National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reclamation demolished efr

  1. Transgenic expression of the dicotyledonous pattern recognition receptor EFR in rice leads to ligand-dependent activation of defense responses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Bahar, Ofir; Thomas, Nicolas; Holton, Nicolas; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Ruan, Deling; Canlas, Patrick E.; Daudi, Arsalan; Petzold, Christopher J.; Singan, Vasanth R.; et al

    2015-03-30

    Plant plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect extracellular pathogen-associated molecules. PRRs such as Arabidopsis EFR and rice XA21 are taxonomically restricted and are absent from most plant genomes. Here we show that rice plants expressing EFR or the chimeric receptor EFR::XA21, containing the EFR ectodomain and the XA21 intracellular domain, sense both Escherichia coli- and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo)-derived elf18 peptides at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Treatment of EFR and EFR::XA21 rice leaf tissue with elf18 leads to MAP kinase activation, reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression. Although expression of EFR does not lead to robust enhanced resistancemore »to fully virulent Xoo isolates, it does lead to quantitatively enhanced resistance to weakly virulent Xoo isolates. EFR interacts with OsSERK2 and the XA21 binding protein 24 (XB24), two key components of the rice XA21-mediated immune response. Rice-EFR plants silenced for OsSERK2, or overexpressing rice XB24 are compromised in elf18-induced reactive oxygen production and defense gene expression indicating that these proteins are also important for EFR-mediated signaling in transgenic rice. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential feasibility of enhancing disease resistance in rice and possibly other monocotyledonous crop species by expression of dicotyledonous PRRs. Our results also suggest that Arabidopsis EFR utilizes at least a subset of the known endogenous rice XA21 signaling components.« less

  2. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP Road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work...

  3. The City Recycled: The Afterlives of Demolished Buildings in Postwar Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kao, Shih-yang

    2013-01-01

    Policy Study on Construction Waste Reclamation in Beijing].succeeded in halting construction of a waste incinerator ondemolition waste was put to use in the construction of the

  4. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  5. DEMOLISHING A COLD-WAR-ERA FUEL STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLOYD ER; ORGILL TK; DAGAN EB

    2008-11-25

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the K East basin within six months of tumover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team implemented open-air demolition techniques to demolish the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovation that aided demolition was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building, portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by removing the CAB during demolition using heavy equipment. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or asbestos) demonstrates that similar open-air demolition ofcontaminated structures can be performed successfully.

  6. North City Water Reclamation Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -Site Cogeneration Methane Power Plant Methane piped in from: Miramar LandfillMiramar Landfill Metropolitan BiosolidsNorth City Water Reclamation Plant Maja Caroee Diana Lee Niko Salvador #12;What is Water% for plant operation 25% sold to local power grid #12;Technical Issues & Innovations COMNET Clean water

  7. DEMOLISHING A COLD WARE ERA FULE STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLOYD ER; STEVENS JM; DAGAN EB; ORGILL TK; GREEN MA; LARSON CH; ZINSLI LC

    2009-01-12

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the KE Basin within six months of turnover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team applied open-air demolition techniques to bring the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives during the demolition; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovative approach that made demolition easier was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building and portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple-layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by using heavy equipment to remove the CAB during demolition. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or asbestos) demonstrates that contaminated structures can be torn down successfully using similar open-air demolition techniques.

  8. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Breakout Session 2-A: The Future of Algae-Based Biofuels...

  9. Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation Jiu Jimmy Jiao Department of groundwater regime, in tum causing similar problems. This paper represents the first attempt to address the impact ofreclamation on groundwater regimes. It will be demonstrated that large-scale of reclamation

  10. Rocky Flats 10 year plan: over 500 structures to be demolished

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, B.; Bengel, P.

    1997-03-01

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has prepared a Ten Year Plan (Plan) that demonstrates how the Site would achieve accelerated cleanup and rapidly reduce the risks the Site currently poses to its workers, the public, and the environment. A major element of the Plan is the decontamination and demolition of over 500 Site facilities, including all of the former nuclear production facilities, by the end of 2006. Facilities used for the storage of plutonium, treatment of low-level mixed waste, and several office building would remain until the plutonium is removed or there is no longer a need for the facility, in which case it would be demolished. While the Plan considers all aspects of the cleanup and closure, this paper focuses on the challenges posed by the removal of highly contaminated equipment and the demolition of structures. This paper describes near- term decommissioning projects as well as the long range plans and budgets. Cash flow ultimately controls schedule, and sharing of budget priorities among processing of special nuclear material, disposing of waste, and cleaning up the environment has to be juggled carefully to attain the goals of the Plan. The total cost of the Plan exceeds $5 billion, and over $1 billion will be spent on decommissioning activities. Following removal of the plutonium and the demolition of the plutonium storage and remaining Site facilities by the end of 2015, the cost to perform the long-term environmental monitoring at the Site is estimated to be $10 million per year.

  11. Automated Storage Reclamation Using Temporal Importance Annotations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehani, Ashish

    Automated Storage Reclamation Using Temporal Importance Annotations Surendar Chandra, Ashish.edu Abstract This work focuses on scenarios that require the storage of large amounts of data. Such sys- tems require the ability to either continuously increase the storage space or reclaim space by deleting

  12. Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

    1990-06-01

    The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. ISO 14000: Impact on mining and reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.E. [Lloyd, Gosselink, Fowler, Blevins & Mathews, Austin, TX (United States); Tipton, S.G. [North American Coal Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Environmental regulation and compliance in the mining and reclamation industry is in a position to take advantage of the ISO 14000 standards being developed by the International Organization for Standardization. The purpose of this paper is to provide environmental managers in the mining and reclamation industry with a basic understanding of the ISO 14000 environmental standards which have traditionally been implemented by conventional manufacturing industries. The paper covers the history of the ISO, its acceptance by industry generally, the ISO 14000 standards being utilized currently and those which are proposed for the future, the benefits associated with implementation and compliance with the standards, and a discussion of ISO 14000 standards` applicability in the mining and reclamation industry. There are seven areas which constitute the ISO 14000 set of standards: (1) Environmental Management Systems; (2) Environmental Auditing; (3) Environmental Labeling; (4) Environmental Performance Evaluation; (5) Life Cycle Assessment; (6) Terms and Definitions; and (7) Environmental Aspects in Product Standards. A commitment to regulatory compliance and sound environmental practices along with ISO certification can potentially provide greater access to capital because lenders will view an environmentally healthy organization as a better risk, it can provide defenses against products liability or personal injury lawsuits, and protect against criminal liability. Implementation of ISO standards can help avoid risks associated with business practices, ensure early detection of potential regulatory violations, and hence ensure company profitability by avoiding discovery of a violation by state and/or federal agencies. It can demonstrate a sincere commitment to regulatory compliance which may in turn provide reduced oversight by state and federal regulatory agencies.

  14. Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Van Geet, O.

    2012-05-01

    Report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Report contains results from utility scale analysis and site visits, as well as facility scale screening and site visits.

  15. In situ soil reclamation by air stripping and sludge uptake 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carden?osa-Mendoza, Mauricio

    1989-01-01

    IN SITU SOIL RECLAMATION BY AIR STRIPPING AND SLUDGE UPTAKE A Thesis by MAURICIO CARDENOSA-MENDOZA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Civil Engineering IN SITU SOIL RECLAMATION BY AIR STRIPPING AND SLUDGE UPTAKE A Thesis by MAURICIO CARDENOSA-MENDOZA Approved as to style and content by: Robin . Autenrieth (Chair of comittee) James S. Bonner...

  16. Technical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of fresh ground water resource because the reclaimed land can be an additional aquifer and rain rechargeTechnical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on Ground Water Level and the Sea Water a significant effect on local ground water systems. Steady-state analytic solutions based on Dupuit and Ghyben

  17. The reclamation of swamp lands in North Carolina/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March, George Miles

    THE RECLAMATION OP SWAMP LANDS IN NORTH CAROLINA. * A THESIS BY GEORGE M. MARCH. SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE FACULTY OP THE UNIVERSITY OP KANSAS AS ONE OP THE REQUIREMENTS POR THE PROFESSIONAL DEGREE OP CIVIL ENGINEER. MARCH 1st.,1915... (> & — — TABLE OF CONTENTS. Page* 1 Title* 2 Table of Contents. 3 Index of Maps and Drawings. 4 Introduction. 6 Geographical Conditions. @ North Carolina Drainage Law. 11 Preliminary Survey. 12 Surveying Problems. 22 Engineering Problems. 31...

  18. Title 43 CFR 429 Use of Bureau of Reclamation Land, Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43 CFR 429 Use of Bureau of Reclamation Land, Facilities, and...

  19. Reclamation Project Act of 1939 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpen EnergyReclamation Project Act of

  20. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  1. Thermal reclamation of used blast grit. Technology spotlight report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Naval shipyards and other domestic port facilities generate thousands of tons of used blast grit annually. There are also thousands of steel bridges in the United States on a repaint schedule that requires grit blasting for surface preparation. All the used grit, along with the paint residue it contains, is currently disposed of in landfills. Cleaning and recycling used blast grit is an attractive alternative. Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed a fluidized-bed sand calciner that is well suited for cleaning and recycling used blast grit. Essentially, IGT researchers applied a transfer/adaptation of fluidized-bed calcination originally developed for the reclamation of foundry sand. The calciner has a patented sloped-grid design that enhances the combustion of paint residues and promotes the isolation of reusable material.

  2. Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA Jump to:Energy Tech ServicesAssociation

  3. Development of a thermal reclamation system for spent blasting abrasive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, B.B.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rehmat, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    Abrasive blasting is the most economical method for paint removal from large surface areas such as the hulls and tanks of oceangoing vessels. Tens of thousands of tons of spent abrasive are generated annually by blasting operations in private and US Navy shipyards. Some of this material is classified as hazardous waste, and nearly all of it is currently being either stockpiled or disposed in landfills. The rapid decline in available landfill space and corresponding rise in landfill tipping fees pose a severe problem for shipyard operators throughout the US. This paper discusses the results of a research and development program initiated by the Institute of Gas Technology and supported by the US Navy to develop and test a fluidized-bed thermal reclamation system for spent abrasive waste minimization. Bench- and pilot-scale reclaimer tests and reclaimed abrasive performance tests are described along with the current status of a program to build and test a 5-ton/hour prototype reclaimer at a US Navy shipyard.

  4. Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s review of Atlas Corporation`s proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Metal concentrations and mobility in marine sediment and groundwater in coastal reclamation areas: A case study in Shenzhen, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Metal concentrations and mobility in marine sediment and groundwater in coastal reclamation areas 2007; accepted 8 April 2007 Metals in coastal groundwater and marine sediment are affected by land reclamation. Abstract The concentrations of metals in the buried marine sediment and groundwater were

  6. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Naturally Saline Boreal Communities as Models for Reclamation of Saline Oil Sand Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Naturally Saline Boreal Communities as Models for Reclamation of Saline Oil Sand Tailings Brett G. Purdy,1,2 S. Ellen Macdonald,1 and Victor J. Lieffers1 Abstract Reclaimed landscapes after oil sands found on the predisturbance land- scape can be established on all reclaimed landscapes after oil sands

  9. Scientific soundness and socio-economic realities in reclamation for habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, K.D.

    1997-12-31

    Reclamation projects must balance data requirements for scientifically-sound design with uncertainty and socio-economic constraints. Whether designing for physical stability, cultural benefits or ecological enhancements, the reclamation project can work with or fight natural processes (physical, chemical, biological). Projects which anticipate and design to fit natural processes have greater chances of success with lower short and long-term cost, and with achievement of a greater range of social objectives. However, the cost of anticipating natural processes (succession, geomorphic patterns, etc.) increases the budget allocation at the design stage in order to save on construction and maintenance. In southern Ontario, once design teams recognize that designing for an {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} natural condition is not feasible, they too often revert to conventional, single-objective approaches which compromise design integrity and social benefits. Case studies are reviewed with analysis of alternative approaches that seek to balance ranges of achievable objectives with cost allocation and scientific soundness.

  10. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Check out this epic demolition video from the Hanford Site in Washington state. But its more than just great footage -- this represents important progress in the cleanup of the environmental legacy of one of America's most famous scientific undertakings -- the Manhattan Project.

  14. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Re-water: More complicated than just toilet-to-tap, water reclamation helps sustain thirsty cities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info Re-water_more complicated than just toilet-to-tap, water reclamation helps sustain thirsty cities.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 14065 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Re-water..._more complicated than just toilet-to-tap, water reclamation helps sustain thirsty cities.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Fall 2011 tx H2O 25 Story by Leslie Lee Timeline of Droughts in Texas TWDB adopts Water for Texas 2007...

  16. On-Demand Node Reclamation and Replacement for Guaranteed Area Coverage in Long-lived Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wensheng

    applica- tion in long-term tasks such as structural health monitoring for bridges and tunnels, border and efficient way to guarantee long-term energy supply has persisted as a big challenge. Recently, Tong et alOn-Demand Node Reclamation and Replacement for Guaranteed Area Coverage in Long-lived Sensor

  17. Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pipeline Surveying Pipeline Surveying Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline...

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tunnel Surveying Pipeline Surveying Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline...

  20. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

  1. Reclamation Rural Water Act 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Desalination and Renewable Energy 71 Reclamation Rural Water Act: Southwestern Navajo Rural Water Supply Index); the energy and water nexus in Arizona; renewable energy for water transmission; and is now researching new techniques for using renewable energy for desalination in an off grid setting. Kevin Black Sr

  2. Walk-through survey report: Control technology for metal reclamation industries at East Penn Manufacturing Company Inc. , Lyon Station, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, R.M.

    1994-08-12

    A walk through survey was conducted at the East Penn Manufacturing Company (SIC-3341), Lyon Station, Pennsylvania to identify and evaluate potentially effective controls and work practices in the lead (7439921) reclamation industry. The facility was a secondary lead smelter which operated 7 days a week, and recycled about 20,000 batteries a day, primarily automobile batteries. The company employed automation, local exhaust ventilation, partial enclosures, and enclosed ventilation systems in the reverberatory furnace operations, blast furnace operations, and casting and refinery area to reduce employee exposure to lead. The arsenic (7440382) personal exposure time weighted averages ranged from 0.10 to 1.14 microg/cubic m in the industrial battery breaking area and ranged from nondetected to 6.16 microg/cubic m in the alloying/pots area.

  3. Use of explosives to demolish multistory steel frame buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landry, Charles Vernon

    1988-01-01

    OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . 1. INTRODUCTION. vi 1. 1 Problem Definition . 1. 2 Work Done to Date. 1. 3 Purpose of the Study . 1. 4 Approach. 2. GENERAL PLANNING FOR STEEL FRAME MULTISTORY DEMOLITION. 2. 1 Introduction. 2. 2 General Mechanics... of the other companies who use these techniques, have, in the past, worked for Controiled Demolition Inc. Due in part to these connections, many of these companies consider all of the information on their controlled demolition techniques as proprietary...

  4. EM Begins Demolishing K-31 Gaseous Diffusion Building | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) began Wednesday, marking the removal of the fourth of five gaseous diffusion buildings at the former uranium enrichment site. The...

  5. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. Contact Colleen Curran Communications Office (505) 664-0344 Email "We look forward to the day we officially...

  6. 1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, Adam

    2013-08-30

    The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer™ is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer™ to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV – a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the developments made under this program have increased 1366 confidence that Direct Wafers can be produced for ~$0.10/W, still nearly 50% lower than current industry best practice. Wafer quality also steadily improved throughout the program, both in electrical performance and geometry. The improvements to electrical performance were achieved through a combination of optimized heat transfer during growth, reduction of metallic impurities to below 10 ppbw total metals, and lowering oxygen content to below 2e17 atoms/cc. Wafer average thickness has been reduced below 200µm with standard deviation less than 20µm. Measurement of spatially varying thickness shortly after wafer growth is being used to continually improve uniformity by adjusting thermal conditions. At the conclusion of the program, 1366 has developed strong relationships with four leading Tier1 cell manufactures and several have demonstrated 17% cell efficiency on Direct Wafer. Sample volumes were limited, with the largest trial consisting of 300 Direct Wafers, and there remains strong pull for larger quantities necessary for qualification before sales contracts can be signed. This will be the focus of our pilot manufacturing scale up in 2014.

  7. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a decades-old waste disposal site at the historic Technical Area 21. Pre-demolition activities are beginning, federal project manager with the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office. "We requirements and shipped offsite to an approved waste disposal facility. MDA B was used from 1944 to 1948

  8. EM Begins Demolishing K-31 Gaseous Diffusion Building | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to5USC787StatementDepartment's

  9. Oak Ridge's EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t787ORDER

  10. Workers Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork Plan|

  11. Workers Demolishing Significant Inactive Facility at Paducah Site |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork Plan|Department of

  12. LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask2 J.N. Shadid,1

  13. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratory program helpsgarnernear DP

  14. Workers Demolish Reactor Support Facility as Part of River Corridor

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuelWeatherize »EvePlant | Department of EnergyContract

  15. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and masthead BerkeleySite IndexRearnear DP

  16. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and masthead BerkeleySite IndexRearnear

  17. GrayQbTM Single-Faced Version 2 (SF2) Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) deployment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, J. R.; Immel, D. M.; Serrato, M. G.; Dalmaso, M. J.; Shull, D. J.

    2015-11-18

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in partnership with CH2M Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) deployed the GrayQbTM SF2 radiation imaging device at the Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) to assist in the radiological characterization of the canyon. The deployment goal was to locate radiological contamination hot spots in the PRF canyon, where pencil tanks were removed and decontamination/debris removal operations are on-going, to support the CHPRC facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) effort. The PRF canyon D&D effort supports completion of the CHPRC Plutonium Finishing Plant Decommissioning Project. The GrayQbTM SF2 (Single Faced Version 2) is a non-destructive examination device developed by SRNL to generate radiation contour maps showing source locations and relative radiological levels present in the area under examination. The Hanford PRF GrayQbTM Deployment was sponsored by CH2M Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) through the DOE Richland Operations Office, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO), DOE-RL IEWO- M0SR900210.

  18. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1992-10-01

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to S0{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids (CSS) from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The final goal of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be used as a satisfactory growing medium in slurry pond reclamation. The chemical analyses of the 8 starting solids (5 FBC wastes, 2 Css samples, and 1 agricultural limestone sample) were completed.

  19. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.

    1991-12-31

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

  20. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01

    ? diameter pipeline ? Cement-mortar lined steel with polyurethane coating ? Pipe protection is galvanic anode cathodic system ? Joints have full circumferential internal welds Conveyance Pipeline ? 43.5 miles long ? Travels north through Kaufman...

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sedimentation Basin Demolition Sedimentation Basin Demolition Surveying Pipeline Surveying Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing Pipeline Demolishing...

  2. Urban Reclamation in São Paulo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eskinazi, Victor

    2009-01-01

    The urbanized terrain of São Paulo is characterized by wasteful landscapes on peripheral areas of the metropolitan agglomeration, and decaying landscapes of waste in the core of the city. If on the one hand, the increasingly ...

  3. The City Recycled: The Afterlives of Demolished Buildings in Postwar Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kao, Shih-yang

    2013-01-01

    to a mechanism in which an iron ore mining company agrees towith the world’s major iron ore mining companies to agreethe world’s top three iron ore mining companies: Rio Tinto,

  4. Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuelWeatherize »EvePlant | Department of Energy

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demolish Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing...

  6. Thermal reclamation of spent blasting abrasive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, B.G. ); Thomas, W.; Adema, C. )

    1990-01-01

    Abrasive blasting media is used to remove anticorrosive and antifoulant coatings from the hulls and tanks of US Navy ships. The total production of paint-contaminated spent abrasives from the eight US. Navy shipyards ranges from 75,000 to 100,000 tons per year. Most of this spent abrasive is disposed in landfills. Organic paint binders and heavy metals are present in the spent abrasives in concentrations sufficient to classify them as hazardous wastes in some states. In an effort to avoid the rising costs an long-term environmental liability associated with landfilling this waste, the US Navy has investigated various methods of reclaiming spent abrasives for reuse in hull- and tank-blasting operations. This paper discusses the results of a research and development project conducted under the Navy's Hazardous Waste Minimization Program to test a fluidized-bed sloped-grid (FBSG) reclaimer to determine if it could be used to recycle spent abrasive. Thirty tons of abrasive were processed and a product meeting military specifications for new abrasives was reclaimed. Blasting performance was also comparable to new abrasives. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Africa, New Zealand (but not designed for nutrient removal). 9 Typical Electro-Mechanical Treatment Plant 10 Aeration Basins with Air Blowers Sludge Settling Tanks -100,000 0...

  8. PROPERTIES OF AGEBASED AUTOMATIC MEMORY RECLAMATION ALGORITHMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    enthusiasm and encouragement. I owe a debt of gratitude to Steve Heller and his group at Sun Microsystems the garbage collector toolkit and the Smalltalk system I have used. I should also like to acknowledge Corporation (now Compaq), Sun Microsystems, and Hewlett­Packard. vi #12; ABSTRACT PROPERTIES OF AGE

  9. Chemical reclamation of scrap rubber. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, G.C.; Chan, S.M.; Culberson, O.L.; Perona, J.J.; Larsen, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual, commercial-scale plant design was formulated for processing 22,500 t/yr of scrap rubber tires to hydrocarbon fuel gases, oils, petrochemicals (principally ethylene and aromatic liquids), and carbon black. The process is based upon molten salt (zinc chloride) pyrolysis of the rubber, and pyrolysis data obtained in a bench-scale flow apparatus. An economic assessment of the plant was made in terms of late 1979 dollars, for ranges in scrap tire costs and prices for the principal products: carbon black and the fuel gases and oil. Profitability at these 1979 costs and prices is somewhat modest by chemical processing industry standards for new processes, but any increases in energy and carbon black prices would cause favorable changes in this assessment.

  10. Bureau of Reclamation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:PontiacInformationAssessmentExploration Operations

  11. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant...

  12. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    remove Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing...

  13. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ancillary Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing...

  14. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collection collection tanks Company Construction container contaminated contaminated water contamination debris demolish demolishing demolition Dewatering Diagram disposal...

  15. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  16. Evaluation of options for reclamation of the Salton Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardie, R.W.

    1998-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, was asked last May by the Congressional Salton Sea Task Force to provide technical support for the remediation of the ecological problems in the Salton Sea. The results of their work in evaluating various concepts for addressing high salinity and variable water levels of the Sea relate to H.R. 3267 is presented. The results are preliminary and in some cases qualitative, but they can be used to help guide decision-makers in their deliberations. Ultimately, selecting the best solution for reclaiming the Salton Sea will have to integrate performance, economic, ecological, and institutional factors into the decision.

  17. Process Optimization and Integration Strategies for Material Reclamation and Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheireddine, Houssein

    2012-07-16

    ratio (SOR) and Temperature (T) on percent oil loss and percent sludge removal (POL/PSR) using 1- Butanol as a solvent (Katiyar 2010). ................................................................................................... 86 Figure... 5.5: Effect of solvent to oil ratio (SOR) and Temperature (T) on percent oil loss and percent sludge removal (POL/PSR) using MEK as a solvent (Katiyar, 2010...

  18. Removal of Animal Antibiotics for Potable Water Reclamation: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Rita

    2015-01-01

    of the Technologies for Water Treatment and Reuse. Ind. Eng.sewage sludge, and surface waters. Chimia. Gobel, A. , C.S.bioreactor treatment. Water Science & Technology. 65(5):

  19. Removal of Animal Antibiotics for Potable Water Reclamation: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Treatment Primary treatment of wastewater usually involveswastewater. Removals of antibiotics in primary treatmentprimary clarifier effluents were taken from the Amherst, NY wastewater treatment

  20. Microsoft Word - LL-ULS reclamation.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1,000 pounds per acre of Granular Humate is recommended for harsh sites. At one site, cattle were used to amend poor soils. After hand-broadcasting seed, cattle were brought onto...

  1. Removal of Animal Antibiotics for Potable Water Reclamation: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Rita

    2015-01-01

    cattle (Colorado State University, 2004). This difference will affect the type of animal antibiotics found in the environment.

  2. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01

    asphalt mixes made from recycled aggregates with the same orasphalt mixes made from recycled aggregates with the same orconsists mostly of recycled natural aggregate and cracked

  3. Decentralized Wastewater Treatment for Distributed Water Reclamation and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , United States *E-mail: jdrewes@mines.edu Cities worldwide are facing a growing water crisis,2013|doi:10.1021/bk-2013-1123.ch015 In Novel Solutions to Water Pollution; Ahuja, S., et al.; ACS Symposium

  4. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01

    content). Small cold milling machines (e.g. , Wirtgen W35 orbe excavated with a cold milling machine to ensure thattest pits using a cold milling machine, the target grading

  5. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01

    cement, lime) and/or inert (fly ash, mineral fines) fillershydrated lime, Class-C fly ash, and cement kiln dust.lime), semi-active (e.g. , fly-ash and kiln dust), and inert

  6. Removal of Animal Antibiotics for Potable Water Reclamation: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Rita

    2015-01-01

    to operate its first desalination plant in Carlsbad by 2015.Desalination compared to potable water reuse will require

  7. ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exercise Program ORISE plans full-scale exercises to test security at major dams across the western United States ORISE has served as lead exercise planner for the U.S....

  8. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01

    Standard Method of Test for Determining the Creep ComplianceStandard Method of Test for Determining the Creep ComplianceLTPP P07 (Test Method for Determining the Creep Compliance,

  9. Removal of Animal Antibiotics for Potable Water Reclamation: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products in effluent matrices: A survey of transformation and removal during wastewater treatment and implications for wastewater management.

  10. Waste site reclamation with recovery of radionuclides and metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-03-08

    A method for decontaminating radionuclides and other toxic metal-contaminate The U.S. government has certain rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016 between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities, Inc.

  11. Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to: navigation, searchSouthport,

  12. Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO is developed by EMDPower IncMethane

  13. Bureau of Reclamation Small Conduit Hydropower Development and Rural Jobs

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: EnergyEnergyOhio: EnergyNorthInformation WashingtonAct of 2013

  14. Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy6-09.doc Microsoft WordBlendsMilwaukeeColorado |

  15. ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE TheForensic Science ForensicHealth Promotion

  16. Introduction The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    , Australia, the Middle East, Northern Africa, Canada, and Singapore described state-of- the-art projects concerning inland, small-scale, low-cost rural brackish desalination water projects using renewable energy such as solar, wind, geothermal, and waste heat sources. The conference brought together about 150 participants

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demolishing Support Buildings at Plutonium Finishing Plant Workers are demolishing or removing support buildings surrounding the Plutonium Finishing Plant to make way for heavy...

