issue in the mine in accordance with related law and agreements at present, JNC has a notion that it is important to reduce the burden of waste management on future generations. Thus, the Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center of JNC proposed a reclamation plan for these facilities with fundamental policy, an example of safety analysis and timetables. The plan has mainly three phases: Phase I is the planning stage, and this paper corresponds to this: Phase II is the stage to perform various tests for safety analysis and site designing: Phase III is the stage to accomplish measures. Preliminarily safety analyses suggested that our supposed cover designs for both waste rock and m ill tailing are enough to keep dose limit of 1mSv/y at site boundaries. The plan is primarily based on the Japanese Mine Safety Law, also refers to ICRP recommendations, IAEA reports, measures implemented overseas, etc. because this is the first case in Japan. For the accomplishment of this plan, it is important to establish a close relationship with local communities and governments, and to maintain a policy of open-to-public.

Sato, Kazuhiko; Tokizawa, Takayuki

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A thick homogeneous vegetated cover design proves cost - and schedule-effective for the reclamation of uranium mills sites near Spokane, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has licensed two medium sized uranium mills with tailings impoundments covering 28 and 40 hectares (70 and 100 acres), respectively, The uranium mill licensees have submitted closure and reclamation plans to the state, and site-specific conditions have determined the closure design features, Conventional uranium mill cover designs usually incorporate an overall cap of one to three meters, which includes a low-permeability clay barrier layer. A technical evaluation of several uranium mill facilities that used this design was published in the fall of 1994 and reported that unexpected vegetation root damage had occurred in the low-permeability clay (or bentonite amended) barrier layers. The technical report suggested that the low-permeability design feature at some sites could be compromised within a very short time and the regulatory goal of 1,000 years performance might not be achieved. In October 1994, WDOH sponsored a technical forum meeting to consider design alternatives to address these reliability concerns. Representatives from the federal government, nuclear industry, licensees, engineering firms, and state regulatory agencies attended the workshop. Risk factors considered in the evaluation of the uranium mill reclamation plans include: (1) radon gas emanation through the cover (the air pathway), and (2) migration of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents (the groundwater pathway). Additional design considerations include site structural stability, longevity of 1,000 years, and no active (ongoing) maintenance. 9 refs.

Blacklaw, J.; Robertson, G.; Stoffel, D.; Ahmad, J.; Fordham, E. [Washington State Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Towns, and Entities NTMWD Water Supply Sources History of NTMWD ? 1956 - First Delivery of Treated Water ? 1970s - Expanded to Wastewater Service ? 1980s - Expanded to Solid Waste Service WATER PLANNING Regional Water Planning...

Hickey, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

H. R. 4934: This title may be cited as the Uranium Revitalization, Tailings Reclamation and Enrichment Act of 1988. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, June 28, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

H.R. 4934 is a bill to provide for a viable domestic uranium industry, to establish a program to fund reclamation and other remedial actions with respect to mill tailings at active uranium and thorium sites, to establish a wholly-owned Government corporation to manage the Nation's uranium enrichment enterprise, operating as a continuing, commercial enterprise on a profitable and efficient basis, and for other purposes.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject isNovember 07, 2007WhatJenniferWork PlanDepartment

76

The City Recycled: The Afterlives of Demolished Buildings in Postwar Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal, plastic, glass, insulation foam board, and rubber.metals, plastic, glass, cloth, paper, foam board, or wood.plastic, glass, rubber, and insulation foam boards. The

Kao, Shih-yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Report on the emergency response to the event on May 14, 1997, at the plutonuim reclamation facility, Hanford Site, Richland,Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the evening of May 14,1997, a chemical explosion Occurred at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) in the 200 West Area(200-W) of the Hanford Site. The event warranted the declaration of an Alert emergency, activation of the Hanford Emergency Response Organization (BRO), and notification of offsite agencies. As a result of the emergency declaration, a subsequent evaluation was conducted to assess: 9 the performance of the emergency response organization o the occupational health response related to emergency activities o event notifications to offsite and environmental agencies. Additionally, the evaluation was designed to: 9 document the chronology of emergency and occupational health responses and environmental notifications connected with the explosion at the facility 0 assess the adequacy of the Hanford Site emergency preparedness activities; response readiness; and emergency management actions, occupational health, and environmental actions 0 provide an analysis of the causes of the deficiencies and weaknesses in the preparedness and response system that have been identified in the evaluation of the response a assign organizational responsibility to correct deficiencies and weaknesses a improve future performance 0 adjust elements of emergency implementing procedures and emergency preparedness activities.

Shoop, D.S.

1997-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

Miscellaneous reclamation legislation. Part 4. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Water and Power of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on S. 1884, S. 1981, and S. 2643, September 20, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 4 of the hearing record covers the first session of hearings on S. 1884, S. 1981, and S. 2643, which affect reclamation projects at Elephant Butte Irrigation District, projects covered by the Small Reclamation Projects Act of 1956, the San Luis Unit of the Central Valley Project in California, and other purposes. The text of each bill is inserted in the record along with the testimony of 13 witnesses representing water agencies, environmental groups, and the Department of Interior's Bureau of Reclamation. Senators from several affected states also made statements. At issue was the need to authorize additional funds for the projects because repayment funds are not credited to the program, making it necessary to raise the authorization ceiling. Witnesses noted the merits of the small projects program in promoting conservation by securing funding on the open market and encouraging local initiative. Critics objected to the piecemeal effect of this approach.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Characterization of the mineralogy of the oxidized portion of the overburden and relation of pre-mine mineralogy to success of post-mine reclamation at a lignite mine near Jewett, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in general and in certain lignite mines in specific. However, the field of study is not closed and the body of knowledge continues to increase. The study of the mineralogy at the Jewett lignite mine and its relation to reclamation processes was part of a.... (Diogenes could have saved himself and his lamp a lot of havel if they had started in College Station. ) Hail to the field Chiefs: Dr. "dirt" Kenny White and "Dr. Mud" David White. I can truly say that Dave gave me direction ? the direction North...

Oliver, Julie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Urban Reclamation in São Paulo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The urbanized terrain of São Paulo is characterized by wasteful landscapes on peripheral areas of the metropolitan agglomeration, and decaying landscapes of waste in the core of the city. If on the one hand, the increasingly ...

Eskinazi, Victor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

North City Water Reclamation Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of Water Supply Future Reliability UncertainFuture Reliability Uncertain Self Sustaining the City of San Courses Agricultural Irrigation #12;Economic & Environmental Benefits Self Sustaining Facility On

Prevedouros, Panos D.

82

Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations aim to ensure that any coal mining or extraction will be conducted in a manner that will not significantly damage the environment or area of land affected. The Department of...

83

Bureau of Reclamation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBullEnergy

84

Sandia National Laboratories: US Bureau of Reclamation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreakingStandardsTCESJBEI ResearchersTrough CoastUASUNM JointBureau of

85

Indicators of Fertility Change in a Developing Nation: Examining the Impact of Motorcycles as a Distance Demolishing Technology on Fertility Change in Rural Indonesia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Given the consistent findings in the development literature that fertility is associated with economic growth for individuals, families, and even influences a country's Gross Domestic… (more)

Muir, Jonathan A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

S. 2415: Title I may be cited as the Uranium Enrichment Act of 1990; Title II may be cited as the Uranium Security and Tailings Reclamation Act of 1989; and Title III may be cited as The Solar, Wind, Waste, and Geothermal Power Production Incentives Act of 1990, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, April 4, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

S. 2415 (which started out as a bill to encourage solar and geothermal power generation) now would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to redirect uranium enrichment enterprises to further the national interest, respond to competitive market forces, and to ensure the nation's common defense and security. It would establish a United States Enrichment Corporation for the following purposes: to acquire feed materials, enriched uranium, and enrichment facilities; to operate these facilities; to market enriched uranium for governmental purposes and qualified domestic and foreign persons; to conduct research into uranium enrichment; and to operate as a profitable, self-financing, reliable corporation and in a manner consistent with the health and safety of the public. The bill describes powers and duties of the corporation; the organization, finance, and management; decontamination and decommissioning. The second part of the bill would ensure an adequate supply of domestic uranium for defense and power production; provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry; and establish, facilitate, and expedite a comprehensive system for financing reclamation and remedial action at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The third part of the bill would remove the size limitations on power production facilities now part of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Solar, wind, waste, or geothermal power facilities would no longer have to be less than 80 MW to qualify as a small power production facility.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

An Overview of Phosphate Mining and Reclamation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). John Bennet Lawes, an English agricultural scientist, examined the application of sulfuric acid to bone

Ma, Lena

88

Process Optimization and Integration Strategies for Material Reclamation and Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the main physical properties that influence solvent(s) performance in extracting additives and contaminants from used lubricating oils (i.e. solubility parameter (delta), viscosity (v), and vapor pressure (p)). The results of the theoretical approach...

Kheireddine, Houssein

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

90

Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland J. (Wading River, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

answer an important question-are these massive dams secure in the event of a terrorist attack? How ORISE is Making a Difference Exercise programs for each of these critical...

93

Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

94

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources...

95

ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK Mapping ApplicationEnvironmentEducationDams Bureau

96

Wastewater reclamation and reuse in a petrochemical plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large petrochemical plant located in a water-limited area is a major water user. The plant is facing a critical water problem because of several factors: (1) the raw water total dissolved solids (TDS) content has been increasing, (2) water rationing, which limits plant production, occurs during drought periods, (3) the plant is planning for a major expansion that requires major additional water supply, and (4) there is persistent community pressure for wastewater discharge reduction. A water resource management and planning study was conducted for this plant to resolve the water problem. This chapter describes the results of the study and the design of a pilot plant program for the testing of a wastewater treatment and recycling system.

Wong, J.M. [Brown and Caldwell, Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Microsoft Word - LL-ULS reclamation.doc  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 Master EMAZINFOEnvironmental Assessment forI I Date: May

98

Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation,Metalysis Jump to:DecMethanolMetro

99

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMayCrossColorado | Department of Energy

100

Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd JumpGTZHolland, Illinois:5717551°Farms Ltd JumpInformation Southside

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3 leanProposalConveyanceProspects

102

Introduction The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concerning inland, small-scale, low-cost rural brackish desalination water projects using renewable energy groundwater sources including solutions to concentrate management, renewable energy/desalination hybrids brackish desalination water projects using renewable energy sources; 2. identify research priorities

Johnson, Eric E.

103

Richland Operations Office Cleanup Strategy, Scope  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Cleanup Work * Deactivate and Demolish facilities * Move buried waste, contaminated soil away from Columbia River * Treat contaminated groundwater * Isolate contamination...

104

Solid electrolyte based sensor for monitoring the magnesium level during reclamation of aluminum scrap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum alloy scrap often contains excess magnesium which must be removed during recycling by a process referred to as demagging. The efficiency of this process could be improved with an in-situ magnesium sensor, which could be used to optimize the process parameters to the changing magnesium content. The sensor developed in this work consists of a galvanic cell with a magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) solid electrolyte and a molten magnesium reference electrode. The voltage output of the sensor changes by about 100 mV for the change in magnesium content which occurs during the demagging process (5 wt% to 0.1 wt%) and is in excellent agreement with thermodynamic measurements using molten chloride electrolytes. This paper focuses on the effect of silicon, which is a common alloying element in aluminum alloys, on the output of an electrochemical magnesium sensor.

Fergus, J.W.; Hui, S. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Materials Research and Education Center

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

In-situ biological reclamation of contaminated ground water. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four triaxial permeability devices were designed and constructed for use in the Environmental Engineering Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology. These devices were used to determine how time and changing permeants affected a soil sample's hydraulic conductivity. Also the attenuation of the priority pollutant, 2,4-dichlorophenol, was studied. Two areas were looked at concerning attenuation, microbial degradation and adsorption. Microbes were grown in the laboratory and then placed into the soil samples. A permeant containing the pollutant, an oxidant, and nutrients was then passed through the soil sample with the microbes. The effects on the effluent concentration were then studied. Two breakthrough curves and two isotherm tests were run in an attempt to distinguish between microbial decay and adsorptive attenuation. Results of the attenuation studies unfortunately were inconclusive, but valuable knowledge was gained on the operation of and experimental procedures with the triaxial permeability devices.

Fant, R.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reclamation of Cleaning Water Using Ultrafiltration and Double Pass Reverse Osmosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Because of the commitment to minimize process generated wastes, an integrated ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) system was installed to reclaim the cleaning water at the PPG Industries, Inc. (PPG) Cleveland, Ohio plant. The recovered water... 590 590 590 600 595 600 590 INLET TORO PSIG 550 590 590 590 600 595 600 590 PSIG 540 580 580 580 595 590 590 585 INTO RO-CIP INTO UF-CIP Temperature Conductivity GPM GPM 2.0 8.5 2.0 6.0 2.0 6.0 1.0 6.0 1.8 5.5 1.9 5...

Neuman, T.; Long, G.; Tinter, M.

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - area land reclamation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 27 LAND USE SUITABILITY INDEX FOR USE IN HARDEE COUNTY Summary: by that date, no soils ("land areas") directly resulting from mining or...

108

Sewage sludge as an amendment for calcareous bauxite mine spoils reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dried aerobically digested sewage sludge applied at seven rates (0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 120 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}) in a field experiment on calcareous bauxite mine spoils significantly increased the available water capacity, concentrations of organic matter, total N, extractable P (Olsen), exchangeable Mg{sup 2+}, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cu, Mn, Zn, and Pb of mine spoils. Total N and extractable P concentrations decreased with time after sludge application. The DTPA-extractable Cu concentration was high 4 yr after application at sludge rates of 80 and 120 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1}. Extractable Cu and Zn concentrations correlated significantly and positively with Cu and Zn concentrations in burnet (Sanguisorba minor subsp. minor) and fiddleneck (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth) tissue. Sludge application depressed plant Mn uptake. Plant biomass, plant density, and foliar cover significantly increased with treatment rates in the first and fourth growing seasons but decreased with time. Fiddleneck and burnet were the species favored by the high rate of sludge application.

Brofas, G.; Michopoulos, P.; Alifragis, D.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Exogenous application of gibberellins to hasten yaupon seed germination for surface mine reclamation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) (T-1) (S-1)(T-1) a e + ntca s a e + nsco t s e + nco st GA concentration/ GA type (C) CXS Error T (C-1) T(C-1) (S-1) (N-1)STC a e + nsa c(t) 0 e + ns sc(t) o e TOTAL NSTC-1 ') The following abbreviations were used: Number of Sample...

Whatley, Christopher Marc

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Use of Irrigation to Extend the Seeding Window for Final Reclamation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to investigate the feasibility of various techniques for reclaiming lands disturbed during site characterization at Yucca Mountain. As part of this program, two studies were conducted in 1997 to assess the effects of combinations of seeding date (date that seeds are planted) and supplemental irrigation on densities of native plant species at Yucca Mountain. Study objectives were to (1) determine whether the traditional seeding window (October-December) could be extended through combinations of seeding date and irrigation date, (2) determine which combination of seeding date and irrigation was most successful, and (3) assess the effects of irrigation versus natural precipitation on seedling establishment. In the first study, a multi-species seed mix of 16 native species was sown into plots on four dates (12/96, 2/97, 3/97, and 4/97). Irrigation treatments were control (no irrigation) or addition of 80 mm of supplemental water applied over a one month period. Plant densities were sampled in August and again in October, 1997. In the second study, Larrea tridentata and Lycium andersonii, two species that are common at Yucca Mountain, but difficult to establish from seed, were sown together into plots in January and August, 1997. Half the plots were irrigated with approximately 250 mm of water between August 18 and September 11, while the remaining plots received no irrigation (control). Plant densities were sampled in October, 1997. The August census for the multi-species mix study showed irrigated plots that were sown in February, March and April had higher plant densities and more species than plots that were not irrigated. Irrigation had no effect on plant densities on plots that were seeded in December. Plots were used again in October following 18 mm of precipitation in September. Densities of three species, Ambrosia dumosa, Hymenoclea salsola, and L. tridentata, (warm-season species) were lower on irrigated plots sown in December, February, and March, and showed no response to irrigation on plots sown in April. Therefore, early spring irrigation did not facilitate establishment of warm-season species. These results suggest that these species are dependent upon precipitation while temperatures are warm in late summer or fall. However, control plots that were seeded in December had acceptable densities of these species. A more practical approach might be to avoid irrigation costs by seeding in December and waiting for fall precipitation. The remaining species (cool-season species) showed an opposite response to supplemental water with greater densities on irrigated plots sown in February, March, and April, and no response to irrigation on plots sown in December. While these results show that irrigation can extend the seeding window for cool-season species should it be necessary, it was also apparent that if seeds are sown by late December, irrigation is not necessary to achieve acceptable plant densities.

TRW Environmental Safety

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Scheduling with Dynamic Voltage/Speed Adjustment Using Slack Reclamation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mission duration (for battery-operated systems), increased heat dissipation, and decreased reliability systems, such as hand-held mobile systems or remote solar explorers. On the other hand, increased power consumption generates more heat, which causes heat dissipation to be a problem since it requires more

Childers, Bruce

113

King Coal vs. Reclamation: federal regulation of mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research focuses on the regulatory politics of mountaintop removal mining for coal within the Appalachian states of West Virginia and Kentucky. Based on Administrative Presidency concepts suggesting that chief executives seek more control and influence over agency program decisions, this article analyzes President George W. Bush's efforts to promote the development of coal resources within these states despite statutory constraints posed by federal environmental laws. The analysis demonstrates that President Bush effectively achieved his energy production goals by combining the use of discretionary authority with staff controls, executive orders, and regulatory initiatives to lessen industry compliance costs with environmental regulatory requirements.

Davis, C.E.; Duffy, R.J. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Political Science

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private land—including abandoned mined lands—is dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Fouling autopsy of hollow-fibre MF membranes in wastewater reclamation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fouling in membrane filtration processes is problematic but inevitable as it occurs with the retention of contaminants that accumulate on the membrane surface. The causes of fouling are often specific, depending upon feed ...

Nghiem, Long D.; Schäfer, Andrea

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 111119 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater reclamation in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 111­119 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater for treatment of metabolic wastewater Tzahi Y. Cath, Dean Adams, Amy E. Childress University of Nevada of an innovative dual membrane contactor process for treatment of combined hygiene and metabolic wastewater

117

EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - Libbyof Energy Project,StatementStatementDepartmentDepartment

118

Reclamation Project Act of 1939 U.S.C. | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca Matulka About Us RebeccaReciprocity Checklist

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - airport land reclamation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AirportAirport Suvarnabhumi Airport... ,Suvarnabhumi Airport, Bangkok, ThailandBangkok, Thailand 12;OverviewOverview Magnitudes and Financing... -- Land purchased inLand...

120

Title 43 CFR 429 Use of Bureau of Reclamation Land, Facilities, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective: Terminology and IndexInformation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Letter Reclamation of Asset Metals 070909.doc  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | DepartmentEnergyMagna:MasterOffice0 1 2 - 2 0 1 5 D e p a rEIR th12July

122

Idaho IC Title 42, Irrigation and Drainage - Water Rights and Reclamation |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia:ISI Solar JumpObtain EPA ID

123

1. Mineral Exploration Regulation in British Columbia Health, Safety and Reclamation Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of guidelines to best practices for an exploration program in British Columbia. For more comprehensive for Mines in British Columbia. All worksites where mechanical disturbance occurs (e.g. trenching, drilling activities including exploratory drilling, excavation, processing, concentrating, waste disposal and site

Bolch, Tobias

124

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION I>ETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on ly as needed. for access road maintenance andor to levellhe landing areas. B. Number and Title of the Categorical Exclusion Being Applied: (See lext in 10 eFR Part...

125

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CAT EGORICAL EXC L USION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to maintain the safety and reliabili ty of the electrical transmission system. B. Number and Title of the Categorical Exclusion Being Applied: (See text in 10 eFR Part J 02...

126

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW f"rCATECORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

spec ies (such as under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act); (iii) Floodplains and wet lands (as defined in 10 eFR 1022.4, X...

127

ENVIRONM ENTAL REVI  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

species (such as under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act); (iii) Floodp lains and wetlands (as defined in 10 eFR 1022.4, X...

128

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown...

129

Categorical ExclusIon Determination Fornl  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This project would demolish the existing Kathabar and utility support services and concrete slab to allow Applied Technologies to utilize this building for future missions....

130

Microsoft Word - Project Mgt Working Group Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of the Bevatron Demolition Project, located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), was to deactivate, demolish, and dispose of the Bevatron accelerator, ancillary...

131

EA-1659: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA-1659: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Demolition of Building 330 at Argonne National Laboratory The U.S. Department of Energy is proposing to demolish Building...

132

Environmental and cultural sustainability In the built environment : an evaluation of LEED for historic preservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preservation of buildings is an important process for both cultural and environmental sustainability. Buildings are frequently demolished and rebuilt long before necessitated by structural or material deterioration, wasting ...

Ferriss, Lori (Lori E.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy Secretary Chu Announces $1.961 Billion in Recovery Act...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

will focus on accelerating cleanup of soil and groundwater, transportation and disposal of waste, and cleaning and demolishing former weapons complex facilities. "These...

134

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NA Unassigned FE NA Site Operations Division 2011 Ben Smith April 2011 - October 2011 NETL: Morgantown, WV (Building 39) Building 39 - Replace Waterless Urinals Demolish existing...

135

From Elevated Freeway to Linear Park: Land Price Impacts of Seoul, Korea's CGC Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this $313 million stream-restoration project, calling it “ademolition and stream restoration was US$313 million. Figurewas demolished and the stream restoration/linear park

Kang, Chang Deok; Cervero, Robert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

T7  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For example, it is not legal under the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) t o demolish a building without first addressing potential asbestos...

137

UTILIZING BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION TO IMPROVE PROCESS LOAD HEAT RECLAMATION FOR A MULTI-SPORT ATHLETICS VENUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this study is a recreational facility that consists of an NHL-size ice arena, 8-sheet curling rink

Joel Good; Bryan Debruyn; Derek Whitehead

138

Environmental Impacts Associated with Current Methods of Re-Use, Recycling and Reclamation of Personal Computers and Cell Phones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic waste is a growing problem worldwide. The need to have newer, faster, more powerful electronic products coupled with a lack of awareness of the hazards of improper disposal of these products is creating an ...

Walden, Joseph L.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

Walk-through survey report: Control technology for metal reclamation industries at Exide/General Battery Corporation, Reading, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A walk through survey was made at Exide/General Battery Corporation, Reading, Pennsylvania to identify and evaluate control methods to reduce lead exposure. About 20,000 to 25,000 batteries a day were recycled, primarily automobile batteries. Lead and plastic from the batteries were reclaimed. The company used local exhaust ventilation, enclosed ventilated booths, partial enclosures, and automated operations throughout production areas of the site. Various occupational safety and health programs were in place including occupational and safety training, a respiratory protection program, various hygiene programs, and blood lead monitoring programs. These findings will be compared with those from other sites and the facility with the lowest lead exposure levels will be examined carefully so that others may be brought in line with the best of standards.

Hall, R.M.

1994-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Enviromental and Resource Science/Studies Program Environmental and Resource Science 4530H: Remediation and Reclamation of Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enviromental and Resource Science/Studies Program Fall, 2012 Environmental and Resource Science industrial lands, eutrophic water bodies) to some degree of vegetative cover or ecosystem service (water management continues to evolve via the field of restoration ecology. This course will explore the application

Fox, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Republic geothermal wells, East Mesa, California.evalu- ation of five geothermal wells, Proc. second UNhydrologic continuity Geothermal Well Inferred barrier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Scheduling with Dynamic Voltage/Speed Adjustment Using Slack Reclamation in Multi-Processor Real-Time Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems or remote solar explorers. On the other hand, increased power consumption generates more heat-operated systems), increased heat dissipation and decreased reli- ability. While many techniques have been proposed, which causes heat dissipation to be a problem since it requires more ex- pensive packaging and cooling

Melhem, Rami

143

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

document. LBL-7094 UC-66~1 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIRInc. , 1976. Study of the geothermal reservoir underlyingtest, 1976, East Mesa geothermal field in California.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell, Wellpinit, Washington, February 2001  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH:LTS PlanLl 1Program

145

Preliminary conceptual study on impact of land reclamation on groundwater flow and contaminant migration in Penny's Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but will migrate northeast toward Yam O Wan. FEMWATER, a three-dimensional finite element ground water model

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

146

atherosclerosis study feast: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Energy Potential at NonPowered Dams in the United Inventory and Hydropower Energy Assessment of Reclamation Owned Conduits B6 Bureau of Reclamation Renewable Energy...

147

The Johns Hopkins University Fun Facts " The public is sensitive to little things, and they wouldn't have full confidence in a college that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at a now-demolished rink on North Avenue in Baltimore, Johns Hopkins played Yale in the first intercollegiate ice hockey game, which ended in a 2-2 tie. In 1916, the Faculty of Philosophy (now known

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

148

EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

149

Progress Continues Toward Demolition of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Piece by piece, workers are safely and compliantly preparing to demolish a relic of Cold War plutonium production at the Hanford site. The Plutonium Finishing Plant was the final...

150

PPPO Official Website  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for 2009) C-410-B Sludge Lagoon (planned for 2009) Demolition of the C-746-A West End Smelter (complete);C-611-M and N Sanitary Water Storage Tanks (demolished in February 2009);...

151

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Recovery Act. Other facilities to be demolished at the site include the East End Smelter and the Uranium Metal Reduction Plant. All three facilities were used in the early...

152

CX-000491: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

713-1A pads. Existing firewater pumps at 784-A are to be removed before the 784-A powerhouse is demolished (not by this project). DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD...

153

Realities and perceptions : HOPE VI poverty deconcentration and implications for broader neighborhood revitalization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOPE VI was developed in 1992 as program to demolish and revitalize the nation's most severely distressed public housing. One element of the HOPE VI program is to move low-income households out of an environment of ...

Vanderford, Carrie Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Building on lessons learned : too high hopes without HOPE VI?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By providing substantial grants to public housing authorities to demolish and rebuild distressed public housing and provide services to public housing residents, the HOPE VI program has helped transform these developments ...

Wang, Kristen J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

pump are to be installed between the 713-A and 713-1A pads. Existing firewater pumps at 784-A are to be removed before the 784-A powerhouse is demolished (not by this...

156

Spatially variable fertility in a psammentic paleustalf of western Niger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graduate committee, Dr. Larry Wilding, for pedongenic interpretations, and Dr. Andrew Manu for lending an ear and helping me construct and demolish one hypothesis after another. My thanks also go to the Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques du...

Gardiner, James Bronson

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Lay Member of Council -Mr Huw Jones Mr Huw Jones is a Civil Engineer. Following graduation from the University of Wales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-employed consultant working on reclamation and regeneration of brownfield sites mainly for residential development. Mr

Martin, Ralph R.

158

Effects of Natural Gas Well Development and Reclamation Activities on Topsoil Properties Proposal Submitted to the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as is typically done during energy development activities, drastically disrupts the soil system and stimulates Submitted to the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources 2007-08 Matching Grant Fund April 15, 2008 Summary: Maintaining and restoring productivity of topsoil disturbed by energy development is crucial

Norton, Jay B.

159

Awareness of sustainable development: why did the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project lead to the first national controversy over sustainable development in South Korea?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a list of aspects or characteristics of sustainable development awareness in a society was made from a literature review of the history of sustainable development, theories and practices on sustainable development, and sustainable...

Choi, In Huck

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

160

Prepared in cooperation with the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Nevada Department of Wildlife, Southern Nevada Water Authority,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards drinking water and the hydropower to provide electricity for major cities including Las Vegas, Phoenix, Los to the importance of Lake Mead, multiple agencies are actively involved in its monitoring and research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Statistics and Differential Geometry 18-466 Mathematical Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistics and Differential Geometry 18-466 Mathematical Statistics Jerome Le Ny December 14, 2005 of statistical curvature [Efr75], that most of the main concepts and methods of differ- ential geometry are of substantial interest in connection with the theory of statistical inference. This report describes in simple

Le Ny, Jerome

162

Comparison of avian species diversity and densities on non-mined and reclaimed surface-mined land in east-central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface mining often changes the native landscape and vegetation of an area. Reclamation is used to counter this change, with the goal of restoring the land to its original pre-mined state. The process of reclamation creates early successional...

Wenzel, Dawn Nicole

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Strip Mine Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This law authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the Department of Natural Resources to adopt and promulgate rules and regulations pertaining to strip mining of coal and reclamation, review...

164

Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

Gensheimer, Robert James, III

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

SSooiill CCoonnttaammiinnaattiioonn && RReemmeeddiiaattiioonn SWS 6262 -3 credits, Fall 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.K. Asante-Duah. 1996. CRC Press. Reclamation of contaminated land by C. P. Nathanail & P. Bardos. 2004. John

Ma, Lena

166

DOE/EA-0978 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT SLUDGE STABILIZATION AT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

limit latent cancer fatality National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium Reclamation Facility Plutonium-Uranium...

167

Preliminary studies on physical and chemical processes in the subsurface system in the land reclaimed from the sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the north-eastern shores of Penny's Bay. After reclamation the total groundwater head in the entire model: Land reclamation, coastal process, groundwater flow, physiochemical reactions 1) Introduction Most that reclamation may change the regional groundwater regime, including groundwater level, interface between

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

168

Industrial and natural sources of gaseous elemental mercury in the Almadén district (Spain): An updated report on this issue after the ceasing of mining and metallurgical activities in 2003 and major land reclamation works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two events during the last decade had major environmental repercussions in Almadén town (Spain). First it was the ceasing of activities in the mercury mine and metallurgical facilities in 2003, and then the finalization of the restoration works on the main waste dump in 2008. The combination of both events brought about a dramatic drop in the emissions of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) to the atmosphere. Although no one would now call the Almadén area as ‘mercury-free’, the GEM levels have fallen beneath international reference safety levels for the first time in centuries. This has been a major breakthrough because in less than one decade the site went from GEM levels in the order of “tens of thousands” to mere “tens” nanogram per cubic meter. Although these figures are per se a remarkable achievement, they do not mark the end of the environmental concerns in the Almadén district. Two other sites remain as potential environmental hazards. (1) The Las Cuevas mercury storage complex, a partially restored ex-mining site where liquid mercury is being stored. The MERSADE Project (LIFE—European Union) has tested the Las Cuevas complex as a potential site for the installation of a future European prototype safe deposit of surplus mercury from industrial activities. Despite restoration works carried out in 2004, the Las Cuevas complex can still be regarded as hotspot of mercury contamination, with high concentrations above 800 ?g g{sup ?1} Hg{sub soil} and 300 ng m{sup ?3} Hg{sub gas}. However, as predicted by air contamination modeling using the ISC-AERMOD software, GEM concentrations fade away in a short distance following the formation of a NW–SE oriented narrow plume extending for a few hundred meters from the complex perimeter. (2) Far more dangerous from the human health perspective is the Almadenejos area, hosting the small Almadenejos village, the so-called Cerco de Almadenejos (CDA; an old metallurgical precinct), and the mines of La Nueva Concepción, La Vieja Concepción and El Entredicho. The CDA is an old metallurgical site that operated between 1794 and 1861, leaving behind a legacy of extremely contaminated soils (mean concentration=4220 ?g g{sup ?1} Hg) and GEM emissions that in summer can reach levels up to 4,000–5,000 ng m{sup ?3}. Thus the CDA remains the sole ‘urban’ site in the district surpassing GEM international reference safety levels. In order to prevent these emissions, the CDA requires immediate action regarding restoration works. These could involve the full removal of soils or their permanent capping to create an impermeable barrier.

Higueras, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.higueras@uclm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Geológica y Minera, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica de Almadén, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain) [Departamento de Ingeniería Geológica y Minera, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica de Almadén, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain); Instituto de Geología Aplicada (IGeA), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain); María Esbrí, José [Departamento de Ingeniería Geológica y Minera, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica de Almadén, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain) [Departamento de Ingeniería Geológica y Minera, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica de Almadén, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain); Instituto de Geología Aplicada (IGeA), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain); Oyarzun, Roberto; Llanos, Willans [Instituto de Geología Aplicada (IGeA), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain) [Instituto de Geología Aplicada (IGeA), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain); Departamento de Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Coronado, Alba [Instituto de Geología Aplicada (IGeA), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain)] [Instituto de Geología Aplicada (IGeA), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almadén (Spain); and others

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

Maya, L.

1981-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

170

Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

Anderson, D.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

None

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Biogeochemical redox cycling in hyper alkaline sediment-water systems. Ian Burke, Rob Mortimer and Doug Stewart (Civil Engineering)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kiln contrusted at Harper Hill in Derbyshire by the Buxton Lime Company was biggest of its type and was in operation continuously, 24/7, from 1872 until it was closed in 1944. (The kiln was demolished in 1980 of the kiln, and groundwater in contact with this waste has become saturated in Ca-, Na-, and K- hydroxides

Burke, Ian

173

Biogeochemical redox cycling in hyper alkaline sediment-water systems. Ian Burke, Rob Mortimer and Doug Stewart (Civil Engineering)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kiln constructed at Harper Hill in Derbyshire by the Buxton Lime Company was biggest of its type and was in operation continuously, 24/7, from 1872 until it was closed in 1944. (The kiln was demolished in 1980 of the kiln, and groundwater in contact with this waste has become saturated in Ca-, Na-, and K- hydroxides

Burke, Ian

174

COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CSMRI) SITE FLOOD PLAIN AREA CLEANUP FACT SHEET & PROJECT SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Environmental Protection Agency excavated and stockpiled soil from the tailings pond and surrounding area, demolished several buildings, and cleaned an industrial sewer system. The School subsequently shipped use in 1997. During the later 1990's several thousand drums of materials were characterized

175

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOE). 2008. Fossil Energy: Coal Mining and Transportation.aspects of generating energy from coal. Land reclamation andthat required for producing energy from coal. Traditionally,

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Transport Corridor Draft Environmental Impact Statement...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

fractional percentages are on lands managed by the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, or by the...

177

Energy Department to Invest up to $5.2 million to Advance Basic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Lab: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project: Land Reclamation for Bioenergy: Genomics of Adaptation of Populus to Marginal Sites DOE Lab: Los Alamos National Laboratory...

178

ammonium dihydrogen phosphate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Reclamation in Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: ). John Bennet Lawes, an English agricultural scientist, examined the application of sulfuric acid to...

179

CX-010341: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

line in order to allow the bureau of Reclamation to enlarge their Chandler Power and Pumping Plant switchyard, eliminating safety hazards and reducing the incidence of power...

180

Microsoft Word - CX_Memo_ChandlerTap_BOR.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in order to allow the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) to enlarge their Chandler Power and Pumping Plant switchyard, eliminating safety hazards and reducing the incidence of power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline radioactive liquid Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction Summary: Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining. Volume 1: Mining and Reclamation Background" by U.S. EPA (2006... as an...

182

BOSQUE REACH ARROYO DE LAS CAAS TO SOUTH BOUNDARY BOSQUE DEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with funding from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in Albuquerque, NM, via U.S. Forest Service Contract: 07-JV

Julien, Pierre Y.

183

Constructing the aesthetic sense : traversing scales of habitation in the Bingham Canyon Mine .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The activities of mining and mine reclamation in the American West raise questions of how we perceive, value, and differentiate between 'natural' and man-made landscapes,… (more)

Pierce, Matthew W., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery. c DanielCycle for Cement Kiln Waste Heat Recovery Power Plants. ”and high temperature waste heat reclamation and solar

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

EIS-0202: Umatilla Basin Project Planning Report and Final Environmental Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes BPA's proposed support for the Bureau of Reclamation proposal to assist in restoration of the Umatilla River anadromous fishery.

186

DOE Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE identified the preferred alternative of continued management of the program with exploration, mine development and operations, and reclamation at 31 lease tracts for the...

187

EA-1736: Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

188

Agencies Publish Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

fractional percentages are on lands managed by the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, or by the...

189

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [accepted]. [and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition.

Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Chanhee Boo Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

324 ­ New Haven, CT, US 06511 Phone: +1 203 623 7876 Email: chanhee.boo@yale.edu Education Sep.2012 desalination and wastewater reclamation - Advisor: Prof. Seungkwan Hong Mar.2002 ­ Feb.2009 Korea University and wastewater reclamation ", Journal of Membrane Science, Submitted Chanhee Boo, Sangyoup Lee, Menachem

Elimelech, Menachem

193

Functional and taxonomic diversity of microbial communities in reclaimed East Texas lignite mine soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collected along a chronosequence including sites of 0, 1, 4, 12, and 28 years following mining and reclamation. In addition to these sites, an unmined reference site, and a tree mott (reclamation age of 20 years) were included in the study. The functional...

Peach, Allen Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

Corrected March 24, 2014 Page 1 of 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Road/Trail/LandingClosure and Treatment Nov08 655 Forest Trails and Landings Sep11 657 Wetland Hedgerow Planting Sep10 423 Hillside Ditch May08 453 Land Reclamation, Landslide Treatment Feb05 Reclamation, Currently Mined Land Aug06 548 Grazing Land Mechanical Treatment Sep10 chiseling or deep ripping

US Army Corps of Engineers

195

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

196

300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2008 Building Completion Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of eighteen buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site that were demolished in Fiscal Year 2008. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

R. A. Westberg

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Environmental Programs: Status of Work and Current Priorities for FY13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation outline is: Mission/overview, Regulatory framework, Current status of cleanup, Shift in priorities to address highest risk, Removal of above-ground waste, Continued focus on protecting water resources, and Priorities for fiscal year 2013. LANL's Environmental Mission is to: (1) Repack and ship legacy transuranic waste containers; (2) Investigate and remediate Cold War (legacy) hazardous and radioactive waste areas; (3) Demolish unused buildings; (4) Disposition solid waste from Laboratory operations; and (5) Lifecycle cost nearly $3 billion.

Jones, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

U.S. Navy- Moanalua Terrace, Hawaii  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Moanalua Terrace is a U.S. Navy housing project on Oahu, Hawaii. At this site the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which were being rebuilt in four phases. The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction projects was an incentive for the Navy to install solar water heaters on family housing units.

199

300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2009 Building Completion Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of seven facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2009. The D4 of these facilities included characterization; engineering; removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials; equipment removal; utility disconnection; deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure; and stabilization or removal of slabs and foundations. This report also summarizes the nine below-grade slabs/foundations removed in FY09 of buildings demolished in previous fiscal years.

B. J. Skwarek

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

LANL disassembles "pits," makes mixed-oxide fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs & GraduatesReducingLANL Demolishes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DQO Summary Report for 324 and 327 Building Hot Cells D4 Project Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data quality objective (DQO) summary report provides the results of the DQO process conducted for waste characterization activities for the 324 and 327 Building hot cells decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities. This DQO summary report addresses the systems and processes related to the hot cells, air locks, vaults, tanks, piping, basins, air plenums, air ducts, filters, an adjacent elements that have high dose rates, high contamination levels, and/or suspect transuranic waste, which will require nonstandard D4 techniques.

T.A. Lee

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

Narratives from Rajendranagar: A Critical Ethnographic Study of Food Insecurity in an Indian Slum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

official Slum Clearance Boards that are tasked with the demolishing and redevelopment of slums. In globalized cities like Mumbai, the government has put forth significant efforts to redevelop slums and modernize the city. In many instances, third world...) Inadequate access to safe water (2) Inadequate access to sanitation. It is argued that unhealthy living conditions and root causes for communicable and non-communicable diseases are due to the lack of safe water and sanitation. (3) Poor structural quality...

Ramadurai, Vandhana

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a reclamation plan for short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with interim cleanup of radionuclide-contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site (located on the Tonopah Test Range). This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. Reclamation demonstration plots were established near the Double Tracks cleanup site in the fall of 1994 to evaluate the performance of several native plant species and to evaluate different irrigation strategies. Results of that study, and the results from numerous other studies conducted at other sites (Area 11 and Area 19 of the Nevada Test Site), have been summarized and incorporated into this final reclamation plan for the cleanup of the Clean Slate 1 site. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both short-term and long-term reclamation.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

HOMOLOGOUS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVES IN THE EMERGING FLUX REGION OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations, we present four homologous extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves within 3 hr on 2010 November 11. All EUV waves emanated from the same emerging flux region (EFR), propagated in the same direction, and were accompanied by surges, weak flares, and faint coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The waves had the basically same appearance in all EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO. The waves propagated at constant velocities in the range of 280-500 km s{sup -1}, with little angular dependence, which indicated that the homologous waves could be likely interpreted as fast-mode waves. The waves are supposed to likely involve more than one driving mechanism, and it was most probable that the waves were driven by the surges, due to their close timing and location relations. We also propose that the homologous waves were intimately associated with the continuous emergence and cancellation of magnetic flux in the EFR, which could supply sufficient energy and trigger the onsets of the waves.

Zheng Ruisheng; Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Hong Junchao; Yang, B.; Yang Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The detection of reconstituted milk in natural milk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?FEHRF ?hR EF^FR?N?N?? RFEH?N?? pHep^J??Fp N? ?N4? J?E ?N4? ?RhEH?^p? l?FC ?hH?E ^?J^ ?RFp? ?N4? ?hppFppFE J ?h?pNEFRJe4F ?FRRN? ?CJ?NEF RFEH?N?? ?J?J?N^C J?E ^?J^ ?FJ^ ^RFJ^?F?^ h? ?N4? hR p^hRJ?F h? ?N4? ?h?EFR H?EFR J^?hp??FRN? ?h?EN^Nh?p N...?J??J? J?E P??JR4J?F ???? ENp?FRpFE ^?F ?Rh^FN?p N? pJ^HRJ^FE HRFJ J^ ?i ??6? l?FC ?FRF Je4F ^h EF^F?^ ^?F ?RFpF??F h? Me.rri.t et al? (34) and. Cardwell and. Berzer (7j 8) applied, this method, with similar success* Cardwell and Herzer (7> 8) modified...

Mulay, Charudatta Anant

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

206

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N FRONT AND BAck cOVER PhOTOS: BuREAu OF REcLAmation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDearTechnicalAwards recognizeStatutes i Table of

207

CX-006591: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Invasive Species Removal and Reclamation in Gold Eagle Mining, IncorporatedCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.20Date: 08/24/2011Location(s): San Miguel County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

208

The Texas Water Plan and its Institutional Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wide array of institutional problems that will extend to such areas as the interstate diversion and interbasin transfers of water, doctrines or water rights and legislated water use-priorities, acreage restrictions established in federal reclamation law...

Jensen, C. W.; Trock, W. L.

209

CX-006711: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Reclamation of Decommissioned Batteries, Test Satellites, and FacilitiesCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1Date: 08/06/2011Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

210

Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

211

Quantitative analysis of heavy metals emission during the combustion and baling of polyvinyl chloride insulated copper wire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was conducted and compared to the airborne dust samples collected during the baling process. From these results, occupational exposures to heavy metals during the reclamation of PVC insulated copper wire were assessed. Bulk ash and dust samples were ?aken...

Pickard, David Paul

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fact #763: January 21, 2013 Eighty-four Percent of Scrapped Tires...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tire Uses, 2009 Market Tons (Thousands) Tire-derived Fuel 2,084.8 Ground Rubber 1,354.2 Civil Engineering 284.9 Reclamation Projects 130.0 Exported 102.1 Baled TiresMarketable...

213

Introduction Increasing demands on limited water resources have made  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(reclamation or reuse) an attractive option for extending water supplies. Treatment technologies have evolved has increasingly been used for municipal irrigation, toilet flushing, industrial cooling, and other varyconsiderablybetweensystems.Theuseofrecycledwater is particularly beneficial to extending water supplies in arid climates

Sanderson, Mike

214

Post-DiplomaBachelorofScience EnvironmentalScience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management (Soil and Water Conservation) (prior to 2004) Selkirk College Integrated Environmental Planning approved: Assiniboine Community College Land and Water Management Aurora College Natural Resources Management Technology) Environmental Conservation and Reclamation Environmental Protection Technology

Seldin, Jonathan P.

215

The Departments of Biological Sciences and Geography jointly offer instruction leading to a post-diploma major in Environmental Science for students who have completed the Diploma in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management or in Environmental Assessment and Restoration (formerly Watershed Management) at Lethbridge Lethbridge Community College Environmental Assessment and Restoration (formerly Watershed Management and Reclamation Soil and Water Conservation Selkirk College Integrated Environmental Planning Technology

Seldin, Jonathan P.

216

CX-006713: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The purpose of the project is to build a working reserve pit for storage of produced fluids during RMOTC reclamation work. The pit will be approximately 30 feet wide by 100 feet...

217

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste heat reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [K Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems inK Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the Bureau of Reclamation signed 10-year agreements - known as the Columbia Basin Fish Accords - with four Northwest tribes and two states on May 2, 2008. These historic...

219

The Oregon State University Kelley Engineering Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offices About Kelley Design Process Project Features Building Performance Project Features: Rainwater Reclamation About Kelley Design Process Project Features Building Performance ? 2,400-watt photovoltaic array ? Doubles as the cooling tower...

Schroeder, B.

220

MSRIP 2013 Faculty Research Projects The following faculty research projects are organized by colleges, and then  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enzymatic fuel cells. Computer Science and Engineering Faculty Mentor: Dr. Frank Vahid Research Setting: Lab on optimizing effective water #12;treatment and distribution, wastewater reclamation, and to understand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tract C-a Tract C-b Reverse osmosis Amortized capital andadsorption, and reverse osmosis. Salts in the leachate wouldWastewater Reclamation by Reverse Osmosis," JWPCF, 21, No.

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is one of the four federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) and it markets at wholesale over 10,000 MW of federal hydropower generated by the Bureau of Reclamation and Army...

223

What do you do when 80 percent of your cups walk out of your store, yet you want to create a system to recycle them? Engage the whole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on which to focus. Cups are made of paper fiber with a coating, and often have a plastic lid materials reclamation facilities, which are an elaborate interweaving of conveyor belts, magnets, and gears

de Weck, Olivier L.

224

Reverse logistics and large-scale material recovery from electronics waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste consolidation is a crucial step in the development of cost-effective, nation-wide material reclamation networks. This thesis project investigates typical and conformational tendencies of a hypothetical end-of-life ...