  18. Mountain, D, C., Hubbard. A, E., Ketten, D, R., & O'Malley, J, (2003) The helicotrema: measurements and models. In Biophysics of the Cochlea: From Molecule to Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichmuth, Colleen

    2003-01-01

    80 Mountain, D, C., Hubbard. A, E., Ketten, D, R., & O'Malley, J, (2003) The helicotrema, M. Nowotny, & M. Scherer), pp. 393-399. Singapore: World Scientific. Naidu, R. C, & Mountain, D, C bearing thresholds using EFRs evoked by trains of tone bursts, the dependence of EFR fundamental- response

  19. The effect of strip-mining and reclamation on small mammal communities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waggoner, Kenneth Van

    1975-01-01

    29. The mean low temperature in January is 37 F. The mining is performed by two large electric draglines. As of April 1975 the deepest pit wss approximately 12 meters deep snd 37 meters wide, but in the future pits will reach depths of 37 meters...

  20. 1. Mineral Exploration Regulation in British Columbia Health, Safety and Reclamation Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    for or to produce coal, mineral bearing substances, placer minerals, rock, limestone, earth, clay, sand or gravel mineral, coal, sand, gravel or rock, or (b) the production of a mineral, a placer mineral, coal, sand under the Criminal Code of Canada for criminal acts or negligence in the workplace. Further information

  1. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Goodrich-Mahoney; Paul Ziemkiewicz

    2006-07-19

    This is the third quarter progress report of Phase II of a three-phase project to develop and evaluate the efficacy of developing multiple environmental market trading credits on a partially reclaimed surface mined site near Valley Point, Preston County, WV. Construction of the passive acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment system was completed but several modifications from the original design had to be made following the land survey and during construction to compensate for unforeseen circumstances. We continued to collect baseline quality data from the Conner Run AMD seeps to confirm the conceptual and final design for the passive AMD treatment system.

  2. Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 8598 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater reclamation in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    , and flow velocities were determined for the three subsystems. Mass and heat transfer in the pretreatment, the DOC system provides high wastewater recovery (>95%), at low energy cost ( are hygiene wastewa- ter, urine, and humidity condensate. The system to treat these wastewaters must

  3. Reclamation of Cleaning Water Using Ultrafiltration and Double Pass Reverse Osmosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuman, T.; Long, G.; Tinter, M.

    1994-01-01

    In the production of electrodeposition primers, water is used as the primary cleaning agent. The dirty water that is generated contains residual contaminants from the primer production equipment, which requires that the water be disposed of as a...

  4. Decentralized Wastewater Management Solutions for Improved Public Health Protection and Reclamation: Optimization and Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naik, Kartiki Shirish

    2014-01-01

    C=(9.89 x 10 4 )Q 1.35 Sludge incineration C=(8.77 x 10 4 )Qdollars/100,000 capita incineration of sludge 7 Bibliography

  5. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

    2009-12-31

    This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private land—including abandoned mined lands—is dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

  6. In-situ biological reclamation of contaminated ground water. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fant, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Four triaxial permeability devices were designed and constructed for use in the Environmental Engineering Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology. These devices were used to determine how time and changing permeants affected a soil sample's hydraulic conductivity. Also the attenuation of the priority pollutant, 2,4-dichlorophenol, was studied. Two areas were looked at concerning attenuation, microbial degradation and adsorption. Microbes were grown in the laboratory and then placed into the soil samples. A permeant containing the pollutant, an oxidant, and nutrients was then passed through the soil sample with the microbes. The effects on the effluent concentration were then studied. Two breakthrough curves and two isotherm tests were run in an attempt to distinguish between microbial decay and adsorptive attenuation. Results of the attenuation studies unfortunately were inconclusive, but valuable knowledge was gained on the operation of and experimental procedures with the triaxial permeability devices.

  7. Safety problems of water-development works designed for land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shchedrin, V. N.; Kosichenko, Yu. M.

    2011-11-15

    A safety declaration is a fundamental document assuring the safety of water-development works, their correspondence to safety criteria, the design, and active technical regulations and rules.

  8. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Letter Reclamation of Asset Metals 070909.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravelInformation Resources»Jim1 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORYJuly

  9. Idaho IC Title 42, Irrigation and Drainage - Water Rights and Reclamation |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFB Agro|How to

  10. Reclamation Project Act of 1939 U.S.C. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-D renderingPartnership ofRSS May 30, 2014The U.S.1 A

  11. Title 43 CFR 429 Use of Bureau of Reclamation Land, Facilities, and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film Solar TechnologiesCFR 1201 General JumpWaterbodies | Open

  12. EIS-0370: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior, Notice of Availability of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 PeerRecordRecordStatement | Department ofDepartment ofFinal

  13. Disconnecting Experience: Making World-Class Roads in Mumbai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Nikhil

    2006-01-01

    tsunami is uprooting and demolishing peoples homes in Mumbai. Why do they talk of early warning systems

  14. Environmental Impacts Associated with Current Methods of Re-Use, Recycling and Reclamation of Personal Computers and Cell Phones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Joseph L.

    2012-05-11

    to recycle cans, plastics and glass. The second phase of the campaign is encouraging producers to design products with the environment and reverse logistics in mind. The third prong of the attack needs to be a comprehensive study sponsored by the USEPA...

  15. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    b r e a k through Ground Subsidence V Inaiiced S e i s m i cBreakthroughs Ground Subsidence Interpolation of Results toPrepare estimates of surface subsidence for the cases chosen

  16. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    document. LBL-7094 UC-66~1 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIRInc. , 1976. Study of the geothermal reservoir underlyingtest, 1976, East Mesa geothermal field in California.

  17. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    1977. Utilization of seismic exploration technology for highwith seismic reflection data is important to exploration and

  18. Node Reclamation and Replacement for Long-lived Sensor Networks Bin Tong, Guiling Wang, Wensheng Zhang, and Chuang Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wensheng

    @njit.edu Abstract--When deployed for long-term tasks, the energy required to support sensor nodes' activities is far is conserved, once the energy is used up, the network life terminates. Therefore, guaranteeing long- term of WSNs for long-term tasks such as structural health monitoring for bridges and tunnels, border

  19. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids (CSS) from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids.

  20. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    to assess their geothermal desalination program. The studyin the geothermal fluids for desalination and systemdesalination project includes mining the better-quality geothermal

  1. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    seismic reflection times to subsea depths. X B L 786-1859INTERVAL 500 FEET COWTOUR WITH SUBSEA DEPTH FAULT WITH SENSEZONE e- CONTOUR WITH SUBSEA DEPTH PRODUCING QEOTHERMAL, WELL

  2. Preliminary conceptual study on impact of land reclamation on groundwater flow and contaminant migration in Penny's Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of the contaminated groundwater due to Cheoy Lee Shipyard, which was located on the north and eastern shores of Penny Shipyard is not removed, the contaminated groundwater will not spread out much within Penny's Bay sand and silt which forms the Chek Lap Kok Formation. A former shipyard called Cheoy Lee Shipyard (CLS

  3. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell, Wellpinit, Washington, February 2001

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr. Anthony V. Andolina:I 1 '\Ll 1v F.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mountain Region (RMR) Small Control building which consists of a wood frame, metal roof, and brick exterior. The proposed project will consist of demolishing the current...

  5. Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Pursues Vision of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    colors note sites where facilities have been demolished, demolition is under way, or structures are ready or being prepared for demolition. It also identifies buildings that will...

  6. EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    preventing contamination from reaching it, and cocooning or demolishing hundreds of structures no longer in use, including former reactors along the river that helped create...

  7. Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown...

  8. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and demolishing facilities, including the U Plant Canyon (a former chemical separations facility) and surrounding facilities. In this photo, radiological control technicians...

  9. Progress Continues Post-Recovery Act Award at Hanford Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    regulatory mile- stone to demolish the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex by 2016, J.D. Dowell, Assistant Manager for the Central Plateau, DOE Richland Operations Office Progress...

  10. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    milestone to demolish the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex by 2016," said J.D. Dowell, Assistant Manager for the Central Plateau, DOE Richland Operations Office. Crews...

  11. Richland Operations Office Cleanup Strategy, Scope

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup Work * Deactivate and Demolish facilities * Move buried waste, contaminated soil away from Columbia River * Treat contaminated groundwater * Isolate contamination from...

  12. Energy Secretary Chu Announces $1.615 Billion in Recovery Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    South Carolina. Projects identified for funding will focus on accelerating cleanup of soil and groundwater, transportation and disposal of waste, and cleaning and demolishing...

  13. Energy Secretary Chu Announces $138 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in Ohio. Projects identified for funding will focus on accelerating cleanup of soil and groundwater, transportation and disposal of waste, and cleaning and demolishing...

  14. Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in New Mexico. Projects identified for funding will focus on accelerating cleanup of soil and groundwater, transportation and disposal of waste, and cleaning and demolishing...

  15. Plutonium Finishing Plant 242-Z Americium Recovery Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the overall mission to safely and compliantly decommission and demolish Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant. The Plutonium Finishing Plant once produced two-thirds of the...

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a water tunnel and pipelines that one brought water to the K East Reactor to support plutonium production operations. Search Search Search Filter: Demolishing K East Water...

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities that workers are demolishing. The plutonium vault complex consists of five ancillary structures and a larger building (2736-ZB) that once stored plutonium produced at...

  18. Environmental and cultural sustainability In the built environment : an evaluation of LEED for historic preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferriss, Lori (Lori E.)

    2010-01-01

    Preservation of buildings is an important process for both cultural and environmental sustainability. Buildings are frequently demolished and rebuilt long before necessitated by structural or material deterioration, wasting ...

  19. Energy Secretary Chu Announces $1.961 Billion in Recovery Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Projects identified for funding will focus on accelerating cleanup of soil and groundwater, transportation and disposal of waste, and cleaning and demolishing former weapons...

  20. Energy Secretary Chu Announces $6 Billion in Recovery Act Funding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects identified for funding will focus on accelerating cleanup of soil and groundwater, transportation and disposal of waste, and cleaning and demolishing former weapons...

  1. Vet Med Awards - 26 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    with EFR, a RLK for EF-Tu and PEPR1/2, a RLK for plant endogenous signal Pep1/2. BAK1 is able to directly phosphorylate a plasma membrane-localized receptor- 2 like cytoplasmic kinase BIK1. In non-elicited cells, BIK1 interacts with BAK1, FLS2, EFR..., and PEPR1/2 (Lu et al., 2010; Zhang et al., 2010). Flg22 induces rapid phosphorylation of BIK1 which further transphosphorylates FLS2-BAK1, and dissociation of BIK1 from FLS2-BAK1 complex (Cao et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2010). As a step toward attenuation...

  2. Environmental factors influencing seed germination and seedling development of Engelmannia pinnatifida and Indigofera mainiata var. leptosepala for use in surface mine reclamation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Darryl Craig

    1986-01-01

    when dry. Soils were collected from the Sandow Sur- face Mine in Milam County, near Rockdale, Texas. The mixture wss intended to simulate mixed overburden as it typically occurs in a dragline operation. All soils were air dried in a greenhouse...

  3. Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended to serve as guidance, or to supplement EPA or other agency environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Nuclear Energy Agency=s (NEA) and IAEA's joint publication Environmental Remediation is the act of returning a mine to a long-term stable condition, or its original contour to ensure the safe

  4. Awareness of sustainable development: why did the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project lead to the first national controversy over sustainable development in South Korea? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, In Huck

    2009-06-02

    point of view. The results of this study indicated that the majority of aspects or characteristics of sustainable development awareness had emerged in the early and middle 1990s when the Saemangeum Project became a national controversy over...

  5. Aging of Development: the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project (STRP) in South Korea and Sustainable Development of the Two Townships in and out of the STRP 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, In Huck

    2012-07-16

    that the PEF values of the two townships appear to be the same and the status of quality of life is quite similar. As an explanation of the unexpected result, this study contends that the level of sustainable development of the people in the in-project...

  6. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Because the hydrogen peroxide oxidation technique underestimated the amount of pyrite in the CSS-2 samples, the amount of FBC waste or sized Ag LS used in each mixture with CSS-2 were less than necessary to satisfy the stoichiometric amount of acid that could be generated by complete oxidation of the pyrite in the CSS samples. However, the leaching experiments demonstrated that FBC waste is as effective as Ag LS in neutralizing the generated acid, and that the leachate pH would be approximately the same as that from Ag LS/CSS mixtures. In fact, the calcium hydroxide from the original hydrated FBC waste was converted to calcium carbonate in a short period of time, as indicated by chemical and mineralogical data. If the laboratory leaching experiments had continued for a long enough term, the alkaline materials present either in the unleached CSS-2, or added to the FBC wastes would have been consumed before all the pyrite had been oxidized, because of the deficiency of FBC waste in the mixtures. There is some concern, because of the concentrations of sodium and chloride in the initial leachates, over the toxicity of the leachates to plants. Although both these solutes were flushed quickly from the laboratory and outdoor weathering solids, this might not be the case in a coal slurry pond. Therefore, salt-tolerant plants might have to be selected for revegetation of the amended coal slurry solids.

  7. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Five fluidized bed combustion (FBC) wastes, one agricultural limestone (Ag LS), and two coal slurry solids (CSS) samples were characterized chemically and mineralogically. Mixtures of the materials (FBC waste or Ag LS and CSS) were prepared and subjected to leaching with deionized water in laboratory experiments and with meteoric water in outdoor weathering experiments. The major cations in the leachates were calcium and sodium, with minor concentrations of magnesium and potassium. The major anions were chloride and sulfate, with minor amounts of fluoride and bicarbonate. The major minerals in the unleached FBC wastes were calcium oxide and calcium sulfate (anhydrite). The calcium oxide was hydrated upon wetting to calcium hydroxide, which was converted to calcium carbonate (calcite) upon exposure to atmospheric carbon dioxide, or carbon dioxide from the neutralization reaction of acid with calcite. The calcium hydroxide controlled the pH of leachates in the early leaching period, whereas calcite controlled the pH in the later leaching period. The alkaline calcium species in the FBC wastes effectively neutralized the acid generated by pyrite oxidation. In extracts generated by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), selenium was found to be above the US EPA primary drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) in extracts from each of the FBC wastes and CSS samples. Mercury was above its MCL in the extract of FBC-2. The other six constituents (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Ag) were below their corresponding MCLS. Hence, these FBC wastes would not be classified as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  8. Is the coal industry worth protecting? an examination of the effects of competing advocacy coalitions on implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) of 1977 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, Michael Sean

    2008-10-10

    stream_source_info Pennington.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 306084 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Pennington.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 IS THE COAL INDUSTRY WORTH... workplaces, and environmental irresponsibility. The type of regulation being discussed in this dissertation—the environmental regulation of the effects of surface coal mining—clearly falls under the purview of the new social regulation. With the great...

  9. Reduced pressure and temperature reclamation of water using the GE Integrated Water-waste Management System for potential space flight application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Hasan Imtiaz

    1989-01-01

    hardware and verify the results previously reported by GE, the following series of tests were performed: 1) Disassemble, clean, and reassemble the system. 2) Determine the condensation rate as a function of temperature of the evaporator and the condenser... derivative (PID) feedback control sensor. The cooling system devised has a capacity of 1465 W and is controlled by an on/otf temperature sensor operating through a time delay relay. B. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The system characterization procedure consisted...

  10. Geography 5: People and Earth's Ecosystems Lecture Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inhalation · Acid mine drainage #12;4 19 Restoration · Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (1977

  11. DUCK STAMPS WILDLIFE REFUGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    established on reclamation reservoirs or drainage sumps. From 1908 to 19.">o, Executive orders established

  12. Quantification of the Potential Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Quantification of the Potential Energy from Residuals (EfR) in the UK Commissioned, by virtue of its biomass content, it can make a valuable contribution towards our renewable energy targets1 waste up to 2020. To determine the potential2 contribution that energy recovery from residual

  13. Statistics and Differential Geometry 18-466 Mathematical Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Ny, Jerome

    Statistics and Differential Geometry 18-466 Mathematical Statistics Jerome Le Ny December 14, 2005 of statistical curvature [Efr75], that most of the main concepts and methods of differ- ential geometry are of substantial interest in connection with the theory of statistical inference. This report describes in simple

  14. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , energy-efficient, and sustainable manner. Infrastructure reduction activities since 2001, in which more than 1.2 million ft 2 (284 buildings) have been demolished, have already significantly changed the face

  15. TRACKING THE LIFE CYCLE OF CONSTRUCTION STEEL: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RESOURCE LOOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lanfang

    2009-12-17

    -to-grave, integrate energy and materials in different processes, such as extract, manufacture, transport, install, deconstruct, demolish and dispose of materials. This thesis developed a "resource loop" which represents both the cradle-to-cradle and cradle...

  16. Realities and perceptions : HOPE VI poverty deconcentration and implications for broader neighborhood revitalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderford, Carrie Ann

    2006-01-01

    HOPE VI was developed in 1992 as program to demolish and revitalize the nation's most severely distressed public housing. One element of the HOPE VI program is to move low-income households out of an environment of ...

  17. Social congestion in Shanghai : an urban housing project designed on its sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Wenjun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    The new housing developments of Shanghai rely on high-rise building, demolishing the prevailing low-rise high-density housing, known as Lilong housing, built in the early 20th century, and known as Lilong housing. The ...

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    piping and duct work. The 224-U, 224-UA, and 203-UX buildings are the last of five ancillary facilities at U Plant that will be demolished with Recovery Act funds. The other...

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, safely demolished a vault complex that once held top-secret stores of plutonium in metal canisters until they were shipped for weapons...

  20. DQO Summary Report for 105-N/109-N Interim Safe Storage Project Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Lee

    2005-09-15

    The DQO summary report provides the results of the DQO process completed for waste characterization activities for the 105-N/109-N Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project including decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities for six associated buildings.

  1. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  2. CX-011645: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolish State Police Radio Tower at West Hackberry CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 12/10/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009 Projected Total Facilities Demolished 181 625 Waste Sites Remediated 442 828 Reactors Cocooned 5 8 Waste Sent to ERDF 8.1M Tons 10.4M Tons* NOTES: * Evaluating path...

  4. Protist, Vol. 165, 305316, May 2014 http://www.elsevier.de/protis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    in paleoclimatic reconstructions, assessing the effectiveness of mine tailings pond reclamation projects tailings pond reclamation (Neville et al. 2010a, b, 2011) and to study the effects of urban development

  5. Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gensheimer, Robert James, III

    2010-01-01

    Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

  6. The Sacramento Area Water Forum: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connick, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    quality, reservoir operations, ground water, water reclamation, water needs of jurisdictions outside the Sacramento area, and water management

  7. The General Welfare Clause and the Theory of Public Goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Neil

    2006-01-01

    surface mining and reclamation standards are essential in order to insure that competition in interstate commerce among sellers of coal

  8. Using a Risk-informed Approach to Find a Solution for Spillway Deficiencies with Upstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    · Reclamation for Portfolio Risk Mgt ~ 1995 · UK for Portfolio RAs ~ 2000 ­ Justify dam safety CAPEX in utility

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research --Ecology --Environmental modeling tools --Land reclamation --Water quality Security -Cyber security -Decision science --Emergency & disaster management --Public...

  10. Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, L.

    1981-11-05

    A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

  11. Characterization of the mineralogy of the oxidized portion of the overburden and relation of pre-mine mineralogy to success of post-mine reclamation at a lignite mine near Jewett, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Julie

    1993-01-01

    by predominantly gray, black or chocolate brown color. When overburden removal procedures are such that cutwalls are visible to the dragline operator these colors may serve as a sign of sediment to avoid when selectively handling overburden for topsoil... three surface pits (areas A, C, & D) are being excavated while plans are being made for a fourth (area B). Special engineering considerations are required for area B since some of the historic mine tunnels are located beneath the area. Draglines...

  12. Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.

    1994-11-01

    Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

  13. `Bings Ain't What They Used to Be'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and shale 1913 ­ Peak production (30-40,000 workers) 1962 ­ Last operation closed (Total production 75. Purple markers 'ghost' villages (completely demolished). #12;History of the shale industry #12;Global Oil Production Peak oil? 2015 1850 #12;Oil distillation and cracking "Cracking" - breaking down large molecules

  14. Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-02

    Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

  15. MINUTES OF MEETING 2005-2006 #2 -Oct. 14th, 2005 Members in attendance: Mr. A. Ansell (Chair), Mr. M. McLaughlin, Mr. P.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clean Up Day collecting 38 bags of trash as well as some auto parts. - Hazardous waste collection not be demolished but could be moved if something were to be built. Parking: - No complaints - Previously approved been completed. - A walking path has also been added up to the parking lot behind the library

  16. CX-003243: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolish Building 51 at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Dispose of Materials According to Classification as Hazardous or Clean Construction DebrisCX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 08/05/2010Location(s): New YorkOffice(s): Brookhaven Site Office

  17. Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Evaluation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has evaluated alternatives for demolishing the buildings at the Portsmouth Site. Two remedial alternatives were developed for consideration. This Proposed Plan describes the required no-action alternative (Alternative 1) and a D&D alternative (Alternative 2). The preferred alternative is Alternative 2, controlled demolition of the process buildings and complex facilities.

  18. DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2004-01-21

    This paper describes the technical approach being used to demolish a plutonium-contaminated processing facility at the Hanford Site. This project represents the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent one of the first plutonium facilities in the DOE complex to be demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contamination structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially-available equipment, materials, and services, this project is demonstrating that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or construct large enclosures. The project is utilizing an excavator with purpose-built concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, specialized fixatives and dust suppressant mixtures, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Between the months of October and December 2003, approximately 85 percent of the footprint of the 233-S Facility had been demolished and properly disposed. Demolition of the remaining and more technically-challenging portion of the facility is expected to be completed by April 2004.

  19. Disaster mitigation and recovery planning for historic buildings: Guam as a case study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cepeda, Ricarda P

    2002-01-01

    Fig. 3. 9 The Lujan House ? An Example of One of the Homes Saved from Demolition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ???, . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ?. . .. . ???. ?,. . . . . . . . . ? 26 LIST OF TABLES Page... will be unnecessarily condemned and demolished. Thus, needless demolition of historic buildings may be avoided if disaster recovery plans are developed ahead of time. Saving historic structures in a rapidly changing society is problematic due to a lack...

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, New Fairfield, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This LEED Platinum home was built on the site of a 60-year-old bungalow that was demolished. It boasts views of Candlewood Lake, a great deal of daylight, and projected annual energy savings of almost $3,000. This home was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  1. 1981 Memorandum of Understanding between the Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Service Abstract Establishes a process to promote the non-Federal development of hydroelectric energy at existing Water and Power (Reclamation) facilities. Author FERC...

  2. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [accepted]. [as geothermal energy [55], solar thermal energy [41], wastetemperature geothermal and solar thermal energy. His results

  3. Federal Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower/Federal Inland...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Reclamation Department of Energy Environmental Protection Agency Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Fish and Wildlife Service Forest Service National Oceanic and...

  4. Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Representatives from the Des Moines Metropolitan WRA and Des Moines Water Works sign the SEP agreement. The Des Moines Metropolitan Wastewater Reclamation Authority (WRA) and Des...

  5. Cultivation, Capital, and Contamination: Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    urban gardens. Land Contamination & Reclamation 12 Schiff,Potentially toxic metal contamination of urban soils andAlloway, B. J. 2004. Contamination of soils in domestic

  6. DEPARTMENT OF LAND RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    of invasive plant species, soil nutrient management, bioremediation, land reclamation ecology of natural systems, chemical fate and transport, water quality, crop

  7. Understanding the Relationship between Osmotic Membrane Structure and Separation Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Mavis C.Y.

    2014-01-01

    project on seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation,The Future of Seawater Desalination: Energy, Technology, andA.F. Ismail, Seawater Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) desalination by

  8. ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 2,"Palo...

  9. Microsoft Word - 4.16.13 Final WAPA Testimony

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the public benefit. Western's transmission system carries electricity from 56 hydro power plants, operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), U.S. Army Corps of...

  10. D D E E S S E E R R T T S S O O U U T T H H W W E E S S T T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water projects. Western's transmission system carries electricity from 57 power plants. These power plants are operated by agencies such as the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S....

  11. DESERT SOUTHWEST REGION FY15 TEN-YEAR APPROPRIATED CAPITAL PROGRAM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water projects. Western's transmission system carries electricity from 57 power plants. These power plants are operated by agencies such as the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S....

  12. EA-1736: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  13. PNGC 8.07.12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reclamation Bonneville Green Springs Lost Creek Hills Creek Lookout Point Cougar Dexter Green Peter Foster Detroit Big Cliff Federal Columbia River Power System Columbia River...

  14. EIS-0202: Umatilla Basin Project Planning Report and Final Environmental Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposed support for the Bureau of Reclamation proposal to assist in restoration of the Umatilla River anadromous fishery.

  15. Student ENG 505 - Energy Technologies Systems and Applications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    505 - Energy Technologies Systems and Applications: Plasma Gasification for Energy Production and Material Reclamation. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Student ENG 505...

  16. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [accepted]. [and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

  17. A Water Conservation Scenario for the Residential and Industrial Sectors in California: Potential Saveings of Water and Related Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01

    flow data for municipal waste water treatment facilities inBulletin 68-73: Inventory of Waste Water Productionand Waste Water Reclamation in California, 1973. Sacramento,

  18. Attempt to extract the preformation probability of. cap alpha. cluster at the surface of heavy nuclei by means of. cap alpha. -transfer reactions leading to the continuum states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Shu-wei; Wu Guo-hua; Miao Rong-zhi; Han Fei

    1983-07-01

    The method of parametrization of an EFR-DWBA overlap integral developed by T. Udagawa and T. Tamura et al./sup 1/ is improved. Using the improved method we have fitted the experimental double differential energy spectrum of the /sup 8/Be cluster coming from the reaction /sup 208/Pb(/sup 12/C, /sup 8/Be) /sup 212/Po leading to the continuum states and extracted the preformation probability of the ..cap alpha.. cluster at the surface of the /sup 212/Po nucleus. Within the range of calculation error, the result is in agreement with that extracted from fitting the experimental data of ..cap alpha.. decay.