Krones, Jonathan Seth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by the Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines at Grand Coulee Dam. BPA will replace the existing underground transmission...

226

Impacts of feral hogs on reclaimed surface-mined lands in eastern Texas: a management perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last decade, surface lignite mines in eastern Texas have experienced damage to reclaimed lands by feral hogs (Sus scrota). Specifically, feral hogs have caused damage to vegetative plantings used in the reclamation process of surface...

Mersinger, Robert C.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Constructing the aesthetic sense : traversing scales of habitation in the Bingham Canyon Mine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The activities of mining and mine reclamation in the American West raise questions of how we perceive, value, and differentiate between 'natural' and man-made landscapes, as they produce radical alterations of the land on ...

Pierce, Matthew W., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) - Infrastructure Rehabilitation - Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves rehabilitating 42+ miles of canals, laterals, and pipelines. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.; Popp, Michael C.

229

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Infrastructure Rehabilitation – Preliminary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves rehabilitating 42+ miles of canals, laterals, and pipelines. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

230

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal - Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves constructing a 48" pipeline to replace the “Wisconsin Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those...

Rister, Edward; Lacewell, Ronald; Sturdivant, Allen; Robinson, John; Popp, Michael

231

WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED Historical Flooding in Havasu Creek, Arizona U.S. GEOLOGICAL OF RECLAMATION #12;WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED Historical Flooding in Havasu Creek, Arizona By THEODORE S

232

Boris Faybishenko's CV January 25, 2010 BORIS FAYBISHENKO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Moscow State University of Environmental Engineering, Moscow, Russia. Ph. D (1977), Institute of Hydraulic Engineers and Land Reclamation, Moscow, Russia. B.S. (1970), Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology, Kiev State University, Ukraine. WORK EXPERIENCE / WORK HISTORY: STAFF SCIENTIST, Earth Sciences

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

233

Oil and Gas Conservation (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Minerals and Mining Program oversees the regulation of oil and gas exploration, recovery, and reclamation activities in South Dakota. Permits are required for drilling of oil or gas wells, and...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous scrap recovery Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or reclamation mandates, and other... of AppliancesEquipment in a Manner that Ensures Refrigerant Recovery MVAC and MVAC-like units (alone... are to be managed as scrap...

235

EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

236

R and D program for core instrumentation improvements devoted for French sodium fast reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the framework of French R and D studies for Generation IV reactors and more specifically for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR); the CEA, EDF and AREVA have launched a joint coordinated research programme. This paper deals with the R and D sets out to achieve better inspection, maintenance, availability and decommissioning. In particular the instrumentation requirements for core monitoring and detection in the case of accidental events. Requirements mainly involve diversifying the means of protection and improving instrumentation performance in terms of responsiveness and sensitivity. Operation feedback from the Phenix and Superphenix prototype reactors and studies, carried out within the scope of the EFR projects, has been used to define the needs for instrumentation enhancement. (authors)

Jeannot, J. P.; Rodriguez, G.; Jammes, C.; Bernardin, B.; Portier, J. L.; Jadot, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, 13108 (France); Maire, S.; Verrier, D. [Advanced Projects and Decommissioning Div. Plant Sector AREVA NP - NEPL-FT, Lyon, 69000 (France); Loisy, F. [EDF - EDF R and D STEP Dept., 6 Quai Watier, Chatou, 78401 (France); Prele, G. [EDF, Generation/Nuclear Engineering, Basic Design Dept., Villeurbanne, 69628 (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mechanical Demolition of Buildings with Concrete Asbestos Board Siding: Methodology, Precautions, and Results at the Hanford Central Plateau - 12417  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the start of its contract in 2008, the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has demolished 25 buildings with concrete asbestos board (CAB) siding using mechanical means. While the asbestos contained in CAB siding is not friable in its manufactured form, concerns persist that mechanical methods of demolition have the potential to render the asbestos friable and airborne, therefore posing a health risk to demolition workers and the public. CH2M HILL's experience demonstrates that when carefully managed, mechanical demolition of CAB siding can be undertaken safely, successfully, and in compliance with regulatory requirements for the disposal of Class II Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM). While the number of buildings demolished at Hanford and the number of samples collected does not make a conclusive argument that CAB cannot be made friable with normal demolition techniques, it certainly provides a significant body of evidence for the success of the approach. Of course, there are many factors that affect how to demolish a structure and dispose of the waste. These factors will impact the success depending on each site. The most obvious factors which contribute to this success at Hanford are: 1. The availability of onsite waste disposal where the handling and cost of asbestos-containing waste is not much different than other potentially contaminated waste. Therefore, segregation of demolition debris from the potential asbestos contamination is not necessary from a debris handling or asbestos disposal aspect. 2. The space between structures is typically significant enough to allow for large exclusion zones. There are not many restrictions due to cohabitation issues or potential contamination of adjacent facilities. 3. The willingness of the regulators and client to understand the industrial safety issues associated with manual CAB removal. (authors)

Kehler, Kurt [Decommissioning and Demolition, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques.

LLOYD, E.R.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energy of magnetic moment of superconducting current in magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of magnetic moment of the persistent current circulating in superconducting loop in an externally produced magnetic field is not taken into account in the theory of quantization effects because of identification of the Hamiltonian with the energy. This identification misleads if, in accordance with the conservation law, the energy of a state is the energy expended for its creation. The energy of magnetic moment is deduced from a creation history of the current state in magnetic field both in the classical and quantum case. But taking this energy into account demolishes the agreement between theory and experiment. Impartial consideration of this problem discovers the contradiction both in theory and experiment.

V. L. Gurtovoi; A. V. Nikulov

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-D4 Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-036  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1607-D4 Septic System was a septic tank and tile field that received sanitary sewage from the 115-D/DR Gas Recirculation Facility. This septic system operated from 1944 to 1968. Decommissioning took place in 1985 and 1986 when all above-grade features were demolished and the tank backfilled. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

A. B. Culp

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

242

Decommissioning and waste disposal methods for an uranium mill facility in Spain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the south of Spain on the outskirts of the town of Andujar an inactive uranium mill tailings pile is being stabilized in place. Mill equipment, buildings and process facilities have been dismantled and demolished and the resulting metal wastes and debris will be placed in the pile. The tailings mass is being reshaped by flattening the sideslopes and a cover system will be placed over the pile. This paper describes the technical procedures used for the remediation and closure of the Andujar mill site and in particular discusses the approaches used for the dismantling and demolition of the processing facilities and the disposal of the metal wastes and demolition debris.

Santiago, J.L. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, M. [INITEC, Madrid (Spain)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200 Wlocalplywood boxremove Demolishing Support

244

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200 Wlocalplywood boxremove Demolishing

245

Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-H-1, 116-H Reactor Stack Burial Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-053  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 132-H-1 waste site includes the 116-H exhaust stack burial trench and the buried stack foundation (which contains an embedded vertical 15-cm (6-in) condensate drain line). The 116-H reactor exhaust stack and foundation were decommissioned and demolished using explosives in 1983, with the rubble buried in situ beneath clean fill at least 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

LANL engineers help New Mexico small businesses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs & GraduatesReducingLANL DemolishesEngineers

247

Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department ofEnergy IsTestimonials Worker Testimonials RickDemolishJuly 27,

248

Workers' Rights  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department ofEnergy IsTestimonials Worker Testimonials RickDemolishJuly 27,

249

Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.

BAZZELL, K.D.; SMITH, B.A.

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Commercial Decommissioning at DOE's Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due in large part to the number of nuclear facilities that make up the DOE complex, DOE-EM work has historically been paperwork intensive and driven by extensive regulations. Requirements for non-nuclear facilities are often grouped with those of nuclear facilities, driving up costs. Kaiser-Hill was interested in applying a commercial model to demolition of these facilities and wanted to apply necessary and sufficient standards to the work activities, but avoid applying unnecessary requirements. Faced with demolishing hundreds of uncontaminated or non-radiologically contaminated facilities, Kaiser-Hill has developed a subcontracting strategy to drastically reduce the cost of demolishing these facilities at Rocky Flats. Aiming to tailor the demolition approach of such facilities to more closely follow commercial practices, Kaiser-Hill recently released a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the demolition of the site's former central administration facility. The RFP significantly reduced requirements for compliance with specific DOE directives. Instead, the RFP required subcontractors to comply with health and safety requirements commonly found in the demolition of similar facilities in a commercial setting. This resulted in a number of bids from companies who have normally not bid on DOE work previously and at a reduced cost over previous approaches. This paper will discuss the details of this subcontracting strategy.

Freiboth, C.; Sandlin, N.; Schubert, A.; Hansen, S.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

Morris, R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes a reclamation plan for the short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with the cleanup of radionuclide contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site. This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. The results of reclamation trials at Area 11, Area 19 and more recently the reclamation demonstration plots at the Double Tracks cleanup site, have been summarized and incorporated into this reclamation and monitoring plan. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both the effectiveness and success of short-term and long-term soil stabilization. The Clean Slate 1 site is located on the Tonopah Test Range. The surface soils were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. Short-term stabilization consists of the application of a chemical soil stabilizer that is applied immediately following excavation of the contaminated soils to minimize Pu resuspension. Long-term stabilization is accomplished by the establishment of a permanent vegetation.

Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Public views of reclaiming an abandoned coal mine: the Macoupin County project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An abandoned underground coal mine waste area in Macoupin County, Illinois, has been reclaimed for demonstration and research purposes near the city of Staunton. According to federal law, end uses of reclaimed coal mines must be determined in part by local concerns. This study examined local residents' preferences for land uses and their social and economic evaluations of reclamation at the Macoupin County site. Personal interviews with 119 residents revealed preferences for recreational use of the demonstration area; however, responses were probably influenced by prior awareness of land-use intentions. Generally, very positive evaluations of the reclamation were received. Willingness to pay for reclamation appears to be linked to fulfillment of desired recreational uses on the site and socioeconomic status of the respondent. In general, the research results provide further evidence that the value of abatement of environmental damage from mining is recognized and supported in economic terms at the public level.

Bernard, J. R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Process-design manual: Land application of municipal sludge. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manual presents a rational procedure for the design of municipal-sludge land-application systems. The utilization of sludge in agriculture, forestry, the reclamation of disturbed and marginal lands, and dedicated high-rate surface disposal practices are discussed in detail, with design concepts and criteria presented where available. A two-phased planning approach to site identification, evaluation, and selection along with information on field investigations are also presented. The manual includes examples of each land-application option and case studies of sludge utilization in agriculture and for reclamation of disturbed mining lands.

Not Available

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Installation of River and Drain Instrumentation Stations to Monitor Flow and Water Quality and Internet Data Sharing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

del Norte Watershed Council With funding support in part by the U.S Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation El Paso Water Utilities, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers through Texas AgriLife Research and the U.S. Department of Interior, Geological.../Texas AgriLife research, United States Bureau of Reclamation, United States Geological Survey, United States Army Corps of Engineers, and the United States Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC). The Project is also based...

Sheng, Z.; Brown, C.; Creel, B.; Srinivasan, R.; Michelsen, A.; Fahy, M. P.

257

Coal-Mac, Inc. Phoenix No. 1 mine provides wildlife haven. 2007 Wildlife West Virginia Award  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Mac, Inc.'s Harless Wood Industrial Park off Holden 22 Mines Road in Logan Country, West Virginia is an award-winning reclamation site in the mountains frequented by geese, wild turkey, deer and black bears. Orchard grass and rye is a temporary cover for the timothy, clover and other seedlings. The area was mined several years ago. Some 40,000-50,000 tons of coal per month are surfaced mined with the current permit that takes in 1,500-2,000 acres. After removing the coal, valleys are backfilled as part of the mining and reclamation plan. 10 photos.

Skinner, A.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Interconnect Between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and Replacement of Rio Grande Diversion Pumping Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Bureau of Reclamation’s evaluation of proposed projects: c60 Number of acre-feet of water saved per dollar of construction costs; c60 Number of British Thermal Units (BTU) of energy saved per dollar of construction costs; and c60 Dollars of annual... Documentation for Sonia Kaniger, March, 2003 Manager, Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) page ii of 82 associated with energy savings. There are energy savings both from pumping less water forthcoming from reducing leaks and from improving...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Stabilization and restoration of an uranium mill site in Spain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the south of Spain on the outskirts of the town of Andujar an inactive uranium mill tailings site has been remediated in place. Mill equipment, buildings and process facilities have been dismantled and demolished and 06q the resulting metal wastes and debris have been placed in the tailings pile. The tailings mass has been reshaped by flattening the sideslopes to improve stability and a cover system has been placed over the pile. Remedial action works started in February 1991 and were completed by April 1994. This paper describes the remediation works for the closure of the Andujar mill site and in particular discusses the approaches used for the dismantling and demolition of the processing facilities and the stabilization of the tailings pile.

Santiago, J.L.; Estevez, C.P. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Decommissioning of facilities and encapsulation of wastes for an uranium mill site in Spain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the south of Spain on the outskirts of the town of Andujar an inactive uranium mill tailings site is being remediated in place. Mill equipment, buildings and process facilities have been dismantled and demolished and the resulting metal wastes and debris have been placed in the tailings pile. The tailings mass has been reshaped by flattening the sideslopes to improve stability and a cover system has been placed over the pile. Remedial action works started in February 1991 and will be completed by March 1994. This paper describes the progress of the remediation works for the closure of the Andujar mill site and in particular discusses the approaches used for the dismantling and demolition of the processing facilities and the stabilization of the tailings pile.

Santiago, J.L. [Enresa, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, M. [Initec, Madrid (Spain)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RADIOLOGICAL CONTROLS FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FROM 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINSHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 232-Z facility at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant operated as a plutonium scrap incinerator for 11 years. Its mission was to recover residual plutonium through incinerating and/or leaching contaminated wastes and scrap material. Equipment failures, as well as spills, resulted in the release of radionuclides and other contamination to the building, along with small amounts to external soil. Based on the potential threat posed by the residual plutonium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued an Action Memorandum to demolish Building 232-2, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERC1.A) Non-Time Critical Removal Action Memorandum for Removal of the 232-2 Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (04-AMCP-0486).

MINETTE, M.J.

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

J. L. Smith

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Expedited Demolition Notification for 2nd Quarter CY 2012 Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) (collectively the Permittees) are informing the New Mexico Environment Department Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of the need to expedite the demolition of structures summarized in the enclosures. These structures have been identified to receive funding and be demolished prior to the 3rd Quarter Demolition Notification (June 30, 2012). This letter is a follow up to the email that was sent to the NMED-HWB on April 17, 2012. The enclosures attached to this letter satisfy the reporting requirements as outlined in Section 1.17 of the LANL Hazardous Facility Waste Permit (Permit). Demolition of buildings that appear on this list will not occur until 30 days after NMED has received this notification.

Juarez, Catherine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Considerations, measurements and logistics associated with low-energy cyclotron decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Iowa's 20-year-old 17 MeV Scanditronix cyclotron underwent decommissioning in the summer of 2011. To satisfy local, state and federal regulations defining removal, transportation and long-term safe and environmentally secure disposal of the 22 ton activated cyclotron, a series of nuclear spectroscopic measurements were performed to characterize the nature and extent of proton and neutron activation of the 22-ton cyclotron, its associated targets, and the concrete wall that was demolished to remove the old cyclotron. Neutron activation of the concrete wall was minimal and below exempt concentrations resulting in standard landfill disposal. The cyclotron assessment revealed the expected array of short and medium-lived radionuclides. Subsequent calculations suggest that meaningful levels residual activity will have decayed virtually to background after 15 years, with the total residual activity of the entire cyclotron dropping below 37 MBq (1 mCi).

Sunderland, J. J.; Erdahl, C. E.; Bender, B. R.; Sensoy, L.; Watkins, G. L. [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City IA 52242 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Iowa, Iowa City IA 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City IA 52242 (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

ANIMAS-LA PLATA PROJECT COMPACT The state of Colorado and the state of New Mexico, in order to implement the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANIMAS-LA PLATA PROJECT COMPACT The state of Colorado and the state of New Mexico, in order to implement the operation of the Animas-La Plata federal reclamation project, Colorado-New Mexico, a proposed the following articles: ARTICLE I A. The right to store and divert water in Colorado and New Mexico from the La

Johnson, Eric E.

266

Acknowledgment This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. SES-0345945 Decision Center for a Desert City (DCDC).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Water Vulnerability on the Urban Periphery: The Case of Metropolitan or chronic hazards. For this study, the vulnerability of community water systems to drought and water to create an integrated municipal water distribution and wastewater reclamation system. · The town

Hall, Sharon J.

267

California's Russian River: A Conservation Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Improve weather and river flow forecasting to maximize water captured for reservoirs and fisheries support forecast-based reservoir operations and allow for improved water management. It may also provide's Russian River Habitat Blueprint #12;Restore floodplain habitat through reclamation of abandoned gravel

268

Call for Proposals Eurasian Center for Food Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Region and to ensure the sustainability of rural development and natural resource management by providing irrigation-induced soil erosion and salinity in Central Asia and Armenia The use of salt-tolerant plants for saline soil reclamation Price volatility and the impact on food security in Central Asia and Armenia

Kaplan, Alexander

269

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Speciation and mobility of heavy metals in mud in coastal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the properties of the pore water in the mud may induce the release of some heavy metals into the mud. Field, but the heavy metals in the groundwater are in- creased. The release of heavy metals into pore water dueORIGINAL ARTICLE Speciation and mobility of heavy metals in mud in coastal reclamation areas

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

270

Aerosol Science 36 (2005) 763783 www.elsevier.com/locate/jaerosci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for indoor air quality assessments of flood reclamation M.P. Fabiana , S.L. Millerb , T. Reponenc , M November 2004; accepted 12 November 2004 Abstract An air quality study was conducted in arid practices on indoor air quality. These assays included (i) optical counting (OPC) of airborne particulate

Pace, Norman

271

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deep into the over- burden to extract soil water that is inaccessible to more shallow-rooted species research conducted at the Powell River Project Research and Education Center site. Sericea Lespedeza in the early days of mined-land reclamation. Sericea has a long, deep tap- root that is capable of penetrating

Liskiewicz, Maciej

272

EIS-0496: San Luis Transmission Project, Alameda, Merced, San Joaquin and Stanislaus Counties, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Western Area Power Administration, with the Bureau of Reclamation as a cooperating agency, is preparing a joint EIS and environmental impact report (under the California Environmental Quality Act) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed interconnection of certain San Luis Unit facilities to Western’s Central Valley Project Transmission System.

273

Energy Efficient Multiprocessor Task Scheduling under Input-dependent Variation Jason Cong and Karthik Gururaj  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce a scheduling solution and voltage assignment such that the average energy consumption is minimized that the scheduling solution generated by our algorithm can provide up to 25% reduction in energy consumption over greedy dynamic slack reclamation algorithms. Index Terms--DVS, scheduling, average energy consumption

Cong, Jason "Jingsheng"

274

Regmi Research Series ,Year 21, January, 1989  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. RRC , Vol . 34 , p .• B 1 •. 6 . lAnd Reclamation in DhWlwakot Royal order to Mabeshwar Pa cihya and Tularam Padhya : IlDig irriJat i on channels and rec laim 1 khat of r ice- l ands through your own re source s wi t hin an a rea wi th the f Oll...

Regmi, Mahesh C

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

SEDIMENT IN ARROYO PASAJERO AND SAN LUIS CANAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEDIMENT IN ARROYO PASAJERO AND SAN LUIS CANAL PREPARED FOR: US BUREAU OF RECLAMATION DENVER as floodwaters breached the San Luis Canal levee and filled the sediment basins with a mixture of water, sediment alternatives, the sediment basins would be enlarged. This study focuses on sedimentation in the West Side

Julien, Pierre Y.

276

DRAFT FOR COMMENT ONLY NOT A SOLICITATION FOR PROPOSALS October 26, 2010 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are required: for environmentally benign disposition of brines and waste streams from desalination and water reclamation projects; for low-cost methods for removal of emerging contaminants from wastewater streams of concentrated brine discharge from reverse osmosis plants limit deployment as permitting is a major constituent

Magee, Joseph W.

277

The School of Civil & Evironmental Engineering (CEE) at Georgia Tech is one of 10 schools within the Institute's College of Engineering. The School has graduated more than 10,000 students and is consistently ranked as one of the most prominent programs of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, comprehensive instruction and research across five disciplines of civil engineering: Construction Engineering solutions. Our faculty and students work with industry and government, finding innovative solutions to help · Wastewater reclamation and reuse · Health effects of air pollution · Bio-remediation of hazardous waste

Wang, Yuhang

278

The School of Civil & Evironmental Engineering (CEE) at Georgia Tech is one of 10 schools within the Institute's College of Engineering. The School has graduated more than 10,000 students and is consistently ranked as one of the most prominent programs of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instruction and research across five disciplines of civil engineering: Construction Engineering, Environmental. Our faculty and students work with industry and government, finding innovative solutions to help drive reclamation and reuse · Health effects of air pollution · Bio-remediation of hazardous waste · Pollution

Wang, Yuhang

279

The School of Civil & Evironmental Engineering (CEE) at Georgia Tech is one of 10 schools within the Institute's College of Engineering. The School has graduated more than 10,000 students and is consistently ranked as one of the most prominent programs of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instruction and research across six disciplines of civil engineering: Construction Engineering, Environmental solutions. Our faculty and students work with industry and government, finding innovative solutions to help · Wastewater reclamation and reuse · Health effects of air pollution · Bio-remediation of hazardous waste

Wang, Yuhang

280

Degree Requirements Cohort AY2011/2012 updated as of 28 December 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Mechanics of Materials 4 CE2134 Hydraulics 4 CE2183 Construction Project Management 4 CE2407 of Adsorption ESE5201 Combustion Pollution Control ESE5202 Air Pollution Control Technology ESE52035402 Industrial Wastewater Control ESE5403 Water Reclamation & Reuse ESE5404 Biological Treatment

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Appendixes Appendix I. Published Reports of Less Common Causes of Elevated Blood Lead Levels (EBLLs) in Children.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description Ref. # Occupational Take Home Exposures Battery reclamation Lead carried home by battery workers. (Only a minority of battery workers showered or changed clothes before going home.) E Twelve (75%) of 16 Bulk-water storage tank Lead leached from soldered seams and brass fittings in bulk- water storage

282

Carpathian Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, September 2011, Vol. 6, No. 2, p. 143 -149 STUDY OF A PASSIVE RADON MITIGATION PROCESS AND INDOOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thege út 29-33, 1121, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: The uranium mining was stopped in the Mecsek Mountains (S-Hungary) in 1997 and mine reclamation of the contaminated area began. For this purpose radiometric survey of houses in the towns of the former mining area, including settlement of Kvágószls

Horváth, Ákos

283

EPA Uranium Program Update Loren W. Setlow and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30, 2008 #12;2 Overview EPA Radiation protection program Uranium reports and abandoned mine lands and Liability Act #12;4 Uranium Reports and Abandoned Mine Lands Program ·Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining, Volume I: Mining and Reclamation Background (Revised

284

Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined in a wide variety of rocks, including sandstone, carbonates1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-1 Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined conventional mining, solution extraction, and milling of uranium, a principal focus of this report is TENORM, or which may need future reclamation. When uranium mining first started, most of the ores were recovered

285

CX-006484: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Reclamation Projects in Energy Fuels Resources Lease Tracts C-AM-19 and C-AM-20, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.28Date: 07/26/2011Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

286

PUBLICATION 460-131 www.ext.vt.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but it is similar to that of other coal-mining states in the Appalachian coal region. Modern coal-cleaning technologies have allowed coal preparation facilities to become quite efficient at remov- ing sulfur compounds, Virginia State, Petersburg. Introduction Stabilization and reclamation of coal refuse disposal piles

Liskiewicz, Maciej

287

Towards Reliable Scheduling Schemes for Long-lived Replaceable Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including energy conservation [1], ambient energy harvesting [2]­[6], incremental deployment, and node reclamation and replacement [7], [8]. Energy conservation schemes can slow down energy con- sumption and thus. For example, the amount of energy that a solar cell can harvest is proportional to its surface area

Wang, Guiling

288

Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the potential to release significant levels of acidity, heavy metals, and toxic oxyanions (As) to groundwater Information Category Data Title Influence of Organic Mine Reclamation Amendments on Metal Mobility and Water Pollution Potential Project Number C-01 Start Date 09/01/1998 End Date 09/30/2000 Research Category Water

289

Walla Walla Subbasin WDFW March 2004 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heaven Hills. Land Ownership Approximately 11% of the Walla Walla subbasin is in federal, state, tribal lands owned by the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, and the U. Forest Service (Umatilla National Forest) and the U. S. Bureau of Land Management. All lands managed

290

Desalination and Water Treatment www.deswater.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.22 µm. Seawater, reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate collected from a wastewater reclamation plant for the treatment of saline water and wastewater such as thermal distillation and reverse osmosis [2,3]. MD has several advantages compared to conventional thermal distillation and reverse osmosis processes [3

291

Survey of Energy Use in Grocery Stores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stores, and varies by ± 2 W/ft^2. This seemed to be due to a set amount of refrigeration capacity in the stores. In this survey, stores built after 1979 had roughly 9% less energy consumption per ft^2 than those built before 1979. Heat reclamation from...

Cox, R. L.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

292

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t Ch A lClimate Change Analyses Columbia River Managementg Joint Operating Committee (RMJOC action agencies (BPA, Corps and Bureau of Reclamation), under the auspices of the River Management Joint Operating Committee (RMJOC), initiated a 2-year project to investigate potential climate change impacts

293

A Tool for Integrated Planning of Water Infrastructure Gwendolyn Woods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or inaccurate. Economy of scale for wastewater reclamation (treatment) facilities may conflict with the energy. Yet the need to plan for new water and wastewater infrastructure remains. In the Assessment of Climate Change in the Southwest United States: A Report Prepared for the National Climate Assessment, Theobald et

Fay, Noah

294

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using Membrane Contactor Processes J O S H U water resources and increased interest in wastewater reclamation for potable reuse. This interest has in the study of wastewater reuse in advanced life support systems (e.g., space missions) because

295

ED-WAVE: an Educational Software for Training on Wastewater Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ED-WAVE: an Educational Software for Training on Wastewater Technologies Using Virtual Application database and case base reasoning in the field of wastewater treatment and water reclamation. ED-WAVE aims education; wastewater technolo- gies; wastewater treatment animations INTRODUCTION SUSTAINABILITY

Gutierrez, Diego

296

Flexible hybrid membrane treatment systems for tailored nutrient management: A new paradigm in urban wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in urban wastewater treatment D. Vuono a , J. Henkel a , J. Benecke a , T.Y. Cath a , T. Reid b , L: Sequencing batch reactor Membrane bioreactor Water reclamation Distributed wastewater treatment Tailored, decentralized, and satellite wastewater treatment systems into existing urban water infrastructure

297

Life Cycle Assessment of Three Water Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards Organization, SETAC, US EPA · Inventory of material and energy required for a product or process on portion of total water received (3%) #12;Reclamation: Scottsdale Reclaims wastewater for use (Reclaimed Plant) Wastewater treatment, advanced water treatment, and groundwater recharge and extraction

Keller, Arturo A.

298

US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS PLANNING AND RESPONSE TEAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS PLANNING AND RESPONSE TEAM INFRASTRUCTURE ASSESSMENT MISSION GUIDE March, hazardous materials, water and wastewater infrastructure (e.g. treatment facilities, lift stations, other Federal agencies (e.g. Bureau of Reclamation). The IA PRT program also supports water/wastewater

US Army Corps of Engineers

299

Graduate Studies Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; wastewater reclamation and reuse; hazardous and solid waste engineering; ground water modeling and treatment subsurface fate and transport of contaminants · Physicochemical processes for water and wastewater treatment collaborations in Atlanta with units at Emory University and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Jacobs, Laurence J.

300

2.4 Contaminant Transport Assessment and Management (CONTAM) The Contam research area focuses on developing technology to observe and manage mass and energy distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater irrigations sites near Merced, CA, we shifted sensing resources to the managed aquifer recharge in identifying a floodwater diversion site to contrast with the existing wastewater reclamation site installed a long-term water quality monitoring station in September 2010. This station is enabling us

California at Los Angeles, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal irrigation scheduling, household conservation patterns, the effects of wastewater reuse on turfgrass, the economics of water transfers, or historical and optimal of Reclamation asked us to help stage a workshop on produced waters those waters resulting from the extraction

302

Page 1 of 3 CUIRE/UCT 2011 Training Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater Reclamation District 6450 York Street Denver, CO 80229 Phone: 303-286-3285 Fax: 303-286-3039 jmaier@mwrd.dst.co.us Terry McArthur, P.E. Senior Project Manager HDR One Company 301 South 13th Street

Texas at Arlington, University of

303

ANL/DIS-11-1 Revised Financial Analysis of Experimental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by United States Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration #12;ii FOREWORD This report releases from the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Area Power of Reclamation. The facilities known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects include dams

Kemner, Ken

304

138 RestoRative Commons Fresh Kills site; an aerial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of brownfield sites to productive landscapes-- whether for development, pubic open space, or mixed uses in this way, brownfield projects can strengthen our understanding and respect for the natural environment communities. In brownfield reclamation, I suggest that these benefits come not just from the renewed

305

Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because reclamation of strip mine areas, hazardous waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects, or spring floods. Because of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has

306

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 54" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves constructing a 72" and 54" pipeline to replace 2.29 miles of the “Main Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

307

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Netherland, WES David Sisneros, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Alison M. Fox, William T. Hailer, University Liquid and Slow-Release Pellet Applications by Michael D. Netherland U.S. Army Corps of Engineers / by Michael D. Netherland ... [et al.]; prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 64p. : ill. ; 28 cm

US Army Corps of Engineers

308

Major Challenges in Landscape Planning: Simulated Field Trips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of production. The surface mining process generally consists of four phases: (1) exploration; (2) development Rowland and Reed Stalder 2/ Abstract: The surface mining process consists of four phases: (1) exploration; (3) production; and (4) reclamation. The purpose of exploration or "prospec- ting" is to discover

Standiford, Richard B.

309

INCORPORATING UNCERTAINTY INTO DAM SAFETY RISK Sanjay S. Chauhan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Reclamation are using risk assessment as a decision support tool. This paper summarizes an approach to incorporating input uncertainties into risk analysis model. Input uncertainties are captured by using for uncertainty analysis in dam safety risk assessment, and demonstrates some useful formats for presenting

Chauhan, Sanjay S.

310

Spill prevention control and countermeasure training series, parts 11-15: The end products and users (vhs 1/2 inch) (video). Audiovisual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This segment describes: gas processing at refineries; petrochemical facilities and processing SPCC requirements at petrochemical plants; storing oil and oil product; product pipelines; inspection and SPCC requirements at end-user facilities (hospitals, utilities, etc) and waste reclamation facilities; and inspection procedures and reports.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Oil shale mining processing, uses, and environmental impacts. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning oil shale mining and retorting, uses, and related environmental aspects. References discuss pyrolyzed, gasified, and combusted oil shales. Product yields and oil quality, socioeconomic impacts, exploration, reclamation of mined lands, and waste disposal are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Approach · Define regions of analysis · Describe existing power systems, including hydrologic for hydropower and power sales from Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) · First Report due in two years as Corps and Reclamation · Include recommendations from PMA administrators The "9505 Assessment

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

313

FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

Laughlin, Robert B.

314

The IDB (Integrated Design Building) Coming Soon Spring 2017 TO APPLY http://www.umass.edu/gradschool/admissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The IDB (Integrated Design Building) Coming Soon Spring 2017 TO APPLY http@larp.umass.edu Master of Landscape Architecture Our landscape architecture program trains students to design parks and recreation Land reclamation and rehabilitation Residential sites Security design Streetscapes and public

Mountziaris, T. J.

315

Montana State University 1 M.S.in Land Resources and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of invasive plant species, soil nutrient management, bioremediation, land reclamation, restoration, chemical fate and transport, water quality, crop diversification, precision agriculture, environmental risk of courses) AGSC 401 Integrated Pest Management 3 ENTO 510 Insect Ecology 3 LRES 507 Environmental Risk

Maxwell, Bruce D.

316

Response for: PROJECT ID 199601900 Second Tier Database Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to management actions in historical and real-time. · Data acquisition and Quality Assurance. Over 400,000 rows system providing web-based real-time and historical data integration services and analyses needed by FWP Environmental Laboratory, US Bureau of Reclamation. - Provide data quality feedback and correction requests

317

ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program WQMP Water Quality Management Plan WSU Washington State University WRP Management BOR Bureau of Reclamation (USDI) cfs cubic feet per second CCRP Continuous Conservation Reserve Commission CRP Conservation Reserve Program (NRCS) CSMEP Collaborative System-wide Monitoring and Evaluation

318

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for reclamation activities. However, environmental policy and effective management practices are extremely to improve best management practices (BMPs) and protect groundwater while continuing to provide a beneficial environmental policy and science over the past decade. These materials, which are a natural by-product of waste

319

Opportunities for Visual Resource Management in the Southern Appalachian Coal Basin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunities for Visual Resource Management in the Southern Appalachian Coal Basin1 John W) in the southern Appalachian coal basin resulting from the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. It focuses been concerned with the visual impacts resulting from the surface mined coal the agency purchases

Standiford, Richard B.

320

Environmental Cleanup of the Idaho National Laboratory Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the status of the cleanup of the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory site (INL). On May 1, 2005 CH2M.WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) began its 7-year, $2.4 billion cleanup of the INL. When the work is completed, 3,406,871 liters (900,000 gallons) of sodium-bearing waste will have been treated; 15 high-level waste tanks will have been grouted and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- closed; more than 200 facilities will have been demolished or disposed of, including three reactors, several spent fuel basins, and hot cells; thousands of containers of buried transuranic waste will have been retrieved; more than 8,000 cubic meters (10,464 cubic yards) of contact-handled transuranic waste and more than 500 cubic meters (654 cubic yards) of remote-handled transuranic waste will have been characterized, packaged, and shipped offsite; almost 200 release sites and voluntary consent order tank systems will have been remediated; and 3,178 units of spent fuel will have been moved from wet to dry storage. In 2007, CWI began the construction of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit that will treat the sodium-bearing waste for eventual disposal; removed and disposed the 112-ton Engineering Test Reactor vessel; demolished all significant radiological facilities at Test Area North; continued the exhumation of buried transuranic wastes from the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex; shipped the first of hundreds of containers of remote-handled transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; disposed of thousands of cubic meters of low-level and low-level mixed radioactive wastes both onsite and offsite while meeting all regulatory cleanup objectives. (author)

Schubert, A.L. [CH2M.WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO{sub 2} in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel` ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

Huffines, R.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

PRB mines mature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Regulatory tools for overcoming barriers to the resale and redevelopment of contaminated properties: A Michigan model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential contamination in urban industrial areas has created a significant barrier to the resale and redevelopment of prime metropolitan sites. Development is forced from existing industrial areas to ``greenfield`` sites. The State of Michigan has developed an innovative program to facilitate the redevelopment of these contaminated ``brownfield`` sites. This comprehensive program includes flexible, land-use based cleanup standards; liability protection for local units of government, covenants not to sue for buyers and potentially responsible parties and State funded grants` and loans for site investigation and reclamation. Each of these regulatory tools and their strengths and weaknesses are discussed. Several examples of the implementation of Michigan`s site reclamation program are also provided.

Lynnes, K.D. [Berlin, Lynnes and Davidson, Inc., Grand Rapids, MI (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As required by the terms of the above referenced grant, the following summary serves as the Final Report for that grant. The grant relates to work performed at two separate sites, the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site south of Gillette, Wyoming, and the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Site near Rock Springs, Wyoming. The primary concern to the State of Wyoming at each site is ground water contamination (the primary contaminants of concern are benzene and related compounds), and the purpose of the grant has been to provide tiding for a Geohydrologist at the appropriate State agency, specifically the Land Quality Division (LQD) of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. The LQD Geohydrologist has been responsible for providing technical and regulatory support to DOE for ground water remediation and subsequent surface reclamation. Substantial progress has been made toward remediation of the sites, and continuation of LQD involvement in the remediation and reclamation efforts is addressed.

Unknown

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011.

328

Review of municipal sludge use as a soil amendment on disturbed lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is examining options of improving soil conditions at Hanford reclamation sites. One promising technology is the incorporation of municipal sewage sludge into the soil profile. This report reviews the potential benefits and adverse consequences of sludge use in land reclamation. Land reclamation comprises those activities instigated to return a mechanically disturbed site to some later successional state. Besides the introduction of suitable plant species to disturbed lands, reclamation generally requires measures to enhance long-term soil nutrient content, moisture retention or drainage, and mitigation of toxic effects from metals and pH. One of the more effective means of remediating adverse soil characteristics is the application of complex organic manures such as municipal sewage sludge. Sewage sludges contain complete macro- and micronutrients necessary to sustain plant growth. The application of sewage sludge may reestablish microbial activity in sterile soils. Physical properties, such as water-holding capacity and percentage water-stable aggregates, also improve with the addition of sewage sludge. Sludge applications may also increase the rate of degradation of some hydrocarbon pollutants in soils. Potential adverse impacts associated with the application of sewage sludge to land include negative public perception of human waste products; concerns regarding pathogen buildup and spread in the soils, plants, and water; entrance and accumulation of heavy metals in the food chain; salt accumulation in the soil and ground water; leaching of nitrates into ground water; and accumulation of other potentially toxic substances, such as boron and synthetic hydrocarbons, in the soil, plants, and food chain. 56 refs., 10 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and California Department of Water Resources are jointly preparing an EIS/Environmental Impact Report that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Bay Delta Conservation Plan for restoring and protecting water supply reliability, water quality, and ecosystem health. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency. Additional information is available at http://baydeltaconservationplan.com/Home.aspx.

330

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C ·Historical Operation ·Western Nuclear Crooks Gap Project ·Mined 1956 ­ 1988 and Open Pit Mining ·Current Mine Permit (381C) ·Updating POO, Reclamation Plan & Bond ·Uranium Recovery

332

Fourth Interview with Sir Eli Lauterpacht - 20 March 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or knowledge about, or information to protect the environment that there is today. Of course it’s a continuing major issue, so that these episodes at that time were part of the evolving history of international environmental protection. 88. Yes, I... at environmental impact assessment. There Malaysia obtained a measure of success. Not that the land reclamation was stopped, but that it was to be controlled and developed in discussion with Malaysia. So I have had a continuing interest in environmental...

Dingle, Lesley; Bates, Daniel

2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

333

Endangered species program Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY94, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to conserve endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 400 preactivity surveys covering approximately 315 acres were conducted in FY94. Mitigation measures implemented as a result of survey findings resulted in avoidance of incidental takes of listed species during construction activities. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. Third-party projects in FY94 included three pipeline projects and two well abandonment/clean-up projects. Cultural resource support provided to NPRC consisted primarily of conducting preliminary surveys for cultural resources, and preparing a Cultural Resource Management Plan and Programmatic Agreement for NPR-1. These two documents will be finalized in FY95. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY94, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was initiated to assess reclamation efficacy. Results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In addition to this effort, 347 reclaimed sites were assessed to evaluate reclamation success.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

335

EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES AND LANDFORMS Earth Surf. Process. Landforms 35, 531548 (2010)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a geomorphic reclamation model for quarries on slopes J.F. Martín-Duque,1 * M.A. Sanz,1 J.M. Bodoque,2 A. Lucía mining and quarries on slopes, where steep gradients are prone to both mass movement and water erosion of a quarry on a slope (La Revilla) in Central Spain. The geomorphic model does not reproduce the original

336

[Aristotle attributed this teaching to Thales of Miletus, the first known Greek philosopher, scientist, and mathematician.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on ordering these publications appears on page 2. Bureau of Reclamation National Park Service U.S. Army Corps-term field research sites in New Hampshire, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Nebraska since the late 1970s of Engineers USDA Forest Service U.S. Geological Survey #12;A G I E n v i r o n m e n t a l A w a r e n e

Hardy, Darel

337

Incorporating Sustainability into Brownfield Remediation and Redevelopment in Mega-project: Experience and Lessons Learnt at the London Olympic Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

network established in 2007 in the UK) and CL:AIRE (Contaminated Land: Applications in Real Environments - a UK not-for-profit organisation founded in 1999), sustainable remediation is defined as ‘‘remediation that eliminates and/or controls... D, CEng, FICE Professor at University of Cambridge Jan Hellings, MBA, PhD, DIC, MSc, CEng, FICE former Project Sponsor at Olympic Delivery Authority Keyword: Pollution, Sustainability, Land reclamation Page 2 of 16 ABSTRACT The 2012 London...

Hou, Deyi; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Hellings, Jan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Computeer-based decision support tools for evaluation of actions affecting flow and water quality in the San Joaquin Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a preliminary effort to draw together some of the important simulation models that are available to Reclamation or that have been developed by Reclamation since 1987. This document has also attempted to lay out a framework by which these models might be used both for the purposes for which they were originally intended and to support the analysis of other issues that relate to the hydrology and to salt and water quality management within the San Joaquin Valley. To be successful as components of a larger Decision Support System the models should to be linked together using custom designed interfaces that permit data sharing between models and that are easy to use. Several initiatives are currently underway within Reclamation to develop GIS - based and graphics - based decision support systems to improve the general level of understanding of the models currently in use, to standardize the methodology used in making planning and operations studies and to permit improved data analysis, interpretation and display. The decision support systems should allow greater participation in the planning process, allow the analysis of innovative actions that are currently difficult to study with present models and should lead to better integrated and more comprehensive plans and policy decisions in future years.

Quinn, N.W.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Risk based optimization procedures applied to the remediation of uranium mining and milling sites in Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The remediation of former uranium mining and milling sites in the Eastern part of Germany represents a major environmental challenge. Due to the size and complexity of the sites and the significance of current and potential long term environmental impacts, effective approaches are required for the planning, implementation and regulatory control of reclamation measures. These have to ensure adequate protection for the people and the environment taking into account the long term nature of the hazards and the technical and economical constraints. The German regulatory framework is based upon ICRP principles of dose limitation, justification and optimization (ALARA). Application of these criteria requires as a first step the assessment of prevailing exposures and their potential long term evolution for each site. These risk assessments are based upon site characterization studies and the modelling of contaminant transfer to the environment and to man. Evaluation of the prevailing and potential future risks leads to the identification of remediation necessities. The subsequent planning of remediation measures is highly site specific and relies on the identification of possible reclamation options and their capability to reduce real risks to acceptable levels. The selection of the reclamation measures which will actually be implemented is performed within an optimization process involving assessments of possible risk reduction, technological feasibility, costs, long term stability, continuing requirements for long term active or passive institutional control and public acceptance.

Goldammer, W.; Barthel, R. [Brenk Systemplanung, Aachen (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

A compliance monitoring program for use and operation of the Grasslands Bypass for drainage conveyance in the western San Joaquin Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) signed a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) No. 92-02-MP dated October 18, 1991 and a Supplement to the FONSI No. 92-03-MP dated April 15, 1991, for use of a 19 mile segment of the San Luis Drain, renamed the Grasslands Bypass, to convey agricultural drainage waters to the San Joaquin River. An Environmental Assessment was prepared and published in support of the FONSI. On September 7, 1995 a Supplemental Environmental Assessment was prepared to update the original document to account for changes to the original project. These changes included a change to the point of entry to the Drain and an increase in the length of the Drain utilized by the Project from 19 to 28 miles. Environmental commitments and a schedule of fees for non-compliance with monthly and annual selenium load targets were also agreed upon for the current Project. Environmental documents preceding the FONSI outlined a monitoring program that obtained general and informal concurrence by technical staff of the participating agencies. A revised version of the proposed monitoring program was distributed by Reclamation for review and comment by the agencies in July 1992. A final monitoring plan document was issued in June 1993 and was subsequently approved by the Oversight Committee. This document includes substantial revisions to the existing June 1993 monitoring plan to reflect the compliance requirements of the current Project.

Quinn, N.W.T.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Advanced In-Service Inspection Approaches Applied to the Phenix Fast Breeder Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety upgrading of the Phenix plant undertaken between 1994 and 1997 involved a vast inspection programme of the reactor, the external storage drum and the secondary sodium circuits in order to meet the requirements of the defence-in-depth safety approach. The three lines of defence were analysed for every safety related component: demonstration of the quality of design and construction, appropriate in-service inspection and controlling the consequences of an accident. The in-service reactor block inspection programme consisted in controlling the core support structures and the high-temperature elements. Despite the fact that limited consideration had been given to inspection constraints during the design stage of the reactor in the 1960's, as compared to more recent reactor projects such as the European Fast Reactor (EFR), all the core support line elements were able to be inspected. The three following main operations are described: Ultrasonic inspection of the upper hangers of the main vessel, using small transducers able to withstand temperatures of 130 deg. C, Inspection of the conical shell supporting the core dia-grid. A specific ultrasonic method and a special implementation technique were used to control the under sodium structure welds, located up to several meters away from the scan surface. Remote inspection of the hot pool structures, particularly the core cover plug after partial sodium drainage of the reactor vessel. Other inspections are also summarized: control of secondary sodium circuit piping, intermediate heat exchangers, primary sodium pumps, steam generator units and external storage drum. The pool type reactor concept, developed in France since the 1960's, presents several favourable safety and operational features. The feedback from the Phenix plant also shows real potential for in-service inspection. The design of future generation IV sodium fast reactors will benefit from the experience acquired from the Phenix plant. (authors)

Guidez, J.; Martin, L. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - CEA (France); Dupraz, R. [AREVA NP (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100 centimeters squared (cm2) beta/gamma. Removable beta/gamma contamination levels seldom exceeded 1,000 dpm/100 cm2, but, in railroad trenches on the reactor pad containing soil on the concrete pad in front of the shield wall, the beta dose rates ranged up to 120 milli-roentgens per hour from radioactivity entrained in the soil. General area dose rates were less than 100 micro-roentgens per hour. Prior to demolition of the reactor shield wall, removable and fixed contaminated surfaces were decontaminated to the best extent possible, using traditional decontamination methods. Fifth, large sections of the remaining structures were demolished by mechanical and open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). Mechanical demolition methods included the use of conventional demolition equipment for removal of three main buildings, an exhaust stack, and a mobile shed. The 5-foot (ft), 5-inch (in.) thick, neutron-activated reinforced concrete shield was demolished by CED, which had never been performed at the NTS.