  19. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  20. WASHINGTON TECHNICAL INSTITUTE WASHINGTON, D. C. 20008 WRRC REPORT NO. 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    was added to alum sludge from Dalecarlia Water Treatment Plant. Aluminum was recovered and used for phosphorus removal from the primary effluent from Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant. Alum sludge RECLAMATION M. L. GOLDMAN F. WATSON WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER #12;FEASIBILITY OF ALUM SLUDGE RECLAMATION

  1. Competitive Interactions Between Appalachian Hardwood Species and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    failure Burger et al. 2002 Groundcovers being used in project Four different ground covers are going ·Soil erosion ·Mass failure With previous lack of regulations, there was little effort in reclamation However.. 1977: Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) was passed Creation of the Office

  2. CLOSEOUT REPORT REMEDIAL ACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL CLOSEOUT REPORT REMEDIAL ACTION AREA OF CONCERN 6 BUILDING 650 RECLAMATION FACILITY SUMP York 11973 REGISTERED TO ISO 14001 #12;AOC 6 BUILDING 650 RECLAMATION FACILITY SUMP AND SUMP OUTFALL .................................................................................9 2.6.1 Final Radiological Status Survey Design

  3. Federal Register / Vol. 58, No. 77 1 Friday, April 23, 1993 / Proposed Rules advance of the hearing will allow OSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) granted the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement may request a meeting at the Indianapolis Field Office by contacting the person listed under State, not by OSM. Under sections 503 and 505 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA

  4. Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

    1998-10-20

    Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition.

  5. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  6. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N FRONT AND BAck cOVER PhOTOS: BuREAu OF REcLAmation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass andAtomsVehicles and Fuelsj B J jGrocer

  7. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2008 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of eighteen buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site that were demolished in Fiscal Year 2008. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  8. Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tower, S.E.

    2000-07-01

    The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

  9. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2009 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Skwarek

    2010-01-27

    This report summarizes the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of seven facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2009. The D4 of these facilities included characterization; engineering; removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials; equipment removal; utility disconnection; deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure; and stabilization or removal of slabs and foundations. This report also summarizes the nine below-grade slabs/foundations removed in FY09 of buildings demolished in previous fiscal years.

  10. DQO Summary Report for 324 and 327 Building Hot Cells D4 Project Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Lee

    2006-02-06

    This data quality objective (DQO) summary report provides the results of the DQO process conducted for waste characterization activities for the 324 and 327 Building hot cells decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities. This DQO summary report addresses the systems and processes related to the hot cells, air locks, vaults, tanks, piping, basins, air plenums, air ducts, filters, an adjacent elements that have high dose rates, high contamination levels, and/or suspect transuranic waste, which will require nonstandard D4 techniques.

  11. Environmental Programs: Status of Work and Current Priorities for FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-17

    Presentation outline is: Mission/overview, Regulatory framework, Current status of cleanup, Shift in priorities to address highest risk, Removal of above-ground waste, Continued focus on protecting water resources, and Priorities for fiscal year 2013. LANL's Environmental Mission is to: (1) Repack and ship legacy transuranic waste containers; (2) Investigate and remediate Cold War (legacy) hazardous and radioactive waste areas; (3) Demolish unused buildings; (4) Disposition solid waste from Laboratory operations; and (5) Lifecycle cost nearly $3 billion.

  12. David Henderson U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    per pound to mine uranium in the U.S. is 67.17 (includes expenses for land, exploration, drilling, production, and reclamation) - far above the current spot market prices of...

  13. WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED Historical Flooding in Havasu Creek, Arizona U.S. GEOLOGICAL OF RECLAMATION #12;WHEN THE BLUE-GREEN WATERS TURN RED Historical Flooding in Havasu Creek, Arizona By THEODORE S

  14. Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

  15. CX-006711: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation of Decommissioned Batteries, Test Satellites, and FacilitiesCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1Date: 08/06/2011Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  16. CX-006690: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation of Pits and BoxesCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1Date: 01/00/1900Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  17. CX-008145: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation of Decommissioned Batteries, Test Satellites, and Facilities CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1 Date: 08/06/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  18. CX-006649: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    T-2-11 Skim Box ReclamationCX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 10/14/2009Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  19. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY CE212 Spring 2006 Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermanowicz, Slawomir W.

    Engin TD430 .W375 2005. Reference Readings: Design of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants. Water and wastewater treatment, and water reclamation: separation and transformation technologies (sedimentation, membrane processes, oxidation, biodegradation, activated sludge, biofilm reactors, biological treatment

  20. Constructing the aesthetic sense : traversing scales of habitation in the Bingham Canyon Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Matthew W., 1973-

    2004-01-01

    The activities of mining and mine reclamation in the American West raise questions of how we perceive, value, and differentiate between 'natural' and man-made landscapes, as they produce radical alterations of the land on ...

  1. CX-002923: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Project in Lease Tract C-G-27, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28, B1.3Date: 06/25/2010Location(s): Mesa County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  2. CX-003331: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects on Slick Rock Lease Tract C-SR-II, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 07/30/2010Location(s): San Miguel County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  3. Notices Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Administration RIN 0648-XD003 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Fish and Wildlife Service FWS-R8-ES-2013-N252 Bay Delta Habitat Conservation Plan and...

  4. MSRIP 2013 Faculty Research Projects The following faculty research projects are organized by colleges, and then

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and enzymatic fuel cells. Computer Science and Engineering Faculty Mentor: Dr. Frank Vahid Research Setting: Lab on optimizing effective water #12;treatment and distribution, wastewater reclamation, and to understand

  5. CX-002918: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects in Energy Fuels Lease Tracts 19A and 20, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 06/25/2010Location(s): Uravan, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  6. CX-003332: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects on Wedding Bell Mountain Lease Tract C-WM-17, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 07/30/2010Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  7. CX-003333: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects in Lease Tract C-G-26, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 07/30/2010Location(s): Mesa County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  8. 1 A selection of Technical Publications produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .J. (2000) Wood residues used to amend coal minespoils for forest reclamation in Wales. In, The forest America. Mycological Research 104 (11), 1322­1332. Broadmeadow, M.S.J. and Jackson, S.B. (2000) Growth

  9. RAJESH ET AL. VOL. 8 ' NO. 12 ' 1233812345 ' 2014 www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    . For example, seawater desalination,1 wastewater reclamation,2 re- cycling metals from expired batteries,3 desalination, which is cur- rently the most energy efficient large-scale desalination process, is one example

  10. 1517 March 2016 | Pan Pacific Hotel Perth | Western Australia 11th International Conference on Mine Closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    dump that works? R Barritt, P Scott, I Taylor, O'Kane Consultants Pty Ltd, Australia Centrifuge de San Andrés, Bolivia Engineering and reclamation of the Holden Legacy Mine -- advancing the state

  11. Quantitative analysis of heavy metals emission during the combustion and baling of polyvinyl chloride insulated copper wire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickard, David Paul

    1996-01-01

    was conducted and compared to the airborne dust samples collected during the baling process. From these results, occupational exposures to heavy metals during the reclamation of PVC insulated copper wire were assessed. Bulk ash and dust samples were ?aken...

  12. Expenses Revenues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expense: 1 Reclamation 44,585,384 Western 59,400,596 Total O&M Expense 103,985,980 Purchase Power Expense: Custom Product and Supplemental Power 2 209,685,496 209,685,496...

  13. Hong Kong : city of edges : South East Kowloon development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Wai-Kuen, 1968-

    1997-01-01

    Many extraordinary cities are developed along the edges of water into different directions. Yet, the city of Hong Kong has been formed along narrow strips of scarce flat-land around the harbor and from reclamations of ...

  14. About SNR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    page > About SNR About SNR SN Office Most power that SNR markets is generated by power plants owned and operated by the Bureau of Reclamation, in the California Central Valley...

  15. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    waste heat reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [K Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems inK Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in

  16. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20032004126 Publications, research programmes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    meets the challenge (free) Land reclamation and urban greening: sustainable woodland remediation Research framework document 2003 (free) Leaflets and brochures The quest for sustainable energy: woodfuel series of technical publications listed below are published for the Forestry Commission by Sustainable

  17. A qualitative assessment of microclimatic perturbations in a tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salve, R.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    ECRB Cross Drift-Exploratory Studies Facilty, Yucca MountainProject, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Bureau of Reclamation andfaults within 100 km of Yucca Mountain, OF 94-0112, USGS,

  18. Reverse logistics and large-scale material recovery from electronics waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krones, Jonathan Seth

    2007-01-01

    Waste consolidation is a crucial step in the development of cost-effective, nation-wide material reclamation networks. This thesis project investigates typical and conformational tendencies of a hypothetical end-of-life ...

  19. Impacts of feral hogs on reclaimed surface-mined lands in eastern Texas: a management perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mersinger, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    During the last decade, surface lignite mines in eastern Texas have experienced damage to reclaimed lands by feral hogs (Sus scrota). Specifically, feral hogs have caused damage to vegetative plantings used in the reclamation ...

  20. NSD Methodology Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kyle Jones William D. Proctor U.S. Bureau of Reclamation: Michael Pulskamp U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Frankie Green U.S. Geological Survey: Eric Evenson ...

  1. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - North Branch / East Main - Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North...

  2. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) - Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station - Preliminary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    2005-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed...

  3. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - Curry Main - Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North...

  4. CX-006591: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Invasive Species Removal and Reclamation in Gold Eagle Mining, IncorporatedCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.20Date: 08/24/2011Location(s): San Miguel County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  5. Preliminary studies on physical and chemical processes in the subsurface system in the land reclaimed from the sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    reclamation and the possible pathway of the contaminated groundwater below Cheoy Lee Shipyard located groundwater near the shipyard will not spread out much within Penny's Bay, as many people expected

  6. |Home Graphic Version The U.S. House of Representatives: COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS Press Releases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Links: Categories Search: Enter text here... Submit Email Sign Up Your email here... Submit News Room of reprogrammings, continuing contracts, and implementation of long-term financial planning. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION

  7. 2015 GRADUATE STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste engineering; ground water modeling and treatment; air quality monitoring, pollution control: environmental biotechnology; water quality and treatment; wastewater reclamation and reuse; hazardous and solid Principles · Contaminant Sediment Geochemistry · Design of Treatment Facilities for Drinking Water

  8. EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

  9. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

  10. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-D4 Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-036

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-02-23

    The 1607-D4 Septic System was a septic tank and tile field that received sanitary sewage from the 115-D/DR Gas Recirculation Facility. This septic system operated from 1944 to 1968. Decommissioning took place in 1985 and 1986 when all above-grade features were demolished and the tank backfilled. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  11. Decontamination and decommissioning of a fuel reprocessing pilot plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heine, W.F.; Speer, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The strontium Semiworks Pilot Fuel Reprocessing Plant at the Hanford Site in Washington State was decommissioned by a combination of dismantlement and entombment. The facility contained 9600 Ci of Sr-90 and 10 Ci of plutonium. Process cells were entombed in place. The above-grade portion of one cell with 1.5-m- (5-ft-) thick walls and ceilings was demolished by means of expanding grout. A contaminated stack was remotely sandblasted and felled by explosives. The entombed structures were covered with a 4.6-m- (15-ft-) thick engineered earthen barrier. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-36, 108-F Biological Laboratory, and for the 116-F-15, 108-F Radiation Crib, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-05-24

    The 100-F-36 waste site is the location of the former 108-F Biological Laboratory. The building was closed in 1973, decontaminated, decommissioned, and eventually demolished in 1999. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  13. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-D-3, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-033

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-05-09

    Decommissioning and demolition of the 132-D-3 site, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1986. Decommissioning included removal of equipment, water, and sludge for disposal as radioactive waste. The at- and below-grade structure was demolished to at least 1 m below grade and the resulting rubble buried in situ. The area was backfilled to grade with at least 1 m of clean fill and contoured to the surrounding terrain. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  14. EM Budget Update by Terry Tyborowski

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel TravelChallengesOhio andTechnologiesLandEnergy Begins Demolishing

  15. EM Business Opportunities Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel TravelChallengesOhio andTechnologiesLandEnergy Begins DemolishingBusiness

  16. Workers Complete Demolition at Historic Los Alamos Site | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department of EnergyDataWind TheEnergy Workers demolish a

  17. Workforce Development Wind Projects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department of EnergyDataWind TheEnergy Workers demolish

  18. Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.

    1997-07-01

    This document constitutes a reclamation plan for the short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with the cleanup of radionuclide contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site. This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. The results of reclamation trials at Area 11, Area 19 and more recently the reclamation demonstration plots at the Double Tracks cleanup site, have been summarized and incorporated into this reclamation and monitoring plan. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both the effectiveness and success of short-term and long-term soil stabilization. The Clean Slate 1 site is located on the Tonopah Test Range. The surface soils were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. Short-term stabilization consists of the application of a chemical soil stabilizer that is applied immediately following excavation of the contaminated soils to minimize Pu resuspension. Long-term stabilization is accomplished by the establishment of a permanent vegetation.

  19. Habitat restoration on naval petroleum reserves in Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C. [EG& G Energy Measurements, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

    1990-12-31

    One of several task performed under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) by EG & G Energy Measurements as part of the endangered species program is the restoration of abandoned well pads, roads, pipelines and soil borrow sites resulting from oil and gas production activities on Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Naval Petroleum Reserves in California is located in the Elk Hills approximately 30 miles southwest of Bakersfield in the rain shadow of the coastal range. Annual precipitation is approximately five inches. Reclamation of disturbed habitat on NPRC began with research plots and test trials in the early 1980s. Full scale reclamation began in 1985 and has continued through the 1989 planting season. Almost 700 acres have been revegetated, which represents over 1,200 sites distributed over the 47,250 acres of NPRC and averaging less than .75 acre in size. Monitoring of the sites began in 1987 to establish reclamation success and evaluate reclamation techniques. Reclamation objectives include the improvement of wildlife habitat for four endangered species living on NPRC, and the protection of the soils from wind and water erosion on the disturbed sites.

  20. RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.; SMITH, B.A.

    2006-02-09

    A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.

  1. Managing water temperatures below hydroelectric facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.L.; Vermeyen, T.B.; O`Haver, G.G.

    1995-05-01

    Due to drought-related water temperature problems in the Bureau of Reclamation`s California Central Valley Project in the early 1990`s, engineers were forced to bypass water from the plants during critical periods. This was done at considerable cost in the form of lost revenue. As a result, an alternative method of lowering water temperature was developed and it has successfully lowered water temperatures downstream from hydroelectric facilities by using flexible rubber curtains. This innovative technology is aiding the survival of endangered fish populations. This article outlines the efforts and discusses the implementation of this method at several hydroelectric facilities in the area.

  2. Guide to Cement-Based Integrated Pavement Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide to Cement-Based Integrated Pavement Solutions August 2011 #12;Cement-Based Integrated Commercial Residential Recreation LAND USE CEMENT-BASED INTEGRATED PAVEMENT SOLUTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Conventional Overlays CRCP VIBRATORY COMPACTION Pervious Concrete Full-Depth Reclamation Cement- Treat- ed Base

  3. Propagation of trembling aspen and hybrid poplar for agroforestry: potential benefits of elevated CO2 in the greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    CO2 in the greenhouse Kendall A. Tupker, Barb R. Thomas* and S. Ellen Macdonald Department the usefulness of elevated CO2 in the greenhouse to aid in early selection of genotypes and in the propagation and reclamation across Canada. Introduction Understanding the effects of greenhouse propagation methods

  4. Call for Proposals Eurasian Center for Food Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    price crisis of 2007/2008. ECFS' mission is to help enhance agricultural performance in the Eurasian for saline soil reclamation Price volatility and the impact on food security in Central Asia and Armenia should be no longer than five A4 text pages (not including reference list, tables, and graphics

  5. Call for Proposals Eurasian Center for Food Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    price crisis of 2007/2008. ECFS' mission is to help enhance agricultural performance in the Eurasian for saline soil reclamation · Price volatility and the impact on food security in Central Asia and Armenia should be no longer than five A4 text pages (not including reference list, tables, and graphics

  6. Evan Tanner Master's Candidate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ·CREP ·GRP ·EQIP ·Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 · Established a program to minimize coal-mined land areas reclaimed in hectares under Focus: Prevent Erosion Within First 5 years State Anniversary of the Surface Mining Law" (http://www.osmre.gov/annivrep.htm) and annual reports to Congress. 2

  7. Carl J. Bauer, Ph.D. Associate Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mining for Coal. EMPLOYMENT 2006-now Associate Professor, School of Geography & Development (SGD), Univ. B.A. (1983) Geology, Yale University, New Haven, CT. Thesis: Reclamation of Land after Surface, and policy in Chile. Fall 1993, 1995 Visiting Professor, Institute of Mining and Water Law, Univ. of Atacama

  8. Ashley Unger M.S. Candidate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    , Burger 2002 #12;10/19/2011 2 Introduction to reclaimed mines The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Study Area Managed under Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Reclaimed coalReclaimed coal mine on reclaimed mines SMCRA also states that "...introduced species may be used in the revegetation process where

  9. Computer-Aided Visual Assessment in Mine Planning and Design1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mine and reclamation plan information is used to describe how the surface disturbances international Inc. is a major mineral development corporation that conducts surface and underground mining- duced through a wholly--owned subsidiary. Our producing domestic coal mines are located in northwestern

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER Primary Productivity in 20-year Old Created

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    standing crop . Tissue nutrient content Introduction Contour surface mining for coal disturbed over 385 Abstract Thousands of depressional wetlands accidentally formed as a result of pre-1977 contour coal mining to enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA, P.L. 95-87). Topographic

  11. Major Challenges in Landscape Planning: Simulated Field Trips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 require surface coal mines to be reclaimed backMajor Challenges in Landscape Planning: Simulated Field Trips Surface Mining1 Robert Leopold, Bruce Rowland and Reed Stalder 2/ Abstract: The surface mining process consists of four phases: (1) exploration

  12. Visual Analysis as a Design and Decision-Making Tool in the Development of a Quarry1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visual Analysis as a Design and Decision-Making Tool in the Development of a Quarry1 Randall Boyd mining area from the adjacent community required a visual im- pact analysis in the planning and design of the project. The Visual Analysis defined design criteria for the min- ing and reclamation plans to minimize

  13. Opportunities for Visual Resource Management in the Southern Appalachian Coal Basin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opportunities for Visual Resource Management in the Southern Appalachian Coal Basin1 John W) in the southern Appalachian coal basin resulting from the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. It focuses been concerned with the visual impacts resulting from the surface mined coal the agency purchases

  14. CX-006484: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects in Energy Fuels Resources Lease Tracts C-AM-19 and C-AM-20, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.28Date: 07/26/2011Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  15. Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ) the physical and chemical properties of several types of char derived from each of the principal sources (coal SEquEStration and rEclamation of dEgradEd landS with coal-combuStion and biomaSS-PyrolySiS Product the properties of the char that is produced. In addition to its high resistance to microbial and chemical

  16. CX-002920: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects in Jo Dandy Lease Tract C-JD-7, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28, B1.3Date: 06/25/2010Location(s): Naturita, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  17. Germination and establishment characteristics of Helianthus maximiliani Schrad. and Simsia calva (Englem. & Gray) Gray 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, David Wayne

    1984-01-01

    alba 1. Phy iologia Pl. 18:ga-sg. Knipe, 0. D. 1968. Effects of moisture-stress on germination of alkali sacation, galleta and blue arama. J. Range Manage. 21:3-4. Knudson, R. 1980. Equipment development projects for disturbed land reclamation. pp...

  18. RESPONSES OF BENTHIC MICROORGANISMS (THECAMOEBIANS) TO OIL SANDS PROCESS-AFFECTED MATERIALS; PROVIDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    RESPONSES OF BENTHIC MICROORGANISMS (THECAMOEBIANS) TO OIL SANDS PROCESS-AFFECTED MATERIALS an important role in reclamation options for fluid tailings (OSPW/M) at surface oil sands operations. Through of oil sands operation have been compared. An index of response to stress has been compiled with the goal

  19. Life Cycle Assessment of Three Water Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    1 Life Cycle Assessment of Three Water Scenarios: Importation, Reclamation, and Desalination Erin and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University #12;Life Cycle Assessment · Described by International · Data analyzed and categorized · Find impacts on planet and humans #12;Life Cycle Assessment Extraction

  20. 2015 GRADUATE STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biotechnology for bioremediation of contaminated soil, sediments and waters · Evolution and adaptation and research op- portunities in air, land and water science and engineering. The principal focus areas include environmental biotechnology; water quality and treatment; wastewater reclamation and reuse; hazardous and solid

  1. Thomas J. Volk, Ph.D. Curriculum vitae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emshwiller, Eve

    as a Fellow of the Mycological Society of America, a mid-career award 2005 Recipient of the Award of the Weston Award for Excellence in Teaching Mycology, from the Mycological Society of America. August 1999 of birdsfoot trefoil in coal spoils from a land reclamation site in southern Illinois." Ohio University, Athens

  2. Journal of Membrane Science 364 (2010) 233241 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    water becomes concentrated and the draw solution becomes diluted. A desalination process (e.g., reverse but rather a high-level pretreatment process before an ulti- mate reconcentration/desalination process [3 evaluated for seawater and brackish water desalina- tion [1,2,4], wastewater concentration and reclamation

  3. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dilution Seawater desalination Wastewater reclamation Trace organic chemicals Membrane fouling Energy dilution of seawater before desalination. The osmotic dilution approach may provide at least four major benefits related to water and energy resources. These include lower energy desalination of seawater, multi

  4. Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, On Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committed on appropriations, House of Representatives. The topics include the Bureau of Reclamation, testimony of the Secretary of the Interior, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The discussion is related to the funding of activities in these areas.

  5. Dissertation submitted to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    by Master-Physicist: Hany El-Gamal born in: El-Menoufia, Egypt Oral examination: 08.06.2005 #12 aquifers supplying water to new reclamation areas southwest of the Nile Delta in Egypt. In this area.........................................................................................8 2.2 Noble gas solubilities................

  6. Two-dimensional simulations of extreme floods on a large watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Two-dimensional simulations of extreme floods on a large watershed John F. England Jr. a,*, Mark L. Velleux b , Pierre Y. Julien c a Bureau of Reclamation, Flood Hydrology, 86-68530, Denver Federal Center September 2007; accepted 14 September 2007 KEYWORDS Flash floods; Flood design; Rainfall runoff; Extreme

  7. Distributed Modeling of Extreme Floods on Large Watersheds John F. England, Jr.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Distributed Modeling of Extreme Floods on Large Watersheds John F. England, Jr.1 , Pierre Y. Julien2 , Mark L. Velleux2 , and James A. Smith3 1 Hydraulic Engineer, Bureau of Reclamation, Flood Estimates of extreme floods and probabilities are needed for hydrologic engineering and dam safety risk

  8. 10 Water Resources and the Urban Environment Tide-induced Air Pressure Fluctuation in Coastal Unsaturated Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    such as asphalt pavement of extremely low permeability, soil structures of the reclamation area, and rainfall soil near the coast may also fluctuate in response to sea tides. If the soil is well capped by low-permeability materials such as concrete or asphalt, which is common in the extensively urbanized coastal areas

  9. SEDIMENT IN ARROYO PASAJERO AND SAN LUIS CANAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    SEDIMENT IN ARROYO PASAJERO AND SAN LUIS CANAL PREPARED FOR: US BUREAU OF RECLAMATION DENVER as floodwaters breached the San Luis Canal levee and filled the sediment basins with a mixture of water, sediment alternatives, the sediment basins would be enlarged. This study focuses on sedimentation in the West Side

  10. WATER ACCOUNTING AND ALLOCATION IN RIVERWARE Edie Zagona, Director, CADSWES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER ACCOUNTING AND ALLOCATION IN RIVERWARE Edie Zagona, Director, CADSWES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, zagona@colorado.edu; Ed Kandl, Hydrologist, Water Operations Group, Bureau of Reclamation, Albuquerque, NM, ekandl@usbr.gov; John Carron, Senior Water Resources Engineer, AMEC Earth and Environmental

  11. Emergency Water Assistance During Drought: Federal Non-Agricultural Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    of Agriculture's RUS provides grants and loans for rural water systems in communities with less than 10.3 billion in loans and $370 million in grants are available for rural community water and waste systems and Water Assistance Grants program $3 million for California's rural communities. Bureau of Reclamation

  12. Oil shale mining processing, uses, and environmental impacts. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning oil shale mining and retorting, uses, and related environmental aspects. References discuss pyrolyzed, gasified, and combusted oil shales. Product yields and oil quality, socioeconomic impacts, exploration, reclamation of mined lands, and waste disposal are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Double Tracks revegetation and monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This document is a reclamation plan for short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with interim clean-up of radionuclide-contaminated surface soil at the Double Tracks site. This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. Reclamation demonstration plots were established near the site in the fall of 1994 to evaluate the performance of several native species and to evaluate different irrigation strategies. Results of the study at Double Tracks, as well as the results from numerous studies conducted at other sites (Area 11 and Area 19 of the Nevada Test Site), have been summarized and incorporated into this final reclamation plan for the interim cleanup of the Double Tracks site, located northwest of the Nevada Test Site on the Nellis Air Force Range. Surface soils at Double Tracks were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. The total amount of Pu deposited on the site was between 980 and 1,600 grams and was scattered downwind south of the detonation site. Short-term stabilization consists of the application of a chemical soil stabilizer that is applied immediately following excavation of the contaminated soils to minimize Pu resuspension. Long-term stabilization is accomplished by the establishment of a permanent vegetation.

  14. Crab Creek Subbasin Plan Prepared for the Washington Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alphabetical order): Juli Anderson, WDFW Paul Ashley, WDFW Jim Blanchard, United States Bureau of Reclamation of Fish and Wildlife and Lincoln County Conservation District's commitment is to make it possible their livelihoods and their quality of life. The NWPCC proposed a three year rolling review of subbasin plans

  15. Trusting the Culture in our Food: Overcoming Barriers for Sustainable Indigenous Foodways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Lois Lorraine

    2014-12-31

    of Indigenous Peoples and how they can be used to assist preservation of these practices. As a living example, this thesis will explain how the influence of reclamation of their indigenous foods has helped my own tribe, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin...