Michael R. Kruzic

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

PREPARATION OF U-PLANT FOR FINAL DEMOLITION AND DISPOSAL - 12109E  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U-Plant is one of the five major nuclear materials processing facilities at Hanford and was chosen as a pilot project to develop the modalities for closure of the other four facilities at Hanford and the rest of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The remedy for this facility was determined by a Record of Decision (ROD) pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). That remedy was to 'Close in Place - Partially Demolished Structure'. The U-Plant facility is identified as the 221-U Building and is a large, concrete structure nominally 247m (810 ft) long, 20 M (66 ft) wide and 24 m (77 ft) high with approximately 9 m (30 ft) being below grade level. It is a robust facility with walls ranging from 0.9 m to 2.7 m (3 ft to 9 ft) thick. One large room extends the entire length of the building that provides access to 40 sub-grade processing cells containing tanks, piping and other components. The work breakdown was divided into three major deliverables: (1) Tank D-10 Removal: removal of Tank D-10, which contained TRU waste; (2) Equipment Disposition: placement of contaminated equipment in the sub-grade cells; and (3) Canyon Grouting: grouting canyon void spaces to the maximum extent practical. A large number of pieces of contaminated equipment (pumps, piping, centrifuges, tanks, etc) from other facilities that had been stored on the canyon operating floor were placed inside of the sub-grade cells as final disposition, grouted and the cell shield plug reinstalled. This action precluded a large volume of waste being transported to another burial site. Finally, {approx}19,000 m3 ({approx}25,000 yd3) of grout was placed inside of the cells (in and around the contaminated equipment), in the major galleries. the ventilation tunnel, the external ventilation duct, and the hot pipe trench to minimize the potential for void spaces and to reduce the mobility, solubility, and/or toxicity of the grouted waste. The interim condition of the facility is 'cold and dark'. Upon availability of funding the structure will have contamination fixative applied to all contaminated surfaces and may be explosively demolished, with the remaining structure buried under an engineered barrier.

FARABEE OA; HERZOG B; CAMERON C

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

344

Results of the radiological survey at the Sacandaga site Glenville, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sacandaga site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1951. Originally used for the study and development of radar during World War II, the facilities housed later operations involving physics studies and sodium technology development in support of breeder reactor design and other AEC programs. Though not in use since the original equipment was dismantled and removed in the early 1950s, portions of the 51-acre site are known to contain buried rubble from demolished structures used in former operations. At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a characterization of current radiological conditions over the site was performed between August and October 1989. The survey included the measurement of direct radiation levels (gamma, alpha, and beta-gamma) over all surfaces both inside and outside the building and tunnel, radionuclide analysis of systematic, biased, and auger hole soil samples, and analysis of sediments from underground structures. Gamma logging of auger holes was conducted and removable contamination levels inside the tunnel were determined. Samples of soil and structural materials from within and around an excavated concrete bunker were analyzed to determine concentrations of radionuclides and nonradioactive elemental beryllium.

Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Results of the radiological and beryllium verification survey at the Sacandaga Site, Glenville, New York (SY002V)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent verification radiological and non-radioactive beryllium survey at the Sacandaga Site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York following limited remediation of the site by Allwash of Syracuse, Inc. At the time of this survey, only building P was still standing. A small concrete structure at the east of the property had been demolished and the debris hauled away, leaving only a pit. The purpose of the survey, conducted between April and August 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any beryllium concentrations or radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside building P, and the collection of soil, dust and debris samples and smears for radionuclide and beryllium analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological and beryllium measurements on the property were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on all data collected. the Sacandaga Site, Glenville, New York, conforms to all applicable radiological and non-radioactive beryllium guidelines established for this site by DOE and approved by the State of New York.

Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Johnson, C.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Results of the radiological survey at the Sacandaga site Glenville, New York. Waste Management Research and Development Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sacandaga site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1951. Originally used for the study and development of radar during World War II, the facilities housed later operations involving physics studies and sodium technology development in support of breeder reactor design and other AEC programs. Though not in use since the original equipment was dismantled and removed in the early 1950s, portions of the 51-acre site are known to contain buried rubble from demolished structures used in former operations. At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a characterization of current radiological conditions over the site was performed between August and October 1989. The survey included the measurement of direct radiation levels (gamma, alpha, and beta-gamma) over all surfaces both inside and outside the building and tunnel, radionuclide analysis of systematic, biased, and auger hole soil samples, and analysis of sediments from underground structures. Gamma logging of auger holes was conducted and removable contamination levels inside the tunnel were determined. Samples of soil and structural materials from within and around an excavated concrete bunker were analyzed to determine concentrations of radionuclides and nonradioactive elemental beryllium.

Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

K-25 D and D Challenges - 12170  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the K-25 former gaseous diffusion plant provides lessons learned applicable to other D and D projects in the DOE Complex. The 175,000- square-meter, 1.6-kilometer-long building is contaminated with highly enriched uranium (HEU), Tc-99, trace quantities of other fission products, asbestos, PCBs, and other hazardous wastes. Safety challenges include deteriorated electrical systems, significant structural degradation, and criticality and exposure risks. The project completely revised the D and D approach after a worker fell through an operating floor and was seriously injured. For protection from deteriorated building conditions, the project reduced the number of workers in the facility, limited their hours in the building, and installed nets and barriers to protect them from falls through weakened floors and from falling material. The new plan involved removing high-risk components, removing motors and compressors, and demolishing the building from the outside with heavy equipment with most of the piping and components inside the building during demolition. The team provided temporary electrical power; reconfigured the criticality alarm system; upgraded security; performed sampling and analysis to locate and characterize HEU deposits and Tc-99; and, to establish 'criticality incredible' conditions, conducted a nondestructive assay program and injected foam into equipment and piping as a contamination fixative. (authors)

Eidam, Greg [Bechtel National, Inc. (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Environmental Solutions FY05: PNNL Contributions to Bechtel Hanford, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided support to Bechtel Hanford, Inc., for their work to safely demolish nuclear facilities and clean up waste sites near the Columbia River. During FY05, PNNL screened a variety of technologies to solve difficult problems. The danger of lung-scarring beryllium becoming airborne during the demolition of a nuclear fuel rod fabrication plant was addressed. For Bechtel Hanford, PNNL researchers extensively screened technologies and supported field testing of selected options. Assisted by the Laboratory's information, Bechtel Hanford staff razed the 76,000-square-feet facility near the Columbia River with no release of airborne beryllium. Removing large tanks and other equipment containing highly radioactive material from the 107-N facility continued to present challenges. The facility housed the filtration equipment for N Reactor's fuel storage basin. In FY05, PNNL identified and reviewed retrieval technologies. This work built on the evaluation criteria PNNL staff developed in FY04. In support of Bechtel Hanford's work to remediate and close the 618-7 burial ground, PNNL researchers evaluated remote technologies to characterize the waste drums as they are retrieved. One objective is to identify any drums containing Zircaloy, a zirconium alloy that can catch on fire when exposed to certain conditions. To assist in safely retrieving, treating, and disposing of spent nuclear fuel decladding waste in the 116-C-3 tank, PNNL identified and reviewed waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment technologies. This information was used by Bechtel Hanford staff as part of their engineering study of the situation.

Truex, Michael J.; Manke, Kristin L.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

INNOVATIVE ALARA TOOLS AND WORK PRACTICES USED AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation occupies an area of 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state. The site was created as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce weapons grade plutonium. A multitude of old reactor plants, processing facilities, underground tank farms, contaminated soil and ground water remain and are part of an on-going environmental cleanup mission of the site. The Columbia River bisects Hanford, and the concern is that the river will become contaminated if the sources of contamination are not removed. Currently facilities are being removed, the ground water is being treated, and contaminated soil is being transferred to an approved burial ground about 15 miles away from the River located in the center of the Hanford Site The remaining facilities and adjacent structures are undergoing D&D (decontaminate and demolish) and to date, significant progress has been made. During this presentation, I will discuss how we are using innovative tools and work practices to D&D these Hanford Site facilities.

WAGGONER LO

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

ACCELERATED PILOT PROJECT FOR U CANYON DEMOLITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is underway on a first-of-a-kind project with the decommissioning and demolition of the U Canyon. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision for the final remediation of the canyon, CH2M HILL is combining old and new technology and techniques to prepare U Canyon for demolition. The selected remedial action called first for consolidating and grouting equipment currently in the canyon into lower levels of the plant (openings called cells), after which the cell galleries, hot pipe trench, ventilation tunnel, drains and other voids below the operating deck and crane-way deck levels will be filled with approximately 20,000 cubic yards of grout and the canyon roof and walls demolished down to the approximate level of the canyon deck. The remaining canyon structure will then be buried beneath an engineered barrier designed to control potential contaminant migration for a 500-year life. Methods and lessons learned from this project will set the stage for the future demolition of Hanford's four other canyon-type processing facilities.

KEHLER KL

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Use of Source Term and Air Dispersion Modeling in Planning Demolition of Highly Alpha-Contaminated Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current cleanup of structures related to cold-war production of nuclear materials includes the need to demolish a number of highly alpha-contaminated structures. The process of planning for the demolition of such structures includes unique challenges related to ensuring the protection of both workers and the public. Pre-demolition modeling analyses were conducted to evaluate potential exposures resulting from the proposed demolition of a number of these structures. Estimated emission rates of transuranic materials during demolition are used as input to an air-dispersion model. The climatological frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures at locations of interest are estimated based on years of hourly meteorological records. The modeling results indicate that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. The pre-demolition modeling directed the need for better contamination characterization and/or different demolition methods—and in the end, provided a basis for proceeding with the planned demolition activities. Post-demolition modeling was also conducted for several contaminated structures, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. Comparisons of modeled and monitoring results are shown. Recent monitoring data from the demolition of a UO3 plant shows increments in concentrations that were previously identified in the pre-demolition modeling predictions; these comparisons confirm the validity and value of the pre-demolition source-term and air dispersion computations for planning demolition activities for other buildings with high levels of radioactive contamination.

Droppo, James G.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bloom, Richard W.

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

Influence of recycled fine aggregates on the resistance of mortars to magnesium sulfate attack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of recycled fine aggregates, which had been reclaimed from field-demolished concretes, on the resistance of mortar specimens to magnesium sulfate attack was investigated. Mortar specimens were prepared with recycled fine aggregates at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of natural fine aggregate by mass). The mortar specimens were exposed to 4.24% magnesium sulfate solution for about 1 year at ambient temperature, and regularly monitored for visual appearance, compressive strength loss and expansion. Additionally, in order to identify products of magnesium sulfate attack, mortar samples incorporating 0%, 25% and 100% replacement levels of the recycled fine aggregates were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Experimental results confirmed that the use of recycled fine aggregates up to a maximum 50% replacement level is effective under severe magnesium sulfate environment, irrespective of type of recycled fine aggregates. However, the worse performance was observed in mortar specimens incorporating 100% replacement level. It was found that the water absorption of recycled fine aggregates affected deterioration of mortar specimens, especially at a higher replacement level. XRD results indicated that the main cause of deterioration of the mortar specimens was primarily due to the formation of gypsum and thaumasite by magnesium sulfate attack. In addition, it appeared that the conversion of C-S-H into M-S-H by the attack probably influenced mechanical deterioration of mortar specimens with recycled fine aggregates.

Lee, Seung-Tae [Department of Civil Engineering, Kunsan National University, 68 Miryong-dong, Kunsan, Jeonbuk 573-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: stlee@kunsan.ac.kr

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Removal design report for the 108-F Biological Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the 100-F facilities were deactivated with the reactor and have since been demolished. Of the dozen or so reactor-related structures, only the 105-F Reactor Building and the 108-F Biology Laboratory remain standing today. The 108-F Biology Laboratory was intended to be used as a facility for the mixing and addition of chemicals used in the treatment of the reactor cooling water. Shortly after F Reactor began operation, it was determined that the facility was not needed for this purpose. In 1949, the building was converted for use as a biological laboratory. In 1962, the lab was expanded by adding a three-story annex to the original four-story structure. The resulting lab had a floor area of approximately 2,883 m{sup 2} (main building and annex) that operated until 1973. The building contained 47 laboratories, a number of small offices, a conference room, administrative section, lunch and locker rooms, and a heavily shielded, high-energy exposure cell. The purpose of this removal design report is to establish the methods of decontamination and decommissioning and the supporting functions associated with facility removal and disposal.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Dry Cask Storage Experience for a One-of-a-Kind Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Rock Point Restoration Project faced many unique challenges in preparation to remove all of the spent fuel from the fuel pool where it had been stored for almost thirty years to facilitate decommissioning and dismantling the entire plant. Being the first site to use a new cask system to place the fuel into dry cask storage canisters to be stored at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) on the Big Rock site was among the challenges. Providing the ability for cask handling operations after the spent fuel pool had been dismantled provided another challenge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenges that the Big Rock team faced in completing this task on a schedule that met the goals of the Restoration Project. In conclusion, the unique features of the Big Rock plant and fuel, coupled with the goals and objectives of the Big Rock decommissioning and site restoration project posed considerable challenges that were successfully overcome by the Big Rock team. The Big Rock spent fuel was successfully moved to dry cask storage in a stand-alone ISFSI awaiting DOE to remove it from the site, and the plant structures, including the spent fuel pool, have been successfully demolished and removed from the site. The site with the exception of the ISFSI has been fully restored and was released by the NRC for unrestricted use on January 08, 2007.

Lehnert, Robert [Energy Solutions, Spent Fuel Division, Inc: 2105 S. Bascom Ave., Suite 160, Campbell, California 95008 (United States); Trubilowicz, William [Operating Solutions of Michigan, Inc: 9039 Norton Road, Charlevoix, Michigan 49720 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Coherent versus measurement feedback: Linear systems theory for quantum information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To control a quantum system via feedback, we generally have two options in choosing control scheme. One is the coherent feedback, which feeds the output field of the system, through a fully quantum device, back to manipulate the system without involving any measurement process. The other one is the measurement-based feedback, which measures the output field and performs a real-time manipulation on the system based on the measurement results. Both schemes have advantages/disadvantages, depending on the system and the control goal, hence their comparison in several situation is important. This paper considers a general open linear quantum system with the following specific control goals; back-action evasion (BAE), generation of a quantum non-demolished (QND) variable, and generation of a decoherence-free subsystem (DFS), all of which have important roles in quantum information science. Then some no-go theorems are proven, clarifying that those goals cannot be achieved by any measurement-based feedback control. On the other hand it is shown that, for each control goal, there exists a coherent feedback controller accomplishing the task. The key idea to obtain all the results is system theoretic characterizations of BAE, QND, and DFS in terms of controllability and observability properties or transfer functions of linear systems, which are consistent with their standard definitions.

Naoki Yamamoto

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

Remediating MGP brownfields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before natural gas pipelines became widespread in this country, gas fuel was produced locally in more than 5,000 manufactured gas plants (MGPs). The toxic wastes from these processes often were disposed onsite and have since seeped into the surrounding soil and groundwater. Although the MGPs--commonly called gas plants, gas-works or town gas plants--have closed and most have been demolished, they have left a legacy of environmental contamination. At many MGP sites, underground storage tanks were constructed of wood or brick, with process piping and equipment which frequently leaked. Waste materials often were disposed onsite. Releases of coal tars, oils and condensates produced within the plants contributed to a wide range of contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, benzene and cyanide. Remediation of selected MGP sites has been sporadic. Unless the site has been identified as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) Superfund site, the regulatory initiative to remediate often remains with the state in which the MGP is located. A number of factors are working to change that picture and to create a renewed interest in MGP site remediation. The recent Brownfield Initiative by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is such an example.

Larsen, B.R.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

Rothe, Robert E

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Action Memorandum for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is documenting the selection of an alternative for the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area using a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA). The scope of the removal action is limited to TAN-607 Hot Shop Area. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) has assisted the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in identifuomg the most effective method for performing the decommissioning of this structure whose mission has ended. TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is located at Test Area North Technical Support Facility within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The selected alternative consists of demolishing the TAN-607 aboveground structures and components, removing belowground noninert components (e.g. wood products), and removing the radiologically contaminated debris that does not meet remedial action objectives (RAOs), as defined in the Record of Decision Amendment for the V-Tanks and Explanation of Significant Differences for the PM-2A Tanks at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10.

M. A. Pinzel

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Will Kentucky lead the way in synthetic fuels production? A history lesson  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At four times in the history of the United States, synthetic fuels have been used as the energy savior of the country, from the period immediately following the second World War to the mid 1980s when the Synthetic Fuels Corporation was unceremoniously demolished by the Reagan administration. The Center for Applied Energy Research at the University of Kentucky has been a major player in the game and the state of Kentucky has received much funding for synthetic fuels development since the 1970s. The article traces the history of developments in the field. The fate of the development has in the author's opinion been influenced by the misalignment of three 'spheres of influence' - in essence the political economy, environmental/regulatory issues, and the technological innovation process. Synthetic fuels can now become an integral part of what is called a 'multiplex energy strategy' and Kentucky again has the opportunity to build on its prior experience and embrace a new paradigm regarding how clean energy solutions based on gasification technologies can aid the USA. 4 photos.

Musulin, M.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

3000 Area Phase 1 environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to sell the 3000 Area to prospective buyers. Environmental Services was requested by the WHC Economic Transition group to assess potential environmental liabilities in the area. Historical review of the area indicated that the site was the location of ``Camp Hanford`` in 1951 and has been used for a variety of purposes since then. The activities in the area have changed over the years. A number of Buildings from the area have been demolished and at least 15 underground storage tanks (USTs) have been removed. Part of the 3000 Area was identified as Operable Unit 1100-EM-3 in the Tri-Party Agreement and was cleaned up by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The cleanup included removal of contaminated soil and USTS. WHC and ICF KH had also performed sampling and analysis at some locations in the 3000 Area prior to USACE`s work on the Operable Unit 1100-EM-3. They removed a number of USTs and performed remediation.

Ranade, D.G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 2, Risk evaluation work procedure for the retired Hanford Site facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk from retired surplus facilities has always been assumed to be low at the Hanford Site as the facilities are inactive and have few potentials for causing an offsite hazardous material release. However,the fatal accident that occurred in the spring of 1992 in which an employee fell through a deteriorated roof at the 105-F Reactor Building has raised the possibility that retired facilities represent a greater risk than was originally assumed. Therefore, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy management have determined that facility risk management strategies and programmatic plans should be reevaluated to assure risks are identified and appropriate corrective action plans are developed. To evaluate risk management strategies, accurate risk information about the current and projected condition of the facilities must be developed. This work procedure has been created to address the development of accurate and timely risk information. By using the evaluation results in this procedure, it will be possible to create a prioritized baseline for managing facility risk until all retired surplus facilities are demolished.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The impact of weathering and aging on a LIMB ash stockpile material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1,500 ton temporary storage pile of water conditioned LIMB (Lime Injected Multistage Burner) ash by-product from the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant Lorain, OH was constructed in July, 1991 at a coal company near New Philadelphia, Ohio. This stockpile was created for dry FGD by-product material to be held in reserve for a land application uses field demonstration. High volume, beneficial uses of dry FGD by-products, such as for mine reclamation and embankment stabilization, will require temporary stockpiling of the by-product. Purpose for constructing this pile was to study changes with time in the LIMB by-product material when exposed to weathering. This by-product material was studied over a 2 1/2 year period. The water to control fugitive dust was added in the ash conditioner at the power plant while being loaded into dump trucks. Amount of water normally added in the conditioning process is close to the optimum moisture content of 40--50 % (dry weight basis), to construct a compacted road embankment or road base. Four environmental operating permits required for construction of the storage pile were obtained, three from Ohio EPA (air, water and solid waste), and one from the Ohio Division of Reclamation (revised reclamation area permit). There was no significant environmental impacts from storm runoff or leachate water from the LIMB ash stockpile during the initial 18 month period through December, 1992. After 2 1/2 years of storage, the potential value of the LIMB material for use as a road embankment material or soil conditioner has declined significantly. Ettringite formation occurs. Aging allows the expansive reaction to take place before its potential use as compacted structural fill or embankment.

Beeghly, J.H. [Dravo Lime Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bigham, J.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources; Dick, W.A.; Stehouwer, R.C. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources; Wolfe, W.B. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Milliwatt Generator Project: April 1988--September 1996. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator (MWG) Project from April 1988 to September 1996. Manufacturing of heat sources for the project ended by September 1990. Beginning in October 1990, the major activities of the project have been surveillance and testing of MWGs, disposal of excess MWGs, and reclamation of the PuO{sub 2} from excess MWG heat sources. Reported activities include fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, compatibility studies, impact testing, examination and electrical testing of surveillance units, and recovery of PuO{sub 2} from heat sources.

Latimer, T.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Nutrient intake of steers in a continuous and a rotational grazing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CITED Acooks, J. p. H. 1966. Ron-selective grazing as a means of veld reclamation. Proc. , Grassld. Soc. So. Africa. 1:33-40 Allden, W. G. and J. A. Whittaker. 1970. The determinants of herbage intake by grazing sheep& the interreiationshi, p... oondition and intensity of grazing upon daily intake and nutritive value oi the diets on desert ranges. J. Range Manage. 15:1-6. Cook, C. W. , L. E. Harris, and N. C. Young. 1967. Botantioal and nutritive content of diets of cattle and'sheep under single...

McKown, Charles David

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS/Environmental Impact Report was prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region) and the Contra Costa Water District to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enlarge the existing Los Vaqueros Reservoir in Contra Costa County, California. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Western) was a cooperating agency because it has jurisdiction over transmission facilities that were expected to be relocated under the proposed action. Based on project changes, however, Western has no action and therefore will not adopt the EIS or issue a ROD.

368

Test plan for N2 HEPA filters assembly shop stock used on PFP E4 exhaust system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) Self-contained HEPA filters, encased in wooden frames and boxes, are installed in the E4 Exhaust Ventilation System to provide confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. Recently during the routine testing in-leakage was discovered downstream of the Self-contained HEPA filters boxes. This Test Plan describes the approach to conduct investigation of the root causes for the in-leakage of HEPA filters.

DICK, J.D.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY09 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2009 (FY09) for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps or USACE], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS).

Johnson, Gary E.

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

370

EIS-0479: North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage Project, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage (NODOS) Investigation is a Feasibility Study being performed by the California Department of Water Resources and the Bureau of Reclamation, pursuant to the CALFED Bay-Delta Program Programmatic EIS/EIR Record of Decision. The NODOS Investigation is evaluating potential offstream surface water storage projects in the upper Sacramento River Basin that could improve water supply for agricultural, municipal, and industrial, and environmental uses. If the project is implemented, DOE’s Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency, could provide power to project facilities and could market hydropower generated by the project.

371

Extracellular bioreduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for processing environmental or industrial samples to remove, reclaim or otherwise reduce the level of chemical species present in the sample that act as redox active species. The redox active species is kept in a waste chamber and is separated from an aqueous bacterial culture that is held in a culture chamber. The waste chamber and the culture chamber are separated by a porous membrane through which electron transfer can occur but through which the aqueous bacterial culture cannot pass. The redox active species substantially remains in the waste chamber and is in non-contact with the aqueous bacterial culture during the process of removal, reduction or reclamation.

Chidambaram, Devicharan (Middle Island, NY); Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 1, Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This first volume provides a summary of the entire project. The study utilized the talents of a large number of participants, including a significant number of peer reviewers from industrial companies, government agencies, and research institutes. in addition, an extensive analysis of relevant literature was carried out. In considering the attractiveness of recycling technologies that are alternatives to waste-to-energy combustion units, a systems approach was utilized. Collection of waste streams containing plastics, sortation, and reclamation of plastics and plastic mixtures, reprocessing or chemical conversion of the reclaimed polymers, and the applicability of the products to specific market segments have been analyzed in the study.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

H. R. 3113: an act providing for the coordinated operation of the Central Valley project and the State water project in California. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 25, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The House Committee on Energy and Natural Resources rewrote the Bill coordinating operations of the Central Valley Project in California and the state water project, and limited the Secretary of the Interior to no more than 75% of the Central Valley Project's annual yield. The Bill specifies procedures for water delivery contracts and reimbursements. Title II deals with the preservation of the Suisin Marsh District; Title III with the reclamation of small projects; and Title IV with contract validation. The document contains both the original and the amended wording of H.R. 3113.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

EA-1948: Gila-North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project, Yuma County, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Western) prepared this EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild and upgrade two parallel 4.8-mile transmission lines between the Gila and North Gila Substations and take actions in support of portions of Arizona Public Service’s construction of a new, 12.8 mile 230-kV transmission line between North Gila and a proposed substation in Yuma County, Arizona. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are cooperating agencies.

375

Singapore approaches next development phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Singapore is pinning its hopes on Jurong Island for maintaining its status as a world-class petrochemical hub. Because of a scarcity of industrial land, the Singapore government has initiated a land reclamation program to create Jurong Island as a base for industrial development. The aim is to attract overseas petrochemical companies with the promise of being able to channel their investments into an area where the proximity of other production units, plus services and utility providers, make for a totally integrated manufacturing complex. Plants will range from refineries to specialty chemicals.

Singh, B.

1997-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

376

Biomass and nutrient accumulation in young Prosopis Juliflora at Mombasa, Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented for 6-yr old P. juliflora, grown for quarry reclamation on: biomass of stems, large branches, small branches and leaves; height and volume of stems and large branches. All were calculated from regressions on based diameter. Volume was 209 cubic m/ha (stems), 75 cubic m/ha (large branches). Total biomass was 216 t/ha (77% in stems and large branches). Leaves plus small branches (22.6% of biomass) contained over 50% of the pool of nutrients N, P, K and Mg. Implications are discussed for site depletion as a result of total tree use for fuelwood and fodder. 25 references.

Maghembe, J.A.; Kariuki, E.M.; Haller, R.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Using LEDs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on EnergyEnergyTheUnitedAbandoned Mine Reclamation,AWith

378

Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate and High Temperature Waste  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002Optics Group (X-ray ScienceMicroflows.coal4.00Reclamation -

379

Organic Photovoltaic Cells with an Electric Field Integrally-Formed at the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002Optics Group (X-ray ScienceMicroflows.coal4.00Reclamation

380

Organic Polymers Show Sunny Potential | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002Optics Group (X-ray ScienceMicroflows.coal4.00ReclamationA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Evaluation of Uranium Mining TENORM Wastes-Characteristics, Occurrence, and Risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is completing a multi year effort to issue technical reports and obtain stakeholder views on future programs to mitigate potential hazards associated with uranium mining Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM). The technical reports are the most comprehensive issued by the Agency on this topic, and should have utility for reclamation of abandoned uranium mines, as well as providing information for new mines proposed by the uranium mining industry. This presentation will provide principal results of the three technical reports issued, and elements of the proposed EPA program for uranium mining TENORM. (authors)

Setlow, L.W. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J), Washington, DC (United States); Peake, R.T. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J), Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Final Demolition and Disposition of 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - 12267  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory was constructed in 1960 to provide a heavy shielded reactor room where quantities of plutonium or uranium in solution could be brought to near-critical configurations under carefully controlled and monitored conditions. In the late 1980's, the responsible contractor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), was directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare the facility for unoccupied status. The facility was demolished under a Removal Action Work Plan pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The funding for this project was provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The primary rooms of concern with regards to contamination in 209-E facility, which is over 9,000 square feet, are the criticality assembly room (CAR), the mix room, and the change room. The CAR contained two reactor hoods (HO-140 and HO-170), which each had a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system. The CAR contained 13 tanks ranging from 38 L (10 gal) to 401 L (106 gal). Tanks TK-109 and TK-110 are below grade, and were removed as part of this demolition and disposition remedy. Nonradiological and radiological hazardous substances were removed, decontaminated, or fixed in place, prior to demolition. Except for the removal of below grade tanks TK-109 and TK-110, the facility was demolished to slab-on-grade. PNNL performed stabilization and deactivation activities that included removal of bulk fissile material and chemicals, flushing tanks, stabilizing contamination within gloveboxes and hoods, and packaging and removing waste. The removal of the contaminated plutonium equipment and materials from the 209E facility presented a number of challenges similar in nature to those associated with the inventory reduction and cleanup activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Although there were no bulk fissile materials or chemicals within the facility, there were residual radiological materials (isotopes of plutonium and americium) in the tanks and hoods. The complexity of the remedy was present because of the various configurations of the tanks and hoods, combined with the residual contaminants. Because of the weight and dimensional configuration, size reduction of the slab tanks, as well as removal and disposal of the different material used for moderation and absorption, were two examples of challenges that were resolved to complete the remedy. One of the key methods developed and implemented at the facility was the design and construction of a shroud to allow the cutting of the Pu contaminated tanks. The shroud design, development and implementation at the 209E Project was an example of enhanced work planning and task hazards analysis with worker involvement. This paper will present the lessons learned from the 209E facility inventory reduction activities including the shroud and other methodologies used. The initial Lessons Learned discussion for this project was scheduled for late January 2012. This facility is the first open-air demolition of a highly contaminated plutonium-contaminated facility accomplished by CH2M Hill under the Plateau Remediation Contract. The demolition was completed without spread of contamination to the workers and the surrounding area. As with any project of this complexity, there are significant accomplishments, as well as experience that can be applied to future demolition of plutonium-contaminated facilities on the Hanford Site. These experiences will be documented at a later date. (authors)

Woolery, Wade [US Department of Energy, Richland WA (United States); Dodd, Edwin III [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland WA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post-closure-posting requirements for the mounded/capped basement structure, as well as for the entire CAU, are addressed in Section 4.2.10. The site contains radiologically impacted surfaces and hazardous materials. Based on review of the historical information for CAU 116 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 116 using the SAFER process. CAUs that may be closed using the SAFER process have conceptual corrective actions that are clearly identified. Consequently, corrective action alternatives can be chosen prior to completing a corrective action investigation, given anticipated investigation results. The SAFER process combines elements of the data quality objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to plan and conduct closure activities. The DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the SAFER process. The purpose of the investigation phase is to verify the adequacy of existing information used to determine the chosen corrective action. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty during the planning and decision-making phases of the project. The SAFER process allows for technical decisions to be made based on information gathered during site visits, interviews, meetings, research, and a consensus of opinion by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) team members. Any uncertainties are addressed by documented assumptions that are verified by sampling and analysis, data evaluation, onsite observations, and contingency plans, as necessary. Closure activities may proceed simultaneously with site characterization as sufficient data are gathered to confirm or disprove the assumptions made during selection of the corrective action. If, at any time during the closure process, new information is discovered that indicates that closure activities should be revised, closure activities will be reevaluated as appropriate. Based on a detailed review of historical documentation, there is sufficient process know

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Geodatabase of the South Texas Uranium District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uranium and its associated trace elements and radionuclides are ubiquitous in the South Texas Tertiary environment. Surface mining of this resource from the 1960s through the early 1980s at over sixty locations has left an extensive anthropological footprint (Fig. 1) in the lower Nueces and San Antonio river basins. Reclamation of mining initiated after 1975 has been under the regulatory authority of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RCT). However, mines that were active before the Texas Surface Mining Act of 1975 was enacted, and never reclaimed, are now considered abandoned. The Abandoned Mine Land Section of the RCT is currently reclaiming these pre-regulation uranium mines with funding from the federal government. The RCT monitors the overall effectiveness of this process through post-reclamation radiation and vegetative cover surveys, water quality testing, slope stability and erosion control monitoring. Presently a number of graduate and postgraduate students are completing research on the watershed and reservoir distribution of trace elements and radionuclides downstream of the South Texas Uranium District. The question remains as to whether the elevated levels of uranium, its associated trace elements and radiation levels in the South Texas environment are due to mining

Mark Beaman; William Wade Mcgee

385

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Effects of unseeded areas on species richness of coal mines reclaimed with municipal biosolids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land application of municipal biosolids on coal mine spoils can benefit vegetation establishment in mine reclamation. However, the application of biosolids leads to domination by early-successional species, such as grasses, and low establishment of woody and volunteer species, thus reducing potential for forestry as a postmining land use. In this experiment, tree seedlings were planted in strips (0.6-, 1-, and 4-m wide) that were not seeded with grasses, and the effects of unseeded strip width on seedling growth and species richness were assessed. Planted seedling mortality was high; therefore, the effect of unseeded strip width on seedling growth could not be determined. However, it was found that natural plant invasion and species richness were highest in the 4-m unseeded strips. The practice of leaving 4-m-wide unseeded strips in mine reclamation with biosolids in the eastern United States, along with the improvement of tree seedling planting practices and planting stock, would help promote a more species-rich plant community that could be utilized for forestry or a variety of other postmining land uses.

Halofsky, J.E.; McCormick, L.H. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). School for Forest Resources

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Crop and soil responses to sewage sludge applied to reclaimed prime farmland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in reclamation of surface mined prime farmland may be obtained by adding sewage sludge to topsoil and subsoil. This prime farmland reclamation study was done in western Kentucky. The experiment was conducted to investigate effects of the sludge amendment to topsoil and subsoil on soil and crop responses. The experiment showed, in most cases at highest application rates, that the sludge addition significantly increased the soil organic matter, total N content, and available P levels. However, water holding capacity, CEC, and exchangeable cations were not significantly affected. Higher microbial populations and activates were also obtained. The wheat biomass, tiller number, tissue N, grain N, grain yield, and N removal in grain were well correlated with application rates of sewage sludge. Corn also responded positively to additions of sewage sludge. The corn ear-leaf N concentration, grain yield, and grain N removal increased with application rates of sewage sludge. Experiments indicated that topsoil and subsoil sewage sludge addition was beneficial practices in terms of increasing crop yield and improving some soil properties.

Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Management of solid wastes from the Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) clean coal technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to characterize by-products from a pilot Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) process and to develop processes directed toward the safe and economic use or disposal of these wastes. Because LIDS is a developing Clean Coal technology, a database of chemical and physical characteristics of the by-product was first developed. During the course of this project, it was found that the waste alone did not form high-strength products sufficient for use in construction and engineering applications. Therefore, the project was redirected to evaluate the by-product as a soil-cement and Portland cement raw material, agricultural liming agent, backfill/landfill material component, and mine reclamation/neutralizing agent. Based on these evaluations, the most viable uses for the LIDS byproduct include use in mine reclamation or as a neutralization agent. If soluble sulfites can be minimized by avoiding a dolomitic LIDS reagent, use as an agricultural liming agent has promise. Interest from an Ohio utility in the LIDS process suggests possible application of results at the demonstration or commercial stages.

Musiol, W.F. Jr.; Czuczwa, J.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

390

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

DECOMMISSIONING OF HOT CELL FACILITIES AT THE BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds at its West Jefferson Facilities by 2006, as mandated by Congress. This effort includes decommissioning several hot cells located in the Hot Cell Laboratory (Building JN-1). JN-1 was originally constructed in 1955, and a hot cell/high bay addition was built in the mid 1970s. For over 30 years, BCL used these hot cell facilities to conduct research for the nuclear power industry and several government agencies, including the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a result of this research, the JN-1 hot cells became highly contaminated with mixed fission and activation products, as well as fuel residues. In 1998, the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) began efforts to decommission JN-1 with the goal of remediating the site to levels of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. This goal requires that each hot cell be decommissioned to a state where it can be safely demolished and transported to an off-site disposal facility. To achieve this, the BCLDP uses a four-step process for decommissioning each hot cell: (1) Source Term Removal; (2) Initial (i.e., remote) Decontamination; (3) Utility Removal; and (4) Final (i.e., manual) Decontamination/Stabilization. To date, this process has been successfully utilized on 13 hot cells within JN-1, with one hot cell remaining to be decommissioned. This paper will provide a case study of the hot cell decommissioning being conducted by the BCLDP. Discussed will be the methods used to achieve the goals of each of the hot cell decommissioning stages and the lessons learned that could be applied at other sites where hot cells need to be decommissioned.

Weaver, Patrick; Henderson, Glenn; Erickson, Peter; Garber, David

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

D&D Waste Estimate Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocky Flats Closure Project (Site) includes several multi-year decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects which, over the next four years, will dismantle and demolish four major plutonium facilities, four major uranium facilities, and over 400 additional facilities of different types. The projects are currently generating large quantities of transuranic, low-level, mixed, hazardous, and sanitary wastes. A previous paper described the initial conceptual estimates and methods, and the evolution of these methods based on the actual results from the decommissioning of a ''pilot'' facility. The waste estimating method that resulted from that work was used for the waste estimates incorporated into the current Site baseline. This paper discusses subsequent developments on the topic of waste estimating that have occurred since the baseline work. After several months of operation under the current Site baseline, an effort was initiated to either validate or identify improvements to the waste basis-of-estimate. Specific estimate and estimating method elements were identified for additional analysis based on the element's potential for error and the impact of that error on Site activities. The analysis took advantage of actual, more detailed data collected both from three years additional experience in decommissioning a second plutonium facility and from experience in deactivating certain non-plutonium facilities. It compared the actual transuranic and low-level waste generation against their respective estimates based on overall distribution and for individual media (i.e. equipment type), and evaluated trends. Finally, it projected the quantity of lead-characteristic low-level mixed waste that will be generated from plutonium building decommissioning and upgraded the decommissioning waste estimates of the non-plutonium buildings.

Sanford, P. C.; Templeton, J. H.; Stevens, J. L.; Dorr, K.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

Preserving Alaska's early Cold War legacy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force owns and operates numerous facilities that were constructed during the Cold War era. The end of the Cold War prompted many changes in the operation of these properties: missions changed, facilities were modified, and entire bases were closed or realigned. The widespread downsizing of the US military stimulated concern over the potential loss of properties that had acquired historical value in the context of the Cold War. In response, the US Department of Defense in 1991 initiated a broad effort to inventory properties of this era. US Air Force installations in Alaska were in the forefront of these evaluations because of the role of the Cold War in the state's development and history and the high interest on the part of the Alaska State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) in these properties. The 611th Air Support Group (611 ASG) owns many of Alaska's early Cold War properties, most were associated with strategic air defense. The 611 ASG determined that three systems it operates, which were all part of the integrated defense against Soviet nuclear strategic bomber threat, were eligible for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and would require treatment as historic properties. These systems include the Aircraft Control and Warning (AC&W) System, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line, and Forward Operating Bases (FOBs). As part of a massive cleanup operation, Clean Sweep, the 611 ASG plans to demolish many of the properties associated with these systems. To mitigate the effects of demolition, the 611 ASG negotiated agreements on the system level (e.g., the DEW Line) with the Alaska SHPO to document the history and architectural/engineering features associated with these properties. This system approach allowed the US Air Force to mitigate effects on many individual properties in a more cost-effective and efficient manner.

Hoffecker, J.; Whorton, M.

1999-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980`s. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history.

Gerber, M.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center)

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

Revised financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western whileothers resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $23 million.

Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

400

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Ion exchange phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Uranium Mill Tailings Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at the Fifth Symposium on Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Advances made with regard to uranium mill tailings management, environmental effects, regulations, and reclamation are reviewed. Topics considered include tailings management and design (e.g., the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, environmental standards for uranium mill tailings disposal), surface stabilization (e.g., the long-term stability of tailings, long-term rock durability), radiological aspects (e.g. the radioactive composition of airborne particulates), contaminant migration (e.g., chemical transport beneath a uranium mill tailings pile, the interaction of acidic leachate with soils), radon control and covers (e.g., radon emanation characteristics, designing surface covers for inactive uranium mill tailings), and seepage and liners (e.g., hydrologic observations, liner requirements).

Nelson, J.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project covers facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) for federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG) for estuary habitat restoration. The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The EOS is tasked by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Action Agencies (AAs) to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the river’s plume in the ocean. Initiated in 2002, the EOS is composed of members from BPA, the Corps, NMFS, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) Marine Sciences Laboratory, and other agencies as necessary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY10 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. The EOS is one of multiple work groups in the federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the FCRPS. The EOS is tasked by NOAA Fisheries and the Action Agencies to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the plume.

Johnson, Gary E.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on air quality and noise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration, which is responsible for marketing electricity produced at the hydroelectric power-generating facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation on the Upper Colorado River, has proposed changes in the levels of its commitment (sales) of long-term firm capacity and energy to its customers. This report describes (1) the existing conditions of air resources (climate and meteorology, ambient air quality, and acoustic environment) of the region potentially affected by the proposed action and (2) the methodology used and the results of analyses conducted to assess the potential impacts on air resources of the proposed action and the commitment-level alternatives. Analyses were performed for the potential impacts of both commitment-level alternatives and supply options, which include combinations of electric power purchases and different operational scenarios of the hydroelectric power-generating facilities.

Chun, K.C.; Chang, Y.S.; Rabchuk, J.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1995 and 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. The Act transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as of July 1, 1993, and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

NONE

1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

Office of Environmental Management uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund financial statements. September 30, 1994 and 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation as of July 1, 1993. However, the Act requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio (diffusion facilities). The Act established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; Pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and Reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

Marwick, P.

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Guide for revegetation of mined land in Eastern United States using municipal sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of municipal sewage sludge to reclaim and revegetate land disturbed by mining activity could deal with two major problems (the 60% of land still unreclaimed and the increasing problem of finding landfills for sewage sludge disposal). An alternative to using sludge as an agricultural fertilizer (and possibly introducing heavy metals into the food chain) is to reclaim marginal and disturbed lands. Guidelines for metal loadings in sludge application for reclamation suggest following those developed for agricultural applications. Regulations to date only cover cadmium, but the guidelines include lead, zinc, curium, and niobium. Other regulations cover permit applications, public participation, site investigations, constraints based on the sludge characteristics, and the selection and management of vegetations. A monitoring program is necessary to assure compliance. The appendix identifies appropriate plants for revegetation. 97 references, 12 figures, 12 tables.

Sopper, W.E.; Seaker, E.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Management of sewage sludge and ash containing radioactive materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the seven to eight million metric tonnes of municipal sewage sludge produced annually in the US is reused. Beneficial uses of sewage sludge include agricultural land application, land reclamation, forestry, and various commercial applications. Excessive levels of contaminants, however, can limit the potential usefulness of land-applied sewage sludge. A recently completed study by a federal inter-agency committee has identified radioactive contaminants that could interfere with the safe reuse of sewage sludge. The study found that typical levels of radioactive materials in most municipal sewage sludge and incinerator ash do not present a health hazard to sewage treatment plant workers or to the general public. The inter-agency committee has developed recommendations for operators of sewage treatment plants for evaluating measured or estimated levels of radioactive material in sewage sludge and for determining whether actions to reduce potential exposures are appropriate.

Bachmaier, J. T.; Aiello, K.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J.-J.; Chiu, W. A.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhart, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A. B.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Yu, C.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Environmental Science Division; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. EPA; N.J. Dept of Environmental Protection; NRC

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled “Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River.” Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

Mike Lewis

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

United States Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decomissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D and D Fund, or Fund) to pay the costs for decontamination and decommissioning three gaseous diffusion facilities located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio (diffusion facilities). The Act also authorized the Fund to pay remedial action costs associated with the Government`s operation of the facilities and to reimburse uranium and thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government. The report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the D and D Fund financial statements as of September 30, 1996. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1996 statement of financial position and the related statements of operations and changes in net position and cash flows.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Denver Radium, Operable Unit 9, Denver, CO. (Eighth remedial action), December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Denver Radium site is a former radioactive mining site located in Denver, Denver County, Colorado. Industrial activities commenced at the site in 1886 with the construction of the Bailey Smelter. By 1903, the Colorado Zinc Company had constructed a mill on the site of the Bailey Smelter, and zinc milling operations continued until 1910. From 1914 to 1917, the U.S. Bureau of Mines operated a radium processing facility onsite, known as the National Radium Institute (NRI). Other onsite industrial activities included minerals recovery, manufacturing and servicing of storage batteries, treating and sacking of metallic ore insulation, oil reclamation, and landfilling. The ROD addresses approximately 16,500 cubic yards of metal-contaminated soil as OU9, the 9th of 11 OUs planned for the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are metals, including arsenic, lead, and zinc.

Not Available

1991-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Survey of nine surface mines in North America. [Nine different mines in USA and Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the information gathered by three mining engineers in a 1980 survey of nine surface mines in the United States and Canada. The mines visited included seven coal mines, one copper mine, and one tar sands mine selected as representative of present state of the art in open pit, strip, and terrace pit mining. The purpose of the survey was to investigate mining methods, equipment requirements, operating costs, reclamation procedures and costs, and other aspects of current surface mining practices in order to acquire basic data for a study comparing conventional and terrace pit mining methods, particularly in deeper overburdens. The survey was conducted as part of a project under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023 titled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

Hayes, L.G.; Brackett, R.D.; Floyd, F.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Yucca Mountain biological resources monitoring program; Annual report FY92  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a potential site for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities (SCA) do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, an environmental program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) during fiscal year 1992 (FY92) for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the YMP environmental program. The six program areas are Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises, Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

NONE

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Progress report, October 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Annual report, FY91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a possible site for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a repository. To ensure that site characterization activities (SCA) do not adversely affect the Yucca Mountain area, an environmental program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and to ensure that activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during fiscal year 1991 (FY91) for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the YMP environmental program. The six program areas are Site Characterization Activities Effects, Desert Tortoises, Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Energy Integrated Dairy Farm System in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EIFS project at North Dakota State University, located at Fargo, North Dakota, is an effort to show how a Northern Great Plains EIFS might be operated. This farm used a combination of energy conservation, energy capture, and energy production. Energy conservation was demonstrated using reduced tillage in a typical cropping system and by using heat reclamation equipment on the ventilation system and the milk cooler in the dairy barn. Energy capture was demonstrated with a solar collector used to preheat ventilation air. Energy production was demonstrated with the construction of an anaerobic digester to produce methane from manure. This manual describes the design, construction, operation, and performance of the EIFS developed at North Dakota State University.