  16. SEE6999 Dissertation Dr. Wen ZHOU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    , rainwater harvesting and wastewater reclamation) in Hong Kong 9. Zero-Food waste Town Development 10. Evaluation of Energy Recovery and GHG Reduction Potentials by Waste to Energy 11. Greenhouse gas accounting in Waste Sector in Hong Kong #12;SEE6999 Dissertation Dr. Denis YU 12. Polymer electrolyte for battery

  17. Aerosol Science 36 (2005) 763783 www.elsevier.com/locate/jaerosci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    2005-01-01

    for indoor air quality assessments of flood reclamation M.P. Fabiana , S.L. Millerb , T. Reponenc , M November 2004; accepted 12 November 2004 Abstract An air quality study was conducted in arid practices on indoor air quality. These assays included (i) optical counting (OPC) of airborne particulate

  18. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water are two examples. Colorado State Legislature and Department of Natural Resources requested our of Reclamation asked us to help stage a workshop on produced waters those waters resulting from the extraction contaminants (OWCs) which result from pharaceuticals and personal care products. DeJong's fellowship work

  19. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pollution is of major interest. Because of several hazardous waste super-fund sites, hazardous waste included (but are not limited to): erosion, non-point pollution reclamation of strip mine areas, hazardous a major issue in cities and rural areas. Past droughts and possible lowering of the Missouri River have

  20. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -point source pollution is of major interest. Because of several hazardous waste super-fund sites, hazardous have included (but are not limited to): erosion, non-point pollution reclamation of strip mine areas a major issue in cities and rural areas. Past droughts and possible lowering of the Missouri River have

  1. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because-point pollution reclamation of strip mine areas, hazardous waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic be held at acceptable levels if water becomes a major issue in cities and rural areas. Past droughts

  2. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pollution is also of major interest. Because of several hazardous waste super-fund sites, hazardous waste (but are not limited to): erosion, non-point pollution reclamation of strip mine areas, hazardous waste and economic costs may no longer be held at acceptable levels if water becomes a major issue in cities

  3. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because-point pollution reclamation of strip mine areas, hazardous waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic costs may no longer be held at acceptable levels if water becomes a major issue in cities and rural

  4. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pollution is also of major interest. Because of several hazardous waste super-fund sites, hazardous waste (but are not limited to): erosion, non-point pollution reclamation of strip mine areas, hazardous waste costs may no longer be held at acceptable levels if water becomes a major issue in cities and rural

  5. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because of several hazardous waste super ten years have included (but are not limited to): erosion, non-point pollution, reclamation of strip levels if water becomes a major issue in cities and rural areas. Past droughts and the possible lowering

  6. Envir. 3 FSs LAIS/EBGN 3 FSs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wastewater Engineering CEEN471 Water Supply Engineering CEEN472 Onsite Water Reclamation and Reuse CEEN474, Characteristics, Transport and Fate CEEN482 Hydrology & Water Resources Laboratory CHGN403 Intro. to Environmental as a quick reference only. For full degree details please see the bulletin applicable to your catalog year

  7. THE CRESCENT BYPASS: A RIPARIAN RESTORATION PROJECT ON THE KINGS RIVER (FRESNO COUNTY)1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - vival include soil quality, irrigation technique, climate, topography, weed competition, gopher, the Tulare Lake Reclamation District No. 749 (TLRD) decided to pump floodwaters from the Lake. Four pumping. After dredging and installation of the pump-back stations in 1983, only weeds, a few willow trees

  8. Volume 6 Number 1 October 30, 2004Volume 6 Number 1 October 30, 2004 THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONGTHE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    , which have very poor permeability, and the air cannot get in or out very freely." Buckled concrete reclamation sites were filled by extremely permeable rock boulders and some incorporated buried old sea walls, unlike natural coastlines where sand, earth and other materials were less permeable and could absorb

  9. Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined in a wide variety of rocks, including sandstone, carbonates1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-1 Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined conventional mining, solution extraction, and milling of uranium, a principal focus of this report is TENORM, or which may need future reclamation. When uranium mining first started, most of the ores were recovered

  10. Appendix III. Occupational and Public Risks Associated with In-Situ Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines Occurring Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining. Volume 1: Mining and Reclamation Background by U.S. EPA in many cases. Lixiviants for uranium mining commonly consist of water containing added oxygen and carbon

  11. Carpathian Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, September 2011, Vol. 6, No. 2, p. 143 -149 STUDY OF A PASSIVE RADON MITIGATION PROCESS AND INDOOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horváth, Ákos

    Thege út 29-33, 1121, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: The uranium mining was stopped in the Mecsek Mountains (S-Hungary) in 1997 and mine reclamation of the contaminated area began. For this purpose radiometric survey of houses in the towns of the former mining area, including settlement of Kvágószls

  12. Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining. Volume 1: Mining and Reclamation Background" by U.S. EPA (2006

  13. Pierre Y. Julien The Impact of Sedimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    . Instream Sediment Sources; 3. Sediment Problems (Examples); 4. Case Studies: Venezuela; 5. Case Studies: Sediment Impact in Venezuela CASC2D-SED Modeling 2004 Example: Vargas Mountains, Venezuela CASC2D Reclamation Dr. Jose Luis Lopez, UCV, Venezuela Dr. Claudia Leon, RTI Erosion and River Mechanics Textbooks

  14. Salinity Management Desalination Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    Salinity Management and Desalination Technology for Brackish Water Resources in the Arid West.S. Bureau of Reclamation August, 2008 #12;Salinity Management and Desalination Technology for Brackish Water a practical roadmap forward for achieving sustainable, viable desalination of inland, moderate salinity waters

  15. Draft Biological Review: Potential Flow Augmentation Action from Lewiston Dam to Protect Adult Salmon in the Lower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Northern California Coast (SONCC) Coho Salmon in the Klamath/Trinity River basin and Sacramento River winter-run to Protect Adult Salmon in the Lower Klamath River in 2015; August 14, 2015 Introduction Reclamation may November 2015 to protect adult salmon in the lower Klamath River. This document is intended to provide

  16. 95AUGUST 2010 Published by the IEEE Computer Society0018-9162/10/$26.00 2010 IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xin "Shane"

    - operated Deepwater Horizon oil-drilling rig exploded, killing 11 workers and injur- ing 17, and sending on fishing, tourism, and deepwater drilling (banned by the federal gov- ernment in the wake of the spill), and the ultimate cleanup, reclamation, and litigation costs will be in the bil- lions of dollars. In short

  17. DRAFT San Acacia Reach San Acacia Dam to Escondida Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    DRAFT San Acacia Reach San Acacia Dam to Escondida Bridge Hydraulic Modeling Analysis 1918, hydraulic modeling analyses have been performed on the San Acacia reach to determine the changes by Reclamation on the San Acacia reach. The 11.6 mile long extends from the San Acacia Diversion dam (River Mile

  18. San Acacia Reach San Acacia Dam to Escondida Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    San Acacia Reach San Acacia Dam to Escondida Bridge Hydraulic Modeling Analysis 1918-2006 Middle, hydraulic modeling analyses have been performed on the San Acacia reach to determine the changes by Reclamation on the San Acacia reach. The 11.6 mile long reach extends from the San Acacia Diversion dam (River

  19. New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

  20. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO{sub 2} in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel` ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  1. Probable new type of reaction mechanism: Double. cap alpha. direct transfer process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Shu-wei; Wu Guo-hua; Miao Rong-zhi; Han Fei

    1983-10-01

    It is assumed that /sup 8/Be consists of two ..cap alpha.. particles which are close to each other in configuration space. A spectroscopic density of /sup 8/Be cluster in the residue nuclei is then obtained, which is proportional to the square of the preformation probability of ..cap alpha.. particle at nuclear surface. Using the improved method of parametrization of EFR-DWBA overlap integral,/sup 1//sup en-dash//sup 2/ we calculate the double differential energy spectra and angular distributions of ..cap alpha.. particles for the reactions /sup 209/Bi (/sup 12/C, ..cap alpha..) /sup 217/Fr and extract the preformation probability of ..cap alpha.. particle at the surface of /sup 217/Fr nuclei from fitting the experimental data. The agreement within the range of calculation error between the preformation probabilities extracted from transfer reactions and ..cap alpha.. decay suggests that the reaction /sup 209/Bi(/sup 12/C, ..cap alpha..) /sup 217/Fr may be explained as a double ..cap alpha.. direct transfer process.

  2. Application of petrographic examination techniques to the assessment of fire-damaged concrete and masonry structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingham, Jeremy P., E-mail: inghamjp@halcrow.com [Halcrow Group Limited, Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, Hammersmith, London W6 7BY (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The number of building fires has doubled over the last 50 years. There has never been a greater need for structures to be assessed for fire damage to ensure safety and enable appropriate repairs to be planned. Fortunately, even after a severe fire, concrete and masonry structures are generally capable of being repaired rather than demolished. By allowing direct examination of microcracking and mineralogical changes, petrographic examination has become widely used to determine the depth of fire damage for reinforced concrete elements. Petrographic examination can also be applied to fire-damaged masonry structures built of materials such as stone, brick and mortar. Petrography can ensure accurate detection of damaged geomaterials, which provides cost savings during building repair and increased safety reassurance. This paper comprises a review of the role of petrography in fire damage assessments, drawing on a range of actual fire damage investigations.

  3. Beneficial Re-use of Decommissioned Former Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.

    1997-06-01

    With the decision to decommission a nuclear facility, it is necessary to evaluate whether to fully demolish a facility or to re-use the facility in some capacity. This evaluation is often primarily driven by both the past mission of the site and the facility and the site's perceived future mission. In the case where the facility to be decommissioned is located within a large research or industrial complex and represents a significant resource to the site's future mission, it may be a perfect candidate to be re-used in some fashion. However, if the site is a rather remote older facility with little chance of being modified to today's standards for its re-use, the chances for its re-use will be substantially reduced. In this presentation, some specific cases of former nuclear facilities being decommissioned and re-used will be reviewed and some factors required to be considered in making this decision will be reviewed.

  4. Expedited Demolition Notification for 2nd Quarter CY 2012 Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juarez, Catherine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    The National Nuclear Security Administration and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) (collectively the Permittees) are informing the New Mexico Environment Department Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of the need to expedite the demolition of structures summarized in the enclosures. These structures have been identified to receive funding and be demolished prior to the 3rd Quarter Demolition Notification (June 30, 2012). This letter is a follow up to the email that was sent to the NMED-HWB on April 17, 2012. The enclosures attached to this letter satisfy the reporting requirements as outlined in Section 1.17 of the LANL Hazardous Facility Waste Permit (Permit). Demolition of buildings that appear on this list will not occur until 30 days after NMED has received this notification.

  5. RADIOLOGICAL CONTROLS FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FROM 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINSHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MINETTE, M.J.

    2007-05-30

    The 232-Z facility at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant operated as a plutonium scrap incinerator for 11 years. Its mission was to recover residual plutonium through incinerating and/or leaching contaminated wastes and scrap material. Equipment failures, as well as spills, resulted in the release of radionuclides and other contamination to the building, along with small amounts to external soil. Based on the potential threat posed by the residual plutonium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued an Action Memorandum to demolish Building 232-2, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERC1.A) Non-Time Critical Removal Action Memorandum for Removal of the 232-2 Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (04-AMCP-0486).

  6. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

  7. Facility deactivation and demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cormier, S.L.; Adamowski, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    Today an improperly closed facility can be a liability to its owner, both financially and environmentally. A facility deactivation program must be planned and implemented to decrease liabilities, minimize operating costs, seek to reuse or sell processes or equipment, and ultimately aid in the sale and/or reuse of the facility and property whether or not the building(s) are demolished. These programs should be characterized within the deactivation plan incorporating the following major categories: Utility Usage; Environmental Decontamination; Ongoing Facility Management; Property Management/Real Estate Issues. This paper will outline the many facets of the facility deactivation and demolition programs implemented across the country for clients in the chemical, automotive, transportation, electronic, pharmaceutical, power, natural gas and petroleum industries. Specific emphasis will be placed on sampling and analysis plans, specification preparation, equipment and technologies utilized, ``how clean is clean`` discussions and regulatory guidelines applicable to these issues.

  8. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  9. NEPA and NHPA- successful decommissioning of historic Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGehee, E.D.; Pendergrass, A.K.

    1997-05-21

    This paper describes experiences at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the process of planning and executing decommissioning and decontamination activities on a number of properties constructed as part of the Manhattan project. Many of these buildings had been abandoned for many years and were in deteriorating condition, in addition to being contaminated with asbestos, lead based paints and high explosive residues. Due to the age and use of the structures they were evaluated against criteria for the National Register of Historic Places. This process is briefly reviewed, along with the results, as well as actions implemented as a result of the condition and safety of the structures. A number of the structures have been decontaminated and demolished. Planning is still ongoing for the renovation of one structure, and the photographic and drawing records of the properties is near completion.

  10. Preliminary evaluation of environmental issues on the use of peat as an energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R.; Richardson, S.; Walters, A.; Boesch, L.; Thomson, W.; Irons, J.

    1980-03-14

    A study to characterize the environmental issues, that would arise from an extensive peat utilization program has been initiated. The objectives of this preliminary report are to: identify the environmental issues and potential problems; examine the significance of issues in the geographical regions where peat use could be developed; and establish a methodology by which issues can be resolved or clarified through future coordinated private, state, and federal programs. An overview of peat development including discussions on conversion technologies, extraction and harvesting procedures, and land reclamation is presented. Environmental concerns are in the areas of water resources and quality, air quality, health and safety issues, solid waste management, and land reclamation. The general environmental issues, resource availability, and attitudes associated with potential peat development in ten states, containing an estimated 90 percent of US peat resources were described. The ten states reviewed are Alaska, Minnesota, Michigan, Maine, North and South Carolina, Wisconsin, New York, Florida, and Louisiana. (DMC)

  11. PRB mines mature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-08-15

    Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

  12. H. R. 5373: An Act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, August 3, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Act may be cited as the [open quotes]Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1993[close quotes]. The purpose of this Act is to make appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, and for other purposes. Title I presents provisions for the Department of Defense--Civil Department of the Army; Title II for the Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation; Title III for the Department of Energy; and Title V for General Provisions.

  13. Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2007-09-17

    incidents from 1972 to 1997. One major HAN incident was an explosion on May 14, 1997, in the Chemical Preparation Room of the Plutonium Reclamation Facility at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (U.S. Department of Energy, 1998). The investigation... FOR THE STUDY OF THERMAL HAZARDS 2.1. Introduction Thermal hazards have been reported as one of the major hazards in chemical process facilities, and they are usually caused by chemical exotherm behavior due to instability, incompatibility, oxidization...

  14. Near-neutral oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, J.K.; Dreher, G.B. [Illinois State Geological Survey (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In this research project we plan to determine the rate of oxidation of pyrite associated with coaly particles (coal slurry solid) when the pH of the surrounding environment is held at approximately 7.8. Coaly particles that contain pyrite are generated during the preparation of Illinois Basin coal for market. These particles are discharged to an impoundment, which eventually must be reclaimed. The purpose for reclamation is either to prevent the generation of acidic solution as the pyrite in the coal slurry solid reacts with air, or to prevent the migration of the acidic solution to a groundwater aquifer. The reclamation is usually accomplished by covering the impoundment with a four-foot-thick layer of topsoil. One possible alternative method for reclamation of a coal slurry impoundment is to mix in alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion of coal. This codisposal would slow the production of acid and would also neutralize any acid produced. If the codisposal method is found to be environmentally acceptable, it will save the coal mining companies part of their cost of reclamation, and also provide a safe and useful disposal outlet for a portion of the residue that is generated by the fluidized-bed combustion of coal. During this quarter we purchased and set up two automatic titrators, which will be used in determining the rate of pyrite oxidation at nearly neutral pH. The titrators will provide a means for maintaining the pH at the desired level. The rate at which sulfate ion is produced as a result of pyrite oxidation will be used to measure the amount of pyrite oxidized over time.

  15. EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011.

  16. Economic Analysis of Wastewater Treatment Alternatives in Rural Texas Communities. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victurine, Raymond F.; Goodwin, H.L. Jr; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    reclamation and recycling through the production of agricultural crops. The law authorized federal funding of up to 75% of construction costs to engender investment in improved wastewater treatment facilities. In response to delays in compliance... communities utilizing this alternative need only lagoons rather than more costly mechanical systems. Because the soil acts as a biological filter providing for efficient removal of the pOllQtants contained in residential wastewater. communities can eliminate...

  17. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

  18. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Endangered species program Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In FY94, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to conserve endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 400 preactivity surveys covering approximately 315 acres were conducted in FY94. Mitigation measures implemented as a result of survey findings resulted in avoidance of incidental takes of listed species during construction activities. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. Third-party projects in FY94 included three pipeline projects and two well abandonment/clean-up projects. Cultural resource support provided to NPRC consisted primarily of conducting preliminary surveys for cultural resources, and preparing a Cultural Resource Management Plan and Programmatic Agreement for NPR-1. These two documents will be finalized in FY95. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY94, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was initiated to assess reclamation efficacy. Results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In addition to this effort, 347 reclaimed sites were assessed to evaluate reclamation success.

  20. Recommended Practice for Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpen EnergyReclamation Project Act

  1. Reconnaissance electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpen EnergyReclamation Project

  2. Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpen EnergyReclamation

  3. Recreational Technical Assistance in Hydropower Licensing | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpen EnergyReclamationInformation

  4. Method for describing and evaluating coal mine wastes for coal recovery: a case history from the historical longwall district in the northeastern Illinois coal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.

    1984-12-01

    A method for describing and evaluating coal mine wastes evolved in 1982 from studies at more than 100 historic longwall mine sites conducted by the Illinois State Geological Survey and partially funded by the Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council (IAMLRC). The primary purpose was to locate and identify different types of waste materials at these sites and to evaluate them for future reclamation. The method which involves geologic characterization, sampling, standard analyses, and evaluation tests, can be used to determine the potential of a mine waste deposit for secondary recovery of coal. It yields data relating to three factors involved in secondary recovery: quality (ash content, heating value), quantity (recoverable tonnages), and the net effect of the recovery operation (product value relative to operations costs; social and environmental assets relative to liabilities). The longwall study did not directly address the question of recoverable tonnages of coal but provided information that can be used to make this evaluation, minimize the amount of drilling required for accurate forecasts of profitability, and measure the economic and environmental benefits of secondary recovery steps in a reclamation plan.

  5. Computeer-based decision support tools for evaluation of actions affecting flow and water quality in the San Joaquin Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1993-01-01

    This document is a preliminary effort to draw together some of the important simulation models that are available to Reclamation or that have been developed by Reclamation since 1987. This document has also attempted to lay out a framework by which these models might be used both for the purposes for which they were originally intended and to support the analysis of other issues that relate to the hydrology and to salt and water quality management within the San Joaquin Valley. To be successful as components of a larger Decision Support System the models should to be linked together using custom designed interfaces that permit data sharing between models and that are easy to use. Several initiatives are currently underway within Reclamation to develop GIS - based and graphics - based decision support systems to improve the general level of understanding of the models currently in use, to standardize the methodology used in making planning and operations studies and to permit improved data analysis, interpretation and display. The decision support systems should allow greater participation in the planning process, allow the analysis of innovative actions that are currently difficult to study with present models and should lead to better integrated and more comprehensive plans and policy decisions in future years.

  6. Western Area Power Administration combined power system financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995 (with independent auditors` report thereon)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Department of Energy`s Western Area Power Administration`s (Western) combined financial statements as of September 30, 1996. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1996 statements. The auditors` report on Western`s internal control structure disclosed two new reportable conditions and discussed the status of an unresolved condition from prior years. The new conditions involved the write-off of aging accounts receivable and the understatement of interest expense for inactive construction work orders. These reportable conditions are not considered to be material weaknesses. Western concurred with the audit recommendations and is responsible for necessary corrective actions. The auditors also considered the overview and performance measure data for completeness and material consistency with the basic financial statements as noted in the internal control report. The report also disclosed an additional reportable condition directed to the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) which is not considered to be a material weakness. Reclamation concurred with the audit recommendation and is responsible for necessary corrective action. The auditors` report on Western`s compliance with laws and regulations disclosed two new instances of noncompliance involving interest charges on all construction costs funded with Federal appropriations and other capitalized costs. The report also discussed the status of one instance of noncompliance from prior years. Western provided concurrence and corrective action plans for all of these instances of noncompliance.

  7. Pre-conceptual design study of ASTRID core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varaine, F.; Marsault, P.; Chenaud, M. S.; Bernardin, B.; Conti, A.; Sciora, P.; Venard, C.; Fontaine, B.; Devictor, N.; Martin, L.; Scholer, A. C.; Verrier, D.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project at CEA, core design studies are performed at CEA with the AREVA and EDF support. At the stage of the project, pre-conceptual design studies are conducted in accordance with GEN IV reactors criteria, in particularly for safety improvements. An improved safety for a sodium cooled reactor requires revisiting many aspects of the design and is a rather lengthy process in current design approach. Two types of cores are under evaluation, one classical derived from the SFR V2B and one more challenging called CFV (low void effect core) with a large gain on the sodium void effect. The SFR V2b core have the following specifications: a very low burn-up reactivity swing (due to a small cycle reactivity loss) and a reduced sodium void effect with regard to past designs such as the EFR (around 2$ minus). Its performances are an average burn-up of 100 GWd/t, and an internal conversion ratio equal to one given a very good behavior of this core during a control rod withdrawal transient). The CFV with its specific design offers a negative sodium void worth while maintaining core performances. In accordance of ASTRID needs for demonstration those cores are 1500 MWth power (600 MWe). This paper will focus on the CFV pre-conceptual design of the core and S/A, and the performances in terms of safety will be evaluated on different transient scenario like ULOF, in order to assess its intrinsic behavior compared to a more classical design like V2B core. The gap in term of margin to a severe accident due to a loss of flow initiator underlines the potential capability of this type of core to enhance prevention of severe accident in accordance to safety demonstration. (authors)

  8. Phased Demolition of an Occupied Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brede, Lawrence M.; Lauterbach, Merl J.; Witt, Brandon W.; McCague, James [Bechtel Jacobs Co., LLC, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The U.S. government constructed the K-1401 facility in the late 1940's as a support building for various projects supporting the uranium gaseous diffusion process. In 2004 the U.S. Department of Energy authorized Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to decontaminate and demolish the facility. The K-1401 facility was used for a variety of industrial purposes supporting the gaseous diffusion process. Many different substances were used to support these processes over the years and as a result different parts of the facility were contaminated with fluorine, chlorine trifluoride, uranium and technetium radiological contamination, asbestos, and mercury. The total facility area is 46,015 m{sup 2} (495,000 sf) including a 6,800 m{sup 2} basement (73,200 sf). In addition to the contamination areas in the facility, a large portion was leased to businesses for re-industrialization when the D and D activities began. The work scope associated with the facility included purging and steam cleaning the former fluorine and chlorine trifluoride systems, decontaminating loose radiologically contaminated and mercury spill areas, dismantling former radiological lines contaminated with uranium oxide compounds and technetium, abating all asbestos containing material, and demolishing the facility. These various situations contributed to the challenge of successfully conducting D and D tasks on the facility. In order to efficiently utilize the work force, demolition equipment, and waste hauling trucks the normal approach of decontaminating the facility of the hazardous materials, and then conducting demolition in series required a project schedule of five years, which is not cost effective. The entire project was planned with continuous demolition as the goal end state. As a result, the first activities, Phase 1, required to prepare sections for demolition, including steam cleaning fluorine and chlorine trifluoride process lines in basement and facility asbestos abatement, were conducted while the tenants who were leasing floor space in the facility moved out. Upon completion of this phase the facility was turned over to the demolition project and the most hazardous materials were removed from the facility. Phase 2 activities included removing the process gas lines from sections C/D/E while decontaminating and preparing sections A and B for demolition. Demolition preparation activities include removing transit siding and universal waste from the area. Phase 3 began with demolition activities in sections A and B1 while continuing process gas line removal from sections C/D/E, as well as conducting demolition preparation activities to these sections. Area B was split into two sections, allowing demolition activities to occur in section B1 while personnel could still access the upper floor in sections C, D, and E. Once demolition began in section B2, personnel entry was only authorized in the basement. This timeline initiated phase 4, and the project completed cleaning the process components from the basement while section B2 demolition began. The final phase, phase 5, began once the basement was cleared. Final demolition activities began on sections C, D, E, and the basement. This material will ship for disposal and is scheduled for completion during FY07. Because the project was able to successfully phase demolition activities, the total facility demolition schedule was reduced by half to 2-1/2 years. The project was able to move portions of the demolition schedule from working in series to working in parallel, allowing the job to deliver facility demolition debris to ship for disposal 'just in time' as the facility was demolished.

  9. PREPARATION OF U-PLANT FOR FINAL DEMOLITION AND DISPOSAL - 12109E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FARABEE OA; HERZOG B; CAMERON C

    2012-02-16

    The U-Plant is one of the five major nuclear materials processing facilities at Hanford and was chosen as a pilot project to develop the modalities for closure of the other four facilities at Hanford and the rest of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The remedy for this facility was determined by a Record of Decision (ROD) pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). That remedy was to 'Close in Place - Partially Demolished Structure'. The U-Plant facility is identified as the 221-U Building and is a large, concrete structure nominally 247m (810 ft) long, 20 M (66 ft) wide and 24 m (77 ft) high with approximately 9 m (30 ft) being below grade level. It is a robust facility with walls ranging from 0.9 m to 2.7 m (3 ft to 9 ft) thick. One large room extends the entire length of the building that provides access to 40 sub-grade processing cells containing tanks, piping and other components. The work breakdown was divided into three major deliverables: (1) Tank D-10 Removal: removal of Tank D-10, which contained TRU waste; (2) Equipment Disposition: placement of contaminated equipment in the sub-grade cells; and (3) Canyon Grouting: grouting canyon void spaces to the maximum extent practical. A large number of pieces of contaminated equipment (pumps, piping, centrifuges, tanks, etc) from other facilities that had been stored on the canyon operating floor were placed inside of the sub-grade cells as final disposition, grouted and the cell shield plug reinstalled. This action precluded a large volume of waste being transported to another burial site. Finally, {approx}19,000 m3 ({approx}25,000 yd3) of grout was placed inside of the cells (in and around the contaminated equipment), in the major galleries. the ventilation tunnel, the external ventilation duct, and the hot pipe trench to minimize the potential for void spaces and to reduce the mobility, solubility, and/or toxicity of the grouted waste. The interim condition of the facility is 'cold and dark'. Upon availability of funding the structure will have contamination fixative applied to all contaminated surfaces and may be explosively demolished, with the remaining structure buried under an engineered barrier.

  10. PROJECT EXPERIENCE REPORT DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERLIN, G.T.; ORGILL, T.K.

    2004-07-14

    This report provides a summary of the preparation, operations, innovative work practices, and lessons learned associated with demolition of the 2334 Plutonium Concentration Facility. This project represented the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent the first plutonium facility in the US. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to have been demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contaminated structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially available equipment, materials, and services, this project demonstrated that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or to construct large enclosures. This project utilized an excavator with concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, commercially available fixatives and dust suppressants, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Following a significant amount of preparation, actual demolition of the 233-S Facility began in October 2003 and was completed in late April 2004. The knowledge and experience gained on this project are important to the Hanford Site as additional plutonium processing facilities are scheduled for demolition in the near future. Other sites throughout the DOE Complex may also be faced with similar challenges. Numerous innovations and effective work practices were implemented on this project. Accordingly, a series of ''Lessons Learned and Innovative Practices Fact Sheets'' were developed and are included as an appendix to this report. This collection of fact sheets is not intended to capture every innovative work practice and lesson learned, but rather to describe those that the project believes to be of most benefit to future DOE projects. These fact sheets cover a number of specific topics within the subject areas noted below: (1) Project Management; (2) Organization Structure and Responsibilities; (3) Demolition Approach and Equipment; (4) Planning and Scheduling; (5) Site Preparation and Infrastructure; (6) Radiological Controls; (7) Industrial Safety and Health; and (8) Waste Management.

  11. PROJECT EXPERIENCE REPORT DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2004-06-25

    This report provides a summary of the preparation, operations, innovative work practices, and lessons learned associated with demolition of the 2334 Plutonium Concentration Facility. This project represented the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent the first plutonium facility in the US. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to have been demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contaminated structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially available equipment, materials, and services, this project demonstrated that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or to construct large enclosures. This project utilized an excavator with concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, commercially available fixatives and dust suppressants, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Following a significant amount of preparation, actual demolition of the 2333 Facility began in October 2003 and was completed in late April 2004. The knowledge and experience gained on this project are important to the Hanford Site as additional plutonium processing facilities are scheduled for demolition in the near future. Other sites throughout the DOE Complex may also be faced with similar challenges. Numerous innovations and effective work practices were implemented on this project. Accordingly, a series of ''Lessons Learned and Innovative Practices Fact Sheets'' were developed and are included as an appendix to this report. This collection of fact sheets is not intended to capture every innovative work practice and lesson learned, but rather to describe those that the project believes to be of most benefit to future DOE projects. These fact sheets cover a number of specific topics within the subject areas noted below: (1) Project Management; (2) Organization Structure and Responsibilities; (3) Demolition Approach and Equipment; (4) Planning and Scheduling; (5) Site Preparation and Infrastructure; (6) Radiological Controls; (7)Industrial Safety and Health; and (8) Waste Management.

  12. INNOVATIVE ALARA TOOLS AND WORK PRACTICES USED AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER LO

    2010-02-12

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation occupies an area of 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state. The site was created as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce weapons grade plutonium. A multitude of old reactor plants, processing facilities, underground tank farms, contaminated soil and ground water remain and are part of an on-going environmental cleanup mission of the site. The Columbia River bisects Hanford, and the concern is that the river will become contaminated if the sources of contamination are not removed. Currently facilities are being removed, the ground water is being treated, and contaminated soil is being transferred to an approved burial ground about 15 miles away from the River located in the center of the Hanford Site The remaining facilities and adjacent structures are undergoing D&D (decontaminate and demolish) and to date, significant progress has been made. During this presentation, I will discuss how we are using innovative tools and work practices to D&D these Hanford Site facilities.

  13. Carbon dioxide and global climate change: The birth and arrested development of an idea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, F.B.

    1996-12-31

    G.S. Callendar (1897--1964) is regarded the originator of the modern theory of carbon dioxide and global climate change. However, this paper shows that the theory was developed and became well accepted during the nineteenth century. Carbon dioxide was discovered by Black in 1752. From 1820 to 1890 a steadily growing number of measurements of its atmospheric concentration were made using steadily improving techniques; the average results fell from around 500 ppm in 1820 to about 300 ppm in 1890. By the end of the following decade the greenhouse theory of global climate change seemed widely accepted. However in 1900 and 1901 Aangstroem appeared to demolish the theory when he reported that changes in the carbon dioxide level can have little effect because of the overlap of the water and carbon dioxide spectral bands. At a stroke, all interest in the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels seemed to disappear, although during the 1920s and 1930s a few workers resumed the work but for reasons unconnected to climate change. Over the next thirty years the writers of authoritative textbooks dismissed the theory of carbon dioxide and climate change as an example of misguided speculation. Then in 1938 Callendar`s first paper appeared, reviving the theory which had lain forgotten for nearly forty years.

  14. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

  15. Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) system. Final report, October 1995--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This report describes the results of Phase 2 efforts to develop a Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) System for the detection of semivolatile organic contaminants on concrete, transite, and metal surfaces. The characterization of equipment and building surfaces for the presence of contaminants as part of building decontamination and decommissioning activities is an immensely large task of concern to both government and industry. Because of the high cost of hazardous waste disposal, old, contaminated buildings cannot simply be demolished and scrapped. Contaminated and clean materials must be clearly identified and segregated so that the clean material can be recycled or reused, if possible, or disposed of more cheaply as nonhazardous waste. DOE has a number of sites requiring surface characterization. These sites are large, contain very heterogeneous patterns of contamination (requiring high sampling density), and will thus necessitate an enormous number of samples to be taken and analyzed. Characterization of building and equipment surfaces will be needed during initial investigations, during cleanup operations, and during the final confirmation process, increasing the total number of samples well beyond that needed for initial characterization. This multiplicity of information places a premium on the ability to handle and track data as efficiently as possible.

  16. Decommissioning and Dismantling of Liquid Waste Storage and Liquid Waste Treatment Facility from Paldiski Nuclear Site, Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvas, M. [AS ALARA, Leetse tee 21, Paldiski, 76806 (Estonia); Putnik, H. [Delegation of the European Commission to Russia, Kadashevskaja nab. 14/1 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nirvin, B.; Pettersson, S. [SKB, Box 5864, Stockholm, SE-102 40 (Sweden); Johnsson, B. [Studsvik RadWaste, Nykoping, SE-611 82 (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    The Paldiski Nuclear Facility in Estonia, with two nuclear reactors was owned by the Soviet Navy and was used for training the navy personnel to operate submarine nuclear reactors. After collapse of Soviet Union the Facility was shut down and handed over to the Estonian government in 1995. In co-operation with the Paldiski International Expert Reference Group (PIERG) decommission strategy was worked out and started to implement. Conditioning of solid and liquid operational waste and dismantling of contaminated installations and buildings were among the key issues of the Strategy. Most of the liquid waste volume, remained at the Facility, was processed in the frames of an Estonian-Finnish co-operation project using a mobile wastewater purification unit NURES (IVO International OY) and water was discharged prior to the site take-over. In 1999-2002 ca 120 m{sup 3} of semi-liquid tank sediments (a mixture of ion exchange resins, sand filters, evaporator and flocculation slurry), remained after treatment of liquid waste were solidified in steel containers and stored into interim storage. The project was carried out under the Swedish - Estonian co-operation program on radiation protection and nuclear safety. Contaminated installations in buildings, used for treatment and storage of liquid waste (Liquid Waste Treatment Facility and Liquid Waste Storage) were then dismantled and the buildings demolished in 2001-2004. (authors)

  17. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  18. A new quantitative method for the rapid evaluation of buildings against earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Amir [Civil Engineering Dept., Islamic Azad University, Nagafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazaheri, Mohammad Mehdi [Faculty member, Tehran University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-08

    At the present time there exist numerous weak buildings which are not able to withstand earthquakes. At the same time, both private and public developers are trying to use scientific methods to prioritize and allocate budget in order to reinforce the above mentioned structures. This is because of the limited financial resources and time. In the recent years the procedure of seismic assessment before rehabilitation of vulnerable buildings has been implemented in many countries. Now, it seems logical to reinforce the existing procedures with the mass of available data about the effects caused by earthquakes on buildings. The main idea is driven from FMEA (Failure Mode and Effect Analysis) in quality management where the main procedure is to recognize the failure, the causes, and the priority of each cause and failure. Specifying the causes and effects which lead to a certain shortcoming in structural behavior during earthquakes, an inventory is developed and each building is rated through a yes-or-no procedure. In this way, the rating of the structure is based on some standard forms which along with relative weights are developed in this study. The resulted criteria by rapid assessment will indicate whether the structure is to be demolished, has a high, medium or low vulnerability or is invulnerable.

  19. Magnetic transitions driven by temperature in surface oxidized Co{sub 0.10}Ni{sub 0.90}/Cu(001) ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Ying-Ta; Shen, Wen-He; Lee, Kuo-Long; Pan, Wei, E-mail: weipane@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Min-Hsiung, Chia-Yi 621, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Min-Hsiung, Chia-Yi 621, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    The magnetization of Co{sub 0.10}Ni{sub 0.90}/Cu(001) films before and after surface oxidization at 300 K is presented. Before the oxidization, the magnetization of the films in the thickness of 11 to 20 monolayers (ML) is in the in-plane direction at the temperature ranging from 140 K to 300 K. After the oxidization, the magnetizations of the films are in the in-plane direction at the temperature above 200 K, but transit to magnetization demolishment, in-plane-and-out-of-plane co-existence, spin reorientation transition, and coercivity enhancement, for films of 11, 12, 13, and above 15 ML, respectively. The blocking temperature of this film is also 200 K, which implies the transitions might be driven by the ordering of the antiferromagnetic surface oxides. The various magnetizations provide a model system for manipulating the magnetization direction, as well as a spin valve device by combination of the oxidized films.

  20. Use of Source Term and Air Dispersion Modeling in Planning Demolition of Highly Alpha-Contaminated Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bloom, Richard W.

    2011-06-22

    The current cleanup of structures related to cold-war production of nuclear materials includes the need to demolish a number of highly alpha-contaminated structures. The process of planning for the demolition of such structures includes unique challenges related to ensuring the protection of both workers and the public. Pre-demolition modeling analyses were conducted to evaluate potential exposures resulting from the proposed demolition of a number of these structures. Estimated emission rates of transuranic materials during demolition are used as input to an air-dispersion model. The climatological frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures at locations of interest are estimated based on years of hourly meteorological records. The modeling results indicate that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. The pre-demolition modeling directed the need for better contamination characterization and/or different demolition methods—and in the end, provided a basis for proceeding with the planned demolition activities. Post-demolition modeling was also conducted for several contaminated structures, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. Comparisons of modeled and monitoring results are shown. Recent monitoring data from the demolition of a UO3 plant shows increments in concentrations that were previously identified in the pre-demolition modeling predictions; these comparisons confirm the validity and value of the pre-demolition source-term and air dispersion computations for planning demolition activities for other buildings with high levels of radioactive contamination.

  1. Coherent versus measurement feedback: Linear systems theory for quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Yamamoto

    2014-10-10

    To control a quantum system via feedback, we generally have two options in choosing control scheme. One is the coherent feedback, which feeds the output field of the system, through a fully quantum device, back to manipulate the system without involving any measurement process. The other one is the measurement-based feedback, which measures the output field and performs a real-time manipulation on the system based on the measurement results. Both schemes have advantages/disadvantages, depending on the system and the control goal, hence their comparison in several situation is important. This paper considers a general open linear quantum system with the following specific control goals; back-action evasion (BAE), generation of a quantum non-demolished (QND) variable, and generation of a decoherence-free subsystem (DFS), all of which have important roles in quantum information science. Then some no-go theorems are proven, clarifying that those goals cannot be achieved by any measurement-based feedback control. On the other hand it is shown that, for each control goal, there exists a coherent feedback controller accomplishing the task. The key idea to obtain all the results is system theoretic characterizations of BAE, QND, and DFS in terms of controllability and observability properties or transfer functions of linear systems, which are consistent with their standard definitions.

  2. K-25 D and D Challenges - 12170

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidam, Greg [Bechtel National, Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the K-25 former gaseous diffusion plant provides lessons learned applicable to other D and D projects in the DOE Complex. The 175,000- square-meter, 1.6-kilometer-long building is contaminated with highly enriched uranium (HEU), Tc-99, trace quantities of other fission products, asbestos, PCBs, and other hazardous wastes. Safety challenges include deteriorated electrical systems, significant structural degradation, and criticality and exposure risks. The project completely revised the D and D approach after a worker fell through an operating floor and was seriously injured. For protection from deteriorated building conditions, the project reduced the number of workers in the facility, limited their hours in the building, and installed nets and barriers to protect them from falls through weakened floors and from falling material. The new plan involved removing high-risk components, removing motors and compressors, and demolishing the building from the outside with heavy equipment with most of the piping and components inside the building during demolition. The team provided temporary electrical power; reconfigured the criticality alarm system; upgraded security; performed sampling and analysis to locate and characterize HEU deposits and Tc-99; and, to establish 'criticality incredible' conditions, conducted a nondestructive assay program and injected foam into equipment and piping as a contamination fixative. (authors)

  3. ACCELERATED PILOT PROJECT FOR U CANYON DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KEHLER KL

    2011-01-13

    At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is underway on a first-of-a-kind project with the decommissioning and demolition of the U Canyon. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision for the final remediation of the canyon, CH2M HILL is combining old and new technology and techniques to prepare U Canyon for demolition. The selected remedial action called first for consolidating and grouting equipment currently in the canyon into lower levels of the plant (openings called cells), after which the cell galleries, hot pipe trench, ventilation tunnel, drains and other voids below the operating deck and crane-way deck levels will be filled with approximately 20,000 cubic yards of grout and the canyon roof and walls demolished down to the approximate level of the canyon deck. The remaining canyon structure will then be buried beneath an engineered barrier designed to control potential contaminant migration for a 500-year life. Methods and lessons learned from this project will set the stage for the future demolition of Hanford's four other canyon-type processing facilities.

  4. Environmental Solutions FY05: PNNL Contributions to Bechtel Hanford, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2005-12-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided support to Bechtel Hanford, Inc., for their work to safely demolish nuclear facilities and clean up waste sites near the Columbia River. During FY05, PNNL screened a variety of technologies to solve difficult problems. The danger of lung-scarring beryllium becoming airborne during the demolition of a nuclear fuel rod fabrication plant was addressed. For Bechtel Hanford, PNNL researchers extensively screened technologies and supported field testing of selected options. Assisted by the Laboratory's information, Bechtel Hanford staff razed the 76,000-square-feet facility near the Columbia River with no release of airborne beryllium. Removing large tanks and other equipment containing highly radioactive material from the 107-N facility continued to present challenges. The facility housed the filtration equipment for N Reactor's fuel storage basin. In FY05, PNNL identified and reviewed retrieval technologies. This work built on the evaluation criteria PNNL staff developed in FY04. In support of Bechtel Hanford's work to remediate and close the 618-7 burial ground, PNNL researchers evaluated remote technologies to characterize the waste drums as they are retrieved. One objective is to identify any drums containing Zircaloy, a zirconium alloy that can catch on fire when exposed to certain conditions. To assist in safely retrieving, treating, and disposing of spent nuclear fuel decladding waste in the 116-C-3 tank, PNNL identified and reviewed waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment technologies. This information was used by Bechtel Hanford staff as part of their engineering study of the situation.

  5. Release and disposal of materials during decommissioning of Siemens MOX fuel fabrication plant at Hanau, Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, Werner; Baumann, Roland

    2007-07-01

    In September 2006, decommissioning and dismantling of the Siemens MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Hanau were completed. The process equipment and the fabrication buildings were completely decommissioned and dismantled. The other buildings were emptied in whole or in part, although they were not demolished. Overall, the decommissioning process produced approximately 8500 Mg of radioactive waste (including inactive matrix material); clearance measurements were also performed for approximately 5400 Mg of material covering a wide range of types. All the equipment in which nuclear fuels had been handled was disposed of as radioactive waste. The radioactive waste was conditioned on the basis of the requirements specified for the projected German final disposal site 'Schachtanlage Konrad'. During the pre-conditioning, familiar processes such as incineration, compacting and melting were used. It has been shown that on account of consistently applied activity containment (barrier concept) during operation and dismantling, there has been no significant unexpected contamination of the plant. Therefore almost all the materials that were not a priori destined for radioactive waste were released without restriction on the basis of the applicable legal regulations (chap. 29 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance), along with the buildings and the plant site. (authors)

  6. Environmental geophysics of the Pilot Plant on the west branch of Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.; Benson, M.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-05-01

    Plans to demolish and remediate the Pilot Plant complex in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground have served to initiate a series of nonintrusive, environmental-geophysical studies. The studies are assisting in the location and identification of pipes, tanks, trenches, and liquid waste in the subsurface. Multiple databases have been integrated to provide support for detection of underground utilities and to determine the stratigraphy and lithology of the subsurface. The studies were conducted within the double security fence and exterior to the double fence, down gradient toward the west branch of Canal Creek. To determine if contaminants found in the creek were associated with the Pilot Plant, both the east and west banks were included in the study area. Magnetic, conductivity, inductive emf, and ground-penetrating-radar anomalies outline buried pipes, trenches, and various pieces of hardware associated with building activities. Ground-penetrating-radar imagery also defines a paleovalley cut 30 ft into Potomac Group sediments of Cretaceous age. The paleovalley crosses the site between Building E5654 and the Pilot Plant fence. The valley is environmentally significant because it may control the pathways of contaminants. The Pilot Plant complex was used to manufacture CC2 Impregnite and incapacitating agents; it also served as a production facility for nerve agents.

  7. Contamination source review for Building E1489, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billmark, K.A.; Hayes, D.C.; Draugelis, A.K.

    1995-09-01

    This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to document the results of a contamination source review of Building E1489 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) in Maryland. This report may be used to assist the U.S. Army-in planning for the future use or disposition of this building. The review included a historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, and geophysical investigation. The field investigations were performed in 1994-1995. Building E1489 located in J-Field on the Gunpowder Peninsula in APG`s Edgewood Area housed a power generator that supplied electricity to a nearby observation tower. Building E1489 and the generator were abandoned in 1974, demolished by APG personnel and removed from real estate records. A physical inspection and photographic documentation of Building E1489 were completed by ANL staff during November 1994. In 1994, ANL staff conducted geophysical surveys in the immediate vicinity of Building E1489 by using several nonintrusive methods. Survey results suggest the presence of some underground objects near Building E1489, but they do not provide conclusive evidence of the source of geophysical anomalies observed during the survey. No air monitoring was conducted at the site, and no information on underground storage tanks associated with Building E1489 was available.

  8. DEVELOPING SITE-SPECIFIC DERIVED CONCENTRATION GUIDELINE LEVELS FOR MULTIPLE MEDIA AT THE CONNECTICUT YANKEE HADDAM NECK PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, S.W.; Smith, L.C.; Carr, R.K.; Carson, A.; Darois, E.

    2003-02-27

    As part of the license termination process, site-specific Derived Concentration Guideline Levels for the Haddam Neck Plant site are developed for soil, groundwater, concrete left standing, and concrete demolished that satisfy the radiological criteria for unrestricted use as defined in 10 CFR 20.1402. Background information on the license termination process and characteristics of the Haddam Neck Plant site are presented. The dose models and associated resident farmer and building occupancy scenarios, applicable pathways, and critical groups developed to establish the Derived Concentration Guideline Levels are described. A parameter assignment process is introduced wherein general population values are used to establish behavioral and metabolic parameters representative of an average member of the critical group, while the uncertainty associated with important physical parameters is considered. A key element of the parameter assignment process is the use of sensitivity analysis to identify the dose sensitive physical parameters and to ensure that such parameters are assigned conservative values. Structuring the parameter assignment process, completing the formal sensitivity analyses, and assigning conservative values to the sensitive physical parameters in a consistent way establishes a calculation framework that lead to Derived Concentration Guideline Levels with a uniform level of conservatism across all media and all radionuclides.

  9. Concrete Dust Suppression System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The improved technology is a water-based dust suppression system for controlling concrete dust generated by demolition equipment, in this case a demolition ram. This demonstration was performed to assess the effectiveness of this system to (1) minimize the amount of water used to suppress potentially contaminated dust, (2) focus the water spray on the dust-generating source and (3) minimize the dust cloud generated by the demolition activity. The technology successfully reduced the water required by a factor of eight compared to the traditional (baseline) method, controlled the dust generated, and permitted a reduction in the work force. The water spray can be focused at the ram point, but it is affected by wind. Prior to the use of this dust control system, dust generated by the demolition ram was controlled manually by spraying with fire hoses (the baseline technology). The improved technology is 18% less expensive than the baseline technology for the conditions and parameters of this demonstration, however, the automated system can save up to 80% versus the baseline whenever waste water treatment costs are considered. For demolishing one high-walled room and a long slab with a total of 413 m{sup 3} (14,580 ft{sup 3}) of concrete, the savings are $105,000 (waste water treatment included). The improved technology reduced the need for water consumption and treatment by about 88% which results in most of the savings.

  10. Summary of the Hanford Site decontamination, decommissioning, and cleanup, FY 1974--FY 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlen, R.K.

    1991-08-01

    At the end of World War II, the demand for more production along with process and military surveillance changes at the Hanford Site caused a continuing cycle of building and obsolescence. This trend continued until 1964, when the cutback in plutonium production began. The cutback caused the shutdown of excess production facilities. The last of eight reactors was shut down in 1971. Since that time, N Reactor has been the only production reactor that has operated. In addition, changes in the method of separating plutonium caused a number of excess facilities in the 200 Areas. Before 1973, no structured program existed for the disposal of unusable facilities or for general cleanup. Following a plant-wide safety and housekeeping inspection in 1973, a program was developed for the disposal of all surplus facilities. Since the start of FY 1974, a total of 46 radioactively contaminated sites have been demolished and disposed of. In addition, 28 buildings have been decontaminated for in situ disposal or for reuse, 21 contaminated sites have been stabilized, 131 clean structures have been removed, and 93 clean sites have received special remedial action to eliminate potential safety and/or environmental hazards. This report summarizes these activities. 3 refs, 1 fig., 18 tabs.

  11. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

  12. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-10-01

    A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

  13. Experiences with combined corrosion effects on stainless steel due to chlorides and H{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M.T.; Wortham, G.M.; Lawson, D.M.

    1999-07-01

    Chloride contamination of amines in contact with stainless steel creates a well known potential for stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A far less recognized hazard of chloride contamination, when sulfides are present, is drastically accelerated generalized corrosion. Chloride induced corrosion can be avoided with an inlet gas reverse flow coalescer and an inlet slug catcher to knock out brine bearing produced water. If the amine is already contaminated with chlorides, steps can be taken to minimize this type of corrosion such as better amine filtration, amine reclamation and using stainless steel with higher nickel contents.

  14. The Lyrical "I" in Heine's Heimkehr and Lazarus Poems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rielley Lyon, Emily

    2012-12-31

    to understand them properly.” 5 One such work, says Sammons, is Heine’s Buch der Lieder. Published in 1827, the book consists of five parts. Bernd Kortländer notes that Heine wrote only seven new poems for the book’s appearance, since each of the five... 5 Jeffrey L. Sammons, Heinrich Heine: The Elusive Poet (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1969), 27. 6 Bernd Kortländer, Heinrich Heine (Stuttgart: Reclam, 2003), 92. 5 publisher fame during his lifetime and remains one of the most famous works...

  15. EIS-0479: North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage Project, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage (NODOS) Investigation is a Feasibility Study being performed by the California Department of Water Resources and the Bureau of Reclamation, pursuant to the CALFED Bay-Delta Program Programmatic EIS/EIR Record of Decision. The NODOS Investigation is evaluating potential offstream surface water storage projects in the upper Sacramento River Basin that could improve water supply for agricultural, municipal, and industrial, and environmental uses. If the project is implemented, DOE’s Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency, could provide power to project facilities and could market hydropower generated by the project.

  16. Fourth Interview with Sir Eli Lauterpacht - 20 March 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingle, Lesley; Bates, Daniel

    2008-06-19

    at environmental impact assessment. There Malaysia obtained a measure of success. Not that the land reclamation was stopped, but that it was to be controlled and developed in discussion with Malaysia. So I have had a continuing interest in environmental... tariffs in which eventually the tribunal decided in favour of Canada. It was a complex technical case; I won’t bother you with the details. 84. 1997. US/Mexico (Metalclad) case. Then there was another case, also under the same agreement [LD...

  17. Remediation and management of degraded lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, M.H.; Wong, J.W.C.; Baker, A.J.M. [eds.

    1999-11-01

    This book presents the program of the first International Conference on the Remediation and Management of Degraded lands. The book has three sections: mine management and rehabilitation, the management of derelict lands, and soil contamination and reclamation. The 34 chapters present a proactive, solution based approach to the rehabilitation of natural resources. Topics of discussions include the following: the multidisciplinary approach practiced by the Australian Center for Minesite Rehabilitation Research; the relationship between biofuel harvesting and Hong Kong`s continuing upland degradation; and experiments with the effectiveness of EDTA/HCI to remove contaminants from soil.

  18. Integrated automation of the New Waddell Dam performance data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, L.R.; Fields, P.E.

    1999-07-01

    New Waddell Dam, a key feature of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Central Arizona Project, had elements of its dam safety data acquisition system incorporated into the design and construction. The instrumentation array is a reflection of the dam's large size and foundation complexity. Much of the instrumentation is automated. This automation was accomplished while maintaining independent communication connections to major divisions of the instrument array. Fiber optic cables are used to provide high Quality data, free from voltage surges that could originate in a nearby powerplant switchyard or from lightning. The system has been working well but there are concerns with a lack of continued equipment manufacturer support.

  19. QER- Comment of Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As SMUD is the largest preference power customer of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) we purchase a substantial amount of electric energy from Western and we are very concerned about the rising costs. Specifically, we have concerns and question regarding the restoration programs on the Central Valley Project that are administered by the United States Bureau of Reclamation. SMUD would like to respectfully request that a review be conducted to address the current sharing of Restoration Fund Charges between Power and Water Customers of the Central Valley Project.

  20. Kansas Journal of Sociology, Volume 8, Number 1 (SPRING, 1972): Book Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southard, Frank

    1972-04-01

    issues and therefore lacks integration. Combined with· a good text, The Sounds of Social Change could be used in an upper level course on the sociology of music and the arts. Frank Southard University of Kansas. Street Arabs and Gutter Snipes...: The Pathetic and Humorous Side of Young Vagabond Life in Great Cities, with Records of Work for their Reclamation. By George C. Needham. Boston: D. L. Guersey, 1884. . George C. Needham's Street Arabs and Gutter Snipes 1 is two things: it is, f1rst, a...

  1. Kansas Journal of Sociology, Volume 8, Number 1 (SPRING, 1972): Book Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordasco, Francesco

    1972-04-01

    of Social Change could be used in an upper level course on the sociology of music and the arts. Frank Southard University of Kansas. Street Arabs and Gutter Snipes: The Pathetic and Humorous Side of Young Vagabond Life in Great Cities, with Records of Work... for their Reclamation. By George C. Needham. Boston: D. L. Guersey, 1884. . George C. Needham's Street Arabs and Gutter Snipes 1 is two things: it is, f1rst, a kaleidoscopic portrait of slum life in the American cities of the late :9t~century with particular attention...

  2. Firefighting and fire prevention: Facilities instructions, standards and techniques. Volume 5-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, H.E.

    1992-02-01

    The operation and maintenance personnel around a powerplant, pumping plant, or other Reclamation establishment are not presumed to be firefighters, but occasionally their duties may make it necessary for them to fight fires. The purpose of this volume is to supply them with fundamental facts which may prove valuable in such an emergency and acquaint them with the use, care, and testing of firefighting equipment. It is assumed that operation and maintenance personnel are familiar with the common safety practices in connection with fire prevention and general safety around electrical equipment. This volume is designed to help improve the work along these lines.

  3. The Goal of Net Zero 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquillo, M.

    2014-01-01

    ? Disposal by Land Application… ESL-KT-14-11-47 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Bio-solids “Wastewater” Village Creek Water Reclamation Facility Homes & Businesses Reuse Water Trinity River Bio-gas 5 Village... Management & Bonds) $37,344,393 $2,526,875 $2,806,175 13 Village Creek WWTP/WRF Energy Savings Performance Contract ESL-KT-14-11-47 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Gas-Turbine Exhaust Duct Burner Burning digester...

  4. EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS/Environmental Impact Report was prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region) and the Contra Costa Water District to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enlarge the existing Los Vaqueros Reservoir in Contra Costa County, California. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Western) was a cooperating agency because it has jurisdiction over transmission facilities that were expected to be relocated under the proposed action. Based on project changes, however, Western has no action and therefore will not adopt the EIS or issue a ROD.

  5. Extracellular bioreduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chidambaram, Devicharan (Middle Island, NY); Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY)

    2012-04-17

    A method for processing environmental or industrial samples to remove, reclaim or otherwise reduce the level of chemical species present in the sample that act as redox active species. The redox active species is kept in a waste chamber and is separated from an aqueous bacterial culture that is held in a culture chamber. The waste chamber and the culture chamber are separated by a porous membrane through which electron transfer can occur but through which the aqueous bacterial culture cannot pass. The redox active species substantially remains in the waste chamber and is in non-contact with the aqueous bacterial culture during the process of removal, reduction or reclamation.

  6. Windpowered irrigation system for small farm applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, B.

    1982-01-01

    The overall purpose of the project was to conserve water on a small-scale truck patch vegetable gardening operation. The main thrust centered on improving water usage in the already-existing windmill/storage tank/house/farm pond setup. Most of the funds were spent on a trickle (drip) irrigation system linked into the existing wetup. Other areas improved were the farm pond itself, backup pumping for windmill and farm pond, and greywater reclamation. In spite of problems which had to be restudied and corrected, the project was an overall success both in terms of results and budget.

  7. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY09 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2009-10-22

    This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2009 (FY09) for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps or USACE], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS).

  8. Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate and High Temperature Waste

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumption (Million Cubic Feet)ContinuousReclamation -

  9. Organic Photovoltaic Cells with an Electric Field Integrally-Formed at the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumption (Million Cubic Feet)ContinuousReclamation

  10. Old-field plant succession on the Pajarito Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxx, T.; Mullen, M.; Salisbury, M.; Tierney, G.

    1997-10-01

    Eight fallow historic fields of the ponderosa pine and pinon-juniper cover types were surveyed to determine species composition and distribution. The purpose of the study was to understand plant succession on old fields as related to mechanically manipulated sites such as material disposal areas (MDAs). Additionally, the authors wanted a listing of species on disturbed lands of the Pajarito Plateau to aide in the reclamation planning of MDAs using native species. They also wanted to determine if any species could be used as an indicator of disturbance. The eight historic fields were all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, and had been abandoned in 1943. Two sites were within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory and were studied both in 1982 and 1993. The study provides a description of each of the field sites, historic information about the homesteads from patent applications, a photographic record of some of the sites, and a listing of species found within each field. The study showed that there were 78 different plant species found on disturbed sites. Of these 78 species, 23 were found to be dominant on one or more of the MDAs or old fields. Although, the disturbance history of each site is imperfectly known, the study does provide an indication of successional processes within disturbed sites of the Pajarito Plateau. Additionally, it provides a listing of species that will invade disturbed sites, species that may be used in site reclamation.

  11. Waterfowl habitats on reclaimed surface mined lands in southwestern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, W.G.; Klimstra, W.D.; Nawrot, J.R.

    1984-12-01

    Loss of quality wetland habitat is probably the most important factor affecting populations of waterfowl in the United States. To counteract this problem programs for protecting critical habitats have been established and research for innovative methods to create wetlands are being pursued. Recently, attention has been given to evaluation of wetland habitats on lands surface-mined and to methods of reclamation to enhance their development as part of future planning. These data indicate quality wetland habitats can be a legitimate aspect of reclaimed surface-mined lands; and selective overburden handling, grading so as to maximize biologically productive zones and selective plantings contribute importantly to their value. Currently bond release criteria by the Illinois regulatory authority for wildlife habitat and developed water resources discourages reclamation that would maximize quality wetland habitats. Suggested changes in these criteria include alternative vegetation requirements for wetland habitats, more leniency on seasonally inundated shallow water areas, and variation from topsoil requirements when adequate unconsolidated substitute material is available. It is believed that such allowances would result in incentives for the industry to develop wetland habitats so vital to continued enjoyment of waterfowl resources.

  12. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  13. Agricultural, industrial and municipal waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    It is right that consideration of the environment is of prime importance when agricultural and industrial processes are being developed. This book compiles the papers presented at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers conference. The contents include: The use of wastes for land reclamation and restoration; landfill, an environmentally acceptable method of waste disposal and an economic source of energy; control of leachate from waste disposal landfill sites using bentonite; landfill gas migration from operational landfill sites, monitoring and prevention; monitoring of emissions from hazardous waste incineration; hazardous wastes management in Hong Kong, a summary of a report and recommendations; the techniques and problems of chemical analysis of waste waters and leachate from waste tips; a small scale waste burning combustor; energy recovery from municipal waste by incineration; anaerobic treatment of industrial waste; a review of developments in the acid hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes; reduction of slag deposits by magnesium hydroxide injection; integrated rural energy centres (for agriculture-based economies); resource recovery; straw as a fuel in the UK; the computer as a tool for predicting the financial implications of future municipal waste disposal and recycling projects; solid wastes as a cement kiln fuel; monitoring and control of landfill gas; the utilization of waste derived fuels; the economics of energy recovery from municipal and industrial wastes; the development and construction of a municipal waste reclamation plant by a local authority.

  14. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  15. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

    2000-01-12

    Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

  16. Removal of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor - 13031

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzog, C. Brad [CH2M HILL, Inc. (United States)] [CH2M HILL, Inc. (United States); Guercia, Rudolph [US-DOE (United States)] [US-DOE (United States); LaCome, Matt [Meier Engineering Inc (United States)] [Meier Engineering Inc (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The 309 Facility housed the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), an operating test reactor in the 300 Area at Hanford, Washington. The reactor first went critical in 1960 and was originally used for experiments under the Hanford Site Plutonium Fuels Utilization Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned in 1988-1989, and the facility was deactivated in 1994. The 309 facility was added to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response actions as established in an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) and Action Memorandum (AM). The IROD directs a remedial action for the 309 facility, associated waste sites, associated underground piping and contaminated soils resulting from past unplanned releases. The AM directs a removal action through physical demolition of the facility, including removal of the reactor. Both CERCLA actions are implemented in accordance with U.S. EPA approved Remedial Action Work Plan, and the Remedial Design Report / Remedial Action Report associated with the Hanford 300-FF-2 Operable Unit. The selected method for remedy was to conventionally demolish above grade structures including the easily distinguished containment vessel dome, remove the PRTR and a minimum of 300 mm (12 in) of shielding as a single 560 Ton unit, and conventionally demolish the below grade structure. Initial sample core drilling in the Bio-Shield for radiological surveys showed evidence that the Bio-Shield was of sound structure. Core drills for the separation process of the PRTR from the 309 structure began at the deck level and revealed substantial thermal degradation of at least the top 1.2 m (4LF) of Bio-Shield structure. The degraded structure combined with the original materials used in the Bio-Shield would not allow for a stable structure to be extracted. The water used in the core drilling process proved to erode the sand mixture of the Bio-Shield leaving the steel aggregate to act as ball bearings against the core drill bit. A redesign is being completed to extract the 309 PRTR and entire Bio-Shield structure together as one monolith weighing 1100 Ton by cutting structural concrete supports. In addition, the PRTR has hundreds of contaminated process tubes and pipes that have to be severed to allow for a uniformly flush fit with a lower lifting frame. Thirty-two 50 mm (2 in) core drills must be connected with thirty-two wire saw cuts to allow for lifting columns to be inserted. Then eight primary saw cuts must be completed to severe the PRTR from the 309 Facility. Once the weight of the PRTR is transferred to the lifting frame, then the PRTR may be lifted out of the facility. The critical lift will be executed using four 450 Ton strand jacks mounted on a 9 m (30 LF) tall mobile lifting frame that will allow the PRTR to be transported by eight 600 mm (24 in) Slide Shoes. The PRTR will then be placed on a twenty-four line, double wide, self powered Goldhofer for transfer to the onsite CERCLA Disposal Cell (ERDF Facility), approximately 33 km (20 miles) away. (authors)

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-12-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post-closure-posting requirements for the mounded/capped basement structure, as well as for the entire CAU, are addressed in Section 4.2.10. The site contains radiologically impacted surfaces and hazardous materials. Based on review of the historical information for CAU 116 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 116 using the SAFER process. CAUs that may be closed using the SAFER process have conceptual corrective actions that are clearly identified. Consequently, corrective action alternatives can be chosen prior to completing a corrective action investigation, given anticipated investigation results. The SAFER process combines elements of the data quality objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to plan and conduct closure activities. The DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the SAFER process. The purpose of the investigation phase is to verify the adequacy of existing information used to determine the chosen corrective action. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty during the planning and decision-making phases of the project. The SAFER process allows for technical decisions to be made based on information gathered during site visits, interviews, meetings, research, and a consensus of opinion by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) team members. Any uncertainties are addressed by documented assumptions that are verified by sampling and analysis, data evaluation, onsite observations, and contingency plans, as necessary. Closure activities may proceed simultaneously with site characterization as sufficient data are gathered to confirm or disprove the assumptions made during selection of the corrective action. If, at any time during the closure process, new information is discovered that indicates that closure activities should be revised, closure activities will be reevaluated as appropriate. Based on a detailed review of historical documentation, there is sufficient process know

  18. Final Demolition and Disposition of 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - 12267

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolery, Wade [US Department of Energy, Richland WA (United States); Dodd, Edwin III [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland WA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory was constructed in 1960 to provide a heavy shielded reactor room where quantities of plutonium or uranium in solution could be brought to near-critical configurations under carefully controlled and monitored conditions. In the late 1980's, the responsible contractor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), was directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare the facility for unoccupied status. The facility was demolished under a Removal Action Work Plan pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The funding for this project was provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The primary rooms of concern with regards to contamination in 209-E facility, which is over 9,000 square feet, are the criticality assembly room (CAR), the mix room, and the change room. The CAR contained two reactor hoods (HO-140 and HO-170), which each had a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system. The CAR contained 13 tanks ranging from 38 L (10 gal) to 401 L (106 gal). Tanks TK-109 and TK-110 are below grade, and were removed as part of this demolition and disposition remedy. Nonradiological and radiological hazardous substances were removed, decontaminated, or fixed in place, prior to demolition. Except for the removal of below grade tanks TK-109 and TK-110, the facility was demolished to slab-on-grade. PNNL performed stabilization and deactivation activities that included removal of bulk fissile material and chemicals, flushing tanks, stabilizing contamination within gloveboxes and hoods, and packaging and removing waste. The removal of the contaminated plutonium equipment and materials from the 209E facility presented a number of challenges similar in nature to those associated with the inventory reduction and cleanup activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Although there were no bulk fissile materials or chemicals within the facility, there were residual radiological materials (isotopes of plutonium and americium) in the tanks and hoods. The complexity of the remedy was present because of the various configurations of the tanks and hoods, combined with the residual contaminants. Because of the weight and dimensional configuration, size reduction of the slab tanks, as well as removal and disposal of the different material used for moderation and absorption, were two examples of challenges that were resolved to complete the remedy. One of the key methods developed and implemented at the facility was the design and construction of a shroud to allow the cutting of the Pu contaminated tanks. The shroud design, development and implementation at the 209E Project was an example of enhanced work planning and task hazards analysis with worker involvement. This paper will present the lessons learned from the 209E facility inventory reduction activities including the shroud and other methodologies used. The initial Lessons Learned discussion for this project was scheduled for late January 2012. This facility is the first open-air demolition of a highly contaminated plutonium-contaminated facility accomplished by CH2M Hill under the Plateau Remediation Contract. The demolition was completed without spread of contamination to the workers and the surrounding area. As with any project of this complexity, there are significant accomplishments, as well as experience that can be applied to future demolition of plutonium-contaminated facilities on the Hanford Site. These experiences will be documented at a later date. (authors)

  19. INNOVATIVE ALARA TECHNIQUES & WORK PRACTICES USED AT HANFORD FOR D & D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2005-01-05

    The Department of Energy's Hanford Site has several nuclear facilities in the process of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) with many more to follow. These facilities contain hazardous and highly radioactive materials in plant systems, gloveboxes, hot cells, rooms, collection tanks, ventilation ducts, fuel pools and outside these facilities. Some of the radioactive isotopes are fissile material and have to be closely guarded and require special handling. To safely work in this environment, workers had to learn new skills and develop innovative techniques to decontaminate, remove all equipment and demolish these radioactive work facilities without spreading contamination to the environment. Changing the workscope and worker attitudes involves a culture change for workers, managers, Department of Energy (DOE) and support organizations. D&D involves making different types of risk-based decisions than were made when the plants were operated or sitting dormant. Management involvement, use of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), communications and sharing lessons learned are essential ingredients in developing a successful D&D strategy. New technologies have to be learned including the use of robotic devices and manipulative arms due to high dose rates and amount of radioactive contamination. Minimizing the amount of Transuranic and Mixed radioactive waste and learning how to ship the large quantities of waste are additional skills the Hanford workers have had to learn. D&D work at Hanford is in progress and Hanford Contractors have completed some very difficult and intense D&D work. This presentation will provide information on the best As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) protective measures, work practices, and the lessons learned to date.

  20. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  1. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  2. UPDATE HANFORD SITE D & D PROGRAMS ACCELERATE EXPAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-04-22

    A large, new decontamination and decommissioning organization targeted toward rapid, focused work on aging and highly contaminated structures was formed at the DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington state in autumn 2003. Managed by prime contractor Fluor Hanford, the new organization has made significant progress during its first six months. Under the direction of Mike Lackey, who recently joined Fluor from the Portland General Electric Trojan Plant, the Fluor Hanford D&D organization is tackling the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and is nearly finished demolishing the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility. In addition, the D&D organization is progressing through the development and public comment phases of its required environmental permitting, planning work and procurement services to D&D three other Hanford facilities: 224-T and 224-B Plutonium Concentration Facilities, and the U Plant radiochemical processing facility. It is also planning and beginning to D&D the spent fuel handling areas of the Site's 100-K Reactor Area. The 586-square mile Hanford Site, the oldest plutonium production center in the world, served as the ''workhorse'' of the American nuclear defense arsenal from 1944 through 1989. Hanford produced the special nuclear material for the plutonium cores of the Trinity (test) and Nagasaki explosions, and then went on to produce more than half of the weapons plutonium ever manufactured by the United States, and about one-fourth of that manufactured worldwide. As a result, Hanford, the top-secret ''Paul Bunyan'' in the desert, is one of the most contaminated areas in the world. Its cleanup agreement with state and federal regulators, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement,'' celebrates its 15th anniversary this spring, at a time when operations dealing with unstable plutonium leftovers, corroded spent fuel, and liquids wastes in single-shelled tanks conclude. As these crucial jobs are coming to an end, D&D has gained traction as a central Site mission.

  3. History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980`s. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history.

  4. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The presence of contaminated uranium mill tailings adjacent to the city of Gunnison has been a local concern for many years. The following issues were identified during public meetings that were held by the DOE prior to distribution of an earlier version of this EA. Many of these issues will require mitigation. Groundwater contamination; in December 1989, a herd of 105 antelope were introduced in an area that includes the Landfill disposal site. There is concern that remedial action-related traffic in the area would result in antelope mortality. The proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road may restrict antelope access to their water supply; a second wildlife issue concerns the potential reduction in sage grouse use of breeding grounds (leks) and nesting habitat; the proposed Tenderfoot Mountain haul road would cross areas designated as wetlands by US Army Corps of Engineers (COE); the proposed disposal site is currently used for grazing by cattle six weeks a year in the spring. Additional concerns were stated in comments on a previous version of this EA. The proposed action is to consolidate and remove all contaminated materials associated with the Gunnison processing site to the Landfill disposal site six air miles east of Gunnison. All structures on the site (e.g., water tower, office buildings) were demolished in 1991. The debris is being stored on the site until it can be incorporated into the disposal cell at the disposal site. All contaminated materials would be trucked to the Landfill disposal site on a to-be-constructed haul road that crosses BLM-administered land.

  5. Revised financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center

    2011-01-11

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western whileothers resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $23 million.

  6. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-04-21

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a ''without experiments'' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were $11.9 million.

  7. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

  8. Coal recovery from mine wastes of the historic longwall mining district of north-central illinois. Illinois mineral notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.; Camp, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Recovery of coal from mine wastes produced by historic longwall mines in northeastern Illinois was studied as part of a project undertaken in 1982 for the Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council. About 100 of these mines operated in the Wilmington and La Salle Districts of the Illinois Coal Field between about 1870 and 1940; all worked the Colchester (No. 2) Coal Seam, using a manual high-extraction mining method. Large samples of the three major kinds of mine waste - gray mining gob, preparation gob, and preparation slurry - were collected from deposits at nine of the larger mine sites and analyzed to determine their general ranges of sulfur, ash, and heating values. Preparation gob and slurry from six of the sites had significant combustible contents, and were evaluated by a simple procedure in which ash analyses and wet-screening tests were used to determine the washability and yield of combustibles to recovery processes.

  9. Treatment method for emulsified petroleum wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sealock, Jr., L. John (West Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    An improved reclamation process for treating petroleum oil and water emulsions derived from producing or processing crude oil is disclosed. The process comprises heating the emulsion to a predetermined temperature at or above about 300.degree. C. and pressurizing the emulsion to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature. The emulsion is broken by containing the heated and pressurized fluid within a vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first, second and third phases. The three phases are then separately withdrawn from the vessel, preferably without any appreciable reduction in temperature and pressure, and at least above a withdraw temperature of about 300.degree. and above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature.

  10. Characterization of seven United States coal regions. The development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimer, R.L.; Adams, M.A.; Jurich, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    This report characterizes seven United State coal regions in the Northern Great Plains, Rocky Mountain, Interior, and Gulf Coast coal provinces. Descriptions include those of the Fort Union, Powder River, Green River, Four Corners, Lower Missouri, Illinois Basin, and Texas Gulf coal resource regions. The resource characterizations describe geologic, geographic, hydrologic, environmental and climatological conditions of each region, coal ranks and qualities, extent of reserves, reclamation requirements, and current mining activities. The report was compiled as a basis for the development of hypothetical coal mining situations for comparison of conventional and terrace pit surface mining methods, under contract to the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023, entitled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  11. Management of sewage sludge and ash containing radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmaier, J. T.; Aiello, K.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J.-J.; Chiu, W. A.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhart, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A. B.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Yu, C.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Environmental Science Division; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. EPA; N.J. Dept of Environmental Protection; NRC

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 50% of the seven to eight million metric tonnes of municipal sewage sludge produced annually in the US is reused. Beneficial uses of sewage sludge include agricultural land application, land reclamation, forestry, and various commercial applications. Excessive levels of contaminants, however, can limit the potential usefulness of land-applied sewage sludge. A recently completed study by a federal inter-agency committee has identified radioactive contaminants that could interfere with the safe reuse of sewage sludge. The study found that typical levels of radioactive materials in most municipal sewage sludge and incinerator ash do not present a health hazard to sewage treatment plant workers or to the general public. The inter-agency committee has developed recommendations for operators of sewage treatment plants for evaluating measured or estimated levels of radioactive material in sewage sludge and for determining whether actions to reduce potential exposures are appropriate.

  12. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Wei, Yaxing; Kao, Shih-Chieh

    2012-04-01

    fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

  13. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site a Naturita, Colorado, conducted in May 1976, are presented. The spread of tailings was detected in the area surrounding the site by means of direct above ground gamma measurements and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples. Radiochemical analyses of water samples in the vicinity of the tailings pile indicate local surface water contamination immediately downstream from the pile, although the /sup 226/Ra concentration in the water at that point as well below the concentration guide for drinking water. The calculated subsoil distribution of /sup 226/Ra in onsite holes is presented graphically. The tailings at this site were removed and reprocessed at another location. This operation was completed and reclamation of the site was conducted in 1978. Consequently the information in this report documents radiological conditions that no longer exist.

  14. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graziano, D. J.; Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2015-09-01

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year (WY) 2014. It is the sixth report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011), a report released June 2012 examined water year 2011 (Poch et al. 2012), a report released April 2013 examined water year 2012 (Poch et al. 2013), and a report released June 2014 examined water year 2013 (Graziano et al. 2014).

  15. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-09-01

    This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

  16. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

    2009-05-29

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

  17. Office of Environmental Management uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund financial statements. September 30, 1994 and 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marwick, P.

    1994-12-15

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation as of July 1, 1993. However, the Act requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio (diffusion facilities). The Act established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; Pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and Reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

  18. Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

    1985-02-01

    A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

  19. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

  20. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

    1998-12-08

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

  1. United States Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decomissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D and D Fund, or Fund) to pay the costs for decontamination and decommissioning three gaseous diffusion facilities located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio (diffusion facilities). The Act also authorized the Fund to pay remedial action costs associated with the Government`s operation of the facilities and to reimburse uranium and thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government. The report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the D and D Fund financial statements as of September 30, 1996. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1996 statement of financial position and the related statements of operations and changes in net position and cash flows.

  2. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  3. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on air quality and noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, K.C.; Chang, Y.S.; Rabchuk, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Western Area Power Administration, which is responsible for marketing electricity produced at the hydroelectric power-generating facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation on the Upper Colorado River, has proposed changes in the levels of its commitment (sales) of long-term firm capacity and energy to its customers. This report describes (1) the existing conditions of air resources (climate and meteorology, ambient air quality, and acoustic environment) of the region potentially affected by the proposed action and (2) the methodology used and the results of analyses conducted to assess the potential impacts on air resources of the proposed action and the commitment-level alternatives. Analyses were performed for the potential impacts of both commitment-level alternatives and supply options, which include combinations of electric power purchases and different operational scenarios of the hydroelectric power-generating facilities.

  4. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  5. A decision analysis method for selection of waste minimization process options for TRU mixed material at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.E.; Dustin, D.F.

    1994-02-01

    When plutonium production operations were halted at the Rocky Flats Plant, there remained a volume of material that was retained in order that its plutonium content could be reclaimed. This material, known as residue, is transuranic and mixed transuranic material with a plutonium content above what was called the ``economic discard limit,`` or EDL. The EDL was defined in terms of each type of residue material, and each type of material is given an Item Description Code, or IDC. Residue IDCs have been grouped into general category descriptions which include plutonium (Pu) nitrate solutions, Pu chloride solutions, salts, ash, metal, filters, combustibles, graphite, crucibles, glass, resins, gloves, firebrick, and sludges. Similar material exists both below and above the EDL, with material with the (previous) economic potential for reclamation of plutonium classified as residue.

  6. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  7. Cheap Textile Dam Protection of Seaport Cities against Hurricane Storm Surge Waves, Tsunamis, and Other Weather-Related Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-04

    Author offers to complete research on a new method and cheap applicatory design for land and sea textile dams. The offered method for the protection of the USA's major seaport cities against hurricane storm surge waves, tsunamis, and other weather-related inundations is the cheapest (to build and maintain of all extant anti-flood barriers) and it, therefore, has excellent prospective applications for defending coastal cities from natural weather-caused disasters. It may also be a very cheap method for producing a big amount of cyclical renewable hydropower, land reclamation from the ocean, lakes, riverbanks, as well as land transportation connection of islands, and islands to mainland, instead of very costly over-water bridges and underwater tunnels.

  8. Survey of nine surface mines in North America. [Nine different mines in USA and Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, L.G.; Brackett, R.D.; Floyd, F.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the information gathered by three mining engineers in a 1980 survey of nine surface mines in the United States and Canada. The mines visited included seven coal mines, one copper mine, and one tar sands mine selected as representative of present state of the art in open pit, strip, and terrace pit mining. The purpose of the survey was to investigate mining methods, equipment requirements, operating costs, reclamation procedures and costs, and other aspects of current surface mining practices in order to acquire basic data for a study comparing conventional and terrace pit mining methods, particularly in deeper overburdens. The survey was conducted as part of a project under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023 titled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  9. Health assessment for Seymour Recycling Corporation, Seymour, Indiana, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IND040313017. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-02

    The Seymour Recycling Corporation site (number 57 on the National Priorities List) is located approximately two miles southwest of Seymour, Indiana. From the very early 1970s to 1980, the site was operated as a processing center for waste chemicals. Distillation was the major method of product reclamation with as many as 11 columns operating simultaneously. Overall environmental monitoring has identified more than 70 contaminants on-site within soil and aquifer samples. The shallow and deep aquifers exhibit both on-site and off-site contamination. The existence of the surface clay cap and fencing to restrict access has removed direct contact as an exposure route for remaining on-site contaminants. The existence of the surface cap should also be preventing contaminant-laden dust from moving off-site.

  10. US Army Corps of Engineers Section 404: permitting of valley fills - red flag or red tape?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas R. Johnston, Jr. [Skelly & Loy (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Since 2001 the US Army Corps of Engineers has been permitting most surface coal mines as Individual Permits rather than Nationwide Permits under the Section 404 program. This was shown in a survey by Skelly & Loy of permits published by Huntingdon Crops District and the state of Kentucky. Nationwide Permit 21 (NWP21) authorises the filling of waters of the United States associated with surface coal mining and reclamation operations already authorised or currently being processed as part of the integrated permit processing procedure. NWP21 has received much opposition and two noticeable court cases involving it, in West Virginia and Kentucy, are briefly reported. The article first appeared in Skelly & Loy's newsletter, Portal to the mining industry, Vol II, Issue 1. 4 photos.

  11. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY10 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-10-26

    The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. The EOS is one of multiple work groups in the federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the FCRPS. The EOS is tasked by NOAA Fisheries and the Action Agencies to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the plume.

  12. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.

    2013-10-30

    This project covers facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) for federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG) for estuary habitat restoration. The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The EOS is tasked by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Action Agencies (AAs) to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the river’s plume in the ocean. Initiated in 2002, the EOS is composed of members from BPA, the Corps, NMFS, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) Marine Sciences Laboratory, and other agencies as necessary.

  13. Development of an Electrochemical Separator and Compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trent Molter

    2011-04-28

    Global conversion to sustainable energy is likely to result in a hydrogen-based economy that supports U.S. energy security objectives while simultaneously avoiding harmful carbon emissions. A key hurdle to successful implementation of a hydrogen economy is the low-cost generation, storage, and distribution of hydrogen. One of the most difficult requirements of this transformation is achieving economical, high density hydrogen storage in passenger vehicles. Transportation applications may require compression and storage of high purity hydrogen up to 12,000 psi. Hydrogen production choices range from centralized low-pressure generation of relatively impure gas in large quantities from steam-methane reformer plants to distributed generation of hydrogen under moderate pressure using water electrolysis. The Electrochemical Hydrogen Separator + Compressor (EHS+C) technology separates hydrogen from impurities and then compresses it to high pressure without any moving parts. The Phase I effort resulted in the construction and demonstration of a laboratory-scale hardware that can separate and compress hydrogen from reformate streams. The completion of Phase I has demonstrated at the laboratory scale the efficient separation and compression of hydrogen in a cost effective manner. This was achieved by optimizing the design of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) cell hardware and verified by parametric testing in single cell hardware. A broad range of commercial applications exist for reclamation of hydrogen. One use this technology would be in combination with commercial fuel cells resulting in a source of clean power, heat, and compressed hydrogen. Other applications include the reclamation of hydrogen from power plants and other industrial equipment where it is used for cooling, recovery of process hydrogen from heat treating processes, and semiconductor fabrication lines. Hydrogen can also be recovered from reformate streams and cryogenic boil-offs using this technology.

  14. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  15. Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, K.L.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

  16. Annotated bibliography for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) with emphasis on the Grand Canyon population.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulet, C. T.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-10-05

    Glen Canyon Dam is a hydroelectric facility located on the Colorado River in Arizona that is operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) for multiple purposes including water storage, flood control, power generation, recreation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife. Glen Canyon Dam operations have been managed for the last several years to improve conditions for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other ecosystem components. An extensive amount of literature has been produced on the humpback chub. We developed this annotated bibliography to assist managers and researchers in the Grand Canyon as they perform assessments, refine management strategies, and develop new studies to examine the factors affecting humpback chub. The U.S. Geological Survey recently created a multispecies bibliography (including references on the humpback chub) entitled Bibliography of Native Colorado River Big Fishes (available at www.fort.usgs.gov/Products/data/COFishBib). That bibliography, while quite extensive and broader in scope than ours, is not annotated, and, therefore, does not provide any of the information in the original literature. In developing this annotated bibliography, we have attempted to assemble abstracts from relevant published literature. We present here abstracts taken unmodified from individual reports and articles except where noted. The bibliography spans references from 1976 to 2009 and is organized in five broad topical areas, including: (1) biology, (2) ecology, (3) impacts of dam operations, (4) other impacts, and (5) conservation and management, and includes twenty subcategories. Within each subcategory, we present abstracts alphabetically by author and chronologically by year. We present relevant articles not specific to either the humpback chub or Glen Canyon Dam, but cited in other included reports, under the Supporting Articles subcategory. We provide all citations in alphabetical order in Section 7.

  17. Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The process for D&D and final dismantlement of facilities requires that the known contaminants of concern (COCs) be evaluated and quantified and to identify and quantify any additional contaminants in order to satisfy the waste acceptance criteria requirements for the desired disposal pathway. Known facility contaminants include, but are not limited to, asbestos-containing material (ACM), radiological contaminants, and chemical contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

  18. Fluor hanford ALARA center -showcases- tools, equipment, and work practices used during D and D work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O. [Fluor Hanford, Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    In 1996, Fluor established the ALARA Center at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to 'showcase' tools and equipment used to support the principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Much of the work was being done by workers who used hand tools while dressed in multiple sets of protective clothing. The Center was opened so that workers could see and handle the latest tools and equipment and have experienced personnel to help them plan work evolutions. Experienced personnel who were familiar with the ALARA concept as well as new technology were assigned to the Center. In addition, vendors were asked to display their products so the Hanford workers could experience state-of-the-art tools and equipment for doing work in a radiological environment. Since opening, the ALARA Center has evolved into a tremendous resource - not only for Hanford, but also most of the entire DOE Complex, as well as contractors around the world. Classes in fundamental radiological work practices are presented when the facilities recognize a need. The ALARA Center has a variety of products that range from simple hand tools to robots, video scopes, and gamma cameras. The tools and equipment on display are used in these training classes to train the workers on the work practices to operate them, take them apart to determine how they work and decide how to maintain them. Many facilities invite the ALARA Center staff to attend planning meetings at the facilities and participate in job walk-downs. Generally, ALARA Center personnel provide several options on how the radiological work can be accomplished safely and recommend the option that is ALARA and safest for the workers. A few years ago, it became obvious that the work scope was changing and many facilities had a new job to clean out the facilities and demolish them. The ALARA Center began contacting vendors who had tools and equipment that could be used for D and D work. Today, the ALARA Center occupies 4,000 square feet (372 m{sup 2}) in a building centrally located in the 586- square mile Hanford Reservation. Other DOE sites have set up their own ALARA Centers because of the success at Hanford. (authors)

  19. Solar Success Story at Moanalua Terrace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-03-01

    Solar systems prove to be the environmentally and economically sound choice for heating water in U.S. Navy housing at Moanalua Terrace in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Hawaii is a perfect environment for solar water heating,'' according to Alan Ikeda, a Housing Management Specialist with the Pacific Naval Facility Engineering Command Housing Department in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. ''The sun shines most of the time, we don't have to worry about freezing, the state offers a 35% solar tax credit, and our local utility supports the purchase and installation of solar systems with generous rebates.'' The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction helped persuade the Navy to take advantage of Hawaii's solar resource and install solar water heaters on family housing units. At Moanalua Terrace, the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which they are rebuilding in four phases. Designers decided to use the opportunity to give the solar systems a try. When the 100 homes in Phase I were built, money was not available for solar water heaters. However, Ikeda subsequently secured a $130,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to retrofit the Phase I homes with solar systems. In retrofit applications, HECO rebates $800 per unit ($80,000 total) on approved equipment, and Pearl Harbor Family Housing will pay the difference of the estimated $340,000 total cost, or about $130,000. The 136 units built during Phase II of the Moanalua Terrace project included solar systems in their specifications, so the Navy was able to take advantage of the $1,500 per system HECO rebate for approved solar water heaters in new construction. The Navy chose direct (open-loop) active systems that circulate potable water through flat-plate collectors coated with a black chrome selective surface. Each system consists of a 4-foot by 8-foot (1.2-m by 2.4-m) collector made by American Energy Technologies, Ltd., and an 80-gallon (302-liter) Rheem tank containing an electric backup element.

  20. FLUOR HANFORD (FH) MAKES CLEANUP A REALITY IN NEARLY 11 YEARS AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2007-05-24

    For nearly 11 years, Fluor Hanford has been busy cleaning up the legacy of nuclear weapons production at one of the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) major sites in the United States. As prime nuclear waste cleanup contractor at the vast Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, Fluor Hanford has changed the face of cleanup. Fluor beginning on October 1, 1996, Hanford Site cleanup was primarily a ''paper exercise.'' The Tri-Party Agreement, officially called the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order - the edict governing cleanup among the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington state - was just seven years old. Milestones mandated in the agreement up until then had required mainly waste characterization, reporting, and planning, with actual waste remediation activities off in the future. Real work, accessing waste ''in the field'' - or more literally in huge underground tanks, decaying spent fuel POO{approx}{approx}S, groundwater, hundreds of contaminated facilities, solid waste burial grounds, and liquid waste disposal sites -began in earnest under Fluor Hanford. The fruits of labors initiated, completed and/or underway by Fluor Hanford can today be seen across the site. Spent nuclear fuel is buttoned up in secure, dry containers stored away from regional water resources, reactive plutonium scraps are packaged in approved containers, transuranic (TRU) solid waste is being retrieved from burial trenches and shipped offsite for permanent disposal, contaminated facilities are being demolished, contaminated groundwater is being pumped out of aquifers at record rates, and many other inventive solutions are being applied to Hanford's most intransigent nuclear wastes. (TRU) waste contains more than 100 nanocuries per gram, and contains isotopes higher than uranium on the Periodic Table of the Elements. (A nanocurie is one-billionth of a curie.) At the same time, Fluor Hanford has dramatically improved safety records, and cost effectively maintained and streamlined infrastructure and equipment that is impossibly old and in many cases ''extinct'' in terms of spare parts and vendor support. The story of Fluor's achievements at the Hanford Site - the oldest and most productive plutonium site in the world - is both inspiring and instructive.

  1. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition. Maintenance of building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) balancing was critical to ensure proper airflow and worker safety. Approximately 103 m{sup 3} of equipment and materials were recovered or generated by the project. Low level waste accounted for approximately 37.4 m{sup 3}. Where possible, ducting was free released for metal recycling. Contaminated ducts were compacted into B-1000 containers and stored in a Shielded Modular Above-Ground Storage Facility (SMAGS) on the WL site awaiting final disposition. The project is divided into three significant phases, with Phases 1 and 2 completed. Lessons learned during the execution of Phases 1 and 2 have been incorporated into the current ventilation removal. (authors)

  2. Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, Lisa K.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

  3. The Cold and Dark Process at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmour, John C.; Willis, Michael L.

    2008-01-15

    The deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of a facility exposes D and D workers to numerous hazards. One of the more serious hazards is coming into contact to hazardous energy sources (e.g. electrical, pressurized steam). At the Savannah River Site (SRS) a formal process for identifying and eliminating sources of hazardous energy was developed and is called 'Cold and Dark'. Several 'near miss' events involving cutting of energized conductors during D and D work in buildings thought to be isolated identified the need to have a formal process to identify and isolate these potentially hazardous systems. This process was developed using lessons learned from D and D activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) in Colorado. The Cold and Dark process defines an isolation boundary (usually a building perimeter) and then systematically identifies all of the penetrations through this boundary. All penetrations that involve hazardous energy sources are then physically air-gapped. The final product is a documented declaration of isolation performed by a team involving operations, engineering, and project management. Once the Cold and Dark declaration is made for a building work can proceed without the usual controls used in an operational facility (e.g. lockout/tag-out, arc flash PPE). It is important to note that the Cold and Dark process does not remove all hazards from a facility. Work planning and controls still need to address hazards that can be present from such things as chemicals, radiological contamination, residual liquids, etc., as well as standard industrial hazards. Savannah River Site experienced 6 electrical events prior to declaring a facility 'cold and dark' and has had zero electrical events after 'cold and dark' declaration (263 facilities to date). The formal Cold and Dark process developed at SRS has eliminated D and D worker exposures to hazardous energy sources. Since the implementation of the process there have been no incidents involving energized conductors or pressurized liquids/gases. During this time SRS has demolished over 200 facilities. The ability to perform intrusive D and D activities without the normal controls such as lock outs results in shorter schedule durations and lower overall costs for a facility D and D.

  4. Oak Ridge Cleanup Vision: Moving to the Future by Cleaning Up the Past - 13291

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cange, Susan M. [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wieland, Christopher C.; DePaoli, Susan M. [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) strives to be the leader in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) EM Complex regarding successful and safe project execution and stakeholder interactions that yield positive results. EM's goal has been to become 'Investment Worthy' and, in order to accomplish that important objective, has also had to improve communications both within and outside of the Department. One of our most important missions is to assist the Department in achieving the sustainability goals set forth in Executive Order 13514. In this regard, EM's primary role is to return land to beneficial use and reduce energy impacts and maintenance costs by demolishing unneeded and deteriorating structures and remediating environmental contamination. Recent accomplishments toward meeting these goals include significant progress in the decontamination and demolition of the country's largest facility, the former K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building, constructed in 1942 to enrich uranium to help end World War II; the disposition of the first phase of Uranium-233 material from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which involved the transfer of Zero Power Reactor Plates to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); and a host of other project successes associated with transuranic (TRU) waste processing, hot cell decontamination and demolition, remediation of highly contaminated soils and burial grounds, and removal of mercury from storm sewers and surface waters. With regard to successful stakeholder interactions, recent accomplishments include a new method for collaboration that has renewed EM's working relationship with the regulators, and success in completing an extensive consultation process with over a dozen parties on the historic preservation of the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, which is now called the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Regarding improved communications, EM has successfully revised Program priorities and has received buy-in from the leadership in Headquarters, the regulators, and the community. Issues EM was facing in 2009 are presented. Resulting lessons learned and subsequent changes that the Office has gone through in the past several years in order to improve performance in the safe execution of work, relationships with external stakeholders, and communications both internally and externally are discussed. Results of these efforts are provided as a summary of Program accomplishments, including a strong focus on the future. EM's motto, Moving to the Future by Cleaning up the Past, will be demonstrated through the Program's mission, which includes protecting the region's health and environment; ensuring the continuation of ongoing vital missions being conducted by DOE on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and making clean land available for future use at all three sites, with a near-term focus on Re-industrialization of ETTP. (authors)

  5. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  6. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  7. Back from the Brink with Something for Everyone - The Final Executed Memorandum of Agreement for Interpretation of the East Tennessee Technology Park and the K-25 Building - 13370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusick, Lesley T. [Restoration Services, Inc. (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc. (United States)

    2013-07-01

    When the Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) began its major decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program activities in the mid-1990's, it was understood that the work to demolish the gaseous diffusion process buildings at the K-25 Site, as it was then known, would be challenging. Nothing of that size and breadth had ever been done within the DOE complex and the job brought about a full menu of unique attributes: radiological contamination with enriched materials entrained in certain areas of the system, a facility that was never designed not to operate but had been shut down since 1964, and a loyal following of individuals and organizations who were committed to the physical preservation of at least some portion of the historic Manhattan Project property. DOE was able to solve and resolve the issues related to nuclear materials management, contamination control, and determining the best way to safely and efficiently deconstruct the massive building. However, for a variety of reasons, resolution of the historic preservation questions - what and how much to preserve, how to preserve it, where to preserve it, how to interpret it, how much to spend on preservation, and by and for whom preservation should occur - remained open to debate for over a decade. After a dozen years, countless meetings, phone calls, discussions and other exchanges, and four National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) [1] Memoranda of Agreement (MOA), a final MOA [2] has been executed. The final executed MOA's measures are robust, creative, substantive, and will be effective. They include a multi-story replica of a portion of the K-25 Building, the dedication of the K-25 Building footprint for preservation purposes, an equipment building to house authentic Manhattan Project and Cold War equipment, a virtual museum, an on-site history center, a grant to preserve a historically-significant Manhattan Project-era hotel in Oak Ridge, and more. The MOA was designed to offer something for everyone. The MOA for the K- 25 Building and interpretation of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP; formerly the K-25 Site) was executed by all of the signatory parties on August 7, 2012 - almost 67 years to-the-day after the 'product' of the K-25 process building became known to more than just a small group of scientists and engineers working on a secret project for the Army Corps of Engineers Manhattan District. (authors)

  8. CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2006-03-17

    The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP.

  9. The Challenges of Preserving Historic Resources During the Deactivation and Decommissioning of Highly Contaminated Historically Significant Plutonium Process Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.; Minette, M.; Sorenson, D.; Heineman, R.; Gerber, M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., PO Box 1000 Richland WA 99352 (United States); Charboneau, S. [US Department of Energy PO Box 550, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Bond, F. [Washington State Department of Ecology, WDOE 3100 Port of Benton Blvd., Richland WA, 99354 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that are included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Site-wide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP. (authors)

  10. LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

    2012-01-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between the contractors and DOE-RL. Information Management (IM) is a key part of the LTS program. The IM Program identifies, locates, stores, protects and makes accessible Hanford LTS records and data to support the transfer of property ultimately to LM. As such, DOE-RL manages the Hanford LTS Program in a manner consistent with LM's goals, policies, and procedures.

  11. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

  12. The effects of overwinter flowson the spring condition of rainbow and brown trout size classes in the Green River downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam, Utah.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnusson, A. K.; LaGory, K. E.; Hayse, J. W.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-06-25

    Flaming Gorge Dam, a hydroelectric facility operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is located on the Green River in Daggett County, northeastern Utah. Until recently, and since the early 1990s, single daily peak releases or steady flows have been the operational pattern of the dam during the winter period. However, releases from Flaming Gorge Reservoir followed a double-peak pattern (two daily flow peaks) during the winters of 2006-2007 and 2008-2009. Because there is little recent long-term history of double-peaking at Flaming Gorge Dam, the potential effects of double-peaking operations on trout body condition in the dam's tailwater are not known. A study plan was developed that identified research activities to evaluate potential effects from winter double-peaking operations (Hayse et al. 2009). Along with other tasks, the study plan identified the need to conduct a statistical analysis of historical trout condition and macroinvertebrate abundance to evaluate the potential effects of hydropower operations. The results from analyses based on the combined size classes of trout (85-630 mm) were presented in Magnusson et al. (2008). The results of this earlier analysis suggested possible relationships between trout condition and flow, but concern that some of the relationships resulted from size-based effects (e.g., apparent changes in condition may have been related to concomitant changes in size distribution, because small trout may have responded differently to flow than large trout) prompted additional analysis of within-size class relationships. This report presents the results of analyses of three different size classes of trout (small: 200-299 mm, medium: 300-399 mm, and large: {ge}400 mm body length). We analyzed historical data to (1) describe temporal patterns and relationships among flows, benthic macroinvertebrate abundance, and condition of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the tailwaters of Flaming Gorge Dam, and to (2) evaluate the relative importance of the effects of flow (i.e., flow volumes and flow variability), trout abundance (catch per unit effort [CPUE]), and benthic macroinvertebrate abundance on trout condition for different size classes of trout.

  13. Sitewide environmental assessment EA-1236 for preparation for transfer of ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The Proposed Action includes the following principal elements: (1) The accelerated plugging and abandoning of uneconomic wells over the next six years. Uneconomic wells are operating wells which can no longer cover their direct and indirect costs. DOE estimates that there are 900 wells to be plugged and abandoned over the next six years, leaving approximately 200 wells for transfer by 2003. (2) Complete reclamation and restoration of abandoned sites. Restoration would include dismantling surface facilities, batteries, roads, test satellites, electrical distribution systems and associated power poles, when they are no longer needed for production. Soil contaminated by hydrocarbons would be biologically treated. Roads, facilities, batteries, and well sites would be ripped up, recontoured, disked and seeded with native vegetation. (3) The continued development of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) through the establishment of a consortium of university, state and private institutions. RMOTC would continue to provide facilities and support to government and private industry for testing and evaluating new oilfield and environmental technologies. Based on the findings of the EA, DOE has determined that the proposal does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  14. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  15. Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

  16. Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

    2014-04-29

    The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utility’s electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munster’s Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the community’s carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

  17. BPA Facts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration is a federal nonprofit power marketing administration based in the Pacific Northwest . Although BPA is part of the U .S . Department of Energy, it is self-funding and covers its costs by selling its products and services . BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydro projects in the Columbia River Basin, one nonfederal nuclear plant and several small nonfederal power plants . The dams are operated by the U .S . Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation . About 30 percent of the electric power used in the Northwest comes from BPA . BPA’s resources — primarily hydroelectric — make its power nearly carbon free . BPA also operates and maintains about three- fourths of the high-voltage transmission in its service territory . BPA’s service territory includes Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana and small parts of eastern Montana, California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming . BPA promotes energy efficiency, renewable resources and new technologies that improve its ability to deliver on its mission . BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin . BPA is committed to public service and seeks to make its decisions in a manner that provides opportunities for input from stakeholders . In its vision statement, BPA dedicates itself to providing high system reliability, low rates consistent with sound business principles, environmental stewardship and accountability

  18. Chemical processing programs. Monthly status report, April 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    During the month of April, 99 metric tonnes uranium (MTU's) of zircaloy-clad N-Reactor fuel were charged to the PUREX dissolvers; bringing the FYTD total to 684 MTU's, 115 MTU's ahead of the 1060 commitment schedule. PUREX solvent extraction was shut down April 14 and the plant entered into a planned maintenance period to effect repairs and perform process chemical flushes to maintain acceptable waste losses and production specification. The Plutonium Oxide Conversion (N)-Cell bi-monthly nuclear material and accountability inventory, initiated in March, was completed satisfactorily in April. UO/sub 3/ Plant initiated the second fiscal year 1986 campaign. During April, 46 MTU's of UO/sub 3/ were shipped to FMPC, bringing the FYTD shipment total to 456 MTU's vs a plan of 490 MTU's. Design and procurement activities for the PUREX Aqueous Make-Up (AMU) chemical containment upgrades continued on schedule during April. The Remote Mechanical C (RMC) line began processing feed for its first fiscal year (FY) 1986 campaign on April 5, 1986. The Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) maintenance outage upgrades are one and one half weeks behind schedule. Functional Design Criteria for B609, RMC Ventilation Improvement (FY 1988 GPP) has been completed. The updated Ten Year Shipping Forecast has been complete and sent to DOE-RL.

  19. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Atencio, J.D.

    1982-03-31

    A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as /sup 240/Pu, /sup 244/Cm and /sup 252/Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter /sup 241/Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether permanent low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

  20. Economic aspects of the rehabilitation of the Hiriya landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayalon, O. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: agofira@tx.technion.ac.il; Becker, N. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Department of Economics and Management, Tel Hai College and NRERC, University of Haifa, Haifa (Israel); Shani, E. [Dan Region Association of Towns, Sanitation and Waste Disposal (Israel)

    2006-07-01

    The Hiriya landfill, Israel's largest, operated from 1952 to 1998. The landfill, located in the heart of the Dan Region, developed over the years into a major landscape nuisance and environmental hazard. In 1998, the Israeli government decided to close the landfill, and in 2001 rehabilitation activities began at the site, including site investigations, engineering and scientific evaluations, and end-use planning. The purpose of the present research is to perform a cost-benefit analysis of engineering and architectural-landscape rehabilitation projects considered for the site. An engineering rehabilitation project is required for the reduction of environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions, slope instability and leachate formation. An architectural-landscape rehabilitation project would consider improvements to the site to make it suitable for future end uses such as a public park. The findings reveal that reclamation is worthwhile only in the case of architectural-landscape rehabilitation of the landfill, converting it into a public park. Engineering rehabilitation alone was found to be unjustified, but is essential to enable the development of a public park.

  1. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1985-09-01

    This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

  2. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1987-09-01

    The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations.

  3. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

  4. GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential reclamation/reuse of the parent substrate for epitaxial growth. Additionally, realistic performance modeling calculations suggest that terrestrial concentrator efficiencies in the range of 40-45% are possible with this new tandem cell approach. A laboratory-scale (0.24 cm2), prototype GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell with a terrestrial concentrator efficiency of 37.9% at a low concentration ratio (10.1 suns) is described, which surpasses the previous world efficiency record of 37.3%.

  5. Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

  6. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  7. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, John T. (Los Alamos, NM); Kunz, Walter E. (Santa Fe, NM); Atencio, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify .sup.233 U, .sup.235 U and .sup.239 Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as .sup.240 Pu, .sup.244 Cm and .sup.252 Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter .sup.241 Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether "permanent" low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

  8. Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather-Blair, Signe

    1985-02-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado: Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    Title 1 of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial action at the inactive Naturita, Colorado, uranium processing site to reduce the potential health effects from the radioactive materials at the site and at vicinity properties associated with the site. Title 2 of the UMTRCA authorized the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or agreement state to regulate the operation and eventual reclamation of active uranium processing sites. The uranium mill tailings at the site were removed and reprocessed from 1977 to 1979. The contaminated areas include the former tailings area, the mill yard, the former ore storage area, and adjacent areas that were contaminated by uranium processing activities and wind and water erosion. The Naturita remedial action would result in the loss of 133 acres (ac) of contaminated soils at the processing site. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and the state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac of steeply sloped contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. Cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers.

  10. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  11. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  12. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS : Appendices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described. The document concludes with an evaluation of the potential effects that could result from implementing proposed actions. The conclusions are based on evaluation of existing data, utilization of numerical models, and application of logical inference. This volume contains the appendices.

  13. PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

    1986-04-01

    PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

  14. Qualitative assessment of the impacts of proposed system operating strategies to resident fish within selected Columbia River Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreffler, D.K.; Geist, D.R.; Mavros, W.V.

    1994-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) are presently conducting the System Operation Review (SOR) for the Columbia River basin. The SOR began in 1990 and is expected to provide an operating strategy that will take into consideration multiple uses of the Columbia River system including navigation, flood control, irrigation, power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, water supply, and water quality. This report provides descriptions of each of the non-modeled reservoirs and other specified river reaches. The descriptions focus on the distinct management goals for resident fish: biodiversity, species-specific concerns, and sport fisheries. In addition, this report provides a qualitative assessment of impacts to the resident fish within these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 alternative system operating strategies. In addition to this introduction, the report contains four more sections. Section 2.0 provides the methods that were used. Reservoir descriptions appear in Section 3.0, which is a synthesis of our literature review and interviews with resident fish experts. Section 4.0 contains a discussion of potential impacts to fish within each of these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 proposed system operating strategies. The references cited are listed in Section 5.0.

  15. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2003-10-30

    The 2002-2003 Department of Energy plantings amounted to 164 acres containing 111,520 tree seedlings in eastern and western Kentucky. Data gathered on these trees included an inventory to determine survival of all planted species. A sub-sample of seedlings was selected to assess the height and diameter of individual species of seedlings established. Additional efforts involved collection of soil sample and litter samples, analysis of herbaceous ground cover from vegetation clip plots and leaf area on each tree species, and development of tissue collections. All areas were sampled for penetration resistance, penetration depth (or depth to refusal), and bulk density at various depths. Rain fall events and flow rates were recorded. The water quality of runoff samples involved the determination of total and settleable solids and particle size distribution. A study was initiated that will focus on the colonization of small mammals from forest edges to various areas located on reclaimed surface mines. This effort will provide a better understanding of the role small mammals and birds have in the establishment of plant communities on mine lands that will be useful in developing and improving reclamation techniques.

  16. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program. Progress report, January 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geological repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) from January 1994 through December 1994 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  17. Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillman, Jack B.

    2008-09-01

    In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

  18. Navajo Generating Station and Clean-Energy Alternatives: Options for Renewables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Turchi, C. S.; Burman, K.

    2012-06-01

    In January 2012, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory delivered to the Department of the Interior the first part of a study on Navajo Generating Station (Navajo GS) and the likely impacts of BART compliance options. That document establishes a comprehensive baseline for the analysis of clean energy alternatives, and their ability to achieve benefits similar to those that Navajo GS currently provides. This analysis is a supplement to NREL's January 2012 study. It provides a high level examination of several clean energy alternatives, based on the previous analysis. Each has particular characteristics affecting its relevance as an alternative to Navajo GS. It is assumed that the development of any alternative resource (or portfolio of resources) to replace all or a portion of Navajo GS would occur at the end of a staged transition plan designed to reduce economic disruption. We assume that replacing the federal government's 24.3% share of Navajo GS would be a cooperative responsibility of both the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Central Arizona Water Conservation District (CAWCD).

  19. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  20. Supplemental Radiological Survey Plan for the Lease of the Rooms Associated with C107 of Building K-1006 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blevins M.F.

    2010-09-01

    In 1998, a portion of Bldg. K-1006 was leased to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) as part of the reindustrialization efforts at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The facility was subleased and is being used as an analytical laboratory. The 1998 lease did not include rooms C107, C107-A, C107-B, C107-C, and C107-D. The lease of these rooms is now desired. These rooms comprise the area to be surveyed. The building was constructed as a laboratory facility to support the gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process. It also contains offices and administrative spaces for laboratory personnel. After the gaseous diffusion process was shut down in the mid-1980s, the building was used to provide research and development support to ETTP environmental, safety, and health programs; the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator; the Central Neutralization Facility; and other multi-site waste treatment activities. It also served as the chemistry laboratory for the Environmental Technology Technical Services Organization. The activities currently conducted in Bldg. K-1006 utilize a variety of analytical techniques. Some of the major techniques being employed are X-ray analysis, electron microanalysis, and spectrochemical analysis. In 1998, a portion of Bldg. K-1006 was leased to CROET as part of the reindustrialization efforts at ETTP. The facility was subleased and is being used as an analytical laboratory. The 1998 lease did not include Rooms C107, C107-A, C107-B, C107-C, and C107-D. Some demolition of furniture and decontamination activities has taken place for Rooms C 107 and C 107-B since the last radiological survey of those rooms. In March 2009, a final remedial action (RA) was performed for the Bldg. K-1006 north basement sump. The Bldg. K-1006 north basement sump is a nominal 30-in.-diameter, 36-in.-deep concrete structure in the north corner of room C107B. The building receives groundwater in-leakage that is periodically pumped to the sewer system via this float-controlled pump. Solids in the bottom of the sump consisted of an estimated 1-ft{sup 3} coarse-grained material that varied in thickness from 0 to 4 in. with no suspended fraction. The RA consisted of removing the water in the sump and then removing and sampling the solids. The solids were mixed with grout after removal and allowed to set. The solids were then disposed off-site at an approved disposal facility. The building sump will remain until the K-1006 building is demolished. The actions for the K- 1006 sump are described in the revised Phased Construction Completion Report for Exposure Unit (EU) Z2-33, which received regulatory approval in December 2009.

  1. Environmental Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park Year One - Execution with Certainty SM - 13120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, A.L. [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-7294 (United States)] [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-7294 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    On August 1, 2011, URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) began its five-year, $1.4 billion cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. UCOR will close out cleanup operations that began in 1998 under a previous contract. When the Contract Base scope of work [1] is completed in 2016, the K-25 gaseous diffusion building will have been demolished and all waste dispositioned, demolition will have started on the K-27 gaseous diffusion building, all contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic waste in inventory (approximately 500 cubic meters) will have been transferred to the Transuranic Waste Processing Center, previously designated 'No-Path-To-Disposition Waste' will have been dispositioned to the extent possible, and UCOR will have managed DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)- owned facilities at ETTP, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Y-12 National Security Complex in a safe and cost-effective manner. Since assuming its responsibilities as the ETTP cleanup contractor, UCOR has completed its life-cycle Performance Measurement Baseline; received its Earned Value Management System (EVMS) certification; advanced the deactivation and demolition (D and D) of the K-25 gaseous diffusion building; recovered and completed the Tank W-1A and K-1070-B Burial Ground remediation projects; characterized, packaged, and shipped contact-handled transuranic waste to the Transuranic Waste Processing Center; disposed of more than 90,000 cubic yards of cleanup waste while managing the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF); and provided operations, surveillance, and maintenance activities at DOE EM facilities at ETTP, ORNL, and the Y-12 National Security Complex. Project performance as of December 31, 2012 has been excellent: - Cost Performance Index - 1.06; - Schedule Performance Index - 1.02. At the same time, since safety is the foundation of all cleanup work, UCOR's safety record goes hand in hand with its excellent project performance. Through calendar year 2012, UCOR's recordable injury rate was 0.33, and the company has worked close to 4 million hours without a lost work day injury. UCOR's safety record is one of the best in the DOE EM Complex. This performance was due, in large part, to the people and processes URS and CH2M HILL, the parent companies of UCOR, brought to the project. Key approaches included: - Selected and deployed experienced staff in key leadership positions throughout the organization; - Approached 'Transition' as the 'true' beginning of the cleanup project - kicking off a number of project initiatives such as Partnering, PMB development, D and D Plan execution, etc. - Established a project baseline for performance measurement and obtained EVMS certification in record time; - Determined material differences and changed conditions that warranted contract change - then quickly addressed these changes with the DOE client; - Aligned the project and the contract within one year - also done in record time; - Implemented Safety Trained Supervisor and Safety Conscious Work Environment Programs, and kicked off the pursuit of certification under DOE's Voluntary Protection Program. (authors)

  2. Packaging and Transportation Support at LANL CTMA 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Nick

    2012-06-08

    Operations Support Packaging and Transportation (OS-PT) supports LANL in various functions. Some highlights of the past year have been with the work relating to environmental remediation, type B packaging, non-DOT compliant transfers, and special permit training. The TA-21 remediation project was part of the ARRA funding that LANL received. The $212 million in funding was used to demolish 24 buildings at TA-21, excavate the lab's oldest waste disposal site, and install 16 groundwater monitoring wells. The project was completed ahead of schedule and under budget. More than 300 tons of metal was recycled and all the soil excavated from MDA-B was replaced with clean fill. OS-PT supported this projected by transporting more than 7 million pounds of waste to TA-54 Area G with an addendum to their TSD. Because of the public access on the transfer route, Los Alamos County restricted the transfer to happen from 2:00 AM to 4:00 AM. OS-PT conducted 8 transfers in support of this project. Some concerns included the contaminated trailers at receipt facilities when transferring filled Super Sacks. Future Super Sacks were over packed into new IP-2 Super Sacks before shipping. OS-PT is also supporting the remediation of TA-54 Area G. LANL has an agreement with the State of New Mexico to remove all TRU waste currently stored above ground from at Area G. OS-PT supports this initiative with transfers of TRU waste under LANL's TSD and support of TRU shipments to WIPP. Another project supported by our organization is gas cylinder/dewar recycling and remediation. We are focusing on reducing risk associated with unneeded gasses at LANL. To minimized excessive ordering, to save money and time, and to minimize hazards OS-PT is supporting a gas recycling program. This program will allow programmatic organization across LANL to share unused/unneeded gasses. Instead of old dewars being disposed of, OS-PT has began identifying these dewars and sending them for refurbishment. To date, this effort has saved LANL $450K and estimated saving for future efforts will be more than $1.5 million. Some Projects that are happening here at LANL are offsite source recovery, weapon component transfers, and isotope science production. There are specific packages that help support these projects for the shipment of related materials. OS-PT provides support to these packages to ensure they are and will be available to continue this support. The Areva 435-B Overpack will help the Offsite Source Recovery Project recover high activity gamma sources from various locations across the globe. The Safety Analysis for Packaging is scheduled for initial completion June of 2012. The DPP-1 package is designed to replace the Model FL, which was designed by Rocky Flats and began service in 1990. LANL has collaborated on package design with LLNL, Pantex, Y-12, and KCP. LANL is supporting LLNL on component fixture development. Testing to 10 CFR 71 is to be completed in the Fall of 2012 and scheduled for NA-174 approval in 2014. The SAFESHIELD package helps supports LANL's Isotope production projects. This package can transfer highly irradiated materials from LANL's accelerator to material processing facilities. LANL worked to renew the SAFESHEILD's Certification for 5 more years.

  3. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27

    The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

  4. HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE 09/2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2007-08-20

    Fluor Hanford's K Basins Closure (KBC) Project tallied three major accomplishments at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State this past summer. The Project finished emptying the aging K East Basin of both sludge and the last pieces of scrap spent nuclear fuel. It also Completed vacuuming the bulk of the sludge in the K West Basin into underwater containers. The 54-year-old concrete basins once held more than four million pounds of spent nuclear fuel and sit less than 400 yards from the Columbia River. Each basin holds more than a million gallons of radioactive water. In 2004, Fluor finished removing all the spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins. Nearly 50 cubic meters of sludge remained--a combination of dirt, sand, small pieces of corroded uranium fuel and fuel cladding, corrosion products from racks and canisters, ion-exchange resin beads, polychlorinated biphenyls, and fission products that had formed during the decades that the spent nuclear fuel was stored underwater. Capturing the sludge into underwater containers in the K East Basin took more than two years, and vacuuming the much smaller volume of sludge into containers in the K West Basin required seven months. Workers stood on grating above the basin water and vacuumed the sludge through long, heavy hoses. The work was complicated by murky water and contaminated solid waste (debris). Pumping was paused several times to safely remove and package debris that totaled more than 370 tons. In October 2006, Fluor Hanford workers began pumping the sludge captured in the K East Basin containers out through a specially designed pipeline to underwater containers in the K West Basin, about a half mile away. They used a heavy but flexible, double-walled ''hose-in-hose'' system. Pumping work progressed slowly at first, but ramped up in spring 2007 and was completed on May 31. Just a week before sludge transfers finished, the KBC Project removed the last few small pieces of irradiated fuel (about 19 pounds) found as the last remnants of sludge were vacuumed up. The fuel was loaded into a cask that sat underwater. The cask was hoisted out of the water, decontaminated, and transported to the K West Basin, where it is now being stored underwater until it can be dried and taken to storage in central Hanford. Removing the sludge and fuel from the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream. Fluor's priority at the K East Basin quickly turned to final preparations for demolishing the structure. Final activities to sort debris are progressing, along with plans to de-water the basin and turn it to rubble in the next two years. At the K West Basin, after the bulk sludge was removed July 3, workers began preparing to load out the last of the ''found'' nuclear fuel and to complete final pass sludge collection this coming year.

  5. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

  6. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The project completed TPA Milestone M-083-032 to 'Complete those activities required by the 241-Z Treatment and Storage Unit's RCRA Closure Plan' four years and seven months ahead of this legally enforceable milestone. In addition, the project completed TPA Milestone M-083-042 to 'Complete transition and dismantlement of the 241-2 Waste Treatment Facility' four years and four months ahead of schedule. The project used an innovative approach in developing the project-specific RCRA closure plan to assure clear integration between the 241-Z RCRA closure activities and ongoing and future CERCLA actions at PFP. This approach provided a regulatory mechanism within the RCRA closure plan to place segments of the closure that were not practical to address at this time into future actions under CERCLA. Lessons learned from th is approach can be applied to other closure projects within the DOE Complex to control scope creep and mitigate risk. A paper on this topic, entitled 'Integration of the 241-Z Building D and D Under CERCLA with RCRA Closure at the PFP', was presented at the 2007 Waste Management Conference in Tucson, Arizona. In addition, techniques developed by the 241-Z D&D Project to control airborne contamination, clean the interior of the waste tanks, don and doff protective equipment, size-reduce plutonium-contaminated process piping, and mitigate thermal stress for the workers can be applied to other cleanup activities. The project-management team developed a strategy utilizing early characterization, targeted cleanup, and close coordination with PFP Criticality Engineering to significantly streamline the waste- handling costs associated with the project . The project schedule was structured to support an early transition to a criticality 'incredible' status for the 241-Z Facility. The cleanup work was sequenced and coordinated with project-specific criticality analysis to allow the fissile material waste being generated to be managed in a bulk fashion, instead of individual waste packages. This approach negated the need for real-time assay of individ

  7. K-25 Structural Separation and Demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cater, Frank [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, East Tennessee Technology Park, Post Office Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The K-25 building is a former gaseous diffusion plant, built in 1944-1945 as part of the United States Manhattan Project. The structure was the largest structure under one roof, surpassed only by the Pentagon. Together the three wings represent about 17.8 hectare (44 acres) under roof and are generally about 18.3 meters (60 ft.) high on the outside face and approximately 12.2 meters (40 ft.) high on the inside face. The entire structure was built in the shape of a 'U', with a lateral distance of approximately one mile. It was constructed in individual building units with each unit connected using expansion joint-type connection. A single unit is approximately 24.4 meters (80 ft.) across and 122 meters (400 ft.) deep. The northern structure is connected to the eastern and western structures at the upper level floors. The four-level, U-shaped building is a steel-frame structure with corrugated cement-asbestos siding. The cell level is an elevated concrete structure supported by reinforced concrete columns located in the basement, or vault area. The vault area can be accessed at grade level from the outside perimeter. Inside the courtyard, the grade level has been raised to provide entry to the second or cell floor level. An engineering evaluation of the structure was performed to determine the condition of the structure and possibility of unplanned collapse of any portion of the structure. The evaluation included physical inspections, calculations for wind, pre-demolition loads, and evaluation of failure modes. The results of the evaluation have provided guidance for the demolition plan and the development of criteria for protection of personnel performing pre-demolition activities. Challenges include degradation of the structure that necessitated repair, dealing with changes in the code revisions from both the American Concrete Institute (ACI) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), access to areas of the structure that were not necessarily designed for access, and acceleration of the building degradation due to the pre-demolition activities. When a full building is evaluated, 50 percent of wind and applied forces are dissipated in 3 units and 80 percent is dissipated in 12 units. The forces are basically linear for the first 6 units once the building is opened at the start of demolition. Some column buckling, based on current codes, was noted in the analysis that would have to be mitigated to ensure a controlled demolition. Loading for the removal of the equipment required structural engineering evaluation of the certainty of the load and the application of the load. Corbels are being evaluated through an inspection program and criteria for repair based on current loading and anticipated additional live loads. Access issues continue to be a challenge and have created the need for a significant fall protection program. Other areas of access require different approaches and engineering solutions, sometime considering ultimate strength design versus standard yield stress design. An evaluation of separating a wing into two sections to allow for worker re-entry to perform pre-demolition activities during the demolition off shift was conducted. The evaluation has shown that because of both design and history of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, significant care and attention is needed to demolish these structures from a structural perspective. When the project schedule issues are overlaid, that may demand workers in other parts of the structure after demolition has begun, the structural issues become severe, demanding exacting analysis and significant controls to ensure the safety of the workers both in and outside the building performing the demolition work.

  8. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  9. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

    2003-04-01

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

  10. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  11. Final sitewide environmental assessment for preparation for transfer of ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The Secretary of Energy is authorized to produce the Naval Petroleum Reserves No. 3 (NPR-3) at its maximum efficient rate (MER) consistent with sound engineering practices, for a period extending to April 5, 2000 subject to extension. Production at NPR-3 peaked in 1981 and has declined since until it has become a mature stripper field, with the average well yielding less than 2 barrels per day. The Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to discontinue Federal operation of NPR-3 at the end of its life as an economically viable oilfield currently estimated to be 2003. Although changes in oil and gas markets or shifts in national policy could alter the economic limit of NPR-3, it productive life will be determined largely by a small and declining reserve base. DOE is proposing certain activities over the next six years in anticipation of the possible transfer of NPR-3 out of Federal operation. These activities would include the accelerated plugging and abandoning of uneconomic wells, complete reclamation and restoration of abandoned sites including dismantling surface facilities, batteries, roads, test satellites, electrical distribution systems and associated power poles, when they are no longer needed for production, and the continued development of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). DOE has prepared this environmental assessment that analyzes the proposed plugging and abandonment of wells, field restoration and development of RMOTC. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). The preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  12. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J.

    1996-03-01

    A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

  13. Conservation plan for protected species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otten, M.R.M.; Cypher, B.L.

    1997-07-01

    Habitats in and around Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) support populations of various vertebrates and plants, including a number of threatened and endangered species. Adequate conservation of habitats and species, particularly protected species, can be facilitated through development and implementation of management plans. This document provides a comprehensive plan for the conservation of protected species on NPR-1, through compliance with terms and conditions expressed in Biological Opinions rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for NPR-1 activities. Six conservation strategies by which threatened and endangered species have been, and will be, protected are described: population monitoring, mitigation strategies, special studies, operating guidelines and policies, information transfer and outreach, and the endangered species conservation area. Population monitoring programs are essential for determining population densities and for assessing the effects of oil field developments and environmental factors on protected species. Mitigation strategies (preactivity surveys and habitat reclamation) are employed to minimize the loss of important habitats components and to restore previously disturbed lands to conditions more suitable for species` use. A number of special studies were undertaken between 1985 and 1995 to investigate the effectiveness of a variety of population and habitat management techniques with the goal of increasing the density of protected species. Operating guidelines and policies governing routine oil field activities continue to be implemented to minimize the potential for the incidental take of protected species and minimize damage to wildlife habitats. Information transfer and outreach activities are important means by which technical and nontechnical information concerning protected species conservation on NPR-1 is shared with both the scientific and non-scientific public.

  14. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  15. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ULLAH, M K

    2001-02-26

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

  16. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No Name

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

  17. Rehabilitation of semi-arid coal mine spoil bank soils with mine residues and farm organic by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, M.; Bosch-Serra, A.; Estudillos, G.; Poch, R.M. [University of Lleida, Lleida (Spain). Dept. of Environmental & Soil Science

    2009-07-01

    A method of rehabilitating coal mine soils was studied under the conditions of a semi-arid climate, lack of topsoil but availability of farm by-products in NE Spain. The objectives of the research were to assess a new method in order to achieve a suitable substrate for the establishment of native vegetation, to evaluate environmental impacts associated with the reclamation process, and to determine the time necessary to integrate the treated area into the surrounding environment. Eight plots (10 x 35 m{sup 2}) were established in September 1997. Substrate combinations of two types of mine spoil (coal dust and coarse-sized material), two levels of pig slurry (39 and 94 Mg ha{sup -1}dry-wt), and cereal straw (0 and 15 Mg ha{sup -1}) were applied. Monitoring of select physical and chemical soil properties and vegetation characteristics was performed from 1997 until 2005. The bulk density and the saturated hydraulic conductivity measured did not limit plant development and water availability. Initial substrate salinity (1.37 S m{sup -1}) decreased with time and in the long term did not limit plant colonization to salinity-adapted species. Initial nitrate concentration was 298 mg kg{sup -1}, but was reduced significantly to acceptable values in 3 years (55 mg kg{sup -1}) and the measured pH (7.6) was maintained at the level of initial spoil values. Vegetation cover reached up to 90%. In the treated area, spontaneous vegetation cover (15 to 70%) colonized the nonsown areas widely. In the medium term, vegetation cover tended to be higher in plots with a thicker layer of coal dust material and the higher slurry rate. Soil rehabilitation and environmental reintegration, taking into account soil and vegetation indicators, was possible in the studied area with low cost inputs using residual materials from mining activities and animal husbandry by-products.

  18. Review of private sector and Department of Energy treatment, storage, and disposal capabilities for low-level and mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, R.A.; Ball, L.W.; Mousseau, J.D.; Piper, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    Private sector capacity for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of various categories of radioactive waste has been researched and reviewed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, the primary contractor for the INEL. The purpose of this document is to provide assistance to the INEL and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites in determining if private sector capabilities exist for those waste streams that currently cannot be handled either on site or within the DOE complex. The survey of private sector vendors was limited to vendors currently capable of, or expected within the next five years to be able to perform one or more of the following services: low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction, storage, or disposal; mixed LLW treatment, storage, or disposal; alpha-contaminated mixed LLW treatment; LLW decontamination for recycling, reclamation, or reuse; laundering of radioactively-contaminated laundry and/or respirators; mixed LLW treatability studies; mixed LLW treatment technology development. Section 2.0 of this report will identify the approach used to modify vendor information from previous revisions of this report. It will also illustrate the methodology used to identify any additional companies. Section 3.0 will identify, by service, specific vendor capabilities and capacities. Because this document will be used to identify private sector vendors that may be able to handle DOE LLW and mixed LLW streams, it was decided that current DOE capabilities should also be identified. This would encourage cooperation between DOE sites and the various states and, in some instances, may result in a more cost-effective alternative to privatization. The DOE complex has approximately 35 sites that generate the majority of both LLW and mixed LLW. Section 4.0 will identify these sites by Operations Office, and their associated LLW and mixed LLW TSD units.

  19. Literature review: Phytoaccumulation of chromium, uranium, and plutonium in plant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossner, L.R.; Loeppert, R.H.; Newton, R.J.; Szaniszlo, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    Phytoremediation is an integrated multidisciplinary approach to the cleanup of contaminated soils, which combines the disciplines of plant physiology, soil chemistry, and soil microbiology. Metal hyperaccumulator plants are attracting increasing attention because of their potential application in decontamination of metal-polluted soils. Traditional engineering technologies may be too expensive for the remediation of most sites. Removal of metals from these soils using accumulator plants is the goal of phytoremediation. The emphasis of this review has been placed on chromium (Cr), plutonium (Pu), and uranium (U). With the exception of Cr, these metals and their decay products exhibit two problems, specifically, radiation dose hazards and their chemical toxicity. The radiation hazard introduces the need for special precautions in reclamation beyond that associated with non-radioactive metals. The uptake of beneficial metals by plants occurs predominantly by way of channels, pores, and transporters in the root plasma membrane. Plants characteristically exhibit a remarkable capacity to absorb what they need and exclude what they don`t need. But most vascular plants absorb toxic and heavy metals through their roots to some extent, though to varying degrees, from negligible to substantial. Sometimes absorption occurs because of the chemical similarity between beneficial and toxic metals. Some plants utilize exclusion mechanisms, where there is a reduced uptake by the roots or a restricted transport of the metal from root to shoot. At the other extreme, hyperaccumulator plants absorb and concentrate metals in both roots and shoots. Some plant species endemic to metalliferous soils accumulate metals in percent concentrations in the leaf dry matter.

  20. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This final report describes the activities of the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) at Iowa State University for the period July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990. Activities include research in mining- and mineral-related areas, education and training of scientists and engineers in these fields, administration of the Institute, and cooperative interactions with industry, government agencies, and other research centers. During this period, ISMMRRI has supported research efforts to: (1) Investigate methods of leaching zinc from sphalerite-containing ores. (2) Study the geochemistry and geology of an Archean gold deposit and of a gold-telluride deposit. (3) Enchance how-quality aggregates for use in construction. (4) Pre-clean coal by triboelectric charging in a fluidized-bed. (5) Characterize the crystal/grain alignment during processing of yttrium-barium-copper-perovskite (1-2-3) superconductors. (5) Study the fluid inclusion properties of a fluorite district. (6) Study the impacts of surface mining on community planning. (7) Assess the hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite for beneficiation. (8) Investigate the use of photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy for monitoring unburnt carbon in the exhaust gas from coal-fired boilers. The education and training program continued within the interdepartmental graduate minor in mineral resources includes courses in such areas as mining methods, mineral processing, industrial minerals, extractive metallurgy, coal science and technology, and reclamation of mined land. In addition, ISMMRRI hosted the 3rd International Conference on Processing and Utilization of High-Sulfur Coals in Ames, Iowa. The Institute continues to interact with industry in order to foster increased cooperation between academia and the mining and mineral community.