Pratt, G.; Lindley, J.; Hirning, H.; Giles, J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Characterization of seven United States coal regions. The development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes seven United State coal regions in the Northern Great Plains, Rocky Mountain, Interior, and Gulf Coast coal provinces. Descriptions include those of the Fort Union, Powder River, Green River, Four Corners, Lower Missouri, Illinois Basin, and Texas Gulf coal resource regions. The resource characterizations describe geologic, geographic, hydrologic, environmental and climatological conditions of each region, coal ranks and qualities, extent of reserves, reclamation requirements, and current mining activities. The report was compiled as a basis for the development of hypothetical coal mining situations for comparison of conventional and terrace pit surface mining methods, under contract to the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023, entitled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

Wimer, R.L.; Adams, M.A.; Jurich, D.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Treatment method for emulsified petroleum wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved reclamation process for treating petroleum oil and water emulsions derived from producing or processing crude oil is disclosed. The process comprises heating the emulsion to a predetermined temperature at or above about 300.degree. C. and pressurizing the emulsion to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature. The emulsion is broken by containing the heated and pressurized fluid within a vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first, second and third phases. The three phases are then separately withdrawn from the vessel, preferably without any appreciable reduction in temperature and pressure, and at least above a withdraw temperature of about 300.degree. and above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature.

Sealock, Jr., L. John (West Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Water assessment report: Section 13 (c); Great Plains gasification project, Mercer County, ND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Resources Council is completing a water assessment of synfuels development in the Upper Missouri River Basin. This is being done under Section 13(a) of the Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act. The assessment area includes the coal deposits in the Mercer County project site. Levels of North Dakota coal gasification development that are several times the production level of the Great Plains gasification project are being examined. This report assesses: (1) the availability of adequate water supplies to meet the water requirements of the project, supporting activities, and other development induced by the project; and (2) the changes in the water resources that will result from the project. Findings of the 13(a) assessment show that water supplies are physically available within the mainstem of the Missouri River in North Dakota to supply the requirements of the gasification facilities and the supporting activities - mining and reclamation, electricity, and project-induced population increases.

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

EA-1944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ormat Technologies, Inc. (Ormat) proposes to use DOE and cost share funding to study the Brady Hot Springs geothermal Field 15-12RD well. This is an EGS Demonstration project divided into three phases. During Phase 1, Ormat characterized the target well to prepare for stimulation activities in Phase 2, Phase 2: Well Stimulation and Collection/Analysis of Stimulation Monitoring Data and Phase 3: Long-term testing of the system. Phase 2 and 3 activities would occur at Ormat's Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in Churchill County, NV on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). Since Phases 2 and 3 have the potential to impact subsurface resources, DOE must analyze the impacts associated with Phases 2 and 3. The BLM will be the lead agency for completion of the EA with BOR and DOE as cooperating agencies.

430

Proceedings of the sixteenth international symposium on mine planning and equipment selection (MPES 2007) and the tenth international symposium on environmental issues and waste management in energy and mineral production (SWEMP 2007)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers presented at MPES 2007 covered: coal mining and clean coal processing technologies; control, design and planning of surface and underground mines; drilling, blasting and excavation engineering; mining equipment selection; automation and information technology; maintenance and production management for mines and mining systems; health, safety and environment; cost effective methods of mine reclamation; mine closure and waste disposal; and rock mechanics and geotechnical issues. Papers from SWEMP 2007 discussed methods and technologies for assessing, minimizing and preventing environmental problems associated with mineral and energy production. Topics included environmental impacts of coal-fired power projects; emission control in thermal power plants; greenhouse gas abatement technologies; remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater; environmental issues in surface and underground mining of coal, minerals and ores; managing mine waste and mine water; and control of effluents from mineral processing, metallurgical and chemical plants.

Singhal, R.K.; Fytas, K.; Jongsiri, S.; Ge, Hao (eds.) [Universite Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Successful tree planting techniques for drastically disturbed lands: A case study of the propagation planting of container-grown oak and nut trees in Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful tree seedling establishment on drastically disturbed lands is contingent on seven major variables: (1) selection of proper native species, (2) purchase of the best quality planting stock, (3) correct handling of planting stock, (4) correct planting techniques, (5) effective control of competing vegetation, (6) proper soil conditions and preparation, (7) weather. Exotic species should not be planted to avoid past mistakes such as kudzu, Japanese honeysuckle, sericea lespedeza and chestnut blight. A major concern of reclamation specialists and ecosystem restorationists is obtaining high-quality plant materials with the correct provenance. Ecosystem restorationists, reclamation specialists, park managers and private landowners can easily and cheaply propagate native oak or other hardwood species from local parent stock using Whitcomb bottomless containers. Proper seed collection, storage and preparation techniques as well as propagation methods are critical for seedling growth and development into quality air-pruned planting stock. Air-pruned seedlings of local provenance can be outplanted in the fall after one growing season with little transplanting shock while developing extensive root systems prior to soil freezing in winter. Establishment success of container-grown seedlings greatly exceeds that of spring-planted bare-root seedlings. Fall-planted, container-grown seedlings have a decided advantage since their roots continue to grow throughout the fall and much of the winter, enabling them to better withstand summer drought and weedy competitors. Container-grown seedlings also allow a five- to six-month planting season compared to bare-root seedlings` four to six weeks. Since propagation costs are minimal, planters who grow their own save money on the planting stock. Because the quality is higher, home-grown seedlings have greater establishment success, saving labor, time and money. With better survival rates, far fewer trees need be planted as compared to bare-root seedlings.

Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States). Land Reclamation Program

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Development of an Electrochemical Separator and Compressor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global conversion to sustainable energy is likely to result in a hydrogen-based economy that supports U.S. energy security objectives while simultaneously avoiding harmful carbon emissions. A key hurdle to successful implementation of a hydrogen economy is the low-cost generation, storage, and distribution of hydrogen. One of the most difficult requirements of this transformation is achieving economical, high density hydrogen storage in passenger vehicles. Transportation applications may require compression and storage of high purity hydrogen up to 12,000 psi. Hydrogen production choices range from centralized low-pressure generation of relatively impure gas in large quantities from steam-methane reformer plants to distributed generation of hydrogen under moderate pressure using water electrolysis. The Electrochemical Hydrogen Separator + Compressor (EHS+C) technology separates hydrogen from impurities and then compresses it to high pressure without any moving parts. The Phase I effort resulted in the construction and demonstration of a laboratory-scale hardware that can separate and compress hydrogen from reformate streams. The completion of Phase I has demonstrated at the laboratory scale the efficient separation and compression of hydrogen in a cost effective manner. This was achieved by optimizing the design of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) cell hardware and verified by parametric testing in single cell hardware. A broad range of commercial applications exist for reclamation of hydrogen. One use this technology would be in combination with commercial fuel cells resulting in a source of clean power, heat, and compressed hydrogen. Other applications include the reclamation of hydrogen from power plants and other industrial equipment where it is used for cooling, recovery of process hydrogen from heat treating processes, and semiconductor fabrication lines. Hydrogen can also be recovered from reformate streams and cryogenic boil-offs using this technology.

Trent Molter

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

Annotated bibliography for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) with emphasis on the Grand Canyon population.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glen Canyon Dam is a hydroelectric facility located on the Colorado River in Arizona that is operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) for multiple purposes including water storage, flood control, power generation, recreation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife. Glen Canyon Dam operations have been managed for the last several years to improve conditions for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other ecosystem components. An extensive amount of literature has been produced on the humpback chub. We developed this annotated bibliography to assist managers and researchers in the Grand Canyon as they perform assessments, refine management strategies, and develop new studies to examine the factors affecting humpback chub. The U.S. Geological Survey recently created a multispecies bibliography (including references on the humpback chub) entitled Bibliography of Native Colorado River Big Fishes (available at www.fort.usgs.gov/Products/data/COFishBib). That bibliography, while quite extensive and broader in scope than ours, is not annotated, and, therefore, does not provide any of the information in the original literature. In developing this annotated bibliography, we have attempted to assemble abstracts from relevant published literature. We present here abstracts taken unmodified from individual reports and articles except where noted. The bibliography spans references from 1976 to 2009 and is organized in five broad topical areas, including: (1) biology, (2) ecology, (3) impacts of dam operations, (4) other impacts, and (5) conservation and management, and includes twenty subcategories. Within each subcategory, we present abstracts alphabetically by author and chronologically by year. We present relevant articles not specific to either the humpback chub or Glen Canyon Dam, but cited in other included reports, under the Supporting Articles subcategory. We provide all citations in alphabetical order in Section 7.

Goulet, C. T.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOC in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 1994 (R94-F), in 1987 (R87-G), in 1982 (R82-F), in 1978 (R78-G), in 1969 (R69-F), in1956 (R56-G), and from the unmined control (UMS-G). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and three under forest cover since reclamation. The samples were air dried and fractionated using a wet sieving technique into macro (> 2.0 mm), meso (0.25-2.0 mm) and microaggregates (0.053-0.25 mm). The soil C and N concentrations were determined by the dry combustion method on these aggregate fractions. Soil C and N concentrations were higher at the forest sites compared to the grass sites in each aggregate fraction for both depths. Statistical analyses indicated that the number of random samples taken was probably not sufficient to properly consider distribution of SOC and TN concentrations in aggregate size fractions for both depths at each site. Erosional effects on SOC and TN concentrations were, however, small. With increasing time since reclamation, SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations also increased. The higher C and N concentrations in each aggregate size fraction in older than the newly reclaimed sites demonstrated the C sink capacity of newer sites.

M.K. Shukla; K. Lorenz; R. Lal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Environmental Assessment for the new sanitary sludge land application sites at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Action is necessary to allow the Savannah River Site (SRS) to provide for efficient disposal of sanitary sludge for SRS as forecast by the latest site projections (WSRC, 1991) and modified by the latest US Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance for SRS (Stello, 1993). From 1986 to 1992, sanitary wastewater sludge was applied on SRS lands in accordance with a South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) permit as part of the reclamation of SRS`s F- and H-Area borrow pits (disturbed land). This reclamation is essentially complete and, if land disposal of sludge is to continue, new land application sites on SRS must be selected as the extended permit for applying sludge to the borrow pits expired in 1992. Currently, sludge is being trucked offsite for disposal by a subcontractor to a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) near Augusta, Georgia (WSRC, 1992a). This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE to assess the potential environmental impacts of onsite land disposal of treated sanitary sewage sludge from SRS. The proposed action is to replace the present offsite disposal of the treated sanitary sludge from existing SRS wastewater treatment plants with onsite reuse through land application. The proposed action is independent of SRS production operations and is necessary for more efficient disposal of SRS sanitary sludge at lower costs. The proposed land application at SRS is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) ``No Action`` alternative (DOE, 1991). The sludge from SRS sanitary wastewater treatment plants is nonhazardous. Onsite disposal of this sludge allows SRS to comply with current DOE policies to keep any DOE wastes onsite where possible and to eliminate any potential accidents due to continuing offsite transportation of sanitary wastes (DOE, 1990a).

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

Bullard, K.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Biological treatment options for consolidated tailings release waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group, operates a large oil sands mining and extraction operation in northeastern Alberta. The extraction plant produces large volumes of a tailings slurry which resists dewatering and treatment, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology is used to treat tailings by either acid/lime or gypsum and enhances the possibility of treating residual fine tails in a ``dry`` land reclamation scenario and treating the release water in a wastewater treatment reclamation scenario. The objective was to assess the treatability of CT release water (i.e., the reduction of acute and chronic toxicities to trout, Ceriodaphnia, and bacteria) in bench-scale biological treatment systems. Microtox{reg_sign} IC20 test showed complete detoxification for the gypsum CT release water within 3 to 5 weeks compared with little reduction in toxicity for dyke drainage. Acute toxicity (fish) and chronic toxicity (Ceriodaphnia, bacterial) was removed from both CT release waters. Phosphate and aeration enhanced detoxification rates. Concentrations of naphthenic acids (an organic toxicant) were not reduced, but levels of dissolved organic compounds decreased faster than was the case for dyke drainage water, indicating that some of the organic compounds in both acid/lime and gypsum CT waters were more biodegradable. There was a pattern of increasing toxicity for dyke drainage water which confirmed observations during field-scale testing in the constructed wetlands and which was not observed for CT release waters. Acid/lime and gypsum CT water can be treated biologically in either an aeration pond, constructed wetlands, or a combination of both thereby avoiding the expense of long-term storage and/or conventional waste treatment systems.

Gunter, C.P.; Nix, P.G.; Sander, B. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Knezevic, Z.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

The Cold and Dark Process at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of a facility exposes D and D workers to numerous hazards. One of the more serious hazards is coming into contact to hazardous energy sources (e.g. electrical, pressurized steam). At the Savannah River Site (SRS) a formal process for identifying and eliminating sources of hazardous energy was developed and is called 'Cold and Dark'. Several 'near miss' events involving cutting of energized conductors during D and D work in buildings thought to be isolated identified the need to have a formal process to identify and isolate these potentially hazardous systems. This process was developed using lessons learned from D and D activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) in Colorado. The Cold and Dark process defines an isolation boundary (usually a building perimeter) and then systematically identifies all of the penetrations through this boundary. All penetrations that involve hazardous energy sources are then physically air-gapped. The final product is a documented declaration of isolation performed by a team involving operations, engineering, and project management. Once the Cold and Dark declaration is made for a building work can proceed without the usual controls used in an operational facility (e.g. lockout/tag-out, arc flash PPE). It is important to note that the Cold and Dark process does not remove all hazards from a facility. Work planning and controls still need to address hazards that can be present from such things as chemicals, radiological contamination, residual liquids, etc., as well as standard industrial hazards. Savannah River Site experienced 6 electrical events prior to declaring a facility 'cold and dark' and has had zero electrical events after 'cold and dark' declaration (263 facilities to date). The formal Cold and Dark process developed at SRS has eliminated D and D worker exposures to hazardous energy sources. Since the implementation of the process there have been no incidents involving energized conductors or pressurized liquids/gases. During this time SRS has demolished over 200 facilities. The ability to perform intrusive D and D activities without the normal controls such as lock outs results in shorter schedule durations and lower overall costs for a facility D and D.

Gilmour, John C. [CH2SRC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Willis, Michael L. [Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between the contractors and DOE-RL. Information Management (IM) is a key part of the LTS program. The IM Program identifies, locates, stores, protects and makes accessible Hanford LTS records and data to support the transfer of property ultimately to LM. As such, DOE-RL manages the Hanford LTS Program in a manner consistent with LM's goals, policies, and procedures.

MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

443

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

444

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

445

CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

446

Oak Ridge Cleanup Vision: Moving to the Future by Cleaning Up the Past - 13291  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) strives to be the leader in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) EM Complex regarding successful and safe project execution and stakeholder interactions that yield positive results. EM's goal has been to become 'Investment Worthy' and, in order to accomplish that important objective, has also had to improve communications both within and outside of the Department. One of our most important missions is to assist the Department in achieving the sustainability goals set forth in Executive Order 13514. In this regard, EM's primary role is to return land to beneficial use and reduce energy impacts and maintenance costs by demolishing unneeded and deteriorating structures and remediating environmental contamination. Recent accomplishments toward meeting these goals include significant progress in the decontamination and demolition of the country's largest facility, the former K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building, constructed in 1942 to enrich uranium to help end World War II; the disposition of the first phase of Uranium-233 material from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which involved the transfer of Zero Power Reactor Plates to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); and a host of other project successes associated with transuranic (TRU) waste processing, hot cell decontamination and demolition, remediation of highly contaminated soils and burial grounds, and removal of mercury from storm sewers and surface waters. With regard to successful stakeholder interactions, recent accomplishments include a new method for collaboration that has renewed EM's working relationship with the regulators, and success in completing an extensive consultation process with over a dozen parties on the historic preservation of the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, which is now called the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Regarding improved communications, EM has successfully revised Program priorities and has received buy-in from the leadership in Headquarters, the regulators, and the community. Issues EM was facing in 2009 are presented. Resulting lessons learned and subsequent changes that the Office has gone through in the past several years in order to improve performance in the safe execution of work, relationships with external stakeholders, and communications both internally and externally are discussed. Results of these efforts are provided as a summary of Program accomplishments, including a strong focus on the future. EM's motto, Moving to the Future by Cleaning up the Past, will be demonstrated through the Program's mission, which includes protecting the region's health and environment; ensuring the continuation of ongoing vital missions being conducted by DOE on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and making clean land available for future use at all three sites, with a near-term focus on Re-industrialization of ETTP. (authors)

Cange, Susan M. [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wieland, Christopher C.; DePaoli, Susan M. [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The process for D&D and final dismantlement of facilities requires that the known contaminants of concern (COCs) be evaluated and quantified and to identify and quantify any additional contaminants in order to satisfy the waste acceptance criteria requirements for the desired disposal pathway. Known facility contaminants include, but are not limited to, asbestos-containing material (ACM), radiological contaminants, and chemical contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

Weaver, Phyllis C

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

FLUOR HANFORD (FH) MAKES CLEANUP A REALITY IN NEARLY 11 YEARS AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For nearly 11 years, Fluor Hanford has been busy cleaning up the legacy of nuclear weapons production at one of the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) major sites in the United States. As prime nuclear waste cleanup contractor at the vast Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, Fluor Hanford has changed the face of cleanup. Fluor beginning on October 1, 1996, Hanford Site cleanup was primarily a ''paper exercise.'' The Tri-Party Agreement, officially called the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order - the edict governing cleanup among the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington state - was just seven years old. Milestones mandated in the agreement up until then had required mainly waste characterization, reporting, and planning, with actual waste remediation activities off in the future. Real work, accessing waste ''in the field'' - or more literally in huge underground tanks, decaying spent fuel POO{approx}{approx}S, groundwater, hundreds of contaminated facilities, solid waste burial grounds, and liquid waste disposal sites -began in earnest under Fluor Hanford. The fruits of labors initiated, completed and/or underway by Fluor Hanford can today be seen across the site. Spent nuclear fuel is buttoned up in secure, dry containers stored away from regional water resources, reactive plutonium scraps are packaged in approved containers, transuranic (TRU) solid waste is being retrieved from burial trenches and shipped offsite for permanent disposal, contaminated facilities are being demolished, contaminated groundwater is being pumped out of aquifers at record rates, and many other inventive solutions are being applied to Hanford's most intransigent nuclear wastes. (TRU) waste contains more than 100 nanocuries per gram, and contains isotopes higher than uranium on the Periodic Table of the Elements. (A nanocurie is one-billionth of a curie.) At the same time, Fluor Hanford has dramatically improved safety records, and cost effectively maintained and streamlined infrastructure and equipment that is impossibly old and in many cases ''extinct'' in terms of spare parts and vendor support. The story of Fluor's achievements at the Hanford Site - the oldest and most productive plutonium site in the world - is both inspiring and instructive.

GERBER, M.S.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

449

Middlesex FUSRAP Site - A Path to Site-Wide Closure - 13416  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The road-map to obtaining closure of the Middlesex Sampling Plant FUSRAP site in Middlesex, New Jersey (NJ) has required a multi-faceted approach, following the CERCLA Process. Since 1998, the US ACE, ECC, and other contractors have completed much of the work required for regulatory acceptance of site closure with unrestricted use. To date, three buildings have been decontaminated, demolished, and disposed of. Two interim storage piles have been removed and disposed of, followed by the additional removal and disposal of over 87,000 tons of radiologically and chemically-impacted subsurface soils by the summer of 2008. The US ACE received a determination from the EPA for the soils Operable Unit, (OU)-1, in September 2010 that the remedial excavations were acceptable, and meet the criteria for unrestricted use as required by the 2004 Record of Decision (ROD) for OU-1. Following the completion of OU-1, the project delivery team performed additional field investigation of the final Operable Unit for Middlesex, OU-2, Groundwater. As of December 2012, the project delivery team has completed a Supplemental Remedial Investigation, which will be followed with a streamlined Feasibility Study, Proposed Plan, and ROD. Several years of historical groundwater data was available from previous investigations and the FUSRAP Environmental Surveillance Program. Historical data indicated sporadic detections of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), with no apparent trend or pattern indicating extent or source of the VOC impact. In 2008, the project delivery team initiated efforts to re-assess the Conceptual Site Model (CSM) for groundwater. The bedrock was re-evaluated as a leaky multi-unit aquifer, and a plan was developed for additional investigations for adequate bedrock characterization and delineation of groundwater contaminated primarily by CT, TCE, and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The investigation was designed to accumulate multiple lines of evidence to determine the source and to delineate the extent of contamination, as required to complete the CERCLA Process and gain regulatory acceptance. Investigative techniques included in-well vertical flow tracing, borehole geophysics and packer testing of temporary test holes to characterize contamination in the bedrock fractures beneath the site, and to delineate likely source areas. (authors)

Miller, David M. [ECC, 110 Fieldcrest Ave, Ste 31, Edison, NJ, 08837 (United States)] [ECC, 110 Fieldcrest Ave, Ste 31, Edison, NJ, 08837 (United States); Edge, Helen [US Army Corps of Engineers - NYD, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1811, New York, NY, 10278 (United States)] [US Army Corps of Engineers - NYD, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1811, New York, NY, 10278 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The Challenges of Preserving Historic Resources During the Deactivation and Decommissioning of Highly Contaminated Historically Significant Plutonium Process Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that are included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Site-wide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP. (authors)

Hopkins, A.; Minette, M.; Sorenson, D.; Heineman, R.; Gerber, M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., PO Box 1000 Richland WA 99352 (United States); Charboneau, S. [US Department of Energy PO Box 550, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Bond, F. [Washington State Department of Ecology, WDOE 3100 Port of Benton Blvd., Richland WA, 99354 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and international government and private industry decommissioning applications. SRS offers critical services based upon the SRS experience in decommissioning and reactor entombment technology (e.g., grout formulations for varying conditions, structural and material sciences). The SRS ISD approach follows a systems engineering framework to achieve a regulatory acceptable end state based on established protocols, attains the final end state with minimal long stewardship requirements, protects industrial workers, and protects groundwater and the environment. The ISD systems engineering framework addresses key areas of the remedial process planning, technology development and deployment, and assessment to attain the ultimate goal of natural resource stewardship and protecting the public. The development and deployment of the SRS ISD approach has established a path for ISD of other large nuclear facilities in the United States and around the globe as an acceptable remedial alternative for decommissioning nuclear facilities. (authors)

Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Back from the Brink with Something for Everyone - The Final Executed Memorandum of Agreement for Interpretation of the East Tennessee Technology Park and the K-25 Building - 13370  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) began its major decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program activities in the mid-1990's, it was understood that the work to demolish the gaseous diffusion process buildings at the K-25 Site, as it was then known, would be challenging. Nothing of that size and breadth had ever been done within the DOE complex and the job brought about a full menu of unique attributes: radiological contamination with enriched materials entrained in certain areas of the system, a facility that was never designed not to operate but had been shut down since 1964, and a loyal following of individuals and organizations who were committed to the physical preservation of at least some portion of the historic Manhattan Project property. DOE was able to solve and resolve the issues related to nuclear materials management, contamination control, and determining the best way to safely and efficiently deconstruct the massive building. However, for a variety of reasons, resolution of the historic preservation questions - what and how much to preserve, how to preserve it, where to preserve it, how to interpret it, how much to spend on preservation, and by and for whom preservation should occur - remained open to debate for over a decade. After a dozen years, countless meetings, phone calls, discussions and other exchanges, and four National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) [1] Memoranda of Agreement (MOA), a final MOA [2] has been executed. The final executed MOA's measures are robust, creative, substantive, and will be effective. They include a multi-story replica of a portion of the K-25 Building, the dedication of the K-25 Building footprint for preservation purposes, an equipment building to house authentic Manhattan Project and Cold War equipment, a virtual museum, an on-site history center, a grant to preserve a historically-significant Manhattan Project-era hotel in Oak Ridge, and more. The MOA was designed to offer something for everyone. The MOA for the K- 25 Building and interpretation of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP; formerly the K-25 Site) was executed by all of the signatory parties on August 7, 2012 - almost 67 years to-the-day after the 'product' of the K-25 process building became known to more than just a small group of scientists and engineers working on a secret project for the Army Corps of Engineers Manhattan District. (authors)

Cusick, Lesley T. [Restoration Services, Inc. (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc. (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition. Maintenance of building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) balancing was critical to ensure proper airflow and worker safety. Approximately 103 m{sup 3} of equipment and materials were recovered or generated by the project. Low level waste accounted for approximately 37.4 m{sup 3}. Where possible, ducting was free released for metal recycling. Contaminated ducts were compacted into B-1000 containers and stored in a Shielded Modular Above-Ground Storage Facility (SMAGS) on the WL site awaiting final disposition. The project is divided into three significant phases, with Phases 1 and 2 completed. Lessons learned during the execution of Phases 1 and 2 have been incorporated into the current ventilation removal. (authors)

Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The effects of overwinter flowson the spring condition of rainbow and brown trout size classes in the Green River downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam, Utah.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flaming Gorge Dam, a hydroelectric facility operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is located on the Green River in Daggett County, northeastern Utah. Until recently, and since the early 1990s, single daily peak releases or steady flows have been the operational pattern of the dam during the winter period. However, releases from Flaming Gorge Reservoir followed a double-peak pattern (two daily flow peaks) during the winters of 2006-2007 and 2008-2009. Because there is little recent long-term history of double-peaking at Flaming Gorge Dam, the potential effects of double-peaking operations on trout body condition in the dam's tailwater are not known. A study plan was developed that identified research activities to evaluate potential effects from winter double-peaking operations (Hayse et al. 2009). Along with other tasks, the study plan identified the need to conduct a statistical analysis of historical trout condition and macroinvertebrate abundance to evaluate the potential effects of hydropower operations. The results from analyses based on the combined size classes of trout (85-630 mm) were presented in Magnusson et al. (2008). The results of this earlier analysis suggested possible relationships between trout condition and flow, but concern that some of the relationships resulted from size-based effects (e.g., apparent changes in condition may have been related to concomitant changes in size distribution, because small trout may have responded differently to flow than large trout) prompted additional analysis of within-size class relationships. This report presents the results of analyses of three different size classes of trout (small: 200-299 mm, medium: 300-399 mm, and large: {ge}400 mm body length). We analyzed historical data to (1) describe temporal patterns and relationships among flows, benthic macroinvertebrate abundance, and condition of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the tailwaters of Flaming Gorge Dam, and to (2) evaluate the relative importance of the effects of flow (i.e., flow volumes and flow variability), trout abundance (catch per unit effort [CPUE]), and benthic macroinvertebrate abundance on trout condition for different size classes of trout.

Magnusson, A. K.; LaGory, K. E.; Hayse, J. W.; Environmental Science Division

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

455

Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

Malinowksi, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of wall saws, both the activated steel liner and the inner reinforcing layer were cut remotely in one process. This allowed for the efficient execution of the following remote concrete removal steps using mining techniques. The electro-hydraulic demolition excavator that was purchased and then modified turned out to be an ideal tool carrier system with rapid-exchange coupling. Due to the high availability, no major delays occurred. This also was a result of the consistently implemented maintenance and repair concept. With the excavator installed in a modifiable scaffolding suspended from a rotating carrier ring, all dismantling areas could be reached and treated in spite of the small space. Thanks to an optimum organization of work-flows, routine change of dismantling work, and maintenance or repair, the iterative radiological measurement campaigns could be integrated in the whole activity without the dismantling work being disturbed significantly. The ventilation system with pressure grading and pre-filtration units ensured a low contamination level in the dismantling area. It was also possible to manage the dust formed by the milling of concrete surfaces. As it was possible to further cut metal parts and crushed concrete later on, residue flows were optimized. The planned overall period for testing, dismantling the bio-shield and removing the equipment was 36 months. The final duration was 39 months. (authors)

Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for agency action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action, and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process provides NNSA with environmental information that can be used in developing mitigative actions, if necessary, to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the quality of the human environment and natural ecosystems should NNSA decide to proceed with implementing the Proposed Action at LANL. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA, and this EA, is to aid NNSA officials in making decisions based on an understanding of environmental consequences and in taking actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment.

N /A

2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

458

PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The project completed TPA Milestone M-083-032 to 'Complete those activities required by the 241-Z Treatment and Storage Unit's RCRA Closure Plan' four years and seven months ahead of this legally enforceable milestone. In addition, the project completed TPA Milestone M-083-042 to 'Complete transition and dismantlement of the 241-2 Waste Treatment Facility' four years and four months ahead of schedule. The project used an innovative approach in developing the project-specific RCRA closure plan to assure clear integration between the 241-Z RCRA closure activities and ongoing and future CERCLA actions at PFP. This approach provided a regulatory mechanism within the RCRA closure plan to place segments of the closure that were not practical to address at this time into future actions under CERCLA. Lessons learned from th is approach can be applied to other closure projects within the DOE Complex to control scope creep and mitigate risk. A paper on this topic, entitled 'Integration of the 241-Z Building D and D Under CERCLA with RCRA Closure at the PFP', was presented at the 2007 Waste Management Conference in Tucson, Arizona. In addition, techniques developed by the 241-Z D&D Project to control airborne contamination, clean the interior of the waste tanks, don and doff protective equipment, size-reduce plutonium-contaminated process piping, and mitigate thermal stress for the workers can be applied to other cleanup activities. The project-management team developed a strategy utilizing early characterization, targeted cleanup, and close coordination with PFP Criticality Engineering to significantly streamline the waste- handling costs associated with the project . The project schedule was structured to support an early transition to a criticality 'incredible' status for the 241-Z Facility. The cleanup work was sequenced and coordinated with project-specific criticality analysis to allow the fissile material waste being generated to be managed in a bulk fashion, instead of individual waste packages. This approach negated the need for real-time assay of individ

JOHNSTON GA

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

K-25 Structural Separation and Demolition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K-25 building is a former gaseous diffusion plant, built in 1944-1945 as part of the United States Manhattan Project. The structure was the largest structure under one roof, surpassed only by the Pentagon. Together the three wings represent about 17.8 hectare (44 acres) under roof and are generally about 18.3 meters (60 ft.) high on the outside face and approximately 12.2 meters (40 ft.) high on the inside face. The entire structure was built in the shape of a 'U', with a lateral distance of approximately one mile. It was constructed in individual building units with each unit connected using expansion joint-type connection. A single unit is approximately 24.4 meters (80 ft.) across and 122 meters (400 ft.) deep. The northern structure is connected to the eastern and western structures at the upper level floors. The four-level, U-shaped building is a steel-frame structure with corrugated cement-asbestos siding. The cell level is an elevated concrete structure supported by reinforced concrete columns located in the basement, or vault area. The vault area can be accessed at grade level from the outside perimeter. Inside the courtyard, the grade level has been raised to provide entry to the second or cell floor level. An engineering evaluation of the structure was performed to determine the condition of the structure and possibility of unplanned collapse of any portion of the structure. The evaluation included physical inspections, calculations for wind, pre-demolition loads, and evaluation of failure modes. The results of the evaluation have provided guidance for the demolition plan and the development of criteria for protection of personnel performing pre-demolition activities. Challenges include degradation of the structure that necessitated repair, dealing with changes in the code revisions from both the American Concrete Institute (ACI) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), access to areas of the structure that were not necessarily designed for access, and acceleration of the building degradation due to the pre-demolition activities. When a full building is evaluated, 50 percent of wind and applied forces are dissipated in 3 units and 80 percent is dissipated in 12 units. The forces are basically linear for the first 6 units once the building is opened at the start of demolition. Some column buckling, based on current codes, was noted in the analysis that would have to be mitigated to ensure a controlled demolition. Loading for the removal of the equipment required structural engineering evaluation of the certainty of the load and the application of the load. Corbels are being evaluated through an inspection program and criteria for repair based on current loading and anticipated additional live loads. Access issues continue to be a challenge and have created the need for a significant fall protection program. Other areas of access require different approaches and engineering solutions, sometime considering ultimate strength design versus standard yield stress design. An evaluation of separating a wing into two sections to allow for worker re-entry to perform pre-demolition activities during the demolition off shift was conducted. The evaluation has shown that because of both design and history of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, significant care and attention is needed to demolish these structures from a structural perspective. When the project schedule issues are overlaid, that may demand workers in other parts of the structure after demolition has begun, the structural issues become severe, demanding exacting analysis and significant controls to ensure the safety of the workers both in and outside the building performing the demolition work.

Cater, Frank [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, East Tennessee Technology Park, Post Office Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

Serrato, M. G.

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Packaging and Transportation Support at LANL CTMA 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations Support Packaging and Transportation (OS-PT) supports LANL in various functions. Some highlights of the past year have been with the work relating to environmental remediation, type B packaging, non-DOT compliant transfers, and special permit training. The TA-21 remediation project was part of the ARRA funding that LANL received. The $212 million in funding was used to demolish 24 buildings at TA-21, excavate the lab's oldest waste disposal site, and install 16 groundwater monitoring wells. The project was completed ahead of schedule and under budget. More than 300 tons of metal was recycled and all the soil excavated from MDA-B was replaced with clean fill. OS-PT supported this projected by transporting more than 7 million pounds of waste to TA-54 Area G with an addendum to their TSD. Because of the public access on the transfer route, Los Alamos County restricted the transfer to happen from 2:00 AM to 4:00 AM. OS-PT conducted 8 transfers in support of this project. Some concerns included the contaminated trailers at receipt facilities when transferring filled Super Sacks. Future Super Sacks were over packed into new IP-2 Super Sacks before shipping. OS-PT is also supporting the remediation of TA-54 Area G. LANL has an agreement with the State of New Mexico to remove all TRU waste currently stored above ground from at Area G. OS-PT supports this initiative with transfers of TRU waste under LANL's TSD and support of TRU shipments to WIPP. Another project supported by our organization is gas cylinder/dewar recycling and remediation. We are focusing on reducing risk associated with unneeded gasses at LANL. To minimized excessive ordering, to save money and time, and to minimize hazards OS-PT is supporting a gas recycling program. This program will allow programmatic organization across LANL to share unused/unneeded gasses. Instead of old dewars being disposed of, OS-PT has began identifying these dewars and sending them for refurbishment. To date, this effort has saved LANL $450K and estimated saving for future efforts will be more than $1.5 million. Some Projects that are happening here at LANL are offsite source recovery, weapon component transfers, and isotope science production. There are specific packages that help support these projects for the shipment of related materials. OS-PT provides support to these packages to ensure they are and will be available to continue this support. The Areva 435-B Overpack will help the Offsite Source Recovery Project recover high activity gamma sources from various locations across the globe. The Safety Analysis for Packaging is scheduled for initial completion June of 2012. The DPP-1 package is designed to replace the Model FL, which was designed by Rocky Flats and began service in 1990. LANL has collaborated on package design with LLNL, Pantex, Y-12, and KCP. LANL is supporting LLNL on component fixture development. Testing to 10 CFR 71 is to be completed in the Fall of 2012 and scheduled for NA-174 approval in 2014. The SAFESHIELD package helps supports LANL's Isotope production projects. This package can transfer highly irradiated materials from LANL's accelerator to material processing facilities. LANL worked to renew the SAFESHEILD's Certification for 5 more years.

Salazar, Nick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as /sup 240/Pu, /sup 244/Cm and /sup 252/Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter /sup 241/Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether permanent low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Atencio, J.D.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Sitewide environmental assessment EA-1236 for preparation for transfer of ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Proposed Action includes the following principal elements: (1) The accelerated plugging and abandoning of uneconomic wells over the next six years. Uneconomic wells are operating wells which can no longer cover their direct and indirect costs. DOE estimates that there are 900 wells to be plugged and abandoned over the next six years, leaving approximately 200 wells for transfer by 2003. (2) Complete reclamation and restoration of abandoned sites. Restoration would include dismantling surface facilities, batteries, roads, test satellites, electrical distribution systems and associated power poles, when they are no longer needed for production. Soil contaminated by hydrocarbons would be biologically treated. Roads, facilities, batteries, and well sites would be ripped up, recontoured, disked and seeded with native vegetation. (3) The continued development of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) through the establishment of a consortium of university, state and private institutions. RMOTC would continue to provide facilities and support to government and private industry for testing and evaluating new oilfield and environmental technologies. Based on the findings of the EA, DOE has determined that the proposal does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

BPA Facts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration is a federal nonprofit power marketing administration based in the Pacific Northwest . Although BPA is part of the U .S . Department of Energy, it is self-funding and covers its costs by selling its products and services . BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydro projects in the Columbia River Basin, one nonfederal nuclear plant and several small nonfederal power plants . The dams are operated by the U .S . Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation . About 30 percent of the electric power used in the Northwest comes from BPA . BPA’s resources — primarily hydroelectric — make its power nearly carbon free . BPA also operates and maintains about three- fourths of the high-voltage transmission in its service territory . BPA’s service territory includes Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana and small parts of eastern Montana, California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming . BPA promotes energy efficiency, renewable resources and new technologies that improve its ability to deliver on its mission . BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin . BPA is committed to public service and seeks to make its decisions in a manner that provides opportunities for input from stakeholders . In its vision statement, BPA dedicates itself to providing high system reliability, low rates consistent with sound business principles, environmental stewardship and accountability

none,

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Peat as an energy alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This symposium, Peat as an Energy Alternative, was organized to facilitate in-depth discussion of the various topics at the last conference. The scope of the symposium was international and included papers from Brazil, Canada, Finland, Israel, Jamaica, and Sweden. The presentations were designed to provide the latest information relating to the following areas of interest: peat resources; peat deposit location; countries using peat for energy; countries showing inerest in considering peat for energy; status of the technologies for harvesting, dewatering, beneficiation, combustion, and conversion to synthetic fuels; environmental and socioeconomic issues relating to large-scale peat utilization; peat reclamation options; Federal and State government plans for peat utilization; and organizations working on developments relating to peat as an energy alternative. The symposium, sponsored by the Institute of Gas Technology, was held at Arlington, VA, December 1-3, 1980. Forth-six papers have been entered individually into EDB and ten also into ERA; two paper had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Selection of water treatment processes special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. The restoration of contaminated aquifers is to be undertaken in Phase II of the UMTRA Project. To begin implementation of Phase II, DOE requested that groundwater restoration methods and technologies be investigated by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). and that the results of the TAC investigations be documented in special study reports. Many active and passive methods are available to clean up contaminated groundwater. Passive groundwater treatment includes natural flushing, geochemical barriers, and gradient manipulation by stream diversion or slurry walls. Active groundwater.cleanup techniques include gradient manipulation by well extraction or injection. in-situ biological or chemical reclamation, and extraction and treatment. Although some or all of the methods listed above may play a role in the groundwater cleanup phase of the UMTRA Project, the extraction and treatment (pump and treat) option is the only restoration alternative discussed in this report. Hence, all sections of this report relate either directly or indirectly to the technical discipline of process engineering.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Selection of water treatment processes special study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. The restoration of contaminated aquifers is to be undertaken in Phase II of the UMTRA Project. To begin implementation of Phase II, DOE requested that groundwater restoration methods and technologies be investigated by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). and that the results of the TAC investigations be documented in special study reports. Many active and passive methods are available to clean up contaminated groundwater. Passive groundwater treatment includes natural flushing, geochemical barriers, and gradient manipulation by stream diversion or slurry walls. Active groundwater.cleanup techniques include gradient manipulation by well extraction or injection. in-situ biological or chemical reclamation, and extraction and treatment. Although some or all of the methods listed above may play a role in the groundwater cleanup phase of the UMTRA Project, the extraction and treatment (pump and treat) option is the only restoration alternative discussed in this report. Hence, all sections of this report relate either directly or indirectly to the technical discipline of process engineering.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

473

Overall requirements for an advanced underground coal extraction system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents overall requirements on underground mining systems suitable for coal seams exploitable in the year 2000, with particular relevance to the resources of Central Appalachia. These requirements may be summarized as follows: (1) Production Cost: demonstrate a return on incremental investment of 1.5 to 2.5 times the value required by a low-risk capital project. (2) Miner Safety: achieve at least a 50% reduction in deaths and disabling injuries per million man-hours. (3) Miner Health: meet the intent of all applicable regulations, with particular attention to coal dust, carcinogens, and mutagens; and with continued emphasis on acceptable levels of noise and vibration, lighting, humidity and temperature, and adequate work space. (4) Environmental Impact: maintain the value of mined and adjacent lands at the pre-mining value following reclamation; mitigation of off-site impacts should not cost more than the procedures used in contemporary mining. (5) Coal Conservation: the recovery of coal from the seam being mined should be at least as good as the best available contemporary technology operating in comparable conditions. No significant trade-offs between production cost and other performance indices were found.

Goldsmith, M.; Lavin, M.L.

1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Diamonds in the rough: identification of individual napthenic acids in oil sands process water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expansion of the oil sands industry of Canada has seen a concomitant increase in the amount of process water produced and stored in large lagoons known as tailings ponds. Concerns have been raised, particularly about the toxic complex mixtures of water-soluble naphthenic acids (NA) in the process water. To date, no individual NA have been identified, despite numerous attempts, and while the toxicity of broad classes of acids is of interest, toxicity is often structure-specific, so identification of individual acids may also be very important. The chromatographic resolution and mass spectral identification of some individual NA from oil sands process water is described. The authors concluded that the presence of tricyclic diamondoid acids, never before even considered as NA, suggests an unprecedented degree of biodegradation of some of the oil in the oil sands. The identifications reported should now be followed by quantitative studies, and these used to direct toxicity assays of relevant NA and the method used to identify further NA to establish which, or whether all NA, are toxic. The two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method described may also be important for helping to better focus reclamation/remediation strategies for NA as well as in facilitating the identification of the sources of NA in contaminated surface waters (auth)

Rowland, Steven J.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Jones, David; West, Charles E. (Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, Biogeochemistry Research Centre, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)); Frank, Richard A. (Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Division-Water Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Sludge processors have wide choice of solutions for waste ammonia problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ocean Dumping Act of 1988 phased out dumping of sewage sludge into the ocean. To use sewage sludge beneficially, facilities treat and process it using such techniques as digestion, dewatering, composting, thermal drying and chemical stabilization. All of these processes create waste discharges containing high concentrations of nitrogen, mainly in the form of ammonia. When nitrification occurs in receiving waters, ammonia is oxidized to nitrate and can lower dissolved oxygen levels in the water. Excess ammonia also is toxic to fish and other aquatic life. Nitrogen reduction alternatives for sludge dewatering and processing waste discharges include the following: air stripping; steam stripping; breakpoint chlorination; selective ion exchange; reverse osmosis; and chemical precipitation. To remove wastewater nitrogen using biological processes, ammonia and organic nitrogen first are oxidized aerobically (nitrification) to nitrate nitrogen, which then is converted biologically to nitrogen gas (denitrification) under zero or low dissolved oxygen (anoxic) conditions. Because sludge treatment discharges contain valuable quantities of ammonia, they may be considered for reuse as supplemental fertilizer for land application or for reclamation through spraying or injection into soil. Such discharges also may be used in combustion processes.

Chen, Y.S.R.; Samela, D. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States). Environmental Technology and Services Div.); Kaylor, F.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Using sludge on land raises more than crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applying sludge to croplands has been one solution to the dilemma of accumulating sewage. At the present time, approximately 25 percent of all sludge disposal programs are conducted as land application, specifically land reclamation and agricultural utilization. The application of sludge to croplands is developing from a small and scattered program into a large-scaled program because of the prohibition of ocean dumping of sludge, increased costs for incineration of sludge and its pollution control, and an increasing national production of over 280 million tons/yr of wet sludge. Agricultural utilization of sewage sludge has several notable benefits including the recycling of essential and trace nutrients, improvement of marginal soil with organic matter, increased crop yield, and direct costs comparable to commercial fertilizers. However, cropland utilization of sewage sludge may involve risks if proper management is not followed. Besides the risk of metal contamination of soil and plants which has received considerable notoriety, the overall environmental impact of sludge application programs must also consider the public health hazards of nitrate (Ntheta/sub 3/) pollution and the spread of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms, and any odor nuisance which may be associated with these programs.

Gerardi, M.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY07 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

478

Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring and Evaluation FY08 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via BPA's project tracking system, Pisces; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on FCRPS operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.

Johnson, GE; Diefenderfer, HL [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

480

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY08 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, Pisces; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on hydrosystem operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reclamation demolished efr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring and Evaluation - FY07 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort of the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

Viatec Recovery System, Inc.: A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I will tell you how we transferred a technology from the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory to the private sector. I`ll begin by telling about the technology and what it does. Then I`ll tell you how we found a commercial partner to market the technology. And I`ll end by telling you some of the lessons we learned and what our customer thinks about the partnership. This is a success for two reasons. First, the people who developed the technology had faith in its potential. And second, they took an active part in the transfer; they didn`t sit back and wait for someone else to do it. That reminds me of Joe. Night after night, Joe prayed for help in winning the lottery, but his prayers went unanswered. Finally he cried out in desperation: ``Lord, give me a break! Please let me win the lottery!`` Suddenly, lightning flashed across the sky and thunder crashed around him. Then, he heard a voice from above: ``Joe! You give ME a break! BUY A TICKET!`` To succeed in tech transfer, you`ve got to have more than faith. You`ve got to buy a ticket. You`ve got to invest time, energy, imagination, and effort. And that`s just what the developers of the waste acid detoxification and reclamation process did.

Williams, L.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kensington, K. [Viatec, Inc., Whitefish, MT (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan progress report, 1994. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report tracks progress made during 1994 against the goals stated in DOE/RL-92-62, Executive Summary, Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan. The Executive Summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, Executive Summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by WAC 173-307, ``Plans,`` for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement RCW 70.95C, ``Waste Reduction,`` an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the in-process reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. The Hanford Site is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. All treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities are exempt from participating; the Hanford Site is classified as a TSD.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify .sup.233 U, .sup.235 U and .sup.239 Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as .sup.240 Pu, .sup.244 Cm and .sup.252 Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter .sup.241 Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether "permanent" low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

Caldwell, John T. (Los Alamos, NM); Kunz, Walter E. (Santa Fe, NM); Atencio, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential