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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Use of an auditory signal in a rear-end collision warning system: effects on braking force and reaction time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This simulator experiment is a preliminary study examining the effects of different auditory signals on braking force and reaction time in a rear-end collision warning system. A driving simulator was built in which subjects operated a computer driving game. Superimposed on the game screen was the image of a car which appeared to the driver to be ahead of him/her. The image enlarged in size, appearing to be a car applying its brakes. The participant was instructed to react as he would in a real driving situation by applying his/her brakes. Closing velocities of 10 miles per hour and 30 miles per hour were used. Braking times and forces were measured for four different warning sounds: 1) no warning; 2) a pulsed warning sound that increased in repetition rate; 3) a sound that increased in frequency; and, 4) a sound that increased in intensity. Results suggested that an auditory warning signal would decrease reaction time and increase maximum braking force applied. The sound that increased in frequency and the sound that increased in intensity provided the greatest savings in reaction time, approximately one quarter second, when compared to the no warning condition. The pulsed warning sound provided the greatest increase in braking force. Participants preferred the pulsed sound over the other warning sounds. Further research must be done to determine if the warning sounds decrease the reaction time enough to cause a significant reduction in accidents.

Hopkins, Jennifer Susan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hybrid: Braking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

button highlighted Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar BRAKING: PART 1 Regenerative braking converts otherwise wasted energy from braking into electricity and stores it in...

3

Gravity brake  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

Lujan, Richard E. (Santa Fe, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

Norgren, D.U.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hybrid: Braking  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

1 1 Regenerative braking converts otherwise wasted energy from braking into electricity and stores it in the battery. In regenerative braking, the electric motor is reversed so that, instead of using electricity to turn the wheels, the rotating wheels turn the motor and create electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the motor slows the vehicle down. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is decelerating. There are arrows flowing from the front wheels to the electric motor to the battery. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is decelerating. There are arrows flowing from the front wheels to the electric motor to the battery.

6

Hybrid: Braking  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

2 2 If additional stopping power is needed, conventional friction brakes (e.g., disc brakes) are also applied automatically. Go back… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Battery: The battery stores energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the electric motor. Since the battery helps power the vehicle, it is larger and holds much more energy than batteries used to start conventional vehicles. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

7

Pella Drum Opener  

The Pella Drum Opener is a developed and tested tool that facilitates the opening of open-head steel drums and resolves a safety issue with respect to drum handling.

8

Type B Drum packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Type B Drum package is a container in which a single drum containing Type B quantities of radioactive material will be packaged for shipment. The Type B Drum containers are being developed to fill a void in the packaging and transportation capabilities of the US Department of Energy (DOE), as no double containment packaging for single drums of Type B radioactive material is currently available. Several multiple-drum containers and shielded casks presently exist. However, the size and weight of these containers present multiple operational challenges for single-drum shipments. The Type B Drum containers will offer one unshielded version and, if needed, two shielded versions, and will provide for the option of either single or double containment. The primary users of the Type B Drum container will be any organization with a need to ship single drums of Type B radioactive material. Those users include laboratories, waste retrieval facilities, emergency response teams, and small facilities.

Edwards, W.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hybrid: Braking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Button Stopped button highlighted subbanner graphic: gray bar Button Stopped button highlighted subbanner graphic: gray bar STOPPED When the vehicle is stopped, such as at a red light, the gasoline engine and electric motor shut off automatically so that energy is not wasted in idling. The battery continues to power auxillary systems, such as the air conditioning and dashboard displays. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Battery: The battery stores energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the electric motor. Since the battery helps power the vehicle, it is larger and holds much more energy than batteries used to start conventional vehicles. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

10

Hybrid: Braking  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Button Stopped button highlighted subbanner graphic: gray bar Button Stopped button highlighted subbanner graphic: gray bar STOPPED When the vehicle is stopped, such as at a red light, the gasoline engine and electric motor shut off automatically so that energy is not wasted in idling. The battery continues to power auxillary systems, such as the air conditioning and dashboard displays. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Battery: The battery stores energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the electric motor. Since the battery helps power the vehicle, it is larger and holds much more energy than batteries used to start conventional vehicles. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

11

Drum-boiler dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear dynamic model for natural circulation drum-boilers is presented. The model describes the complicated dynamics of the drum, downcomer, and riser components. It is derived from first principles, and is characterized by a few physical parameters. ...

K. J. StrM; R. D. Bell

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hot air drum evaporator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

Black, Roger L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Full Hybrid: Braking  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Braking button highlighted Stopped button Braking button highlighted Stopped button BRAKING PART 1 Regenerative braking converts otherwise wasted energy from braking into electricity and stores it in the battery. In regenerative braking, the electric motor is reversed so that, instead of using electricity to turn the wheels, the rotating wheels turn the motor and create electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the motor slows the vehicle down. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is decelerating. There are arrows flowing from the front wheels to the power split device to the electric motor to the battery. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is decelerating. There are arrows flowing from the front wheels to the power split device to the electric motor to the battery.

14

FAILURE ANALYSIS: WASTEWATER DRUM BULGING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 55 gallon wastewater drum lid was found to be bulged during storage in a remote area. Drum samples were obtained for analysis. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

Vormelker, P

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Vehicle brake testing system  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to a force measuring system capable of measuring forces associated with vehicle braking and of evaluating braking performance. The disclosure concerns an invention which comprises a first row of linearly aligned plates, a force bearing surface extending beneath and beside the plates, vertically oriented links and horizontally oriented links connecting each plate to a force bearing surface, a force measuring device in each link, a transducer coupled to each force measuring device, and a computing device coupled to receive an output signal from the transducer indicative of measured force in each force measuring device. The present invention may be used for testing vehicle brake systems.

Stevens, Samuel S [Harriman, TN; Hodgson, Jeffrey W [Lenoir City, TN

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

16

Svendborg Brakes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy Product Denmark-based manufacturer of braking systems for the wind industry, as well as for the oil sector. References Svendborg Brakes1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

17

Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing: Five-Axle Combination Tractor-Flatbed Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, in coordination with the Federal Highway Administration, sponsored the Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing (HOVBT) program in order to provide information about the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) on braking performance. Because the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations limit the number of braking system defects that may exist for a vehicle to be allowed to operate on the roadways, the examination of the effect of brake defects on brake performance for increased loads is also relevant. The HOVBT program seeks to provide relevant information to policy makers responsible for establishing load limits, beginning with providing test data for a combination tractor/trailer. This testing was conducted on a five-axle combination vehicle with tractor brakes meeting the Reduced Stopping Distance requirement rulemaking. This report provides a summary of the testing activities, the results of various analyses of the data, and recommendations for future research. Following a complete brake rebuild, instrumentation, and brake burnish, stopping tests were performed from 20 and 40 mph with various brake application pressures (15 psi, 25 psi, 35 psi, 45 psi, 55 psi, and full system pressure). These tests were conducted for various brake conditions at the following GVWs: 60,000, 80,000, 91,000, 97,000, 106,000, and 116,000 lb. The 80,000-lb GVWs included both balanced and unbalanced loads. The condition of the braking system was also varied. To introduce these defects, brakes (none, forward drive axle, or rear trailer axle) were made inoperative. In addition to the stopping tests, performance-based brake tests were conducted for the various loading and brake conditions. Analysis of the stopping test data showed the stopping distance to increase with load (as expected) and also showed that more braking force was generated by the drive axle brakes than the trailer axle brakes. The constant-pressure stopping test data revealed a linear relationship between brake application pressure and was used to develop an algorithm to normalize stopping data for weight and initial speed.

Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL] ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL] ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL] ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Transuranic drum hydrogen explosion tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiolysis of transuranic (TRU) waste can produce flammable ({gt}4%) mixtures of hydrogen gas in 55 gallon vented waste storage drums. Explosion testing was conducted at the E. I. duPont Explosion Hazards Laboratory to determine the minimum concentration at which a drum lid removal occurs. A secondary objective was to investigate the maximum pressure and rate of pressure rise as a function of hydrogen concentration. Prior to beginning any drum explosion tests, small-scale pressure vessel tests and drum mixing tests were completed. The pressure vessel tests established a relationship between hydrogen concentration and the maximum pressure and pressure rise. These small-scale tests were used to establish the concentration range over which a drum lid removal might occur. Mixing tests were also conducted to determine the equilibration times for two different hydrogen-air mixtures in a TRU drum. Nine successful drum explosion tests were conducted over a hydrogen concentration range of 13--36% (v/v), test results suggest total integrity failure via drum lid removal will not occur below 15% (v/v). Controlled small-scale pressure vessel tests were conducted over a range of 5--50% (v/v) to determine the pressure and pressure rise as a function of hydrogen concentration. No similar relationship could be established for the drum explosion tests due to the variability in drum lid sealing and retaining ring closure. Mixing tests conducted at 5% and 25% (v/v) indicate adding pure hydrogen to the middle of a drum causes some initial stratification along the drum length, but the air and hydrogen become well-mixed after 50 minutes. 4 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Dykes, K.L.; Meyer, M.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

NIST Physicists 'Entangle' Microscopic Drum's Beat with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... entangled a microscopic mechanical drum with electrical signals ... Entanglement has technological uses. ... cooled" the drum to a very low energy level ...

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle is disclosed. The braking system is responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

Venkataperumal, R.R.; Mericle, G.E.

1979-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle, with the braking system being responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

Venkataperumal, Rama R. (Troy, MI); Mericle, Gerald E. (Mount Clemens, MI)

1981-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

'Tuning' Graphene Drums Might Turn Conductors to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Tuning' Graphene Drums Might Turn Conductors to Semiconductors. From NIST Tech Beat: June 27, 2012. ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

Drum inspection robots: Application development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE), drums containing mixed and low level stored waste are inspected, as mandated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and other regulations. The inspections are intended to prevent leaks by finding corrosion long before the drums are breached. The DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) has sponsored efforts towards the development of robotic drum inspectors. This emerging application for mobile and remote sensing has broad applicability for DOE and commercial waste storage areas. Three full scale robot prototypes have been under development, and another project has prototyped a novel technique to analyze robotically collected drum images. In general, the robots consist of a mobile, self-navigating base vehicle, outfitted with sensor packages so that rust and other corrosion cues can be automatically identified. They promise the potential to lower radiation dose and operator effort required, while improving diligence, consistency, and documentation.

Hazen, F.B. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Warner, R.D. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Drum tie-down apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drum tie-down apparatus for securing drum-like containers in an upright position to a floor or platform of a transportation vehicle having spaced apart cargo tie-down points. The apparatus comprises a pair of cylindrical, hollow tube segments horizontally oriented and engageable with a drum lid adjacent opposite rim edges, flexible strap segments for connecting upper and lower central portions of the tube segments together across the drum lid and a pair of elongated flexible tie-down segments, one extending horizontally through each of the tube segments, the ends thereof being attached to said spaced apart tie-down points such that end portions of the pair of tie-down segments extend downwardly and radially outwardly from the tube segments to the tie-down points.

Morse, Harvey E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Regenerative braking device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are several embodiments of a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a plurality of rubber rollers (24, 26) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (14) connectable to the vehicle drivetrain and an output shaft (16) which is drivingly connected to the input shaft by a variable ratio transmission (20). When the transmission ratio is such that the input shaft rotates faster than the output shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy, thereby slowing the vehicle. When the transmission ratio is such that the output shaft rotates faster than the input shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally relaxed to deliver accumulated energy, thereby accelerating or driving the vehicle.

Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

L AREA WASTEWATER STORAGE DRUM EVALUATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the determination of the cause of pressurization that led to bulging deformation of a 55 gallon wastewater drum stored in L-Area. Drum samples were sent to SRNL for evaluation. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

Vormelker, P; Cynthia Foreman, C; Zane Nelson, Z; David Hathcock, D; Dennis Vinson, D

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Variable ratio regenerative braking device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Vapor generator steam drum spray head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and "cooldown" water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure.

Fasnacht, Jr., Floyd A. (Massillon, OH)

1978-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake Assessment Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor #12;Overview · Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) Air Brake System · North American Standard Level-1

30

Study of Present-Day LED Brightness and Corresponding Rear Signaling Concepts (LED Optimization)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crash database studies have shown that more than 29 percent of all crashes are rear-end crashes. These types of crashes often result from a failure to respond (or delays in responding) to a stopped or decelerating lead vehicle (NHTSA, 2005). The work described here is part of a larger program of research intended to develop and evaluate rear signaling applications designed to reduce the frequency and severity of rear-end crashes by redirecting drivers visual attention to the forward roadway (for cases involving a distracted driver), and/or increasing the saliency or meaningfulness of the brake signal (for attentive drivers).

Round Stop Lamp A; Round Stoplamp A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Brake blending strategy for a hybrid vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including a transmission for driving a pair of wheels of a vehicle and a heat engine and an electric motor/generator coupled to the transmission. A friction brake system is provided for applying a braking torque to said vehicle. A controller unit generates control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system for controllably braking the vehicle in response to a drivers brake command. The controller unit determines and amount of regenerative torque available and compares this value to a determined amount of brake torque requested for determining the control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system.

Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI)

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

Hot air drum evaporator. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

Black, R.L.

1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

Drum Ring Tools: Removal/Installation Set  

Container drums and barrels are commonly known and widely used for shipping, storage, etc. They typically have a rigid cylindrical construction, such as steel, and ...

34

CMV Brake Wear and Performance Test Little is known about the brake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inspections were due to brake defects. Additionally, brake maintenance and repair present a significant cost Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) Research Areas Aviation Safety Air Traffic Management Analysis Environmental Policy Analysis Highway Safety Intelligent Transportation Systems Logistics Management Supply

35

Improved braking torque generation capacity of an eddy current brake with time varying magnetic fields: A numerical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eddy current brakes (ECB) are electrically controlled and non-contact actuators used as assistive brakes in vehicles. ECBs exhibit insufficient generated braking torque at low speeds. In order to overcome this, the use of AC magnetic fields with fixed ... Keywords: Automotive applications, Brake-by-wire, Eddy current brakes, Finite element analysis, Time-varying magnetic field

Kerem Karakoc; Edward J. Park; Afzal Suleman

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor

38

Multidisciplinary design optimization of an automotive magnetorheological brake design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a new electromechanical brake system using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. The proposed brake system consists of rotating disks immersed in a MR fluid and enclosed in an electromagnet, where the yield stress of the ... Keywords: Automotive brake, Computational fluid dynamics, Electric brake actuator, Finite element analysis, Magnetorheological fluid, Multidisciplinary design optimization

Edward J. Park; Luis Falco da Luz; Afzal Suleman

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Application of Fuzzy Logic in Regenerative Braking of EV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regenerative braking can improve energy usage efficiency and prolong the driving distance of electric vehicle per charge, effectively. In the paper, we design a sugenos fuzzy logic controller which has four inputs including drivers braking ... Keywords: regenerative braking, fuzzy logic control, braking force distribution, ADVISOR

Zijian Zhang; Guoqing Xu; Weimin Li; Liang Zheng

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

Barbu, Corneliu (Laguna Hills, CA); Teichmann, Ralph (Nishkayuna, NY); Avagliano, Aaron (Houston, TX); Kammer, Leonardo Cesar (Niskayuna, NY); Pierce, Kirk Gee (Simpsonville, SC); Pesetsky, David Samuel (Greenville, SC); Gauchel, Peter (Muenster, DE)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Drum Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.544722222222,"lon":-112.91611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more roadwheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the roadwheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the roadwheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded.

Davis, Roy I. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more road wheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the road wheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the road wheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded. 8 figs.

Davis, R.I.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

U-drumwave: an interactive performance system for drumming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we share our experience of applying the modern multimedia technologies to the traditional performing art in a drumming performance project, U-Drumwave. By deploying an interactive system on the drumming stage, the audience will see augmented ... Keywords: drumming performance, interactive art, spatial AR

Yin-Tzu Lin; Shuen-Huei Guan; Yuan-Chang Yao; Wen-Huang Cheng; Ja-Ling Wu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Passivity based control of drum boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel state space model for the drum boilers with natural recirculation. This model uses the total mass and energy inventories of the boiler as the state variables, and has an affine structure in the control variables. A passivity ...

Chengtao Wen; B. Erik Ydstie

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Model and Simulation of a Super-capacitor Braking Energy Recovery System for Urban Railway Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a braking energy recovery system based on super-capacitor was presented. The method use super-capacitor and the conventional braking resistance constitute a new braking unit to realize the regenerative energy recovery, when braking, braking ... Keywords: Urban railway transportation, regeneration braking, super-capacitor, energy recovery, electric traction

Chen Xiao-li; Yang Jian; Fang Yu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydrualic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

Cikanek, Susan R. (Wixom, MI)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control. 10 figs.

Cikanek, S.R.

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

49

THERMAL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR WSB DRUM  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum.

Lee, S

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

50

CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May, 2007 readiness assessment of the Management at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

51

CRAD, Training - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Training - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2007 readiness assessment of the Training Program at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

52

Potential VOC Deflagrations in a Vented TRU Drum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the analysis is to examine the potential for lid ejection from a vented transuranic (TRU) waste drum due to pressure buildup caused by the deflagration of hydrogen and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the drum. In this analysis, the AICC pressure for a stoichiometric mixture of VOCs is calculated and then compared against the experimental peak pressure of stoichiometric combustion of propane and hexane in a combustion chamber. The experimental peak pressures of propane and hexane are about 12 percent lower than the calculated AICC pressure. Additional losses in the drum are calculated due to venting of the gases, drum bulging, waste compaction, and heat losses from the presence of waste in the drum. After accounting for these losses, the final pressures are compared to the minimum observed pressure that ejects the lid from a TRU drum. The ejection pressure of 105 psig is derived from data that was recorded for a series of tests where hydrogen-air mixtures were ignited inside sealed TRU drums. Since the calculated pressures are below the minimum lid ejection pressure, none of the VOCs and the hydrogen (up to 4 percent) mixtures present in the TRU waste drum is expected to cause lid ejection if ignited. The analysis of potential VOC deflagrations in a vented TRU drum can be applied across the DOE-Complex since TRU waste is stored in drums throughout the complex.

Mukesh, GUPTA

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

DEGRADATION EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER DRUMS AND TANKS  

SciTech Connect

Heavy water with varying chemistries is currently being stored in over 6700 drums in L- and K-areas and in seven tanks in L-, K-, and C-areas. A detailed evaluation of the potential degradation of the drums and tanks, specific to their design and service conditions, has been performed to support the demonstration of their integrity throughout the desired storage period. The 55-gallon drums are of several designs with Type 304 stainless steel as the material of construction. The tanks have capacities ranging from 8000 to 45600 gallons and are made of Type 304 stainless steel. The drums and tanks were designed and fabricated to national regulations, codes and standards per procurement specifications for the Savannah River Site. The drums have had approximately 25 leakage failures over their 50+ years of use with the last drum failure occurring in 2003. The tanks have experienced no leaks to date. The failures in the drums have occurred principally near the bottom weld, which attaches the bottom to the drum sidewall. Failures have occurred by pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and are attributable, in part, to the presence of chloride ions in the heavy water. Probable degradation mechanisms for the continued storage of heavy water were evaluated that could lead to future failures in the drum or tanks. This evaluation will be used to support establishment of an inspection plan which will include susceptible locations, methods, and frequencies for the drums and tanks to avoid future leakage failures.

Mickalonis, J.; Vormelker, P.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2007 readiness assessment of the Engineering program at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

55

CRAD, Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2007 readiness assessment of the Quality Assurance Program at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

56

Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

McCormick, W.A.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

57

NIST Mechanical Micro-Drum Used as Quantum Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a micro-drum and later retrieved with 65 percent efficiency, a good ... achieve rapid, reliable exchanges between the circuit's electrical energy, in the ...

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the DTF, its support systems, tools, and drum treatment activities identified in ORPS corrective actions, NCRs or CARS have been adequately resolved. b. Lessons learned from...

59

Cooler Than Ever: NIST Mechanical Micro-Drum Chilled to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Each departing photon takes with it one mechanical unit of energyone phononfrom the drum motion. At a drive intensity that corresponds to ...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

Modeling of a Drum Boiler Using MATLAB/Simulink.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dynamic simulator was developed for a natural circulation drum type boiler through a joint Youngstown State University/The Babcock and Wilcox Company cooperative agreement. The (more)

Anderson, Scott B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

85-GAL DRUM AND NUCFIL-007LS FILTERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

{sm_bullet} 55-gallon drums were overpacked into 85-gallon drums {sm_bullet} ANucFiI-007LS long-stem filter was installed- NucFiI certified the use of NucFiI-007LS filters in 8S-gallon drums as DOT 7AType A - Wood wedges were used during the tests to center and . stabilize the inner 55-gallon drums {sm_bullet} During inspection, afew filters were found to be loose, canted, and/or with RTV seals broken - No contamination or loss of container integrity {sm_bullet} Discovered in November 2008 U.

JB WOODBURY

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Experimental study of elastoplastic mechanical properties of coke drum materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coke drums are vertical pressure vessels used in the delayed coking process in petroleum refineries. Significant temperature variation during the delayed coking process causes the (more)

Chen, Jie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Research of Traction Motor Energy-Saving Regenerative Braking Control Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In all the motor braking control systems, regenerative braking is the only way of energy-saving braking control mode. It can convert dynamic energy which generate during braking period into electric energy, then return to the grid. In this paper, through ... Keywords: regenerative braking, traction motor, direct torque, stator flux, slip frequency

Yuhua Wang; Jianlin Miao; Yuanfang Wei

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Niobium Alloying in Grey Cast Iron for Vehicle Brake Discs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Niobium Alloying in Grey Cast Iron for Vehicle Brake Discs. Author(s) ... Microtexture Analysis of a Hot Rolled Silicon Electric Steel Niobium

65

Radiogenic gas accumulation in TRU waste storage drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field experiment was conducted over a four-year time span to determine the effect of high-activity transuranic (TRU) waste on the atmosphere within TRU waste storage drums typical of those generated in Savannah River Plant operation. Routine gas composition analyses showed that a significant amount of hydrogen can accumulate in drums that contain high alpha activity, and that flammable gas mixtures could form in such drums in spite of the radiolytic consumption of oxygen. According to this study, gas pressure accumulation does not pose a threat to the integrity of the TRU waste containers that are now being stored at the Savannah River Plant. Therefore, the 20-year storage criterion is still viable. However, the continued avoidance of a perfectly gas-tight drum seal (e.g., epoxy, metal welding) is recommended. The test drums will continue to be monitored.

Ryan, J.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Braking system for use with an arbor of a microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling device causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

Norgren, Duane U. (Orinda, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Drum Mountain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Drum Mountain Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.544722222222°, -112.91611111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.544722222222,"lon":-112.91611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

Doc.384, 'Lali drums/gongs and davui shell trumpets'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lali drums/gongs and davui shell trumpets Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry) Lali drum/gong beats and davui triton-shell trumpets, recorded at Serua Island in July 1957. 12 min 42 seconds. 1) Lali ni soqo ni vaka turaga... Fijian Musical instruments and / or other objects used in performance Lali drums/gongs, davui shell trumpets Level of public access (fully closed, fully open) Fully open last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Notes and context (include reference...

Roth, George Kingsley

69

Study on Regenerative Brake Method of Hybrid Electric Drive System of Armored Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at characteristics of regenerative brake of hybrid electric drive system of tracked armored vehicle, mechanism of regenerative brake by pulse width modulation is in-depth analyzed, motor speed, brake current, feedback current, feedback energy ... Keywords: hybrid electric drive, motor, regenerative brake

Li Hua; Zhong Meng-chun; Zhang Jian; Xu Da; Lin Hai

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Hydrogen explosion testing with a simulated transuranic drum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transuranic (TRU) waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored onsite for future retrieval and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Some of the TRU waste is stored in vented 210-liter (55-gallon) drums and consists of gloves, wipes, plastic valves, tools, etc. Gas generation caused by radiolysis and biodegradation of these organic waste materials may produce a flammable hydrogen-air mixture (>4% v/v) in the multi-layer plastic waste bags. Using a worst case scenario, a drum explosion test program was carried out to determine the hydrogen concentration necessary to cause removal of the drum lid. Test results indicate an explosive mixture up to 15% v/v of hydrogen can be contained in an SRS TRU drum without total integrity failure via lid removal.

Dykes, K.L.; Meyer, M.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hydrogen explosion testing with a simulated transuranic drum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transuranic (TRU) waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored onsite for future retrieval and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Some of the TRU waste is stored in vented 210-liter (55-gallon) drums and consists of gloves, wipes, plastic valves, tools, etc. Gas generation caused by radiolysis and biodegradation of these organic waste materials may produce a flammable hydrogen-air mixture (>4% v/v) in the multi-layer plastic waste bags. Using a worst case scenario, a drum explosion test program was carried out to determine the hydrogen concentration necessary to cause removal of the drum lid. Test results indicate an explosive mixture up to 15% v/v of hydrogen can be contained in an SRS TRU drum without total integrity failure via lid removal.

Dykes, K.L.; Meyer, M.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Degradation of transuranic waste drums in underground storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford site is one of several U.S. Department of Energy locations that has transuranic radioactive Waste in storage, resulting from nuclear weapons material production. Transuranic waste has extremely long-lived radionuclides requiring great care in management; such waste is slated for eventual disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Most of this waste is stored in 208-{ell} (55-gal) drums below ground. At the Hanford site 37 641 drums are stored in several trenches. The drums were stacked up to five high with plywood sheeting between the layers and on top of the stacks. Plastic tarps were used to cover the drums and the plywood, with several feet of earth backfilled on top of the plastic. A fraction of the drums ({approximately}20%) were covered only with earth, not with plywood and plastic. The drums are either painted low-carbon steel or galvanized low-carbon steel. They have been placed in storage from 1970 to 1988, resulting in between 7 and 25 yr of storage. The environment is either soil or air atmosphere. The air atmosphere environment also includes, for some drum surfaces, contact with the underside of the tarp. The temperature of the air atmosphere is relatively uniform. Year-round measurements have not been taken, but available data suggest that the temperature span should be from {approximately} 10 to 30{degrees}C (50 to 86{degrees}F). Humidity in underground storage module mock-ups has been measured at nearly 90% during testing in the summer months. Subsequent tests have shown that the humidity probably drops to 50 to 60% during other seasons. This report describes results of a project to inspect the condition of the waste drums.

Duncan, D.; DeRosa, D.C.; Demiter, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Regenerative braking on bicycles to power LED safety flashers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work develops a method for capturing some of the kinetic energy ordinarily lost during braking on bicycles to power LED safety flashers. The system is designed to eliminate: (a) battery changing in popular LED flashers, ...

Collier, Ian M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Computational model design and performance estimation in registration brake control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric motorcycles are applicable to both toys and real motorcycles, and also is a reference for constructing larger electrical vehicles. A design computational model of regenerative braking control of electric motorcycles and an experimental identification ...

P. S. Pa; S. C. Chang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Potential chemical hazards during retrieval of TRU waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is implementing a program to retrieve a large number of transuranic (TRU) waste containers retrievably stored under earthen cover on three pads. The waste containers will be inspected and overpacked or repackaged as necessary. The majority of the containers are drums (> 16,000) and, as shown in Table 1,99.9% are 208-L (55-gal.) drums. The 208-L drums are reported to be of mild steel construction with removable lids and gaskets. The gaskets are believed to be permeable to hydrogen, but their permeability to volatile organic compounds (VOCS) is not known. As part of the retrieval operations, the drums will be penetrated and then fitted with a carbon-filter-containing venting device to ensure they do not contain flammable gases. A fully contained and high-efficiency air particulate (HEPA) filtered venting system with gas analysis capability for insertion of the vent device has been designed and is being constructed. A Hazards Analysis (HA) has been performed on the system to identify and evaluate potential accidents arising from the operation of the drum venting system.

Kosiewicz, S.T.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.; Sasser, M.K.; Foxx, C.L.; Gruetzmacher, K.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Drum, New York  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Drum, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Drum took place on May 4 and 5, 2010.

Brown, Scott A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Solana, Amy E.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Hand, James R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rowley, Steven; Nesse, Ronald J.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum...

79

Research on water level optimal control of boiler drum based on dual heuristic dynamic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler drum system is an important component of a thermal power plant or industrial production, and the water level is a critical parameter of boiler drum control system. Because of non-linear, strong coupling and large disturbance, it is difficult to ... Keywords: BP neural network, boiler drum level, dual heuristic dynamic programming, optimal control

Qingbao Huang; Shaojian Song; Xiaofeng Lin; Kui Peng

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Analytical and experimental evaluation of solid waste drum fire performance volumes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fire hazards associated with drum storage of radioactively contaminated wastes are a major concern in DOE facilities design for long term storage of solid wastes in drums. These facilities include drums stored in pallet arrays and in rack storage systems. This report details testing in this area

Hecker, C.F., [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States); Rhodes, B.T.; Beitel, J.J.; Gottuk, D.T.; Beyler, C.L.; Rosenbaum, E.R., [Hughes Associates, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control. 123 figs.

Cikanek, S.R.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

Cikanek, Susan R. (Wixom, MI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Regenerative braking device with rotationally mounted energy storage means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (30) and an output shaft (32), clutches (50, 56) and brakes (52, 58) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. In a second embodiment the clutches and brakes are dispensed with and the variable ratio transmission is connected directly across the input and output shafts. In both embodiments the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft rotates faster or relative to the output shaft and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft rotates faster or relative to the input shaft.

Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

1982-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

84

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Plans 1. Atlantic Red Drum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Plans 1. Atlantic Red Drum 2. Shrimp 3. Stone Crab 4. Coral, Coral Reef, and Live/Hard Bottom Habitats (with SAFMC) Key Gulf of Mexico Commercial Species Commercially-important species and species groups in the Gulf of Mexico include: blue crab, stone crab

85

JUSTIFICATION FOR A LIMIT OF 15 PERCENT HYDROGEN IN A 55 GALLON DRUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concentration of 15% hydrogen in air in a waste drum is used as the concentration at which the drum remains intact in the case of a deflagration. The following describes what could happen to the drum if 15% hydrogen or more in air were ignited. Table 2 of the Savannah River report WSRC-TR-90-165 ''TRU Drum Hydrogen Explosion Tests'' provides the results of tests performed in 55-gallon drums filled with hydrogen and air mixtures. The hydrogen-air mixtures were ignited by a hot-wire igniter. The results of the tests are shown in Table 1. They concluded that drums can withstand deflagration involving hydrogen concentration up to 15% hydrogen. Testing was performed at Idaho Falls and documented in a letter from RH Beers, Waste Technology Programs Division, EG&G Idaho, to CP Gertz, Radioactive Waste Technology Branch, DOE dated Sept. 29, 1983. In these tests, 55-gallon drums were filled with hydrogen-air mixtures which were ignited. The results in Table 2.2 showed that ignition for drums containing 11% and 14% hydrogen, the drum lid remained on the drum. Ignition in drum with 30% hydrogen resulted in lid loss. It is concluded from the results of these two tests that, for uncorroded drums, a 15% hydrogen in air mixture will not result in loss of drum integrity (i.e., lid remains on, walls remain intact). The drum walls however, may be thinned due to corrosion. The effect of the deflagration on thinner walls is assessed next. Assume a 15% hydrogen in air mixture exists in a drum. The pressure assuming adiabatic isochoric complete combustion (AICC) conditions is 69 psig (using the same deflagration pressure calculation method as in HNF-19492, ''Revised Hydrogen Deflagration Analysis which got 82 psig for 20% hydrogen in air).

MARUSICH, R.M.

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of...

87

Criticality Safety Controls for 55-Gallon Drums with a Mass Limit of 200 grams Pu-239  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following 200-gram Pu drum criticality safety controls are applicable to RHWM drum storage operations: (1) Mass (Fissile/Pu) - each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be limited to 200 gram Pu or Pu equivalent; (2) Moderation - Hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density greater than that (0.133 g H/cc) of polyethylene and paraffin are not allowed and hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density no greater than that of polyethylene and paraffin are allowed with unlimited amounts; (3) Interaction - a spacing of 30-inches (76 cm) is required between arrays and 200-gram Pu drums shall be placed in arrays for 200-gram Pu drums only (no mingling of 200-gram Pu drums with other drums not meeting the drum controls associated with the 200-gram limit); (4) Reflection - no beryllium and carbon/graphite (other than the 50-gram waiver amount) is allowed, (note that Nat-U exceeding the waiver amount is allowed when its U-235 content is included in the fissile mass limit of 200 grams); and (5) Geometry - drum geometry, only 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be used and array geometry, 55-gallon drums are allowed for 2-high stacking. Steel waste boxes may be stacked 3-high if constraint.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Oxygen-Diffused Titanium as a Candidate Brake Rotor Material  

SciTech Connect

Titanium alloys are one of several candidate materials for the next generation of truck disk brake rotors. Despite their advantages of lightweight relative to cast iron and good strength and corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are unlikely to be satisfactory brake rotor materials unless their friction and wear behavior can be significantly improved. In this study, a surface engineering process oxygen diffusion was applied to titanium rotors and has shown very encouraging results. The oxygen diffused Ti-6Al-4V (OD-Ti) was tested on a sub-scale brake tester against a flat block of commercial brake lining material and benchmarked against several other Ti-based materials, including untreated Ti-6Al-4V, ceramic particle-reinforced Ti composites (MMCs), and a thermal-spray-coated Ti alloy. With respect to friction, the OD-Ti outperformed all other candidate materials under the imposed test conditions with the friction coefficient remaining within a desirable range of 0.35-0.50, even under the harshest conditions when the disk surface temperature reached nearly 600 ?C. In addition, the OD-Ti showed significantly improved wear-resistance over the non-treated one and was even better than the Ti-based composite materials.

Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (3) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Project: Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (3) Development Project: Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (3) Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 39.32.41" N, 112°55'1" W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 39.32.41" N, 112°55'1" W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

90

Transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate at which hydrogen (H {sub 2}) or a volatile organic compound (VOC) exits a layer of confinement in a vented waste drum is proportional to the concentration difference across the layer. The proportionality constant is the gas transport characteristic. A series of transport experiments were conducted to determine H{sub 2} and VOC transport characteristics across different drum filter vents and polymer bags. This report reviews the methods and results of past investigators in defining transport characteristics across filter vents and polymer bags, describes the apparatus and procedures used in these experiments, compares the reported and estimated transport characteristics with earlier results, and discusses the impact of changing the transport characteristic values used in model calculations.

Liekhus, K.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Gas generation results and venting study for transuranic waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixteen waste drums, containing six categories of plutonium-contaminated waste, were monitored for venting and gas generation for six months. The venting devices tested appeared adequate to relieve pressure and prevent hydrogen accumulation. Most of the gas generation, primarily H2 and CO2, was due to radiolytic decomposition of the hydrogenous wastes. Comparison of the gas yields with those obtained previously in laboratory tests showed very reasonable agreement with few exceptions.

Kazanjian, A.R.; Arnold, P.M.; Simmons, W.C.; D'Amico, E.L.

1985-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

Project Drum Inlet: explosive excavation in saturated sand  

SciTech Connect

Seasonal storms during February of 1971 completely closed the Drum Inlet navigation channel through the Outer Banks off the North Carolina coast. This channel is highly useful to commercial and sport fishing industries in the Carteret County vicinity of North Carolina, and is vital to maintenance of the ecological balance in the inland Core Sound waters. To reopen Drum Inlet, an alignment about 2.1 miles south of the original location was selected. A contract dredge excavated a channel from the inland Core Sound waterway to and part way through the Outer Banks. The final 385-ft-long section of sand separating the Core Sound from the Atlantic Ocean was excavated with large explosive charges, This report describes the explosive excavation of that portion of the channel. Twenty-two separate canisters, each containing 1 ton of aluminized ammonium-nitrate slurry blasting agent, were emplaced in two rows. All charges were detonated simultaneously at 1327 hours, 23 Decembcr 1971. The detonation successfully removed the sand barrier, forming a continuous channel over 80 ft in width. This channel subsequently washed out to a width of about 1000 ft and was used:is an access route to the Raleigh Bay fishing grounds. The Drum Inlet project demonstrated the practicality of explosive channel excavation in saturated sand under the special conditions encountered at this site. (auth)

Snell, C.M.; Gillespie, R.H.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy Efficiency in Heavy Vehicle Tires, Drivetrains, and Braking Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document was prepared to support the primary goals of the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These were recently stated as follows: ''Develop by 2004 the enabling technologies for a class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) which will meet prevailing emission standards. For Class 3-6 trucks operating on an urban driving cycle, develop by 2004 commercially viable vehicles that achieve at least double the fuel economy of comparable current vehicles (1999), and as a research goal, reduce criteria pollutants to 30% below EPA standards. Develop by 2004 the diesel engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of Class 1 and 2 trucks, achieving a 35 % fuel efficiency improvement over comparable gasoline-fueled trucks, while meeting applicable emissions standards.'' The enabling technologies for improving the fuel efficiency of trucks, include not only engine technologies but also technologies involved with lowering the rolling resistance of tires, reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag, improving thermal management, and reducing parasitic frictional losses in drive train components. Opportunities also exist for making better use of the energy that might ordinarily be dissipated during vehicle braking. Braking systems must be included in this evaluation since safety in truck operations is vital, and braking requirements are greater for vehicles having lowered resistance to rolling. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has initiated a program to improve the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles through wind tunnel testing, computational modeling, and on-road evaluations. That activity is described in a separate multi-year plan; therefore, emphasis in this document will be on tires, drive trains, and braking systems. Recent, dramatic fluctuations in diesel fuel prices have emphasized the importance of effecting savings in truck fuel economy by implementing new component designs and materials.

Peter J. Blau

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

EVALUATION OF RADIOLYSIS INDUCED HYDROGEN GENERATION IN DOT 6M DRUMS FROM INTEC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three DOT 6M 30-gallon drums are scheduled to be shipped from the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to L-Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These three drums contain radioactive materials that resulted from the material recovery effort following a small explosion that had occurred in the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) hot chemistry laboratory (HCL). In support of the shipment and subsequent storage of the three DOT 6M drums, an evaluation of the potential for molecular hydrogen production in the drums has been completed and documented herein. The potential sources of hydrogen evaluated in the current report include radiolytic decomposition of polymeric materials in the DOT 6M drums No.3031 and No.3598 and the radiolytic decomposition of water in drum No.20102. No other potential sources have been identified based upon reported drum contents and packaging configuration. A parametric approach was used to evaluate the maximum quantity of molecular hydrogen that can be expected to evolve in two DOT 6M 30-gallon drums in support of receipt and subsequent interim storage prior to canyon processing. These drums are two of three drums scheduled for shipment from INTEC to SRS as part of the decommissioning effort of the INTEC facility. The three DOT 6M drums will be received at L-Area in SRS and stored for up to 13-years prior to final disposition at HB-Line in 2020. Results of the current analysis do not include parametric analysis of drum No.20102 containing 114/133 SAL (salvage) which contains UO{sub 3} powder. This drum has not been identified as containing polymeric materials and a conservative calculation indicates that the maximum gross molecular hydrogen production due to the radiolysis of adsorbed moisture would yield a production rate of 5.1-cm{sup 3}/yr, driven primarily by the large surface are to volume ratio of the oxide powder. The remaining two drums, No.3031 and No.3598 contain polymer bags and/or bottles that will be subject to radiolytically induced hydrogen gas generation due to decomposition of the polymers. Conservative values for hydrogen gas generation rates and rates of pressure increase within the drums have been determined based upon a number of inputs and assumptions. The results are that hydrogen will be produced at a rate of 1.93-cm{sup 3}/yr and 1.50-cm{sup 3}/yr, respectively for drums No.3031 and No.3598. Projected molecular hydrogen concentrations at 2020 have been calculated to remain below the lower flammability limit of 4% molecular hydrogen by volume in air.

Vinson, D

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF NGS CONCENTRATE DRUM SAMPLES [Next Generation Solvent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared two drums (50 gallons each in ?Drum#2? and ?Drum#4?) of NGS-MCU (Next Generation Solvent-Modular CSSX Unit) concentrate for future use at MCU in downblending the BOBCalixC6 based solvent to produce NGS-MCU solvent. Samples of each drum were sent for analysis. The results of all the analyses indicate that the blend concentrate is of the correct composition and should produce a blended solvent at MCU of the desired formulation.

Peters, T.; Williams, M.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

96

Parents' Expectations about Child Rearing after Divorce: Does Anticipating Difficulty Deter Divorce?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Child Rearing after Divorce: Does Anticipating DifficultyChild Rearing after Divorce: Does Anticipating DifficultyChild Rearing after Divorce: Does Anticipating Difficulty

Poortman, Anne-Rigt; Seltzer, Judith A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Brake rotor design and comparison using finite element analysis : an investigation in topology optimization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Disc brake technology used for mountain bikes, and mountain bike technology in general, has improved significantly as the sport of mountain biking has evolved. Disc (more)

Domond, Kenneth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Numerical Simulation of Brake Discs of CRH3 High-Speed Trains ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the research object?the course of emergency brake was simulated by ANSYS. .... Energy X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Studies of Bulk Polycrystal Responses.

99

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

CSER 96-027: storage of cemented plutonium residue containers in 55 gallon drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear criticality safety analysis has been performed for the storage of residual plutonium cementation containers, produced at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, in 55 gallon drums. This CSER increases the limit of total plutonium stored in each 55 gallon drum from 100 to 200 grams.

Watson, W.T.

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assay of Drums with Unknown Content Stored in 247-41F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested by the Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Program (FDD) to determine the radionuclide content in two drums that were stored in an inactive warehouse of the Naval Fuels facility. The drums were labeled as containing fissile material and were placed in a critically safe arrangement, but it was not known whether they still contained the fissile material. Our g-PHA assay results indicate that the unknown highly enriched uranium (HEU) content of the two drums is one and 0.5 grams of surface contamination. Our neutron measurements confirmed that there are no significant lumps of 235U present in these drums and that only surface contamination is present. The results confirmed that the facility was in compliance with administrative controls for fissile materials and that it is safe to open the drums for visual inspection.

Dewberry, R.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tachyon cosmology, supernovae data, and the big brake singularity  

SciTech Connect

We compare the existing observational data on type Ia supernovae with the evolutions of the Universe predicted by a one-parameter family of tachyon models which we have introduced recently [Phys. Rev. D 69, 123512 (2004)]. Among the set of the trajectories of the model which are compatible with the data there is a consistent subset for which the Universe ends up in a new type of soft cosmological singularity dubbed big brake. This opens up yet another scenario for the future history of the Universe besides the one predicted by the standard {lambda}CDM model.

Keresztes, Z.; Gergely, L. A.; Gorini, V.; Moschella, U.; Kamenshchik, A. Yu. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Szeged, Tisza Lajos krt 84-86, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Department of Experimental Physics, University of Szeged, Dom Ter 9, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Szeged, Tisza Lajos krt 84-86, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Department of Experimental Physics, University of Szeged, Dom Ter 9, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Department of Applied Science, London South Bank University, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 OAA (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Mathematiche, Universita dell'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); INFN, sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin street 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Dual-channel Haptic Synthesis of Viscoelastic Tissue Properties using Programmable Eddy Current Brakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a novel method for haptic synthesis of viscoelastic responses which employs a dual-channel haptic interface. It has motors that generate torque independently of velocity and brakes that generate viscous torque independently of position. ... Keywords: eddy current brakes, haptic simulation, viscoelastic simulation

Andrew H. C. Gosline; Vincent Hayward

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Simulation of PSO Fuzzy Control Stratety for Regenerative Braking of HEV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on particle swarm optimization algorithm, a new fuzzy controller was constructed and a fuzzy control strategy of regenerative braking for HEV was proposed. A model of a parallel hybrid electric vehicle was built. The performance of the default ... Keywords: hybrid electric vehicle, fuzzy control, regenerative braking, particle swarm optimization

Wang Chun; Tang Lan

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Operation Pattern Recognition and Control for Super Capacitor Braking Energy Regeneration System of Micro EV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Super capacitor has some advantages of high charge-discharge rate, long life, simple structure and reliable performance, and it is especially suitable as braking energy renewable energy storage device for electric vehicle and hybrid electric vehicle. ... Keywords: Super capacitor, braking energy regeneration, micro EV, pattern recognition and control

Jinyu Qu; Liyan Liang; Zhongyu Yang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Microsoft PowerPoint - Real-Time Dynamic Brake Assessment poster.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Brake Assessment Dynamic Brake Assessment Purpose Conduct a proof-of-concept test to examine the feasibility of developing an on-board system to assess a vehicle's ability to stop based on typical low-pressure in-service braking events. Partnerships H.T. Hackney Company MGM Brakes Overview Funded through the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's Vehicle and Roadside Operations Division Concept stemming from on the Department of Energy's Medium Truck Duty Cycle research as well as previous research conducted for the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. Signals to be collected Real-time brake application pressure Vehicle speed and acceleration GPS location and grade information Vehicle weight (current load) Engine parameters such as RPM and torque To be conducted October 2010 -

107

Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (2) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project (2) Project (2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (2) Project Location Information Coordinates 39.544722222222°, -112.91611111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.544722222222,"lon":-112.91611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum  

SciTech Connect

This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nondestructive testing methods for 55-gallon, waste storage drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) authorized Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct a feasibility study to identify promising nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for detecting general and localized (both pitting and pinhole) corrosion in the 55-gal drums that are used to store solid waste materials at the Hanford Site. This document presents results obtained during a literature survey, identifies the relevant reference materials that were reviewed, provides a technical description of the methods that were evaluated, describes the laboratory tests that were conducted and their results, identifies the most promising candidate methods along with the rationale for these selections, and includes a work plan for recommended follow-on activities. This report contains a brief overview and technical description for each of the following NDT methods: magnetic testing techniques; eddy current testing; shearography; ultrasonic testing; radiographic computed tomography; thermography; and leak testing with acoustic detection.

Ferris, R.H.; Hildebrand, B.P.; Hockey, R.L.; Riechers, D.M.; Spanner, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

Quandt, G.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

MULTIPLE INPUT BINARY ADDER EMPLOYING MAGNETIC DRUM DIGITAL COMPUTING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital computing apparatus is described for adding a plurality of multi-digit binary numbers. The apparatus comprises a rotating magnetic drum, a recording head, first and second reading heads disposed adjacent to the first and second recording tracks, and a series of timing signals recorded on the first track. A series of N groups of digit-representing signals is delivered to the recording head at time intervals corresponding to the timing signals, each group consisting of digits of the same significance in the numbers, and the signal series is recorded on the second track of the drum in synchronism with the timing signals on the first track. The multistage registers are stepped cyclically through all positions, and each of the multistage registers is coupled to the control lead of a separate gate circuit to open the corresponding gate at only one selected position in each cycle. One of the gates has its input coupled to the bistable element to receive the sum digit, and the output lead of this gate is coupled to the recording device. The inputs of the other gates receive the digits to be added from the second reading head, and the outputs of these gates are coupled to the adding register. A phase-setting pulse source is connected to each of the multistage registers individually to step the multistage registers to different initial positions in the cycle, and the phase-setting pulse source is actuated each N time interval to shift a sum digit to the bistable element, where the multistage register coupled to bistable element is operated by the phase- setting pulse source to that position in its cycle N steps before opening the first gate, so that this gate opens in synchronism with each of the shifts to pass the sum digits to the recording head.

Cooke-Yarborough, E.H.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Development of a model for predicting transient hydrogen venting in 55-gallon drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote drum venting was performed on a population of unvented high activity drums (HAD) in the range of 63 to 435 plutonium equivalent Curies (PEC). These 55-gallon Transuranic (TRU) drums will eventually be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As a part of this process, the development of a calculational model was required to predict the transient hydrogen concentration response of the head space and polyethylene liner (if present) within the 55-gallon drum. The drum and liner were vented using a Remote Drum Venting System (RDVS) that provided a vent sampling path for measuring flammable hydrogen vapor concentrations and allow hydrogen to diffuse below lower flammability limit (LFL) concentrations. One key application of the model was to determine the transient behavior of hydrogen in the head space, within the liner, and the sensitivity to the number of holes made in the liner or number of filters. First-order differential mass transport equations were solved using Laplace transformations and numerically to verify the results. the Mathematica 6.0 computing tool was also used as a validation tool and for examining larger than two chamber systems. Results will be shown for a variety of configurations, including 85-gallon and 110-gallon overpack drums. The model was also validated against hydrogen vapor concentration assay measurements.

Apperson, Jason W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clemmons, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Michael D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sur, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Duan Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons 74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility at Technical Area 16, U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55-gallon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

114

Additional Steam Traps Increase Production of a Drum Oven at a Petroleum Jelly Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional steam traps were installed on the drum oven at a petroleum jelly production facility at an ExxonMobil plant in Nigeria. The installation improved heat transfer and saved energy.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats during FY 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rocky Flats Plant Transuranic Waste Drums were sampled for gas composition. Combustibles, plastics, Raschig rings, solidified organic sludge, and solidified inorganic sludge transuranic waste forms were sampled. Plastic bag material and waste samples were also taken from some solidified sludge waste drums. A vacuum system was used to sample each layer of containment inside a waste drum, including individual waste bags. G values (gas generation) were calculated for the waste drums. Analytical results indicate that very low concentrations of potentially flammable or corrosive gas mixtures will be found in vented drums. G(H{sub 2}) was usually below 1.6, while G(Total) was below 4.0. Hydrogen permeability tests on different types of plastic waste bags used at Rocky Flats were also conducted. Polyvinylchloride was slightly more permeable to hydrogen than polyethylene for new or creased material. Permeability of aged material to hydrogen was slightly higher than for new material. Solidified organic and inorganic sludges were sampled for volatile organics. The analytical results from two drums of solidified organic sludges showed concentrations were above detection limits for four of the 36 volatile organics analyzed. The analytical results for four of the five solidified inorganic sludges show that concentrations were below detection limits for all volatile organics analyzed. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Roggenthen, D.K.; McFeeters, T.L.; Nieweg, R.G.

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nonlinear Control Synthesis for a Self-energizing Electro-Hydraulic Brake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear control algorithm for a self-energizing electro-hydraulic brake is analytically designed. The desired closed-loop system behavior is reached via a synthesized nonlinear controller.

Starykh, Alexey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method for producing H.sub.2 using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300.degree. to 1400.degree. F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A computer model of gas generation and transport within TRU waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model has been developed to predict radiolytic gas generation and transport within Transuranic (TRU) waste drums and surrounding enclosures. Gas generation from the radiolytic decomposition of organic material contaminated with plutonium is modeled and the concentrations of gas throughout the waste drum and enclosures are determined using a diffusional transport model. The model accurately reproduces experimentally measured gas concentrations. With polyethylene waste in unvented drums, the model predicts that the concentration of hydrogen gas can exceed 4 mole percent (lower flammable limit) with only about 5 curies of plutonium. If the drum liner is punctured and an unrestricted 0.75-in. carbon composite filter vent is installed in the drum lid, the plutonium loading can be increased to 240 Ci without generating flammable gas mixtures. Larger diameter filters can be used to increase the curie loading. The model has been used to show that shipments of 1000 Ci of plutonium-238 contaminated waste from Savannah River to the WIPP site are feasible using the TRUPACT shipping container. 10 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, F.G. III

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP The November shipment was the final delivery this year to the Carlsbad plant, which is scheduled to undergo facility maintenance through mid-January. November 25, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

120

Determining site-specific drum loading criteria for storing combustible {sup 238}Pu waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste containing hydrogenous-combustible material contaminated with {sup 238}Pu can generate hydrogen gas at appreciable rates through alpha radiolysis. To ensure safe transportation of WIPP drums, the limit for {sup 238}Pu-combustible waste published in the WIPP TRUPACT-11 CONTENT (TRUCON) CODES is 21 milliwafts per 55 gallon drum. This corresponds to about 45 milligrams of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} used for satellite heat source-electrical generators. The Los Alamos waste storage site adopted a {sup 238}Pu waste storage criteria based on these TRCUCON codes. However, reviews of the content in drums of combustible waste generated during heat source assembly at Los Alamos showed the amount of {sup 238}Pu is typically much greater than 45 milligrams. It is not feasible to appreciably reduce Los Alamos {sup 238}Pu waste drum loadings without significantly increasing waste volumes or introducing unsafe practices. To address this concern, a series of studies were implemented to evaluate the applicability of the TRUCON limits for storage of this specific waste. Addressed in these evaluations were determination of the hydrogen generation rate, hydrogen diffusion rates through confinement layers and vent filters, and packaging requirements specific to Los Alamos generated {sup 238}Pu contaminated combustible waste. These studies also showed that the multiple-layer packaging practices in use at Los Alamos could be relaxed without significantly increasing the risk of contamination. Based on a model developed to predict H{sub 2} concentrations in packages and drum headspace, the site specific effective hydrogen generation rate, and hydrogen-diffusion values, and revising the waste packaging practices, we were able to raise the safe loading limit for {sup 238}Pu waste drums for on site storage to the gram levels typical of currently generated {sup 238}Pu waste.

Marshall, R.S.; Callis, E.L.; Cappis, J.H.; Espinoza, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Reich, B.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, M.C. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cooperative fish-rearing programs in Hanford Site excess facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In, 1993, two successful fish-rearing pilot projects were conducted in Hanford Site 100 K Area water treatment pools (K Pools) that are excess to the US Department of Energy needs. Beginning this spring, two larger cooperative fish programs will be undertaken in the K Pools. One program will involve the Yakama Indian Nation, which will rear, acclimate, and release 500,000 fall chinook salmon. The other program involves the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, which will rear warm-water specie (walleye and channel catfish) for planting in state lakes. Renewed economic vitality is the goal expected from these and follow-on fish programs.

Herborn, D.I.; Anderson, B.N.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Environmental Assessment K Pool 'Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOERA-1 11 1 DOERA-1 11 1 Environmental Assessment K Pool 'Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Emrgy Richland, Washington December 1996 DOEEA-1111 ENVIRONMJ3'NTAL ASSESSMENT K POOL 'F'ISH REARING HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND, WASHINGTON December 1996 This page intentionally left blank. DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. 1 ' U.S. Department of Energy summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to respond to a request to lease facilities at the Hanford Site 100-KE and 100-KW filter plant pools (K Pools) for fish rearing activities. These fish rearing activities would be: (1) business ventures with public h

123

Hook Echoes and Rear-Flank Downdrafts: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nearly 50 years of observations of hook echoes and their associated rear-flank downdrafts (RFDs) are reviewed. Relevant theoretical and numerical simulation results also are discussed. For over 20 years, the hook echo and RFD have been ...

Paul M. Markowski

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Environmental assessment, K Pool fish rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to respond to a request to lease facilities at the Hanford Site 100-KE and 100-KW filter plant pools (K Pools) for fish rearing activities. These fish rearing activities would be: (1) business ventures with public and private funds and (2) long-term enhancement and supplementation programs for game fish populations in the Columbia River Basin. The proposed action is to enter into a use permit or lease agreement with the YIN or other parties who would rear fish in the 100-K Area Pools. The proposed action would include necessary piping, pump, and electrical upgrades of the facility; cleaning and preparation of the pools; water withdrawal from the Columbia River, and any necessary water or wastewater treatment; and introduction, rearing and release of fish. Future commercial operations may be included.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2010 Smart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Smart Fortwo MHD VIN: WME4513341K406476 Seatbelt Positions: 2 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Drum Brakes Rear Wheel Drive Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD player Weights Design Curb Weight:1,818 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 1.742 lb Distribution F/R (%):44/56 GVWR: 2,244 lb GAWR F/R: 968/1,452 lb Payload 1 : 426 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 73.5 in Track F/R: 50.5/54.5 in Length: 106.1 in Width: 61.4 in Height: 60.7 in Ground Clearance: 6.25 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Continental Model: ContiproContact Size: Front -P155/60/R15

126

Control of a dynamic brake to reduce turbine-generator shaft transient torques  

SciTech Connect

A resistive, thyristor-controlled brake is used to damp transient torques in large thermo-electric generators supplying series-compensated transmission lines. Emphasis is placed on developing a suitable control algorithm and testing the algorithm through a wide variety of different operating configurations. Discrete-level Generalized Predictive Control is examined as one possible approach to optimal control of the brake. Some problems with implementation of GPC on the system are discussed. Prony analysis is used to identify system transfer functions which are then related to control design considerations and robustness properties.

Donnelly, M.K.; Smith, J.R.; Johnson, R.M. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)); Hauer, J.F. (Bonneville Power Administration, Kalispell, MT (United States)); Brush, R.W. (Montana Power Co., Butte, MT (United States)); Adapa, R. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Drum type fossil fueled power plant control based on fuzzy inverse MIMO model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new fuzzy controller is proposed based on inverse model of boiler-turbine system. Gain scheduling scheme is used to keep feedback rule as close as possible to optimal condition while generating plant Input/Output data. Interaction between ... Keywords: ANFIS, drum type fossil fueled power plant (FFPP), interaction, inverse model control, nonlinear model, robustness

Ali Ghaffari; Mansour Nikkhah Bahrami; Hesam Parsa

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

ANALYSIS OF AVAILABLE HYDROGEN DATA & ACCUMULATION OF HYDROGEN IN UNVENTED TRANSURANIC (TRU) DRUMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a response to the second action required in the approval for the Justification for Continued Operations (JCO) Assay and Shipment of Transuranic (TRU) Waste Containers in 218-W-4C. The Waste Management Project continues to make progress toward shipping certified TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As the existing inventory of TRU waste in the Central Waste Complex (CWC) storage buildings is shipped, and the uncovered inventory is removed from the trenches and prepared for shipment from the Hanford Site, the covered inventory of suspect TRU wastes must be retrieved and prepared for processing for shipment to WIPP. Accumulation of hydrogen in unvented TRU waste containers is a concern due to the possibility of explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. The frequency and consequence of these gas mixtures resulting in an explosion must be addressed. The purpose of this study is to recommend an approach and schedule for venting TRU waste containers in the low-level burial ground (LLBG) trenches in conjunction with TRU Retrieval Project activities. This study provides a detailed analysis of the expected probability of hydrogen gas accumulation in significant quantities in unvented drums. Hydrogen gas accumulation in TRU drums is presented and evaluated in the following three categories: Hydrogen concentrations less than 5 vol%; Hydrogen between 5-15 vol%; and Hydrogen concentrations above 15 vol%. This analysis is based on complex-wide experience with TRU waste drums, available experimental data, and evaluations of storage conditions. Data reviewed in this report includes experience from the Idaho National Environmental Engineering Laboratories (INEEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratories, (ORNL), Rocky Flats sites, Matrix Depletion Program and the National Transportation and Packaging Program. Based on this analysis, as well as an assessment of the probability and frequency of postulated credible accident scenarios, this study presents a plan and schedule for accomplishing necessary venting for segregated unvented TRU drums. A recommended method for venting TRU drums is proposed. Upon revision of the authorization basis document to include TRU drum venting, and successful completion of readiness activities; TRU drum venting will be implemented in the LLBG.

DAYLEY, L.

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Results for the Independent Sampling and Analysis of Used Oil Drums at the Impact Services Facility in Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), via the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, perform independent sampling and analysis of used oils contained within eight 55 gallon drums stored at the former IMPACT Services facility, located at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These drums were originally delivered by LATA Sharp Remediation Services (LSRS) to IMPACT Services on January 11, 2011 as part of the Bldg. K-33 demolition project, and the drums plus contents should have been processed as non-hazardous non-radiological waste by IMPACT Services. LSRS received a certificate of destruction on August 29, 2012 (LSRS 2012a). However, IMPACT Services declared bankruptcy and abandoned the site later in 2012, and eight of the original eleven K-33 drums are currently stored at the facility. The content of these drums is the subject of this investigation. The original drum contents were sampled by LSRS in 2010 and analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), using both compositing and grab sampling techniques. The objective of this 2013 sample and analysis effort was to duplicate, to the extent possible, the 2010 sampling and analysis event to support final disposition decisions. Part of that decision process includes either verifying or refuting the assertion that oils that are currently stored in drums at the IMPACT Services facility originated from Bldg. K-33 equipment.

none,

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Method of production H/sub 2/ using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300/degree/ to 1400/degree/F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices. 1 fig.

Paulson, L.E.

1988-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

131

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) is a test program designed to yield data on measurement system capability to characterize drummed transuranic (TRU) waste generated throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The tests are conducted periodically and provide a mechanism for the independent and objective assessment of NDA system performance and capability relative to the radiological characterization objectives and criteria of the Office of Characterization and Transportation (OCT). The primary documents requiring an NDA PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC), which requires annual characterization facility participation in the PDP, and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD). This NDA PDP implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC. Measurement facilities must demonstrate acceptable radiological characterization performance through measurement of test samples comprised of pre-specified PDP matrix drum/radioactive source configurations. Measurement facilities are required to analyze the NDA PDP drum samples using the same procedures approved and implemented for routine operational waste characterization activities. The test samples provide an independent means to assess NDA measurement system performance and compliance per criteria delineated in the NDA PDP Plan. General inter-comparison of NDA measurement system performance among DOE measurement facilities and commercial NDA services can also be evaluated using measurement results on similar NDA PDP test samples. A PDP test sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum containing a waste matrix type representative of a particular category of the DOE waste inventory and nuclear material standards of known radionuclide and isotopic composition typical of DOE radioactive material. The PDP sample components are made available to participating measurement facilities as designated by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). The nuclear material type, mass and associated alpha activity of the NDA PDP radioactive standard sets have been specified and fabricated to allow assembly of PDP samples that simulate TRU alpha activity concentrations, radionuclidic/isotopic distributions and physical forms typical of the DOE TRU waste inventory. The PDP matrix drum waste matrix types were derived from an evaluation of information contained in the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (TWBIR) to ensure representation of prevalent waste types and their associated matrix characteristics in NDA PDP testing. NDA drum analyses required by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) may only be performed by measurement facilities that comply with the performance criteria as set forth in the NDA PDP Plan. In this document, these analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the wastes on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP wastes.

Carlsbad Field Office

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

Effects of lysine nutrition on production characteristics and ammonia excretion of red drum Sciaenops ocellatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) has traditionally been an important commercial and recreational fish species in the Gulf of Mexico; therefore, its aquacultural production for food and for stock enhancement continues to develop. The minimum dietary lysine requirement of juvenile red drum was previously quantified to be 1.55% of a 35% crude protein (CP) diet (4.4% of dietary protein). However, red drum are usually fed diets containing 40 to 50% CP under commercial production. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to reevaluate the dietary lysine requirement of red drum as a function of dietary CP, and determine the effects of dietary manipulations on ammonia excretion. Control diets at 35 and 45% CP contained only the intact protein provided by a 50/50 mixture of red drum muscle and wheat gluten. Four experimental diets at each CP level contained the mixture (64% of CP) and crystalline amino acids (34% of CP) to provide lysine levels above and below the previously determined requirement. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of 20 juvenile red drum initially averaging 3.4 g/fish in 110-l aquaria containing brackish (7ppt) water at 271 C and operated in a recirculating mode. Diets were fed at a fixed rate approaching apparent satiation twice daily for 6 weeks after which total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) excretion at 4-h postprandial was determined. Diets supplemented with crystalline amino acids supported similar weight gain (94 - 98%) as that obtained by fish fed control diets with intact protein. Based on weight gain, protein efficiency ratio (PER), and protein conversion efficiency (PCE) data, the minimum dietary lysine requirement was not influenced by dietary CP. Broken-line regression analysis of weight gain data of fish fed increments of lysine in both 35 and 45% CP diets yielded a lysine requirement estimate of 1.490.07% of diet, confirming the previously determined value. Weight gain and TAN excretion were significantly (P#0.05) higher in fish fed the 45% CP diets while PER and PCE values were significantly reduced. Lysine deficiency also resulted in elevated ammonia excretion, but significant reductions were not achieved when dietary lysine was at or above the established requirement.

Webb, Kenneth Ashley

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

EA-0995: Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations, Golden, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate a drum storage facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden,...

134

Subdiffusive axial transport of granular materials in a long drum mixer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular mixtures rapidly segregate radially by size when tumbled in a partially filled horizontal drum. The smaller component moves toward the axis of rotation and forms a buried core, which then splits into axial bands. Models have generally assumed that the axial segregation is opposed by diffusion. Using narrow pulses of the smaller component as initial conditions, we have characterized axial transport in the core. We find that the axial advance of the segregated core is well described by a self-similar concentration profile whose width scales as $t^\\alpha$, with $\\alpha \\sim 0.3 < 1/2$. Thus, the process is subdiffusive rather than diffusive as previously assumed. We find that $\\alpha$ is nearly independent of the grain type and drum rotation rate within the smoothly streaming regime. We compare our results to two one-dimensional PDE models which contain self-similarity and subdiffusion; a linear fractional diffusion model and the nonlinear porous medium equation.

Zeina S. Khan; Stephen W. Morris

2004-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the concrete-shielded RH TRU drum for the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to a solid waste storage facility on the Hanford Site.

Smith, R.J.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for concrete-shielded RHTRU waste drum for the 327 postirradiation testing laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete- Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to the Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility in the 200 West Area and on to a Solid Waste Storage Facility, also in the 200 Area.

Adkins, H.E.

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

137

Drum Screen Filtration of Cooling Water in Fossil-Fired and Nuclear Power Plants: The Electricite de France (EDF) Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents a summary of the lessons learned from operating the drum screen filtration systems used for the last three decades in lectricit de Frances (EDFs) nuclear and fossil-fired power plants, both in terms of the technological aspects of filtration and with regard to the prevention of clogging risks and the prevention of damage to the living organisms impinged on the drum screens and entrained into the cooling ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) process at Fort Drum, New York  

SciTech Connect

The federal energy manager has been directed by the Comprehensive Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) to reduce energy consumption by 20% from 1985 levels, by the year 2000. However, the tools and funding to capture this resource in a cost-effective manner have not been provided. In an effort to assist federal agencies in meeting EPAct requirements, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) to identify, evaluate, and acquire all cost-effective energy projects at selected federal facilities. PNL has developed and applied the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) methodology at the Fort Drum FORSCOM facility near Watertown, New York. The FEDS methodology is a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that result in a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost justified fashion over a 5 to 10 year period. At Fort Drum, the net present value (NPV) of the installed cost of all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROS) is over $16 million (1992 $). The NPV of the savings associated with this investment is nearly $47 million (1992 $), for an overall NPV of approximately $31 million. By implementing all the cost-effective EROS, Fort Drum will reduce annual energy use by over 230,000 MBtu, or 15%. Annual energy expenditures will decrease by over $2.4 million, or a 20% reduction.

Dixon, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rowley, S.E. [Directorate of Engineering & Housing, Ft. Drum, NY (United States); Gillespie, A.H. [Army Forces Command, Ft. McPherson, GA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Urat Rear Banner Jihe Orient Wind Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urat Rear Banner Jihe Orient Wind Energy Co Ltd Urat Rear Banner Jihe Orient Wind Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Urat Rear Banner Jihe Orient Wind Energy Co Ltd Place Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China Sector Wind energy Product Urat Rear Banner Jihe Orient Wind Energy was established by Beijing Keval-East Technology Development in 2006 to develop wind power projects. References Urat Rear Banner Jihe Orient Wind Energy Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Urat Rear Banner Jihe Orient Wind Energy Co Ltd is a company located in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China . References ↑ "Urat Rear Banner Jihe Orient Wind Energy Co Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Urat_Rear_Banner_Jihe_Orient_Wind_Energy_Co_Ltd&oldid=352581

140

Surface Analysis of the Rear-Flank Downdraft Outflow in Two Tornadic Supercells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rear-flank downdraft regions of two tornadic supercells were sampled on 12 June 2004 and 9 June 2005 using four mobile mesonet probes. These rear-flank downdraft outflows were sampled employing two different data collection routines; ...

Brian D. Hirth; John L. Schroeder; Christopher C. Weiss

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thermodynamic Analysis of Supercell Rear-Flank Downdrafts from Project ANSWERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data collected during Project Analysis of the Near-Surface Wind and Environment along the Rear-flank of Supercells (ANSWERS) provided an opportunity to test recently published associations between rear-flank downdraft (RFD) thermodynamic ...

Matthew L. Grzych; Bruce D. Lee; Catherine A. Finley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Collapse and Fragmentation of Molecular Cloud Cores. X. Magnetic Braking of Prolate and Oblate Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The collapse and fragmentation of initially prolate and oblate, magnetic molecular clouds is calculated in three dimensions with a gravitational, radiative hydrodynamics code. The code includes magnetic field effects in an approximate manner: magnetic pressure, tension, braking, and ambipolar diffusion are all modelled. The parameters varied for both the initially prolate and oblate clouds are the initial degree of central concentration of the radial density profile, the initial angular velocity, and the efficiency of magnetic braking (represented by a factor $f_{mb} = 10^{-4}$ or $10^{-3}$). The oblate cores all collapse to form rings that might be susceptible to fragmentation into multiple systems. The outcome of the collapse of the prolate cores depends strongly on the initial density profile. Prolate cores with central densities 20 times higher than their boundary densities collapse and fragment into binary or quadruple systems, whereas cores with central densities 100 times higher collapse to form single...

Boss, Alan P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

How Many CVs are Crossing the Period Gap? A Test for the Disruption of Magnetic Braking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply population synthesis techniques to calculate the present day number of two types of white dwarf-main sequence star (WDMS) binaries within the cataclysmic variable period gap. The first are post-common envelope binaries with secondary stars that have masses between 0.17 and 0.36 Msun (gPCEBs), such that they will commence mass transfer within the period gap. The second type are systems that were CVs at some point in their past, but detached once they evolved down in orbital period to ~3 h as a consequence of disrupted magnetic braking, and are crossing the period gap via gravitational radiation (dCVs). Full population synthesis calculations are performed where we assume either constant, global values of the common envelope ejection efficiency, or consider the ejection efficiency as a function of secondary mass. Several forms of magnetic braking are also considered. We predict an excess of dCVs over gPCEBs within the period gap of ~4 to ~13 assuming an ejection efficiency between 0.1 and 0.6, and a flat initial mass ratio distribution. This excess is revealed as a prominent peak at the location of the period gap in the orbital period distribution of the combined gPCEB and dCV population. We suggest that if such a feature is observed in the orbital period distribution of an observed sample of short orbital period WDMS binaries, this would strongly corroborate the disruption of magnetic braking.

P. J. Davis; U. Kolb; B. Willems; B. T. Gnsicke

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Variations in gear fatigue life for different wind turbine braking strategies  

SciTech Connect

A large number of gearbox failures have occurred in the wind industry in a relatively short period, many because service loads were underestimated. High-torque transients that occur during starting and stopping are difficult to predict and may be overlooked in specifying gearbox design. Although these events comprise a small portion of total load cycles, they can be the most damaging. The severity of these loads varies dramatically with the specific configuration of the wind turbine. The large number of failures in Danish-designed Micon 65 wind turbines prompted this investigation. The high-speed and low-speed shaft torques were measured on a two-stage helical gearbox of a single Micon 65 turbine. Transient events and normal running loads were combined statistically to obtain a typical annual load spectrum. The pitting and bending fatigue lives of the gear teeth were calculated by using Miner's rule for four different high-speed shaft brake configurations. Each breaking scenario was run for both a high- and a low-turbulence normal operating load spectrum. The analysis showed increases in gear life by up to a factor of 25 when the standard high-speed shaft brake is replaced with a dynamic brake or modified with a damper. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

McNiff, B.P. (Second Wind, Inc., Somerville, MA (USA)); Musial, W.D. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Errichello, R. (GEARTECH, Albany, CA (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Variations in gear fatigue life for different wind turbine braking strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large number of gearbox failures have occurred in the wind industry in a relatively short period, many because service loads were underestimated. High-torque transients that occur during starting and stopping are difficult to predict and may be overlooked in specifying gearbox design. Although these events comprise a small portion of total load cycles, they can be the most damaging. The severity of these loads varies dramatically with the specific configuration of the wind turbine. The large number of failures in Danish-designed Micon 65 wind turbines prompted this investigation. The high-speed and low-speed shaft torques were measured on a two-stage helical gearbox of a single Micon 65 turbine. Transient events and normal running loads were combined statistically to obtain a typical annual load spectrum. The pitting and bending fatigue lives of the gear teeth were calculated by using Miner's rule for four different high-speed shaft brake configurations. Each breaking scenario was run for both a high- and a low-turbulence normal operating load spectrum. The analysis showed increases in gear life by up to a factor of 25 when the standard high-speed shaft brake is replaced with a dynamic brake or modified with a damper. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

McNiff, B.P. (Second Wind, Inc., Somerville, MA (USA)); Musial, W.D. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Errichello, R. (GEARTECH, Albany, CA (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC), utilizing spectral summing of spectra from groups of drums of similar waste type, is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposal (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no place to go unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs two High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confinned TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radio nuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have too high a MDA to be classified as LLW enter a radioactive waste characterization indetenninate status that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced ganuna spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discernable in the individual spectra can become quantifiable in the summed spectrum and the MDA for group sum is reduced. The group of waste items can then be properly classified as LLW based on the summed spectrum and valid assay values can be assigned for disposal. This technique has been successfully applied to a set of 52 debris drums - with individual MDA > 100 nCi/g - with a resulting group total TRU alpha activity concentration below 40nCi/g. Further application of the technique at LANL to other waste drums that are measured on a WIPP certified HENC system is planned and good candidate drum sets are being evaluated as indeterminate situations develop.

Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veilleux, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucero, Randy P [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORAPTION; Seamans, Jr., James V [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION; Clapham, Martin J [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral summing technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC) is a unique modeling technique that is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposition (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no disposal path unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confirmed TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radionuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have TRU MDAs > 100nCi/g enter a radioactive waste characterization indeterminate state that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced gamma spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discemable in the individual spectra become quantifiable in the summed spectrum and the MDA for the group sum is reduced. The group of waste items can then be properly classified as LLW waste on the summed spectrum and valid assay values can be assigned for disposal. This technique has been successfully applied to a set of 52 debris drums - with individual MDA > 100nCi/g - with a resulting group total TRU alpha activity concentration below 40nCi/g. Further application of the technique at LANL to other debris drums and sludge drums that were measured on a WIPP certified HENe is planned and good candidate drum sets are being evaluated.

Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veilleux, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucero, Randy P [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION; Seamans, Jr, J. V. [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPATION; Clapham, M. J. [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

148

DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD IMPLEMENTATION OF AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR HEADSPACE GAS SAMPLING OF TRANSURANIC WASTE DRUMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast, safe, and cost-effective method for obtaining headspace gas samples has been developed and implemented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A sample port is installed directly into a drum lid using a pneumatic driver, allowing sampling with a side-port needle. Testing has shown that the sample port can be installed with no release of radioactive material. Use of this system at LANL has significantly reduced the time required for sampling, and eliminates the need for many safety precautions previously used. The system has significantly improved productivity and lowered radiation exposure and cost.

Polley, M.; Ankrom, J.; Wickland, T.; Warren, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

149

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) Objective: NS.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. (CR 7) Criterion: An unreviewed safety question (USQ) screen/evaluation has been completed and approved for the installation and use of the DTF for drum treatment in the DTF. Objective: NS.2 The facility systems and procedures, for the DTF and drum treatment activities, are consistent with the description of the facility, procedures, and accident analysis included in the safety basis. (CR9) Criterion: The DTF and drum treatment activities are adequately described in the documented safety analysis (DSA) or changes have been identified for inclusion in the next annual update.

150

Characterizing and improving passive-active shufflers for assays of 208-Liter waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A passive and active neutron shuffler for 208-L waste drums has been used to perform over 1500 active and 500 passive measurements on uranium and plutonium samples in 28 different matrices. The shuffler is now better characterized and improvements have been implemented or suggested. An improved correction for the effects of the matrix material was devised from flux-monitor responses. The most important cause of inaccuracies in assays is a localized instead of a uniform distribution of fissile material in a drum; a technique for deducing the distribution from the assay data and then applying a correction is suggested and will be developed further. A technique is given to detect excessive amounts of moderator that could make hundreds of grams of {sup 235}U assay as zero grams. Sensitivities (minimum detectable masses) for {sup 235}U with active assays and for {sup 240}Pu{sub eff} with passive assays are presented and the effects of moderators and absorbers on sensitivities noted.

Rinard, P.M.; Adams, E.L.; Menlove, H.O.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Characterizing and improving passive-active shufflers for assays of 208-Liter waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A passive and active neutron shuffler for 208-L waste drums has been used to perform over 1500 active and 500 passive measurements on uranium and plutonium samples in 28 different matrices. The shuffler is now better characterized and improvements have been implemented or suggested. An improved correction for the effects of the matrix material was devised from flux-monitor responses. The most important cause of inaccuracies in assays is a localized instead of a uniform distribution of fissile material in a drum; a technique for deducing the distribution from the assay data and then applying a correction is suggested and will be developed further. A technique is given to detect excessive amounts of moderator that could make hundreds of grams of {sup 235}U assay as zero grams. Sensitivities (minimum detectable masses) for {sup 235}U with active assays and for {sup 240}Pu{sub eff} with passive assays are presented and the effects of moderators and absorbers on sensitivities noted.

Rinard, P.M.; Adams, E.L.; Menlove, H.O.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

IMPROVING THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DRUM TYPEPACKAGES BY USING HEAT PIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a feasibility study to improve thermal loading of existing radioactive material packages by using heat pipes. The concept could be used to channel heat in certain directions and dissipate to the environment. The concept is applied to a drum type package because the drum type packages are stored and transported in an upright position. This orientation is suitable for heat pipe operation that could facilitate the heat pipe implementation in the existing well proven package designs or in new designs where thermal loading is high. In this position, heat pipes utilize gravity very effectively to enhance heat flow in the upward direction Heat pipes have extremely high effective thermal conductivity that is several magnitudes higher than the most heat conducting metals. In addition, heat pipes are highly unidirectional so that the effective conductivity for heat transfer in the reverse direction is greatly reduced. The concept is applied to the 9977 package that is currently going through the DOE certification review. The paper presents computer simulations using typical off-the-shelf heat pipe available configurations and performance data for the 9977 package. A path forward is outlined for implementing the concepts for further study and prototype testing.

Gupta, N

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

153

Solar tracker motor having a fixed caliper and a translating caliper each with an electromagnetic brake system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concepts and technologies described herein provide for an accurate and cost-effective method for rotating a solar array disk for tracking the movement of the sun. According to various aspects, a motor includes a fixed caliper and a translating caliper positioned adjacent to one another. Electromagnetically controlled brakes on the translating caliper grip the solar array disk while adjacent, but spaced apart, electromagnets on the fixed caliper and the translating caliper are energized to create an attractive force that pulls the translating caliper with the solar array disk toward the fixed caliper. After reaching the fixed caliper, brakes on the fixed caliper are engaged with the disk, brakes on the translating caliper are released from the disk, and the translating caliper is pushed back to the starting location where the process repeats until the desired rotation is completed.

Rau, Scott James

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Interaction of temperature, dissolved oxygen and feed energy on ecophysiological performance of juvenile red drum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) is important for recreational fishing and aquacultural production in Texas' coastal waters and elsewhere in the nearshore Gulf of Mexico and in subtemperate to subtropical areas of the western North Atlantic Ocean. I performed indoor-tank and outdoor-pond experiments, in conjunction with automa ted respirometry and ecophysiological modeling, to assess interacting effects of temperature, dissolved-oxygen concentration (DO) and feed energy density on survival, growth, metabolism, and other measures of juvenile red drum performance. The main objective was to test an energy/metabolism tradeoff hypothesis, which states that growth of fish exposed to high temperatures can be limited by available feed energy; whereas, growth of fish exposed to lower temperatures can be limited by their metabolic capacity to exploit available feed energy. Also, I examined the influence of DO on this relationship and evaluated the effects of cyclical regimes of temperature and DO on fish performance. Insights from laboratory-based feeding trials were incorporated in experiments conducted in hatchery ponds to assess effects of oxygen supplementation and dietary additives - nucleotides and prebiotics - on performance in a more natural setting. In examining these issues, various technologies were developed. These included a computer-based apparatus for autonomously inducing cyclical regimes of temperature and DO in experimental tanks over an extended period of time. Additionally, I developed a soft feed with low energy-density to simulate natural forage. Experimental results supported the principal research hypothesis: At high temperature and DO, ecophysiological performance of juvenile red drum was enhanced by feeding to satiation with a high-energy feed (15.9 kJ/g) versus with a foragesimulating feed having lower energy density (4.1 kJ/g). Cyclical regimes of temperature and DO - as imposed in my particular laboratory experiments -did not impart growth benefits; however, the potential for enhanced growth via an appropriate cyclical environmental regime remains intact. Results from outdoor-pond experiments were consistent with laboratory results; however, the strong positive effect of feed energy density overwhelmed potential effects of dietary additives or oxygen supplementation on growth.

Fontaine, Lance Pierre

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Deviation to the Test Program and Procedures for the 710 Critical Experiment Reactor Control Drum Mockup Experiment  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a deviation from the "Test Program and Procedures for the 710 Critical Experiment Reactor Control Drum Mockup Experiment," TM-64-3-706, which was made in accordance with ITS Standard Practice J80-81 on September 14, 1964. The deviation did not involve a significant change in the safety of the operation.

Sims, F.L.

1964-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

An RTD study for the flow of lignite particles through a pilot rotary dryer. Part 2: Flighted drum case  

SciTech Connect

In Part 2 of this work a flighted pilot rotating cylindrical drum, intended to be used as either a dryer or calciner (kiln), has been used to investigate the flow, through it, of pulverized moist lignite. Tracer pulse input-response experiments have been performed. Residence Time Distribution (RTD) data have been deduced for three types of flight geometry, namely: Rectangular (RA), Equal Angular Distribution (EAD) and Equal Horizontal Distribution (EHD). For each flight shape, mean residence time {bar t} has been correlated with drum operating conditions. The sequence {bar t}{sub EAD} < {bar t}{sub RA} < {bar t}{sub EHD} has been validated. A comparison between the residence time predictions for the flighted and the bare drum has indicated that {bar t} for the former may be higher by up to 3.5 times than that for the latter. Exceptionally high solids hold-up values (i.e., Z = 0.13--0.42) have been observed and compared to theoretical predictions. Particle size segregation during lignite flow through the flighted drum was not confirmed.

Hatzilyberis, K.S.; Androutsopoulos, G.P. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

THERMAL EVALUATION OF DRUM TYPE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING ARRAYS IN STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR 71.[1] In recent years, there has been a greater need to use these packagings to store the excess fissile material, especially plutonium for long term storage. While the design requirements for safe transportation of these packagings are well defined, the requirements for safe long term storage are not well established. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are stored carefully to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals to prevent any leakage and the impact limiter to maintain the package structural integrity. This paper analyzes different storage arrays for a typical 9977 packaging for thermal considerations and makes recommendations for their safe storage under normal operating conditions.

Gupta, N

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

158

Intelligent Mobile Sensor System for drum inspection and monitoring -- Volume 2. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 22, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) project was to develop an operational system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations at several DOE sites. Specifically, the product of this effort was a robotic device with enhanced intelligence and maneuverability capable of conducting routine inspection of stored waste drums. The system has an integrated sensor suite for problem-drum detection, and creates and maintains a site database both for inspection planning and for data correlation, updating, and report generation. The system is capable of departing on an assigned mission, collecting required data, recording which portions of its mission had to be aborted or modified due to environmental constraints, and reporting back when the mission is complete. Successful identification of more than 96% of drum defects has been demonstrated in a high fidelity waste storage facility mockup. Identified anomalies included rust spots, rust streaks, areas of corrosion, dents, and tilted drums. All drums were positively identified and correlated with the site database. This development effort was separated into three phases of which phase three is now complete. The first phase demonstrated an integrated system (maturity level IVa) for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations. The second phase demonstrated a prototype system appropriate for operational use in an actual storage facility. The prototype employed an integrated design that considered operational requirements, hardware costs, maintenance, safety, and robustness. The final phase has demonstrated the commercial viability of the vehicle in operating waste storage facilities at Fernald, Ohio and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report summarizes the system upgrades performed in phase 3 and the evaluation of the IMSS Phase 3 system and vehicle.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Intelligent mobile sensor system for drum inspection and monitoring: Phase 1. Topical report, October 1, 1992--June 8, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop an operational system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations at several DOE sites. Specifically, the product of this effort is a robotic device with enhanced intelligence and maneuverability capable of conducting routine inspection of stored waste drums. The device is capable of operating in narrow aisles and interpolating the free aisle space between rows of stacked drums. The system has an integrated sensor suite for leak detection, and is interfaced with a site database both for inspection planning and for data correlation, updating, and report generation. The system is capable of departing on an assigned mission, collecting required data, recording which positions of its mission had to be aborted or modified due to environmental constraints, and reporting back when the mission is complete. Successful identification of more than 90% of all drum defects has been demonstrated in a high fidelity waste storage facility mockup. Identified anomalies included rust spots, rust streaks, areas of corrosion, dents, and tilted drums. All drums were positively identified and correlated with the site database. This development effort is separated into three phases of which phase one is now complete. The first phase has demonstrated an integrated system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations. This demonstration system was quickly fielded and evaluated by leveraging technologies developed from previous NASA and DARPA contracts and internal research. The second phase will demonstrate a prototype system appropriate for operational use in an actual storage facility. The prototype provides an integrated design that considers operational requirements, hardware costs, maintenance, safety, and robustness. The final phase will demonstrate commercial viability using the prototype vehicle in a pilot waste operations and inspection project.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pre-title I safety evaluation for the retrieval operations of transuranic waste drums in the Solid Waste Disposal Facility. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Facility Line Item Project includes the retrieval and safe storage of the pad drums that are stored on TRU pads 2-6 in the Solid Waste Disposal Facility (SWDF). Drums containing TRU waste were placed on these pads as early as 1974. The pads, once filled, were mounded with soil. The retrieval activities will include the excavation of the soil, retrieval of the pad drums, placing the drums in overpacks (if necessary) and venting and purging the retrieved drums. Once the drums have been vented and purged, they will be transported to other pads within the SWDF or in a designated area until they are eventually treated as necessary for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. This safety evaluation provides a bounding assessment of the radiological risk involved with the drum retrieval activities to the maximally exposed offsite individual and the co-located worker. The results of the analysis indicate that the risk to the maximally exposed offsite individual and the co-located worker using maximum frequencies and maximum consequences are within the acceptance criteria defined in WSRC Procedural Manual 9Q. The purpose of this evaluation is to demonstrate the incremental risk from the SWDF due to the retrieval activities for use as design input only. As design information becomes available, this evaluation can be revised to satisfy the safety analysis requirements of DOE Orders 4700 and 5480.23.

Rabin, M.S.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On The Use of Eddy Current Brakes as Tunable, Fast Turn-On Viscous Dampers For Haptic Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on eddy current brakes because they are inexpensive, friction- e-mail: andrewg@cim.mcgill.ca e-mail: champ@cim.mcgill.ca e-mail: hayward@cim.mcgill.ca free, capable of fast turn-on time, and linear

Hayward, Vincent

162

CityCarControl : an electric vehicle drive-by-wire solution for distributed steering, braking and throttle control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose CityCarControl, a system to manage the steering, braking, and throttle of a new class of intra-city electric vehicles. These vehicles have a focus on extreme light-weight and a small parking ...

Brown, Thomas B., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1999-2003 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has been conducting Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research since the early 1990s. NATURES studies have looked at a variety of mechanisms to enhance production of wild-like salmonids from hatcheries. The goal of NATURES research is to develop fish culture techniques that enable hatcheries to produce salmon with more wild-like characteristics and increased postrelease survival. The development of such techniques is called for in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This document is the draft report for the Supplemental Fish Quality Contract DE-AI79-91BP20651 Over the history of the project, the effects of seminatural raceway habitats, automated underwater feeders, exercise current velocities, live food diets, and predator avoidance training have been investigated. The findings of these studies are reported in an earlier contract report (Maynard et al. 1996a). The current report focuses on research that has been conducted between 1999 and 2002. This includes studies on the effect of exercise on salmon and steelhead trout, effects of predator avoid training, integration of NATUES protocols into production hatcheries, and the study of social behavior of steelhead grown in enriched and conventional environments. Traditionally, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are reared in barren concrete raceways that lack natural substrate, in-stream structure, or overhead cover. The fish are fed in an unnatural manner with artificial feeds mechanically or hand broadcast across the water surface. This traditional approach has increased the egg-to-smolt survival of hatchery-reared fish by an order of magnitude over that experienced by wild-reared salmon. However, once hatchery-reared fish are released into the wild their smolt-to-adult survival is usually much lower than wild-reared salmon. The reduced postrelease survival of hatchery-reared fish may stem from differences in their behavior and morphology compared to wild-reared salmon. After release, hatchery-reared fish are inefficient foragers and are often found with empty stomachs or stomachs filled with indigestible debris (Miller 1953, Hochachka 1961, Reimers 1963, Sosiak et al. 1979, Myers 1980, O'Grady 1983, Johnsen and Ugedal 1986). Their social behavior also differs, with hatchery-reared fish congregating at higher densities, being more aggressive, and displaying less territory fidelity than wild-reared fish (Fenderson et al. 1968, Bachman 1984, Swain and Riddell 1990). In the natural environment this results in hatchery-reared fish spending more time in high-risk aggressive behavior and less time in beneficial foraging behavior than their wild-reared counterparts. Hatchery-reared fish are also more surface oriented than wild-reared salmonids (Mason et al. 1967, Sosiak 1978). This increases their risk of being attacked by avian predators, such as kingfishers (Ceryle spp.), which search for fish near the surface. Although some of the differences between wild and hatchery-reared fish are innate (Reisenbichler and McIntyre 1977, Swain and Riddell 1990), many are conditioned and can be modified by altering the hatchery rearing environment. NATURES studies are aimed at developing a more natural salmon culture environment to prevent the development of these unnatural attributes in hatchery-reared fish. NATURES fish culture practices are already producing salmon with up to about 50% higher in-stream survival than conventionally-reared fish (Maynard et al. 1996b). When these techniques are incorporated into production releases, they should also translate into increased smolt-to-adult survival. Conservation and supplementation programs can use NATURES-reared salmonids to rebuild stocks currently listed as endangered and threatened into healthy self-sustaining runs more rapidly than traditional programs. Traditional production programs can also use high-survival NATURES-reared fish to reduce their impact on wild populations, while still meeting their adult mitigation goals.

Maynard, Desmond J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

Injection Timing Effects on Brake Fuel Conversion Efficiency and Engine System's Respones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Societal concerns on combustion-based fuel consumption are ever-increasing. With respect to internal combustion engines, this translates to a need to increase brake fuel conversion efficiency (BFCE). Diesel engines are a relatively efficient internal combustion engine to consider for numerous applications, but associated actions to mitigate certain exhaust emissions have generally deteriorated engine efficiency. Conventionally, diesel engine emission control has centered on in-cylinder techniques. Although these continue to hold promise, the industry trend is presently favoring the use of after-treatment devices which create new opportunities to improve the diesel engine's brake fuel conversion efficiency. This study focuses on injection timing effects on the combustion processes, engine efficiency, and the engine system's responses. The engine in the study is a medium duty diesel engine (capable of meeting US EPA Tier III off road emission standards) equipped with common rail direct fuel injection, variable geometry turbo charging, and interfaced with a custom built engine controller. The study found that injection timing greatly affected BFCE by changing the combustion phasing. BFCE would increase up to a maximum then begin to decrease as phasing became less favorable. Combustion phasing would change from being mostly mixing controlled combustion to premixed combustion as injection timing would advance allowing more time for fuel to mix during the ignition delay. Combustion phasing, in turn, would influence many other engine parameters. As injection timing is advanced, in-cylinder temperatures and pressures amplify, and intake and exhaust manifold pressures deteriorate. Rate of heat release and rate of heat transfer increase when injection timing is advanced. Turbocharger speed falls with the advancing injection timing. Torque, however, rose to a maximum then fell off again even though engine speed and fueling rate were held constant between different injection timings. Interestingly, the coefficient of heat transfer changes from a two peak curve to a smooth one peak curve as the injection timing is advanced further. The major conclusion of the study is that injection advance both positively and negatively influences the diesel engine's response which contributes to the brake fuel conversion efficiency.

McLean, James Elliott

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in cooperation with Idaho and BPA, has established captive broodstocks to aid recovery of endangered Snake River sockeye salmon. NMFS is currently maintaining four separate Redfish Lake sockeye Salmon captive broodstocks; all these broodstocks are being reared full-term to maturity in fresh (well) water. Experiments are also being conducted on nonendangered 1990 and 1991-brood Lake Wenatchee (WA) sockeye salmon to compare effects on survival and reproduction to maturity in fresh water and seawater; for both brood-years, fish reared in fresh water were larger than those reared in seawater. Data from captive rearing experiments suggest a ranking priority of circular tanks supplied with pathogen-free fresh water, circular tanks supplied with pumped/filtered/uv-sterilized seawater, and seawater net-pens for rearing sockeye salmon to maturity.

Flagg, Thomas A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A study of factors affecting foot movement time in a braking maneuver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of foot movement time (MT) in an actual braking maneuver and in a stationary vehicle was investigated regarding the effects of age and gender of the driver and nature of the stimulus to which the driver was responding. ANOVAs showed that the nature of the stimulus was not a significant factor in length of MT, but distance between pedals and age-gender levels were found to have significant effects. For the actual braking maneuver, gender and the gender-by-age interaction were significant; in the stationary vehicle portion of the study, they were not. Mean foot MT for both genders over all conditions were 0.28 seconds for women and 0.22 seconds for men. For older drivers, over all conditions, the mean foot MT was 0.25 seconds, and, for the younger drivers, 0.24 seconds. Linear regressions revealed high intra-subject variation in MT, which was corroborated by comparing with data from other parts of the study. Poor r2 values for fitting the data to Fitts' Law and to a modification of Fitts' Law were attributed to this high intra-subject variation and to obtaining data from only two different movement amplitudes. It was found that drivers' foot MTs tended to converge to a common value when controlling the vehicle at 88 km/hr (55 mph) as opposed to sitting in the driver's seat while the vehicle was stationary; mean foot MT for each subject group decreased, and differences between genders and age groups significantly diminished while the car was in motion.

Berman, Andrea Helene

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Pen Rearing and Imprinting of Fall Chinook Salmon, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to compare net-pen rearing methods to traditional hatchery methods of rearing upriver bright fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawvtscha). Fish were reared at several densities in net pens at three Columbia River backwater sites during 1984-1987, and in a barrier net at one site during 1984-1986; methods included both fed and unfed treatments. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results obtained from the unfed treatments and the current return of adults from all fed treatments and the barrier net. Zooplankton were the primary food item of unfed fish. Fish reared in net pens utilized insects colonizing the nets as an additional food source, whereas those reared in the barrier net did not. Growth and production of fish reared in the unfed treatments were low. Instantaneous growth rates of unfed fish were much lower than those of the fed treatments and hatchery controls except when zooplankton densities were high and chironomid larvae were important in the diet of unfed fish reared in pens. Only fish in the barrier net treatment resulted in consistent net gains in growth and production over the rearing periods. Adult returns of fish from all fed and unfed treatments are lower than those of control fish reared at the hatchery. Returns appear to be inversely related to rearing density. Even though adult returns are lower than those of traditional hatchery methods, a cost-benefit analysis, as return data becomes more complete, may prove these methods to be an economical means of expanding current hatchery production, particularly if thinning releases were used.

Beeman, John W.; Novotny, Jerry F.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIATION PROTECTION (RP) RADIATION PROTECTION (RP) Objective: RP.1 Adequate and correct contamination control procedures and safety limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and conducting drum treatment operations in the DTF. (CR1, CR10) a. A thorough hazard analysis addressing contamination control and radiation protection has been completed for drum treatment activities in the DTF. b. The design of the DTF and ventilation system is adequate to prevent the spread of contamination. The adequacy has been demonstrated by testing and mockup operations. c. Appropriate limits, contamination control methods, and radiation protection practices have been identified and included in the applicable AMOW, PTW and procedures. d. Adequate radiation monitoring instruments are installed and properly located

169

An RTD study for the flow of lignite particles through a pilot rotary dryer. Part 1: Bare drum case  

SciTech Connect

In Part 1 of the present work a pilot rotating cylindrical drum, without an internal lifting flight system (bare), has been employed for the study of lignite motion through it, at ambient temperature. Tracer pulse stimulus-response experiments have been carried out to deduce residence time distribution (RTD) data and relate them to the operating conditions (slope, speed of revolution, etc.). Mean residence time, space-time and solids hold-up have been correlated with the drum operating conditions. Experimental data of mean axial velocity of solids have been compared with theoretical predictions and found to deviate within a {+-}15% margin. A size segregation of particles during their motion through the kiln under a variety of operating conditions has been confirmed and quantified. An average maximum divergence of 20% between the residence time of the smallest and that of the largest nominal particle sizes has been assessed.

Hatzilyberis, K.S.; Androutsopoulos, G.P. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Header and Drum Damage: Theory and Practice: Volume 1: Information Common to All Damage Types; Volume 2: Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Headers and drums represent two of the largest and most expensive components in boilers. Particularly in the case of high-temperature headers, there are considerable safety concerns when operating aging plants, and some notable failures have occurred. For these reasons, understanding the types of damage that can accumulate and dealing with that damage are vital to the safe and economic operation of fossil power plants.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

A perturbative approach to the spectral zeta functions of strings, drums, and quantum billiards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the spectral zeta functions of inhomogeneous strings and drums can be calculated using Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory. The inhomogeneities that can be treated with this method are small but otherwise arbitrary and include the previously studied case of a piecewise constant density. In two dimensions the method can be used to derive the spectral zeta function of a domain obtained from the small deformation of a square. We also obtain exact sum rules that are valid for arbitrary densities and that correspond to the values taken by the spectral zeta function at integer positive values; we have tested numerically these sum rules in specific examples. We show that the Dirichlet or Neumann Casimir energies of an inhomogeneous string, evaluated to first order in perturbation theory, contain in some cases an irremovable divergence, but that the combination of the two is always free of divergences. Finally, our calculation of the Casimir energies of a string with piecewise constant density and of two perfectly conducting concentric cylinders, of similar radius, reproduce the results previously published.

Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Diaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Design and manufacture of a rear driveline package including limited slip differential for Formula SAE applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes the design and manufacture of a lightweight rear driveline package for a Formula SAE race car. The design focuses on all components needed to transfer power from the chain driven Honda CBR600 F4i ...

Yazicioglu, Tolga T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Review of Downdrafts at the Rear of Tropical Squall Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observational evidence for the formation of downdrafts at the rear of tropical squall lines is reviewed. Some mechanisms, which have been proposed for the formation of such downdrafts, also are reviewed. Although the mechanisms are different, ...

Walter Fernandez

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Replacement of Fishmeal with Plant Feedstuffs in the Diet of Red Drum Sciaenops ocellatus: An Assessment of Nutritional Value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The expansion of aquaculture has increased demand for fishmeal supplies around the world; this, in turn, has resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of fishmeal, which has sparked interest in alternative feedstuffs. The development of new processing technologies, as well as the expanding generation of by-products from ethanol production has resulted in the development of novel protein sources that have the potential for replacing fishmeal in aquafeeds. The present study assessed the nutritional value of soy protein concentrate (SoyPC), barley protein concentrate (BarPC) and corn protein concentrate (CornPC) in the diet of red drum. Three sequential feeding trials were conducted; in these 50%, 75%, or 90% of the protein provided by Special SelectTM menhaden fishmeal in the reference diet was replaced with either SoyPC, BarPC, or CornPC in isonitrogenous (40% CP), isoenergetic (3.1kcal g-1) diets. Red drum with an average weight of 2.5 g, 1.6 g, and 1.5 g for trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively, were stocked in a recirculating system and fed twice daily at a rate approaching apparent satiation for 6 to 8 weeks. Along with the substitution of the selected plant feedstuffs, supplementation of DL-methionine and L-lysine was provided to exceed the established requirements of red drum for lysine and methionine, and glycine was added for palatability. Performance parameters of weight gain, feed efficiency, survival, hepatosomatic index, intraperitoneal fat ratio, and apparent digestibility coefficients for protein along with proximate composition of whole-body tissues were determined in the various trials. Results showed that 50% replacement of fishmeal protein by each of the protein concentrates produced fish performance, condition indices, and whole-body composition similar to those produced by the reference diet. However, replacing 75% and 90% of fishmeal protein with each of the plant protein concentrates reduced fish performance but not as severely as replacing all of the fishmeal protein with equal (33%) contributions from SoyPC, BarPC, and CornPC. Contrarily, these dietary substitutions did not reduce the apparent protein digestibility of the experimental diets. Based on the various results of this study, SoyPC, BarPC, and CornPC can readily replace 50% of the protein provided by menhaden fishmeal without adversely affecting the performance of cultured red drum.

Moxley, Joseph

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Preliminary report of the comparison of multiple non-destructive assay techniques on LANL Plutonium Facility waste drums  

SciTech Connect

Prior to disposal, nuclear waste must be accurately characterized to identify and quantify the radioactive content. The DOE Complex faces the daunting task of measuring nuclear material with both a wide range of masses and matrices. Similarly daunting can be the selection of a non-destructive assay (NDA) technique(s) to efficiently perform the quantitative assay over the entire waste population. In fulfilling its role of a DOE Defense Programs nuclear User Facility/Technology Development Center, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility recently tested three commercially built and owned, mobile nondestructive assay (NDA) systems with special nuclear materials (SNM). Two independent commercial companies financed the testing of their three mobile NDA systems at the site. Contained within a single trailer is Canberra Industries segmented gamma scanner/waste assay system (SGS/WAS) and neutron waste drum assay system (WDAS). The third system is a BNFL Instruments Inc. (formerly known as Pajarito Scientific Corporation) differential die-away imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) counter. In an effort to increase the value of this comparison, additional NDA techniques at LANL were also used to measure these same drums. These are comprised of three tomographic gamma scanners (one mobile unit and two stationary) and one developmental differential die-away system. Although not certified standards, the authors hope that such a comparison will provide valuable data for those considering these different NDA techniques to measure their waste as well as the developers of the techniques.

Bonner, C.; Schanfein, M.; Estep, R. [and others

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Process Knowledge Summary Report for Advanced Test Reactor Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Drum TRA010029  

SciTech Connect

This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of one drum containing contact-handled transuranic (TRU) actinide standards generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) for storage and subsequent shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for final disposal. The drum (i.e., Integrated Waste Tracking System Bar Code Number TRA010029) is currently stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex. The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and applicable sections of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and disposal of this TRU waste generated from ATR. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for this TRU waste originating from ATR.

B. R. Adams; R. P. Grant; P. R. Smith; J. L. Weisgerber

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1996-1998 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the 1996-1998 Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research for increasing hatchery salmon postrelease survival and producing fish with more wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology prior to release. Experiments were conducted evaluating automatic subsurface feeders; natural diets; exercise systems; seminatural raceway habitat enriched with cover, structure, and substrate; and predator avoidance conditioning for hatchery salmonids. Automatic subsurface feed delivery systems did not affect chinook salmon depth distribution or vulnerability to avian predators. Live-food diets only marginally improved the ability of chinook salmon to capture prey in stream enclosures. A prototype exercise system that can be retrofitted to raceways was developed, however, initial testing indicated that severe amounts of exercise may increase in culture mortality. Rearing chinook salmon in seminatural raceway habitat with gravel substrate, woody debris structure, and overhead cover improved coloration and postrelease survival without impacting in-culture health or survival. Steelhead fry reared in enriched environments with structure, cover, and point source feeders dominated and outcompeted conventionally reared fish. Exposing chinook salmon to caged predators increased their postrelease survival. Chinook salmon showed an antipredator response to chemical stimuli from injured conspecifics and exhibited acquired predator recognition following exposure to paired predator-prey stimuli. The report also includes the 1997 Natural Rearing System Workshop proceedings.

Maynard, Desmond J.

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

A preliminary assessment of asbestos awareness and control measures in brake and clutch repair services in Knoxville and Knox County, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The pending OSHA standard revision proposed in 1990 to lower the asbestos Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) and to mandate effective asbestos control measures (ACM) in brake and clutch assembly work may have a profound effect on industries involved in such operations. Health protection of workers will be improved and costs of improved control methods and training will increase. Considering these facts, this preliminary study was designed to assess the level of worker and management awareness of asbestos hazards associated with brake and clutch repair and to determine what ACM had been implemented by businesses in Knoxville and Knox County, Tennessee. The study, in a metropolitan area of approximately 336,000 people, revealed eight different categories of businesses conducting brake and clutch repair work with an estimated 363 potentially exposed employees. Results of the study suggest that managers and employees of the 80 businesses studied were in need of asbestos hazard awareness training and more adequate asbestos control measures.

Phillips, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Hamilton, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of Whole and Lipid-Extracted Algae Meals (LEA) in the Diet of Juvenile Red Drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and Digestibility of LEA by Red Drum and Hybrid Striped Bass (Morone chrysops x Morone saxatilis)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As aquaculture continues to expand, protein sources have become more costly and less available. Simultaneously, lipid-extracted algal meals (LEA) (co-products of bio-diesel production) are becoming increasingly available as alternative sources of energy are investigated. By integrating LEA into aquaculture diets, feed prices could be lowered and bio-diesel production would have an additional revenue stream. Three feeding trials each of 7 weeks duration were conducted to evaluate five different algal meals as partial replacements for fishmeal and soy protein concentrate in diets for juvenile red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). Apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) for CP and energy in various LEAs also were determined with red drum and hybrid striped bass (HSB). In the first trial, whole algae meal and LEA derived from Navicula sp. replaced 5 or 10% of the crude protein (CP) in the reference diet. Weight gain, feed efficiency (FE), hepatosomatic index (HSI), as well as protein and energy retention were not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the dietary treatments. Algal inclusion significantly affected the ADCs of the various dietary treatments for dry matter, CP, and energy. The inclusion of ash in the form of diatomaceous earth improved digestibility of protein as well as weight gain, survival and FE. A second feeding trial evaluated LEA derived from Chlorella sp. processed at high temperatures, replacing 5, 10, 20, and 25% of the CP in the reference diet. Weight gain, FE, survival, and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were significantly reduced at substitution levels of 20 and 25%. The third feeding trial evaluated LEA derived from Nanochloropsis salina, replacing 5, 7.5, 10, and 15% of the CP in the reference diet. Weight gain, FE, survival, and PER were significantly affected by some dietary treatments, with the 15% substitution levels causing significant reductions in performance. Intraperitoneal fat ratio and whole-body lipids were significantly lower in the fish fed the 15% substitution diet. Based on the results of these experiments, replacement of up to 10% of CP from fishmeal and soy protein concentrate with LEA was possible without causing substantial reductions in fish performance, and the whole algae product provided a more nutritious product. Red drum and HSB showed similar responses in their ability to digest CP and energy from the various algal products, although ADCs varied greatly among the different products and processing methods.

Patterson, Donovan Aaron

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Out-Of-Drum Grout Mixer Testing With Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2003, alternatives were evaluated for grout formulation development and associated mixing for the Sodium-Bearing Waste cesium ion exchange process. The neutralization agents calcium or sodium hydroxide and the solidification agents Portland cement, with or without blast furnace slag were evaluated. A desired uniform formulation was pursued to develop a grout waste form without any bleed liquid and solidify within a reasonable period of about twenty-eight days. This testing evaluates the out-of-drum alternative of mixing the effluent with solidification agents prior to being poured into drums versus the in-drum alternative of mixing them all together after being poured into the drums. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout using the Autocon continuous mixer within the range of 66 to 72 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 30 weight percent NWCF scrubber simulant also produced an acceptable grout waste form.

B. A. Scholes; A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; S. H. Hinckley

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) Objective: OP.1 Adequate and correct procedures and safety limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and conducting treatment activities. (CR1, CR-10) Criteria: a. All required procedures, AMOWs, PTWs, and work orders have been prepared, validated, and approved for all routine treatment and support activities. b. Procedures include actions for anticipated abnormal or emergency conditions. c. Workers have demonstrated their familiarity and knowledge of the procedures during interviews and mockup operations. Objective: OP.2 Routine drills have been prepared and conducted for the DTF drum treatment activities. (CR11) Criteria; a. Drills have been prepared that address the anticipated abnormal and

182

Evaluation of rotary drum screens used to protect juvenile salmonids in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to assess the design and operation of rotary drum screens. Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss are the potentially affected fish. Cold-branded fish are released upstream of the screen facilities. For descaling tests, the fish are captured as they exit the facility and are examined for injuries, descaling, and post-test mortalities. For screen passage tests, nets are placed in the irrigation ditch, downstream of the screen facilities, to determine if fish can pass through or over the screens. More than 100 tests have been conducted with almost 35,000 fish. Additionally, nearly 2000 native fish have been evaluated. Usually less than 2% of the test fish are injured or dead, and the condition of test fish does not differ from the controls. Less than 2% of the fish pass through or over the screens when the screen seals are properly installed and maintained.

Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Clune, T.J. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Yakima, WA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since beginning operations in 1954, the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site FB-Line conducted atomic energy defense activities consistent with the listing in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The facility mission was to process and convert dilute plutonium solution into highly purified weapons grade plutonium metal. As a result of various activities conducted in support of the mission (e.g., operation, maintenance, repair, clean up, and facility modifications), the facility generated transuranic waste. This document, along with referenced supporting documents, provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration,equipment, process operations, and waste management practices.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

Direct Surface Thermodynamic Observations within the Rear-Flank Downdrafts of Nontornadic and Tornadic Supercells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the long-surmised importance of the hook echo and rear-flank downdraft (RFD) in tornadogenesis, only a paucity of direct observations have been obtained at the surface within hook echoes and RFDs. In this paper, in situ surface ...

Paul M. Markowski; Jerry M. Straka; Erik N. Rasmussen

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Northwest Fisheries Science Center, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the Bonneville Power Administration, has established captive broodstock programs to aid recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). Captive broodstock and captive rearing programs are a form of artificial propagation that are emerging as an important component of restoration efforts for ESA-listed salmon populations that are at critically low numbers. Captive broodstocks, reared in captivity for the entire life cycle, couple the salmon's high fecundity with potentially high survival in protective culture to produce large numbers of juveniles in a single generation for supplementation of natural populations. The captive broodstocks discussed in this report were intended to protect the last known remnants of sockeye salmon that return to Redfish Lake in the Sawtooth Basin of Idaho at the headwaters of the Salmon River. This report addresses NMFS activities from 1 September 2001 to 31 August 2002 on the Redfish Lake sockeye salmon captive broodstock and captive rearing program. NMFS currently has broodstocks in culture from year classes 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 in both the captive breeding and captive rearing programs. Offspring from these programs are being returned to Idaho to aid recovery efforts for the species.

Frost, Deborah; McAuley, W.; Maynard, Desmond

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1991-1995 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), presents research findings and guidelines for development and evaluation of innovative culture techniques to increase postrelease survival of hatchery fish. The Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) described in this report is a collection of experimental approaches designed to produce hatchery-reared chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that exhibit wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology. The NATURES culture research for salmonids included multiple tests to develop techniques such as: raceways equipped with cover, structure, and natural substrates to promote development of proper body camouflage coloration; feed-delivery systems that condition fish to orient to the bottom rather than the surface of the rearing vessel; predator conditioning of fish to train them to avoid predators; and supplementing diets with natural live foods to improve foraging ability. The underlying assumptions are that NATURES will: (1) promote the development of natural cryptic coloration and antipredator behavior; (2) increase postrelease foraging efficiency; (3) improve fish health and condition by alleviating chronic, artificial rearing habitat-induced stress; and (4) reduce potential genetic selection pressures induced by the conventional salmon culture environment. A goal in using NATURES is to provide quality fish for rebuilding depleted natural runs.

Maynard, Desmond J.; Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnken, Conrad V.W.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Criticality Safety Analysis on the Mixed Be, Nat-U, and C (Graphite) Reflectors in 55-Gallon Waste Drums and Their Equivalents for HWM Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis is to develop and establish the technical basis on the criticality safety controls for the storage of mixed beryllium (Be), natural uranium (Nat-U), and carbon (C)/graphite reflectors in 55-gallon waste containers and/or their equivalents in Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. Based on the criticality safety limits and controls outlined in Section 3.0, the operations involving the use of mixed-reflector drums satisfy the double-contingency principle as required by DOE Order 420.1 and are therefore criticality safe. The mixed-reflector mass limit is 120 grams for each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent. a reflector waiver of 50 grams is allowed for Be, Nat-U, or C/graphite combined. The waived reflectors may be excluded from the reflector mass calculations when determining if a drum is compliant. The mixed-reflector drums are allowed to mix with the typical 55-gallon one-reflector drums with a Pu mass limit of 120 grams. The fissile mass limit for the mixed-reflector container is 65 grams of Pu equivalent each. The corresponding reflector mass limits are 300 grams of Be, and/or 100 kilograms of Nat-U, and/or 110 kilograms of C/graphite for each container. All other unaffected control parameters for the one-reflector containers remain in effect for the mixed-reflector drums. For instance, Superior moderators, such as TrimSol, Superla white mineral oil No. 9, paraffin, and polyethylene, are allowed in unlimited quantities. Hydrogenous materials with a hydrogen density greater than 0.133 gram/cc are not allowed. Also, an isolation separation of no less than 76.2 cm (30-inch) is required between a mixed array and any other array. Waste containers in the action of being transported are exempted from this 76.2-cm (30-inch) separation requirement. All deviations from the CS controls and mass limits listed in Section 3.0 will require individual criticality safety analyses on a case-by-case basis for each of them to confirm their criticality safety prior to their deployment and implementation.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM SLUDGE SAMPLE BOTTLES CAUSED BY RADIOLYSIS AND CHEMISTRY WITH CONCETNRATION DETERMINATION IN A STANDARD WASTE BOX (SWB) OR DRUM FOR TRANSPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A volume of 600 mL of sludge, in 4.1 L sample bottles (Appendix 7.6), will be placed in either a Super Pig (Ref. 1) or Piglet (Ref. 2, 3) based on shielding requirements (Ref. 4). Two Super Pigs will be placed in a Standard Waste Box (SWB, Ref. 5), as their weight exceeds the capacity of a drum; two Piglets will be placed in a 55-gallon drum (shown in Appendix 7.2). The generation of hydrogen gas through oxidation/corrosion of uranium metal by its reaction with water will be determined and combined with the hydrogen produced by radiolysis. The hydrogen concentration in the 55-gallon drum and SWB will be calculated to show that the lower flammability limit of 5% hydrogen is not reached. The inner layers (i.e., sample bottle, bag and shielded pig) in the SWB and drum will be evaluated to assure no pressurization occurs as the hydrogen vents from the inner containers (e.g., shielded pigs, etc.). The reaction of uranium metal with anoxic liquid water is highly exothermic; the heat of reaction will be combined with the source term decay heat, calculated from Radcalc, to show that the drum and SWB package heat load limits are satisfied. This analysis does five things: (1) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water; (2) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from radiolysis (using Radcalc 4.1); (3) Combines both H{sub 2} generation amounts, from Items 1 and 2, and determines the percent concentration of H{sub 2} in the interior of an SWB with two Super Pigs, and the interior of a 55-gallon drum with two Piglets; (4) From the combined gas generation rate, shows that the pressure at internal layers is minimal; and (5) Calculates the maximum thermal load of the package, both from radioactive decay of the source and daughter products as calculated/reported by Radcalc 4.1, and from the exothermic reaction of uranium metal with water.

RILEY DL; BRIDGES AE; EDWARDS WS

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 1998-1999 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1999, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued developing techniques for the captive rearing of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Techniques under development included protocols for rearing juveniles in freshwater and saltwater hatchery environments, and fieldwork to collect brood year 1998 and 1999 juveniles and eggs and to investigate the ability of these fish to spawn naturally. Fish collected as juveniles were held for a short time at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and later transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery for rearing. Eyed-eggs were transferred immediately to the Eagle Fish Hatchery where they were disinfected and reared by family groups. When fish from either collection method reached approximately 60 mm, they were PIT tagged and reared separately by brood year and source stream. Sixteen different groups were in culture at IDFG facilities in 1999. Hatchery spawning activities of captive-reared chinook salmon produced eyed-eggs for outplanting in streamside incubation chambers in the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=2,297) and the East Fork Salmon River (N=1,038). Additionally, a number of these eggs were maintained at the Eagle Fish Hatchery to ensure adequate brood year 1999 representation from these systems, and produced 279 and 87 juveniles from the West Fork Yankee Fork and East Fork Salmon River, respectively. Eyed-eggs were not collected from the West Fork Yankee Fork due to low adult escapement. Brood year 1998 juveniles were collected from the Lemhi River (N=191), West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=229), and East Fork Salmon River (N=185). Additionally, brood year 1999 eyed-eggs were collected from the Lemhi River (N=264) and East Fork Salmon River (N=143). Sixty-two and seven maturing adults were released into Bear Valley Creek (Lemhi River system) and the East Fork Salmon River, respectively, for spawning evaluation in 1999. Nine female carcasses from Bear Valley Creek were examined for egg retention, and of these five were spawned out, one was partially spawned, and three died before depositing eggs. However, much of the spawning related behavior observed involved female chinook salmon paired with male bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. Two female carcasses from the East Fork Salmon River were recovered and examined for egg retention. One of these had spawned and one had not.

Hassemer, Peter F.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 1999 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1999, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued developing techniques for the captive rearing of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Techniques under development included protocols for rearing juveniles in freshwater and saltwater hatchery environments, and fieldwork to collect brood year 1998 and 1999 juveniles and eggs and to investigate the ability of these fish to spawn naturally. Fish collected as juveniles were held for a short time at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and later transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery for rearing. Eyed-eggs were transferred immediately to the Eagle Fish Hatchery where they were disinfected and reared by family groups. When fish from either collection method reached approximately 60 mm, they were PIT tagged and reared separately by brood year and source stream. Sixteen different groups were in culture at IDFG facilities in 1999. Hatchery spawning activities of captive-reared chinook salmon produced eyed-eggs for outplanting in streamside incubation chambers in the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=2,297) and the East Fork Salmon River (N=1,038). Additionally, a number of these eggs were maintained at the Eagle Fish Hatchery to ensure adequate brood year 1999 representation from these systems, and produced 279 and 87 juveniles from the West Fork Yankee Fork and East Fork Salmon River, respectively. Eyed-eggs were not collected from the West Fork Yankee Fork due to low adult escapement. Brood year 1998 juveniles were collected from the Lemhi River (N=191), West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=229), and East Fork Salmon River (N=185). Additionally, brood year 1999 eyed-eggs were collected from the Lemhi River (N=264) and East Fork Salmon River (N=143). Sixty-two and seven maturing adults were released into Bear Valley Creek (Lemhi River system) and the East Fork Salmon River, respectively, for spawning evaluation in 1999. Nine female carcasses from Bear Valley Creek were examined for egg retention, and of these five were spawned out, one was partially spawned, and three died before depositing eggs. However, much of the spawning related behavior observed involved female chinook salmon paired with male bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. Two female carcasses from the East Fork Salmon River were recovered and examined for egg retention. One of these had spawned and one had not.

Hassemer, Peter F.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

What Employees Need (and Want) to Hear When Justifying the Suspension of a Regulated Metals Plan for the Processing of Drums Containing Metal Turnings  

SciTech Connect

A Regulated Metals Plan (RMP) was implemented for outdoor work activities involving the removal and disposition of approximately 4,000 deteriorated waste drums containing 236 metric tonnes (260 tons) of lead turnings from various, unspecified machine shop facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Until exposure monitoring could prove otherwise, the work area established for processing the drums was conservatively defined as a Lead Regulated Area (LRA) subject to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Lead Standard found in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1910.1025. The vast majority of the analytical results for the industrial hygiene breathing zone samples collected and tested for arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's analytical method 7300 were equivalent to the laboratory detection limits for each analyte. All results were less than 6% of their respective Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL), except for one nickel result that was approximately 17% of its PEL. The results provided justification to eventually down-post the LRA to existing employee protection requirements. In addition to removing the deteriorated drums and accompanying debris, the success of this project was quantified in terms of zero recordable injuries. The primary contributor in achieving this success was the sharing and communication of information between management, safety, and the field teams. Specifically, this was what the employees needed (and wanted) to hear when justifying the suspension of the RMP for the processing of drums containing metal turnings. Daily briefings on the status of the project and field monitoring results were just as important as maintaining budget and schedule milestones. Also, the Environmental, Safety and Health organization maintained its presence by continuing to monitor evolving field conditions to ensure the effectiveness of its plans and procedures. (authors)

Todd Potts, T. [WESKEM, LLC, Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylko, J.M. [Paducah Remediation Services, LLC, Kevil, KY (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Role of Convectively Generated Rear-Inflow Jets in the Evolution of Long-Lived Mesoconvective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the structure of convectively generated rear-inflow jets and their role in the evolution of long-lived mesoconvective systems are investigated through an analysis of idealized three-dimensional simulations using a nonhydrostatic ...

Morris L. Weisman

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect

In partial response to a Department of Energy (DOE) request to evaluate the state of measurements of special nuclear material, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) evaluated and classified all highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide items in its inventory. Because of a lack of traceable HEU standards, no items were deemed to fit the category of well measured. A subsequent DOE-HQ sponsored survey by New Brunswick Laboratory resulted in their preparation of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements], a unit of which was delivered to LLNL in October of 1999. This paper describes the approach to calibration of the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of poorly measured/unmeasured HEU oxide inventory. Included are discussions of (1) the calibration effort, including the development of the mass calibration curve; (2) the results from an axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber, and (3) an error model for the total (systematic + random) uncertainty in the predicted mass that includes the uncertainties in calibration and sample position.

Mount, M.; Glosup, J.; Cochran, C.; Dearborn, D.; Endres, E.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

Final Environmental Assessment - Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1301 October 2000 Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Final Environmental Assessment - Need and Purpose for Action Bonneville Power Administration i Contents 1. NEED AND PURPOSE FOR ACTION ..................................................................................1 1.1. Introduction ........................................................................................................................1 1.2. Need for Action ...................................................................................................................1 1.3. Purposes (Decision Factors)...............................................................................................2

195

Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon : Project Progress Report, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

During 2001, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were hydraulically collected from redds in the East Fork Salmon River (EFSR; N = 311) and the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF; N = 272) to establish brood year 2001 culture cohorts. The eyed-eggs were incubated and reared by family group at the Eagle Fish Hatchery (Eagle). Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease prior to the majority of them being transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through maturity. Smolt transfers included 210 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 242 from the WFYF, and 178 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from Manchester to Eagle included 62 individuals from the LEM, 72 from the WFYF, and 27 from the EFSR. Additional water chilling capacity was added at Eagle in 2001 to test if spawn timing could be advanced by temperature manipulations, and adults from the LEM and WFYF were divided into chilled ({approx} 9 C) and ambient ({approx} 13.5 C) water temperature groups while at Eagle. Twenty-five mature females from the LEM (11 chilled, 14 ambient) were spawned in captivity with 23 males with the same temperature history in 2001. Water temperature group was not shown to affect the spawn timing of these females, but males did mature earlier. Egg survival to the eyed stage of development averaged 37.9% and did not differ significantly between the two temperature groups. A total of 8,154 eyed-eggs from these crosses were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 89) were released into the WFYF to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Five of the 18 redds spawned by captive-reared parents were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from four of these, and survival to this stage ranged from 0%-89%. Expanding these results to the remaining redds produced an estimate of 15,000 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish.

Venditti, David A.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cold tolerance of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and thermal-refuge technology to protect this species from cold-kill in aquaculture ponds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need to protect red drum in aquaculture ponds from cold-kill led to the development of thermalrefuge technology for overwintering these fish. Successive versions of an experimental thermal refuge were installed and operated in two adjacent red drum culture ponds at Redfish Unlimited, Palacios, Texas, during the winters of 1991-92 and 1992-93. Although red drum in the ponds at Palacios were not threatened by cold during either of these mild winters, the thermodynamic efficiency of the two versions of the refuge could be tested and compared, both with each other and with the prototype refuge used in the winter of 1990-91. The 1992-93 refuge design, which featured an inflated, dome-like cover, was the most effective in terms of cost, ease of maintenance, and resistance to heat loss. A mathematical model, based on Newton's law of cooling, was used to simulate refuge thermodynamics. The best-fitting model had exponential rate constants ranging from 0.01 1 to 0.026 min-' for the 1991-92 version and 0.004 to 0.006 min-' for the 1992-93 version (r > 0.99). A second phase of the research focused on cold tolerance of red drum in ponds at Palacios, from 6 February to 2 April 1993. Values of the 24-h lower lethal temperature of fish sampled from refuge-equipped and non-refuge-equipped ponds were estimated via lethal-cold bioassays. Regression of probit-transformed percent survival at 24 h yielded estimates of mean lower lethal temperature which rose from 0.7 IC on 6 February to 6.6 IC on 2 April. Within dates lower lethal temperatures of fish taken from refuge-equipped and non-refugeequipped ponds did not differ; however, there was a significant difference among sample dates. Values of estimated acclimation temperature for these red drum ranged from 13.5 IC on 6 February to 17.7 IC on 2 April. Acclimation temperatures were inferred by exponentially filtering the pondtemperature time series so that the filtered values had maximum linear correlation (r = 0.93) with the lower-lethal-temperature series; the requisite filter had an exponential rate constant of 0.044 day-1.

Dorsett, Paul Wesley

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Model Based Structural Evaluation & Design of Overpack Container for Bag-Buster Processing of TRU Waste Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a materials and computational model based analysis utilized to design an engineered overpack container capable of maintaining structural integrity for confinement of transuranic wastes undergoing the cryo-vacuum stress based Bag-Buster process and satisfying DOT 7A waste package requirements. The engineered overpack is a key component of the Ultra-BagBuster process/system being commercially developed by UltraTech International for potential DOE applications to non-intrusively breach inner confinement layers (poly bags/packaging) within transuranic (TRU) waste drums. This system provides a lower cost/risk approach to mitigate hydrogen gas concentration buildup limitations on transport of high alpha activity organic transuranic wastes. Four evolving overpack design configurations and two materials (low carbon steel and 300 series stainless) were considered and evaluated using non-linear finite element model analyses of structural response. Properties comparisons show that 300-series stainless is required to provide assurance of ductility and structural integrity at both room and cryogenic temperatures. The overpack designs were analyzed for five accidental drop impact orientations onto an unyielding surface (dropped flat on bottom, bottom corner, side, top corner, and top). The first three design configurations failed the bottom and top corner drop orientations (flat bottom, top, and side plates breached or underwent material failure). The fourth design utilized a protruding rim-ring (skirt) below the overpacks bottom plate and above the overpacks lid plate to absorb much of the impact energy and maintained structural integrity under all accidental drop loads at both room and cryogenic temperature conditions. Selected drop testing of the final design will be required to confirm design performance.

D. T. Clark; A. S. Siahpush; G. L. Anderson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Viruses in laboratory-reared cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae), is a non-native species threatening a variety of native cacti, particularly endangered species of Opuntia (Zimmerman et al. 2001), on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Cactoblastis cactorum populations have expanded from Florida northward along the Atlantic coast as far as Charleston, SC, and westward along the Gulf of Mexico to Dauphin Island, south of Mobile, AL. It is feared that further movement to the west will allow C. cactorum to enter the US desert Southwest and Mexico, particularly the latter. Numerous cactus species, especially those of the genera Opuntia and Nopalea, are native to the U.S. and Mexico. Local economies based on agricultural and horticultural uses of cacti could be devastated by C. cactorum (Vigueras and Portillo 2001). A bi-national control program between the US and Mexico is being developed, utilizing the sterile insect technique (SIT). In the SIT program, newly emerged moths are irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source and released to mate with wild individuals. The radiation dose completely sterilizes the females and partially sterilizes the males. When irradiated males mate with wild females, the F1 progeny of these matings are sterile. In order for the SIT program to succeed, large numbers of moths must be reared from egg to adult on artificial diet in a quarantined rearing facility (Carpenter et al. 2001). Irradiated insects must then be released in large numbers at the leading edge of the invasive population and at times which coincide with the presence of wild individuals available for mating. Mortality from disease in the rearing colony disrupts the SIT program by reducing the numbers of insects available for release.

Marti, O.G.; Myers, R.E.; Carpenter, J.E. [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Crop Protection and Management Research Laboratory, PO Box 748, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States); Styer, E.L. [University of Georgia, Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory, PO Box 1389, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2000 Project Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

During 2000, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were collected to establish captive cohorts from three study streams and included 503 eyed-eggs from East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), 250 from the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and 304 from the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF). After collection, the eyed-eggs were immediately transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery, where they were incubated and reared by family group. Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease before the majority (approximately 75%) were transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through sexual maturity. Smolt transfers included 158 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 193 from the WFYF, and 372 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from the Manchester facility to the Eagle Fish Hatchery included 77 individuals from the LEM, 45 from the WFYF, and 11 from the EFSR. Two mature females from the WFYF were spawned in captivity with four males in 2000. Only one of the females produced viable eggs (N = 1,266), which were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 70) from the Lemhi River were released into Big Springs Creek to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Fifteen of the 17 suspected redds spawned by captive-reared parents in Big Springs Creek were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from 13 of these, and survival ranged from 0% to 96%, although there was evidence that some eggs had died after reaching the eyed stage. Six redds were capped in an attempt to document fry emergence, but none were collected. A final hydraulic sampling of the capped redds yielded nothing from five of the six, but 75 dead eggs and one dead fry were found in the sixth. Smothering by fine sediment is the suspected cause of the observed mortality between the eyed stage and fry emergence.

Venditti, David A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Effects of prebiotics on growth performance, nutrient utilization and the gastrointestinal tract microbial community of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of experiments examined the effects of four potential prebiotics-- GroBiotic-A (a mixture of partially autolyzed brewers yeast, dairy components and dried fermentation products), mannanoligosaccharide (MOS), galactooligosaccharide (GOS), and inulin/ fructooligosaccharide (FOS)--on the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts microbial community in hybrid striped bass and red drum. The first in vitro experiment applied denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to examine responses of red drum GI tract microbiota to anaerobic incubation with brewers yeast, FOS, and GroBiotic-A. Brewers yeast and GroBiotic-A produced unique microbial communities compared to that associated with the basal diet. Volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles did not differ among treatments, with acetate being the major fermentation product. A second in vitro experiment examined effects of GroBiotic-A, MOS, GOS, and FOS on the GI tract microbiota of hybrid striped bass. None of the prebiotics altered the culturable microbial community, but all tended to lower acetate production and increase butyrate production. A third experiment examined the effects of the four prebiotics fed to juvenile hybrid striped bass for 8 weeks. Growth, feed efficiency ratio (FER) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were not affected by the different prebiotics, but the GI tracts microbial community was altered from that associated with the basal diet. The fourth experiment consisted of an 8-week feeding trial and one 6-week feeding trial in which the effects of GroBiotic-A and FOS on growth performance and microbial community composition were compared for red drum living in independent tanks versus tanks with a shared water system. Neither the intestinal microbial community nor growth performance were significantly altered by the prebiotics in these trials; fish in independent and shared water tanks produced similar results. The final experiment examined the effects of GroBiotic-A, FOS, MOS and GOS on nutrient and energy digestibility of sub-adult red drum fed diets containing fish meal and soybean meal. The prebiotics generally increased protein, organic matter, and energy digestibility, with the exception of FOS/inulin. Lipid digestibility was decreased by GOS, MOS and FOS. These studies are the first to establish that prebiotics can alter the GI tract microbial community of these fish and influence nutrient digestibility.

Burr, Gary Stephen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2002, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued to develop techniques to rear Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were hydraulically collected from redds in the East Fork Salmon River (EFSR; N = 328) and the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF; N = 308) to establish brood year 2002 culture cohorts. The eyed-eggs were incubated and reared at the Eagle Fish Hatchery, Eagle, Idaho (Eagle). Juveniles collected in 2000 were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease prior to being transferred to the NOAA Fisheries, Manchester Marine Experimental Station, Manchester, Washington (Manchester) for saltwater rearing through maturity. Smolt transfers included 203 individuals from the WFYF and 379 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from Manchester to Eagle included 107 individuals from the LEM, 167 from the WFYF, and 82 from the EFSR. This was the second year maturing adults were held on chilled water at Eagle to test if water temperature manipulations could advance spawn timing. Adults from the LEM and WFYF were divided into chilled ({approx} 9 C) and ambient ({approx} 13.5 C) temperature groups while at Eagle. Forty-seven mature females from the LEM (19 chilled, 16 ambient, and 12 ambient not included in the temperature study) were spawned at Eagle with 42 males in 2002. Water temperature group was not shown to affect the spawn timing of these females, but males did mature earlier. Egg survival to the eyed stage averaged 66.5% and did not differ significantly between the temperature groups. Personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe placed a total of 47,977 eyed-eggs from these crosses in in-stream incubators. Mature adults (N = 215 including 56 precocial males) were released into the WFYF to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Twenty-six captive-reared females constructed 33 redds in the WFYF in 2002. Eighteen of these were hydraulically sampled, and eggs were collected from 17. The percentage of live eggs ranged from 0-100% and averaged 34.6%. No live eggs were found in redds spawned by brood year 1997 females. Expanding these results to the remaining redds gives an estimate of 22,900 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish in the WFYF. Additionally, 130 mature adults (including 41 precocial males) were released into the EFSR. Almost all of these fish moved out of the areas shoreline observers had access to, so no spawning behavior was observed. Radio-telemetry indicated that most of these fish initially moved downstream (although three females moved upstream as far as 7 km) and then held position.

Venditti, David; Willard, Catherine; James, Chris

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Final Environmental Assessment - Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Fish and Game Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Finding of No Significant Impact October 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE), is proposing to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Program (IDFG Program). The IDFG Program is a small-scale research and production initiative designed to increase numbers of three weak but recoverable populations of spring/summer chinook salmon in the Salmon River drainage. This would increase numbers of spring/summer chinook salmon within the Snake River

203

Nevada Test Site Perspective on Characterization and Loading of Legacy Transuranic Drums Utilizing the Central Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has successfully completed a multi-year effort to characterize and ship 1860 legacy transuranic (TRU) waste drums for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a permanent TRU disposal site. This has been a cooperative effort among the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), the U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO), the NTS Management and Operations (M&O) contractor Bechtel Nevada (BN), and various contractors under the Central Characterization Project (CCP) umbrella. The success is due primarily to the diligence, perseverance, and hard work of each of the contractors, the DOE/CBFO, and NNSA/NSO, along with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters (DOE/HQ). This paper presents, from an NTS perspective, the challenges and successes of utilizing the CCP for obtaining a certified characterization program, sharing responsibilities for characterization, data validation, and loading of TRU waste with BN to achieve disposal at WIPP from a Small Quantity Site (SQS) such as the NTS. The challenges in this effort arose from two general sources. First, the arrangement of DOE/CBFO contractors under the CCP performing work and certifying waste at the NTS within a Hazard Category 2 (HazCat 2) non-reactor nuclear facility operated by BN, presented difficult challenges. The nuclear safety authorization basis, safety liability and responsibility, conduct of operations, allocation and scheduling of resources, and other issues were particularly demanding. The program-level and field coordination needed for the closely interrelated characterization tasks was extensive and required considerable effort by all parties. The second source of challenge was the legacy waste itself. None of the waste was generated at the NTS. The waste was generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Lynchburg, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and a variety of other sites over 20 years ago, making the development of Acceptable Knowledge a significant and problematic effort. In addition, the characterization requirements, and data quality objectives for shipment and WIPP disposal today, were non-existent when this waste was generated, resulting in real-time adjustments to unexpected conditions.

R.G. Lahoud; J. F. Norton; I. L. Siddoway; L. W. Griswold

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Movement of Fall Chinook Salmon Fry Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Approach Angles for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed tests to determine whether a significant difference in fish passage existed between a 6-ft screening facility built perpendicularly to canal flow and an identical screening facility with the screen mounted at a 45-degree angle to the approach channel. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fall chinook salmon fry were introduced into the test system, and their movements were monitored. A total of 14 tests (400 fish per test) that lasted 20 hours were completed during April and May, 1996. There was no significant difference in fish passage rate through the two approach configurations. Attraction flow to the bypass across the face of the screen was more evident for the angled approach, although this did not appear to play a significant role in attracting fish to the bypass. Approach velocities at the face of the screen did not exceed the 0.4 fps criteria for either approach configuration and posed not threat to fish. No fish passed over, around, or through the drum screen during any test.

Neitzel, D.A.; Blanton, S.L.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Daly, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Methods and apparatus to produce stick-slip motion of logging tool attached to a wireline drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described to produce stick-slip motion of a logging tool within a cased well attached to a wireline that is drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum. The stick-slip motion results in the periodic upward movement of the tool in the cased well described in terms of a dwell time during which time the tool is stationary, the move time during which time the tool moves, and the stroke that is upward distance that the tool translates during the "slip" portion of the stick-slip motion. This method of measurement is used to log the well at different vertical positions of the tool. Therefore, any typical "station-to-station logging tool" may be modified to be a "continuous logging tool", where "continuous" means that the wireline drum continually rotates while the tool undergoes stick-slip motion downhole and measurements are performed during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary. The stick-slip methods of operation and the related apparatus are particularly described in terms of making measurements of formation resistivity from within a cased well during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary during the periodic stick-slip motion of the logging tool.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA); Momii, Steven Thomas (Seattle, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Methods and apparatus to produce stick-slip motion of logging tool attached to a wireline drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described to produce stick-slip motion of a logging tool within a cased well attached to a wireline that is drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum. The stick-slip motion results in the periodic upward movement of the tool in the cased well described in terms of a dwell time during which time the tool is stationary, the move time during which time the tool moves, and the stroke that is upward distance that the tool translates during the ``slip`` portion of the stick-slip motion. This method of measurement is used to log the well at different vertical positions of the tool. Therefore, any typical ``station-to-station logging tool`` may be modified to be a ``continuous logging tool,`` where ``continuous`` means that the wireline drum continually rotates while the tool undergoes stick-slip motion downhole and measurements are performed during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary. The stick-slip methods of operation and the related apparatus are particularly described in terms of making measurements of formation resistivity from within a cased well during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary during the periodic stick-slip motion of the logging tool. 12 figs.

Vail, W.B. III; Momii, S.T.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Initiation and Development of Rear Inflow within the 28-29 June 1989 North Dakota Mesoconvective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five dual-Doppler analyses spanning a period of 1.5 h are used to document the initiation and development of rear inflow within a High Plains squall line. The squall line developed as part of the 28-29 June 1989 mesoconvective system that passed ...

Brian A. Klimowski

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Development and Forcing of the Rear Inflow Jet in a Rapidly Developing and Decaying Squall Line during BAMEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the development, structure, and forcing of the rear inflow jet (RIJ) through the life cycle of a small, short-lived squall line over north-central Kansas on 29 June 2003. The analyses were developed from airborne quad-Doppler ...

Joseph A. Grim; Robert M. Rauber; Greg M. McFarquhar; Brian F. Jewett; David P. Jorgensen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

MHV Fleet Testing - Maintenance Sheet for 2010 Smart Fortwo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

472012 47,544 Changed oil and filter 64.33 4112012 47,840 Replaced left front tire (labor) 45.00 4122012 47,847 Replaced front brake pads, adjusted rear brake shoes...

210

Feasibility study 100 K East Area water purification pools fish-rearing program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the feasibility study, a design analysis was conducted to determine the usefulness of the existing sand filters and associated media for reuse. The sand filters which were studied for potential reuse are located on the northern end of the 100-K East Area water filtration plant on the Hanford Site. This plant is located about one- half mile from the Columbia River. The sand filters were originally part of a system which was used to provide cooling water to the nearby plutonium production K Reactors. This Cold War operation took place until 1971, at which time the K Reactors were closed for eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Recently, it was decided to study the concept of putting the sand filter structures back into use for fish-rearing purposes. Because the water that circulated through the water purification pools (K Pools) and associated sand filters was clean river water, there is little chance of the structures being radioactively contaminated. To date, separate K Pools have been used for raising a variety of cold water fish species, including white sturgeon and fall chinook salmon, as well as for providing potable water to the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site for fire and service water purposes.

Betsch, M.D., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Bowdle, South Dakota, Cyclic Tornadic Supercell of 22 May 2010: Surface Analysis of Rear-Flank Downdraft Evolution and Multiple Internal Surges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile mesonet sampling in the hook echo/rear-flank downdraft (RFD) region of a tornadic supercell near Bowdle, South Dakota, provided the opportunity to examine RFD thermodynamic and kinematic attributes and evolution. Focused analysis of the ...

Bruce D. Lee; Catherine A. Finley; Christopher D. Karstens

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Calibration Tools for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Oxide and Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide with a Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed an extensive effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler (Canberra Model JCC-92) for accountability measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide and HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. Earlier papers described the PAN shuffler calibration over a range of item properties by standards measurements and an extensive series of detailed simulation calculations. With a single normalization factor, the simulations agree with the HEU oxide standards measurements to within {+-}1.2% at one standard deviation. Measurement errors on mixed U-Pu oxide samples are in the {+-}2% to {+-}10% range, or {+-}20 g for the smaller items. The purpose of this paper is to facilitate transfer of the LLNL procedure and calibration algorithms to external users who possess an identical, or equivalent, PAN shuffler. Steps include (1) measurement of HEU standards or working reference materials (WRMs); (2) MCNP simulation calculations for the standards or WRMs and a range of possible masses in the same containers; (3) a normalization of the calibration algorithms using the standard or WRM measurements to account for differences in the {sup 252}Cf source strength, the delayed-neutron nuclear data, effects of the irradiation protocol, and detector efficiency; and (4) a verification of the simulation series trends against like LLNL results. Tools include EXCEL/Visual Basic programs which pre- and post-process the simulations, control the normalization, and embody the calibration algorithms.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P

2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Update on Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect

In October of 1999, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began an effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron (PAN) drum shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide. A single unit of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] was used to (1) develop a mass calibration curve for HEU oxide in the nominal range of 393 g to 3144 g {sup 235}U, and (2) perform a detailed axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber. Results from these efforts were reported at the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 41st Annual Meeting in July 2000. This paper describes subsequent efforts by LLNL to use a unit of CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to CRM 149 and CRM 146 units and a selected set of containers with CRM 149-equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to (1) extend the low range of the reported mass calibration curve to 10 g {sup 235}U, (2) evaluate the effect of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (5.24 cm to 12.17 cm inside diameter and 6.35 cm to 17.72 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop mass calibration curves for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} enriched to 20.1 wt% {sup 235}U and 52.5 wt% {sup 235}U.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Mixed Oxide  

SciTech Connect

As a follow-on to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide, a method has been developed to extend the use of the PAN shuffler to the measurement of HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. This method uses the current LLNL HEU oxide calibration algorithms, appropriately corrected for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, and recently developed PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithms to yield the mass of {sup 235}U present via differences between the expected count rate for the PuO{sub 2} and the measured count rate of the mixed U-Pu oxide. This paper describes the LLNL effort to use PAN shuffler measurements of units of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] and CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] and a selected set of LLNL PuO{sub 2}-bearing containers in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to each to (1) establish and validate a correction to the HEU calibration algorithm for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, (2) develop a PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithm that includes the effect of PuO{sub 2} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (8.57 cm to 9.88 cm inside diameter and 9.60 cm to 13.29 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop and validate the method for establishing the mass of {sup 235}U present in an unknown of mixed U-Pu oxide.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Investigations into the reproductive performance and larval rearing of the Brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus aztecus, using closed recirculating systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of unilateral eyestalk ablation, diets and sex ratios were evaluated on two wild populations of Farfantepenaeus aztecus in a closed recirculating maturation system. Ovarian development and spawning frequencies of ablated females in both studies were higher than the non-ablated females. Replacement of bloodworms in maturation diet with enriched adult Artemia sp. had no negative effect on the number of eggs spawned and resulted in increased hatch and survival rates from Nauplius I to Zoea I. Life span of ablated females fed enriched Artemia sp. was longer than ablated females fed bloodworms. Replacement of the expensive bloodworm diet component with adult enriched Artemia sp. is possible without negative impact on female reproductive performance. Reducing male to female ratio from 2:1 to 1:1 resulted in a 1.25% decrease in spawning activities of ablated females. The life cycle of pond-raised F1 generation F. aztecus also was completed in the closed recirculating system using unilateral eyestalk ablation as previously described. This study found diets that contained an enriched adult Artemia sp. component performed superior (i.e. hatch rate, nauplii and zoea production) to a diet containing bloodworms. Six consecutive larval rearing trials evaluated changes in select water quality indicators and their effect on growth, survival, and stress tolerance of F. aztecus postlarvae cultured in artificial seawater under closed recirculating and flow-through conditions. The closed recirculating larval rearing system successfully produced five-day-old postlarvae (PL) from Zoea I (Z1) with similar dry weights, lengths and stress resistance to PL produced under standard water exchange practices. The trickling biofilters were found to be a limiting component of this system. A submerged coral biofilter was added to the system and effectively processed culture water for re-use. Addition of the submerged biofilter resulted in improved survival rates in Trials 4, 5 and 6. These studies demonstrate maturation and larval rearing of F. aztecus is feasible in closed recirculating systems. Implementation of these systems in hatcheries bolsters biosecurity while reducing the environmental impact of hatchery effluent. Recirculating and re-use systems are therefore essential in the further development of sustainable hatchery programs for endemic species.

Gandy, Ryan Leighton

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recovery efforts for the endangered fall chinook salmon necessitates knowledge of the factors limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which affect spawning of the fish in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing seward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs. The spawning was generally a November event in 1993, with some activity in late Oct. and early Dec. Spawning habitat availability was assessed by applying hydraulic and habitat models to known fall chinook salmon spawning sites. Juveniles were seined and PIT tagged in the free-flowing Snake River, and in the Columbia River in he Hanford Reach and in McNary Reservoir. Subyearling fish were marked at McNary Dam to relate river flow and migration patterns of juveniles to adult returns. Hydroacoustic surveys were conducted on McNary and John Day reservoirs and in net pens.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Redeployment as an alternative to decommissioning. Conversion of a US Department of Energy facility to fish rearing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site and the Tri-Cities community have before them an unprecedented opportunity to create an economic renaissance based on the unparalleled environmental cleanup mission. The nation and the world await the emergence of the post-Cold War economy and conversion of the national defense complex into new national economic thrusts. The legacy of the Hanford Site national defense mission must not end up simply with the Site being cleaned up and land being restored to near-original conditions. There also needs to be a future economic legacy of a dynamic Tri-Cities community resulting from the cumulative current activities that will have a positive impact for years to come. In anticipation of the eventual completion of the Hanford Site cleanup mission, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Office of Economic Transition to identify and implement policies and actions that will support the cleanup mission of the Site and the long-term economic development of the Tri-Cities area. In the future, it is envisioned that one phase of a vibrant regional economy with a diversified economic job base will be the capability to compete in national and international environmental services markets. Recently, it was realized that the K Area water treatments facilities might be suitable for the rearing of fish. A `marketing` effort was undertaken to match the facility with potential users. At this time, four fish-rearing projects have either been conducted or are in various stages of progress or implementation. These will be described to explain the participants, the purposes, and the scope of each project.

Anderson, B.N.; Herborn, D.I.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Numerical Simulation of an Intense Squall Line during 1011 June 1985 PRE-STORM. Part II: Rear Inflow, Surface Pressure Perturbations and Stratiform Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intense rear-inflow jet, surface pressure perturbations, and stratiform precipitation associated with a squall line during 1011 June 1985 are examined using a three-dimensional mesoscale nested-grid model. It is found that the large-scale ...

Da-Lin Zhang; Kun Gao

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Drum bubbler tritium processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating tritium oxide from a gas stream containing tritium oxide. The gas stream containing tritium oxide is fed into a container of water having a head space above the water. Bubbling the gas stream containing tritium oxide through the container of water and removing gas from the container head space above the water. Thereafter, the gas from the head space is dried to remove water vapor from the gas, and the water vapor is recycled to the container of water.

Rule, Keith; Gettelfinger, Geoff; Kivler, Paul

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Drum bubbler tritium processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating tritium oxide from a gas stream containing tritium oxide. The gas stream containing tritium oxide is fed into a container of water having a head space above the water. The tritium oxide is separated by bubbling the gas stream containing tritium oxide through the container of water and removing gas from the container head space above the water. Thereafter, the gas from the head space is dried to remove water vapor from the gas, and the water vapor is recycled to the container of water. 2 figs.

Rule, K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Kivler, P.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

Drum bubbler tritium processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating tritium oxide from a gas stream containing tritium oxide. The gas stream containing tritium oxide is fed into a container of water having a head space above the water. Bubbling the gas stream containing tritium oxide through the container of water and removing gas from the container head space above the water. Thereafter, the gas from the head space is dried to remove water vapor from the gas, and the water vapor is recycled to the container of water.

Rule, Keith (Hopewell, NJ); Gettelfinger, Geoff (Lexington, MA); Kivler, Paul (Hamilton Square, NJ)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Brake System Modeling and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 3447 kPa Upper Left: Volts vs. Angular Position, showingone cycle. Lower Right: Volts vs. Position at several brakewith a magnitude of several volts. The INA118, a precision

Hedrick, J. K.; Uchanski, M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mechanical and Hydraulic Press Brakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...drives, with mechanical linkages from motor to flywheel to clutch to gears to crankshaft to crank arm to ram (Fig. 4). They all have one thing in common: a crankshaft action that converts rotary motion into straight, reciprocating motion (Fig. 5). During a stroke cycle, the crank arm drives the ram down...

225

Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, 1989 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979 this study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall chinook salmon from the Columbia River. Coded wire tagging (CWT) of hatchery fall chinook salmon began in 1979 with the 1978 brood and was completed in 1982 with the 1981 brood of fish at rearing facilities on the Columbia River system. From 18 to 20 rearing facilities were involved in the study each brood year. Nearly 14 million tagged fish, about 4% of the production, were released as part of this study over the four years, 1979 through 1982. Sampling for recoveries of these tagged fish occurred from 1980 through 1986 in the sport and commercial marine fisheries from Alaska through California, Columbia River fisheries, and returns to hatcheries and adjacent streams. The National Marine Fisheries Service coordinated this study among three fishery agencies: US Fish and Wildfire Service, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution, fishery contribution, survival, and value of the production of fall chinook salmon from each rearing facility on the Columbia River system to Pacific coast salmon fisheries. To achieve these objectives fish from each hatchery were given a distinctive CWT. 81 refs., 20 figs., 68 tabs.

Vreeland, Robert R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Instream Flows Needed for Successful Migration and Rearing of Rainbow and Westslope Cutthroat Trout in Selected Tributaries of the Kootenai River: Final Report FY 1988.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second phase of a two-part study that was conducted by Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks in contractual agreement with Bonneville Power Administration to address measures of the Northwest Power Planning Council's River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Objectives were to determine instream flow needs in Kootenai River tributaries to maintain successful fish migration, spawning and rearing habitat of game fish, evaluate existing resident and rearing fish populations, and compile hydrologic and fishery information required to secure legal reservation of water for the fishery source. The Kootenai River fishery is threatened by microhydro and other water use development which reduce tributary habitat critical for maintaining a healthy spawning and rearing environment. The wetted perimeter method was used to estimate flows required to maintain existing resident and migratory fish populations in 28 tributaries to the Kootenai River. Migrant passage flows were determined using the discharge-average depth relationship at four (usually five) riffle transects. This information will provide the basis to reserve water through application to the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. 45 figs., 56 tabs.

Marotz, Brian

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Movement and Injury Rates for Three Life Stages of Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Submerged Orifices and an Overflow Weir for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen : Annual Report 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the effectiveness of 6-in. and 2-in. submerged orifices, and an overflow weir for fish bypass at a rotary drum fish screening facility. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fry, subyearlings, and smolts of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha) were introduced into the test system, and their movement and injury rates were monitored. A total of 33 tests (100 fish per test) that lasted from 24 to 48 hr were completed from 1994 through 1995. Passage rate depended on both fish size and bypass configuration. For fry/fingerling spring chinook salmon, there was no difference in passage rate through the three bypass configurations (2-in. orifice, 6-in. orifice, or overflow weir). Subyearlings moved sooner when the 6-in. orifice was used, with more than 50% exiting through the fish bypass in the first 8 hr. Smolts exited quickly and preferred the 6-in. orifice, with over 90% of the smolts exiting through the bypass in less than 2 hr. Passage was slightly slower when a weir was used, with 90% of the smolts exiting in about 4 hr. When the 2-in. orifice was used in the bypass, 90% of the smolts did not exit until after 8 hr. In addition, about 7% of the smolts failed to migrate from the forebay within 24 hr, indicating that smolts were significantly delayed when the 2-in. orifice was used. Few significant injuries were detected for any of the life stages. However, light descaling occurred on about 15% of chinook salmon smolts passing through the 2-in. orifice. Although a single passage through the orifice did not appear to cause significant scale loss or other damage, passing through several screening facilities with 2-in. orifices could cause cumulative injuries.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Mavros, William V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluation of 1991-1992 Brood Overwinter-Reared Coho Released from Net Pens in Youngs Bay, Oregon : Final Completion Report Youngs Bay Terminal Fishery Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Funding from Bonneville Power Administration was provided to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s Fisheries Project to identify and develop terminal fishing opportunities. The 1991 and 1992 brood fingerling coho from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife hatcheries were successfully reared during the winter period to smolt stage in Youngs Bay utilizing floating net pens. Based on coded-wire-tag recoveries during 1991--93 from 2-week net-pen acclimation releases, total accountability of coho adults averaged 40,540 fish, with the Youngs Bay commercial harvest accounting for 39%. With reduced ocean harvest impacts during 1994 and 1995, 92% of 51,640 coho in 1994 and 68% of 23,599 coho in 1995 (based on coded-wire-tag recoveries) were accounted for in the Youngs Bay commercial fishery for combined 2-week and overwinter acclimation net-pen releases. Overwinter net-pen acclimation coho accounted for 35,063 and 15,775 coho adults in 1994 and 1995 with 93% and 68% accountable in the Youngs Bay commercial harvest. Based on coded-wire-tag recoveries, less than 1% of the adults resulting from releases at Youngs Bay net pens strayed to hatcheries, while none were recovered on spawning ground surveys during 1991--95. The highest survival rates were observed for 1991 and 1992 brood overwinter coho released in early May. Time of release, not rearing strategy, appears to be the determining factor affecting survival in Youngs Bay.

Hirose, Paul S.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Utilizing fly ash particles to produce low-cost metal matrix composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are a blend of fine ceramic particles mixed with metals such as aluminium or magnesium. Fly ash is considerably cheaper than ceramics; aluminium-fly ash composites cost less than 60% of conventional aluminium-SiC composites making them attractive to automakers striving for lower weight and cheaper materials for brake rotors or brake drums. Ultalite.com has consulted with US researchers to to find the optimum requirements of the fly ash needed to make MMCs. Particle size 20-40 microns, low calcium oxide content and spherical particles were identified. The desired particles once extracted are stirred into molten aluminum and the resulting composite is into ingots for shipment to a casting facility. Dynamometer testing has shown that aluminium-fly ash composite brake drums have better performance and wear than cast iron drums. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Withers, G. [Ultalite.com, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Oxides within DOE-STD-3013-2000 Containers  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler (Canberra Model JCC-92) for accountability measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide and HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. In June 2002, at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management, LLNL reported on an extensive effort to calibrate this shuffler, based on standards measurements and extensive simulations, for HEU oxides and mixed U-Pu oxides in thin-walled primary and secondary containers. In August 2002, LLNL began to also use DOE-STD-3013-2000 containers for HEU oxide and mixed U-Pu oxide. These DOE-STD-3013-2000 containers are comprised of a stainless steel convenience can enclosed in welded stainless steel primary and secondary containers. Compared to the double thin-walled containers, the DOE-STD-3013-2000 containers have substantially thicker walls, and the density of materials in these containers was found to extend over a greater range (1.35 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.62 g/cm{sup 3}) than foreseen for the double thin-walled containers. Further, the DOE-STD-3013-2000 Standard allows for oxides containing at least 30 wt% Pu plus U whereas the calibration algorithms for thin-walled containers were derived for virtually pure HEU or mixed U-Pu oxides. An initial series of Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to given quantities of HEU oxide and mixed U-Pu oxide in DOE-STD-3013-2000 containers was generated and compared with the response predicted by the calibration algorithms for thin-walled containers. Results showed a decrease on the order of 10% in the count rate, and hence a decrease in the calculated U mass for measured unknowns, with some varying trends versus U mass. Therefore a decision was made to develop a calibration algorithm for the PAN shuffler unique to the DOE-STD-3013-2000 container. This paper describes that effort and selected unknown item measurement results.

Mount, M E; O' Connell, W J

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

Gas turbine engine braking and method  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of decelerating a ground vehicle driven by a gas turbine engine having a gas generator section and a free turbine output power section driven by a gas flow from the gas generator section, comprising the steps of: altering the incidence of gas flow from the gas generator section onto the free turbine section whereby said gas flow opposes rotation of the free turbine section; increasing gas generator section speed; and subsequent to said altering and increasing steps, selectively mechanically interconnecting said gas generator and free turbine sections whereby the rotational inertia of the gas generator section tends to decelerate the free turbine section.

Mattson, G.; Woodhouse, G.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction ...  

Patent Number: 5,450,324: Issued: September 12, 1995: Official Filing: View the Complete Patent at the US Patent & Trademark Office: Lab: Idaho ...

234

Effective passivation of the low resistivity silicon surface by a rapid thermal oxide/PECVD silicon nitride stack and its application to passivated rear and bifacial Si solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel stack passivation scheme, in which plasma silicon nitride (SiN) is stacked on top of a rapid thermal SiO{sub 2} (RTO) layer, is developed to attain a surface recombination velocity (S) approaching 10 cm/s at the 1.3 {Omega}-cm p-type (100) silicon surface. Such low S is achieved by the stack even when the RTO and SiN films individually yield considerably poorer surface passivation. Critical to achieving low S by the stack is the use of a short, moderate temperature anneal (in this study 730 C for 30 seconds) after film growth and deposition. This anneal is believed to enhance the release and delivery of atomic hydrogen from the SiN film to the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface, thereby reducing the density of interface traps at the surface. Compatibility with this post-deposition anneal makes the stack passivation scheme attractive for cost-effective solar cell production since a similar anneal is required to fire screen-printed contacts. Application of the stack to passivated rear screen-printed solar cells has resulted in V{sub oc}`s of 641 mV and 633 mV on 0.65 {Omega}-cm and 1.3 {Omega}-cm FZ Si substrates, respectively. These V{sub oc} values are roughly 20 mV higher than for cells with untreated, highly recombinative back surfaces. The stack passivation has also been used to form fully screen-printed bifacial solar cells which exhibit rear-illuminated efficiency as high as 11.6% with a single layer AR coating.

Rohatgi, A.; Narasimha, S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Univ. Center for Excellence in Photovoltaics Research and Education; Ruby, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2010 Honda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Honda Civic Hybrid VIN: JHMFA3F24AS005577 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Disc Brakes Front Wheel Drive Regenerative Braking Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD State of Charge Meter 1 Weights Design Curb Weight: 2877 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2982 lb Distribution F/R (%): 57/43 GVWR: 3792 lb GAWR F/R: 1973/1841 lb Payload 2 : 810 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 106.3 in Track F/R: 59.1/60.2 in Length: 177.3 in Width: 69.0 in Height: 56.3 in Ground Clearance: 6.0 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Bridgestone

236

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective: ENV.1 Adequate and correct environmental permit requirements and hazardous waste procedures and limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and...

237

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITERIA: QA.2.1 Any open ICARE or Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) corrective actions that may impact the activity have been closed prior to commencement...

238

Savannah River Site TRU Drum Waste Criticality Safety Margin Improvements  

SciTech Connect

The text of the paper will include an overview of the methodology used to determine the credible scenarios, summary of the analysis of the results, challenges overcome during compliance and implementation, and cost savings due to reduced operational expanses.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hammer, K.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Microsoft Word - NDA_Drum_PDP_Rev 4-final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the TRU Waste Characterization Program Revision 4 June 2013 This document supersedes DOECBFO-01-1005, Revision 3 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Office of the...

240

Dynamic Behaviour of Coke Drums PSVs During Blocked Outlet Condition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The maximum yield taken in an oil refinery can not exceed 70% without including Delayed Coker Unit (DCU) as part of unit operations in the (more)

Vakilalroayaei, Hessam

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E19: Rear Axle Shaft Failure Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A10: Mechanical Properties and Weld-Ability of Laser Welded Metal Bellows ..... J5: Electrical Conductivity of Diesel-Biodiesel Blends Evaluated by the...

242

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 Mazda 3 VIN: JMZBLA4G601111865 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Disc Brakes Front Wheel Drive Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD Weights Design Curb Weight: 2,954 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2,850 lb Distribution F/R (%): 63/37 GVWR: 4,050 lb GAWR F/R: 2,057/1,896 lb Payload 1 : 1,096 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 103.9 in Track F/R: 60.4/59.8 in Length: 175.6 in Width: 69.1 in Height: 57.9 in Ground Clearance: 6.1 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Yokohama Model: YK520 Size: P205/55R17 Pressure F/R: 35/33 psi

243

Customer Side Monitoring at an Automobile Brake Manufacturer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This customer-side monitoring project correlated distribution-related power quality (PQ) events with customer-side events and vice-versa and characterized equipment sensitivity to voltage variations. It also characterized overall levels of PQ on the feeder and in the facility and compared these levels with the national baseline sample being gathered for the Distribution Power Quality project.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Mechanical and Regenerative Braking Integration for a Hybrid Electric Vehicle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hybrid electric vehicle technology has become a preferred method for the automotive industry to reduce environmental impact and fuel consumption of their vehicles. Hybrid electric (more)

DeMers, Steven Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on Brake Discs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbothermal Production of Zrb2-Zro2 Composite Powder from Zro2-B2O3/B System by ... Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes.

246

NREL: Continuum Magazine - Putting On the Brakes to Protect America...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

beyond. Sustainable Transportation Reaches Across-and Beyond-Parks A photo of three propane buses parked on asphalt road in treed park setting with stone cliffs in the...

247

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Data Center Rack Cooling with Rear-door Heat Exchanger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

they can use treated water from a plate-and-frame heat exchanger connected to a cooling tower. These inherent features of a RDHx help reduce energy use while minimizing maintenance...

251

Microwave applicator for in-drum processing of radioactive waste slurry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave applicator for processing of radioactive waste slurry uses a waveguide network which splits an input microwave of TE.sub.10 rectangular mode to TE.sub.01 circular mode. A cylindrical body has four openings, each receiving 1/4 of the power input. The waveguide network includes a plurality of splitters to effect the 1/4 divisions of power.

White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Application of microwave energy for in-drum solidification of simulated precipitation sludge  

SciTech Connect

The application of microwave energy for in-container solidification of simulated transuranic contaminated precipitation sludges has been tested. Results indicate volume reductions to 83% are achievable by the continuous feeding of pre-dried sludge into a waste container while applying microwave energy. An economic evaluation was completed showing achievable volume and weight reductions to 87% compared with a current immobilization process for wet sludge. 7 refs., 15 figs., 16 tabs.

Petersen, R.D.; Johnson, A.J.; Swanson, S.D.; Thomas, R.L. (ed.)

1987-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

253

Detection of free liquid in drums of radioactive waste. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nondestructive thermal imaging method for detecting the presence of a liquid such as water within a sealed container is described. The process includes application of a low amplitude heat pulse to an exterior surface area of the container, terminating the heat input and quickly mapping the resulting surface temperatures. The various mapped temperature values can be compared with those known to be normal for the container material and substances in contact. The mapped temperature values show up in different shades of light or darkness that denote different physical substances. The different substances can be determined by direct observation or by comparison with known standards. The method is particularly applicable to the detection of liquids above solidified radioactive wastes stored in sealed containers.

Not Available

1979-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

254

Microwave applicator for in-drum processing of radioactive waste slurry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave applicator for processing of radioactive waste slurry uses a waveguide network which splits an input microwave of TE[sub 10] rectangular mode to TE[sub 01] circular mode. A cylindrical body has four openings, each receiving 1/4 of the power input. The waveguide network includes a plurality of splitters to effect the 1/4 divisions of power. 4 figures.

White, T.L.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

New Technology Demonstration of Microturbine with Heat Recovery at Fort Drum, New York  

SciTech Connect

This report replaces PNNL-14417 and documents a project to demonstrate and evaluate a combined heat and power-configured microturbine system.

Friedrich, Michele; Armstrong, Peter R.; Smith, David L.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Regenerative Braking for an Electric Vehicle Using Ultracapacitors and a Buck-Boost Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mail: jdixon@ing.puc.cl *University of Concepción Abstract An ultracapacitor bank control system and decelerations of the vehicle with minimal loss of energy, and minimal degradation of the main battery pack. The system uses an IGBT Buck-Boost converter, which is connected to the ultracapacitor bank at the Boost side

Rudnick, Hugh

257

Equilibrium and Braking of Fully Avalanched Runaway Electron Currents: a New Disruption Mitigation Strategy for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 334 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618465

Parks, P.B.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Pneumatic brake control for precision stopping of heavy-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stopping of a 40 foot CNG bus for the Bus Precision Dockingfor two different 40 foot CNG buses (c1 and c2). Althoughpressure of two different CNG buses (c1 and c2) speeds since

Bu, Fanping; Tan, Han-Shue

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Brake rotor design and comparison using finite element analysis : an investigation in topology optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Rotor Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appendix D Unsatisfactory RotorAppendix G Supplemental Rotor Symmetrical Instance

Domond, Kenneth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Design, Modeling And Control Of Steering And Braking For An Urban Electric Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

service access to small electric cars. The research involvedservice access to small electric cars. The research involvedservice access to small electric cars. This concept has been

Maciua, Dragos

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Adaptive brake lights : an investigation into their relative benefits in regards to road safety.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The implementation of In-Vehicle Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) is becoming a common occurrence in modern vehicles. Automobile manufacturers are releasing vehicles with many forms of (more)

Roughan, Craig

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Experimental analysis of disc thickness variation development in motor vehicle brakes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the past decade vehicle judder caused by Disc Thickness Variation (DTV) has become of major concern to automobile manufacturers worldwide. Judder is usually perceived (more)

Rodriguez, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Experimental Verifi cation of Discretely Variable Compression Braking Control for Heavy Duty Vehicles: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference, 2002. [14] T.R. Fortescue, L.S. Kershenbaum, andscheme is proposed by Fortescue et al. [14] in which a time-

Vahidi, Ardalan; Stefanopoulou, Anna G.; Wang, Xiaoyong; Tsao, Tsu Chin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Experimental Verification of Discretely Variable Compression Braking Control for Heavy Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Control, [11] T.R. Fortescue, L.S. Kershenbaum, and B.E.scheme is proposed by Fortescue et al. [11] in which a time-

Vahidi, Ardalan; Stefanopoulou, Anna G.; Farias, Phil; Tsao, Tsu Chin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

2009 BMW MINI EVAmerica fact sheet.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3230 lb 3230 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 3306 lb Distribution F/R: 51/49 % GVWR: 3660 lb Payload 2 : 354 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 97.1 inches Track F/R: 57.4/57.8 inches Length: 145.6 inches Width: 66.3 inches Height: 55.4 inches Ground Clearance: 6.0 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches CHARGER Level 1: Location: On-board Type: Conductive Input Voltages: 120VAC Level 2: Location: Off-board Type: Conductive Input Voltages: 240 VAC © 2009 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved BASE VEHICLE: 2009 BMW MINI E Seatbelt Positions: Two Standard Features: Front Wheel Drive Front Disc and Rear Disc Brakes Regenerative Braking With Coast Down Three-Point Safety Belts Speedometer Odometer State-Of-Charge Meter BATTERY Type: Lithium Ion Number of Modules: 48

266

Microsoft Word - ffort-07.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8SK100655 Seating Capacity: 2 Adults Features: AMFM Stereo, Battery Thermal Management, Power Steering, Power Brakes, Front Disc Brakes & Anti-Lock Brakes DIMENSIONS Wheelbase:...

267

Gearing Up for Electric Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

half the energy lost during braking (regenerative braking),regenerative braking energ~ durmg de- celeration A fl)wheel stores energy

Sperling, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accept all the regenerative braking energy. This paper isaccept all the regenerative braking energy. Figure 1 showsaccepts all the regenerative braking energy. In this mode, a

Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, store regenerative braking energy and to operate2 emissions. However, regenerative braking energy cannot beas electrical energy if regenerative braking is available (

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to capture regenerative braking energy, or a simplerto recapture regenerative braking energy over a modestto recapture regenerative braking energy and to meet vehicle

Lipman, Timothy Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Velocity Measurements at Three Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima Basin, Washington : Summer 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) measured the velocity conditions at three fish screening facilities in the Yakima River Basin: Wapato, Chandler, and Easton Screens. The measurement objectives were different at the three screens. At Wapato, approach and sweep velocities were measured to evaluate the effect of rearing pens in the screen forebay. A complete survey was performed at the Chandler Screens. At Easton, velocity was measured behind the screens to provide information for the installation of porosity boards to balance flow through the screens. Salmon-rearing pens used at the Wapato Canal had a minimal effect on the magnitude of approach and sweep velocities at the face of the drum screens, although the pens caused increased turbulence and variability in water velocities. The net pens did not appear to affect flows through the three fish bypasses. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

MEP Advisory Board Webcast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. BRAKES DOORS HVAC February 2012 Page 2. ... Freight / Commercial Vehicles (Trucks, Busses) Brakes / Doors / HVAC Page 3. ...

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to recover energy during regenerative braking. Theunituse of regenerative braking. 4.3 Pulse Power Energy Storage

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and from regenerative braking, and passes energy to theor from regenerative braking and uses the energy in the

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

MaintenanceRecords  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/11/2011 8/11/2011 6,825 Changed oil and filter and replaced alternator belt $122.46 10/13/2011 11,287 Purchased two rear tires $120.24 10/19/2011 12,360 Changed oil and filter $64.20 11/23/2011 14,209 Replaced tailgate latch assembly $94.80 1/17/2012 18,254 Changed oil and filter $64.20 3/5/2012 22,872 Replaced serpentine belt $45.00 3/24/2012 24,753 Changed oil and filter $64.20 7/9/2012 30,143 30K mile service $215.75 8/14/2012 35,276 Changed oil and filter $64.33 9/6/2012 39,081 Replaced two tires $196.52 9/12/2012 39,989 Replaced serpentine belt $45.00 9/13/2012 40,377 Changed oil and filter $64.33 9/21/2012 41,795 Replaced two tires $181.83 10/1/2012 43,067 Replaced front brake pads, checked rear brakes, and resurfaced rotors $209.15 10/12/2012 45,457 Changed oil and filter $64.33 11/27/2012 50,630 Changed oil and filter

276

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENGINEERING AND FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING AND FIRE PROTECTION OBJECTIVE EN.1 - Equipment (systems and components) required for activity performance has been identified, meets the design criteria for the activity, and a system is in place to maintain control over the design. EN.1.1. Requirements from vendor technical manuals and data have been incorporated into activity documents. EN. 1.2 Spare parts inventory for activity and support equipment is adequate for activity performance. EN. 1.3 A program is in place to confirm and periodically reconfirm the condition and operability of safety SSCs. This includes examinations of records of tests and calibration of these systems. REVIEW APPROACH: Document Reviews: * Review activity documents to ensure that vendor data and information from

277

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (EM) EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (EM) OBJECTIVE EM.1 The selection, training, and qualification for operations, maintenance, operations support personnel, and technical staff have been established, documented, and implemented meet the following criteria: EM. 1.1 A routine drill program and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have been established and implemented. REVIEW APPROACH: Document Reviews: * Review applicable operational event scenarios for identification and implementation of emergency management responses. * Review applicable EARS. * Review Emergency Management drill and exercise training records to determine effectiveness of program and activity personnel. * Review Emergency Management drill and exercise training records to

278

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY OBJECTIVE CS.1 Facility safety documentation that describes the "safety envelope" for the AR Project II activities is in place and has been implemented and administrative and engineering controls to prevent and mitigate hazards associated with commencing the AR Project II activities are tailored to the work being performed and the associated hazards to meet the following criteria: CRITERIA: CS. 1.1 Criticality safety requirements are current, approved, and properly controlled. CS. 1.2 Facility safety and criticality requirements have been incorporated into applicable procedures and documents. REVIEW APPROACH: Document Reviews: * Review applicable CSEs for identification of facility hazards and development

279

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conduct of Operations (OP) Conduct of Operations (OP) OBJECTIVE OP.1 Resources are effectively allocated to address environmental, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q), programmatic, and operational considerations required for commencing AR Project II activities to meet the following criteria: CRITERIA: OP.1.1. There are sufficient numbers of trained/qualified operations personnel to conduct and support the activity. OP. 1.2 There are adequate facilities and equipment available to ensure operational support is adequate for the activity. (Such support services include operations, training, maintenance, waste management, environmental protection, industrial safety and hygiene, radiological protection and health physics, emergency preparedness, fire protection, quality assurance, criticality safety, and

280

Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method  

SciTech Connect

A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of Borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% Borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

Taylor, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Boyer, Norman W. (Livermore, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Operational Flexibility Implementation: Case Study #3: Extreme Turndown of a Coal-Fired Drum-Type Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThe case study presented in this report is the third in a series that examines the variety of challenges that electric utilities face in trying to improve flexibility in the operational performance of their generation assets. Each case is unique in both the performance goals that are sought by the utility and the equipment and operational limitations that are present.ObjectiveTo reduce the minimum achievable power level ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

Performance of a Drum Type Packaging with Urethane Foam Overpack Subjected to Crush and Other Regulatory Tests  

SciTech Connect

In order to improve the melt rate of high level waste slurry feed being vitrified in the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter, a melter glass pump (pump 1) was installed in the DWPF Melter on February 10, 2004. The glass pump increased melt rate by generating a forced convection within the molten glass pool, thereby increasing the heat transfer from the molten glass to the unmolten feed cold cap that is on top of the glass pool. After operating for over four months, the pump was removed on June 22, 2004 due to indications that it had failed. The removed pump exhibited obvious signs of corrosion, had collapsed inward at the glass exit slots at the melt line, and was dog-legged in the same area. This lead to the pump being redesigned to improve its mechanical integrity (increased wall thickness and strength) while maintaining its hydraulic diameter as large as possible. The improved DWPF glass pump (pump 2) was installed on September 15, 2004. The impact of the new design on pump life, along with analysis of the glass pump's impact on melt rate in the DWPF Melter is discussed in this paper.

ALLEN, SMITH

2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

284

Initial results using Eddy Current Brakes as Fast Turn-on, Programmable Physical Dampers for Haptic Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the eddy currents can be neglected, the resistive force is proportional to the speed of the e-mail: champ@cim.mcgill.ca e-mail: andrewg@cim.mcgill.ca e-mail: hayward@cim.mcgill.ca conductor [8]. The physics behind eddy

Hayward, Vincent

285

Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Northwest Fisheries Science Center, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) and the Bonneville Power Administration, has established captive broodstocks to aid recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) listed as endangered under the US Endangered Species Act (ESA). Captive broodstock programs are emerging as an important component of restoration efforts for ESA-listed salmon populations. Captive broodstock programs are a form of artificial propagation. However, they differ from standard hatchery techniques in one important respect: fish are cultured in captivity for the entire life cycle. The high fecundity of Pacific salmon, coupled with their potentially high survival in protective culture, affords an opportunity for captive broodstocks to produce large numbers of juveniles in a single generation for supplementation of natural populations. The captive broodstocks discussed in this report were intended to protect the last known remnants of this stock: sockeye salmon that return to Redfish Lake in the Sawtooth Basin of Idaho at the headwaters of the Salmon River. This report addresses NMFS research from January to December 1994 on the Redfish Lake sockeye salmon captive broodstock program and summarizes results since the beginning of the study in 1991. Spawn from NMFS Redfish Lake sockeye salmon captive broodstocks is being returned to Idaho to aid recovery efforts for the species.

Flagg, Thomas A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Extending the Virtual Trackball Metaphor to Rear Touch Input Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, TU Berlin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 3D model inspection. The hardware capabilities of mobile devices for rendering 3D content-based touch interaction. This problem has been named the "fat finger problem" [1]. Sev- eral solutions have

287

Quality Control and Captive Rearing Genetics of the Biological Control Agent Trichogramma pretiosum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetics 4: 189-197. Grenier, S. , and P. De Clercq. 2003.Genetics 4: 189-197. Grenier, S. , and P. De Clercq. 2003.Lassabliere, J. Daumal, and S. Grenier. 2002. Does a cyclic

Gonzalez-Cabrera, Jaime

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Funnel Cloud in a Convective Cloud Line to the Rear of a Surface Cold Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brief case study describes the unusually benign environment in which a funnel cloud formed along a line of convective towers during the summer in Kansas. The parent cloud line was solitary and very narrow, yet organized on the mesoscale. The ...

Howard B. Bluestein

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle Project Track Construction And Testing Program Phase 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lines show energy flow during regenerative braking. Theregenerative braking, the motor (acting as a generator) is supplying as much energyregenerative braking above the base speed of 12 mph. The energy

Systems Control Technology, Inc.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Microsoft Word - ford99.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FM Stereo Radio Tilt Steering Wheel Cabin Heat Dual Air Bags Power Steering (electro-hydraulic) Power Brakes Four Wheel Disc Brakes Four Wheel Anti-Lock Brakes Regenerative...

291

MaintenanceRecords  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1/22/2010 1/22/2010 4,894 Changed oil and filter $60.70 12/18/2010 10,075 Changed oil and filter $60.70 12/22/2010 10,651 Replaced driver-side headlight $32.78 2/18/2011 20,255 Changed oil and filter $60.70 3/29/2011 25,267 Changed oil and filter $60.70 5/16/2011 30,509 Changed oil and filter and replaced fanbelt $116.20 6/28/2011 34,831 Replaced alternator/water pump belt and tow fees $80.50 7/8/2011 35,652 Changed oil and filter and replaced air filter $80.88 7/13/2011 35,885 Installed two tires $277.25 7/27/2011 36,982 Towed vehicle and replaced alternator/water pump belt $300.00 8/8/2011 37,738 Repaired left front tire $10.00 9/1/2011 40,384 Replaced alternator belt $45.00 9/8/2011 40,948 Changed oil and filter $60.70 10/22/2011 43,484 30K mile service $192.45 10/26/2011 43,492 Replaced front brake pads and cleaned and adjusted rear brake shoes

292

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2001 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accomplishments of the John Day, Umatilla, and Walla Walla Fish Passage and Screening Programs include the following: Operation and maintenance of 364 existing fish screening devices (see Table 4), replacement of 18 outdated fish screening devices that totaled 31 rotary drums (some were multiple drum systems), 4 new screens at unscreened diversions, 26 pump intake fish screens, fabrication of components for 16 additional fish screens for the Rogue basin, construction of two fish passage structures, and participation in other activities. After the replacement or construction of 22 fish screening devices during 2001, we now have 108 screening devices that meet NMFS criteria. Funding for these projects was attained from BPA, NMFS and OWEB. The John Day Fish Passage and Screening Program focused construction efforts into new and replacement fish screening devices for these various programs throughout the state of Oregon. The program also continued to develop and implement innovative designs to meet the diverse and expanding needs for the state of Oregon. Projects completed during this report period meet the current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria. Fish species targeted for protection include ESA Listed Mid-Columbia steelhead, Columbia basin bull trout, anadromous and resident salmonids, and numerous non-game fish species. Priority project locations have been identified as the upper reaches of the Middle Fork, North Fork, South Fork and the Mainstem of the John Day River and their tributaries. These upper reaches contain critical salmon and steelhead spawning and rearing habitat.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

Microsoft Word - ffort-11.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seating Capacity: 2 Adults Features: AC, Power Steering AMFM Stereo, Power Brakes, Battery Thermal Management, Anti-Lock Brakes & Heater DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 117.4 inches...

294

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fleet). Regenerative braking can improve energy efficiencyregenerative braking. Application of these technologies and strategies has the effect of lowering the energy

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fuel Economy: Where the Energy Goes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and lighter-weight technologies. Hybrids, plug-in hybrids, and electric vehicles use regenerative braking to recover some braking energy that would otherwise be lost. more......

296

Stop/Start: Overview  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

a combination of regenerative and conventional friction braking to slow the vehicle. In regenerative braking, energy from the wheels turns the electric generator, creating...

297

International Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicles: Policies, Markets, and Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the vehmle allows regenerative brakmg energy to be captured,and to capture regenerative braking energy, or a simplerto recapture regenerative braking energy. motor-asstst

Sperling, Daniel; Lipman, Timothy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such that regenerative braking energy can be efficientlyto recovering energy by regenerative braking. This increaseis to recover energy while decelerating through regenerative

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maximum, and restricts regenerative energy to be less thanthe extra energy made available by regenerative braking. Theregenerative braking (for fuel-cell vehicles without electro-chemical energy

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acceleration energy recovered by regenerative braking Heavy-efficiencies, energy use by accessories, use of regenerativeregenerative braking can return up to 20% of propulsion energy;

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microsoft Word - ev1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Running Lamps Power Windows, Mirrors & Door Locks AMFM Stereo wCassette and CD Player Regenerative Braking with Coastdown Electro-Hydraulic Braking with ABS Electro Windshield...

302

Um estudo dos mecanismos de desgaste em disco de freio automotivo ventilado de ferro fundido cinzento perltico com grafita lamelar.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main mechanims of wear, present in ventilated brake disc had been determined, when submited to the braking test in inertial dynamometric simulator. Were measured (more)

Edison Marcelo Serbino

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

1999 EV America Technical Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

braking and anti-lock brake systems. 4.3 OVERHEATING The vehicle motor and controllerinverter should be capable of continuous operation at maximum vehicle speed andor sustained...

304

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lift fixture for 55-gallon drums, greatly increasing the efficiency of remote drum handling in the hotcell. TWPC also developed an in-drum liner to be used in the hot cell...

305

Theoretical Study of the Reactivity of Mixed Manganese and Silver Oxides on Hydrogen Simulating Tritium for the Limitation of Outgassing from Waste Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

X. Lefebvre; K. Liger; M. Troulay; N. Ghirelli; C. Perrais

306

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

308

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

312

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

313

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: -Drum payload assembly -Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly -Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

To facilitate disposal of approximately 76 unusable 55 gallon drums with a rad history, Spent Fuel Projects personnel will absorb any residual water contained in the drums which...

316

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

To facilitate disposal of approximately 100 unusable 55 gallon drums with a rad history, Spent Fuel Projects personnel will absorb any residual water contained in the drums which...

317

SR0605  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Until recently, these drums were covered with mounds of earth at SRSs central waste management facility. The drums were generated during decades of nuclear operations at SRS....

318

Braking the making of a treaty : the role of Spain and Poland in the intergovernmental negotiations on the treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The 2003 Intergovernmental Conference in the EU was halted from December 2003 till March 2004. The reason was the opposition against the proposed new double (more)

Gulbrandsen, Christer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Improving the Speed of Virtual Rear Projection: A GPU-Centric Architecture Matthew Flagg, Jay Summet, and James M. Rehg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface and its installation, the projection area behind the screen costs an average of $77 (USD) per square foot in an office building [18]. Figure 1: Players interacting with a game on the Big a feasible option for space and cost reasons. Recent research suggests that many of the desir- able features

Haro, Antonio

320

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of food level and rearing temperature on burst speed and muscle composition of Western Spadefoot Toad (Spea hammondii)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in larval and juvenile herring. Journal of Experimentaltemperature in Atlantic herring development Clupea harengus.sh, the spring-spawning herring (Johnston, Vieira & Temple

Arendt, J; Hoang, L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Airborne Pseudo-Dual-Doppler Analysis of a Rear-Inflow Jet and Deep Convergence Zone within a Supercell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 22 May 1995, numerous thunderstorms, several of which produced large hail and small tornadoes, formed along a dryline in the central and northern Texas Panhandle. The only long-lasting, daytime, severe storms developed later, south of the ...

Howard B. Bluestein; Stephen G. Gaddy

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Allergy arising from exposure to airborne contaminants in an insect rearing facility: Health effects and exposure control  

SciTech Connect

In agricultural crop improvement, yield under various stress conditions and limiting factors is assessed experimentally. Of the stresses on plants which affect yield are those due to insects. Ostrinia nubilalis, the European corn borer (corn borer) is a major pest in sweet and field corn in the U.S. There are many ways to fight crop pests such as the corn borer, including (1) application of chemical insecticides, (2) application of natural predators and, (3) improving crop resistance through plant genetics programs. Randomized field trials are used to determine the effectiveness of pest management programs. These trials frequently consist of randomly selected crop plots to which well-defined input regimes are instituted. For example, corn borers might be released onto crop plots in several densities at various stages of crop development, then sprayed with different levels of pesticide. These experiments are duplicated across regions and, in some cases across the country, to determine, in this instance for example, the best pesticide application rate for a given pest density and crop development stage. In order to release these pests onto crop plots, one must have an adequate supply of the insect pest. In winter months studies are carried out in the laboratory to examine chemical and natural pesticide effectiveness, as well as such things as the role of pheromones in moth behavior. The advantage in field trials is that yield data can be garnered directly. In this country, insects are raised for crop research primarily through the US Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with public Land Grant Universities and, by the private sector agricultural concerns - seed companies and others. This study quantifies the airborne allergen exposure of persons working in a Land Grant University entomology lab were allergy to European corn borer was suspected.

Wolff, D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regenerative braking was much more significant with the separately- excited motor in that the energy

Cairns, Elton J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-wheel motors, EMB : · standard ABS algorithms are not adapted to regenerative braking (Toyota Prius

327

System for measuring the coordinates of tire surfaces in transient conditions when rolling over obstacles: Description of the system and performance analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a system for measuring surface coordinates (commonly known as ''shape measurements'') which is able to give the temporal evolution of the position of the tire sidewall in transient conditions (such as during braking, when there are potholes or when the road surface is uneven) which may or may not be reproducible. The system is based on the well-known technique of projecting and observing structured light using a digital camera with an optical axis which is slanted with respect to the axis of the projector. The transient nature of the phenomenon has led to the development of specific innovative solutions as regards image processing algorithms. This paper briefly describes the components which make up the measuring system and presents the results of the measurements carried out on the drum bench. It then analyses the performance of the measuring system and the sources of uncertainty which led to the development of the system for a specific dynamic application: impact with an obstacle (cleat test). The measuring system guaranteed a measurement uncertainty of 0.28 mm along the Z axis (the axial direction of the tire) with a measurement range of 250(X)x80(Y)x25(Z) mm{sup 3}, with the tire rolling at a speed of up to 30 km/h.

Castellini, Paolo; Di Giuseppe, Andrea [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ROBUST AND NONLINEAR CONTROL Int. J. Robust Nonlinear Control 2009; 19:17211744  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and attemperator spray flow rate; outputs are: drum level, header pressure and steam temperature. The differential

Marquez, Horacio J.

329

EA-0995: Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations

330

Alloy Groupings by Application or Major Characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Missile bodies Missile fins Aircraft pylons Aircraft canopies Wing flaps Speed brakes Hatch covers Hydraulic pumps Automotive suspension systems and cross-members Fuel pumps Brake valves Armored cupolas Aerospace structural parts Applications include:...

331

VIN# JHMFA36216S019329 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16S019329 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 15 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 968 lbs Features: Front disk brakes wEBD brake...

332

VIN# JHMFA36246S018725 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

46S018725 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 15 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 968 lbs Features: Front disk brakes wEBD brake...

333

file:///E|/ev/test/evps.shtml  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is used as a generator to recharge the batteries when the vehicle is slowing down. During regenerative braking, some of the kinetic energy normally absorbed by the brakes and...

334

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to recover energy during regenerative braking. Both theof energy. The batteries are also recharged via regenerative

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Feasible Caf Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to recover energy during regenerative braking. Both theof energy. The batteries are also recharged via regenerative

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to recover energy during regenerative braking. Both theof energy. The batteries are also recharged via regenerative

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regenerative braking to capture cially in medium-sized trucks used for deliveries, and fuel-cell energy

Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

NREL: Vehicle Systems Analysis - Future Automotive Systems Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rolling resistance) Powertrain components (engine, motor, battery, and auxiliary loads) Regenerative braking Energy management strategies Battery life estimates Cost estimates...

339

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

petroleum consumption and emissions * Optimized fuel efficiency and performance * Recover energy during regenerative braking * Use existing gas station infrastructure * Minimal...

340

ACCESS Magazine Fall 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regenerative braking to capture cially in medium-sized trucks used for deliveries, and fuel-cell energy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Evolution of Sustainable Personal Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as well as energy recovery during regenerative braking. Theenergy is recoverable in an electrically dominant vehicle through regenerative

Jungers, Bryan D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ETA-HITP06  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Revision 0 Effective November 1, 2004 Braking Test Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Garrett...

343

EV America Skid Test Procedure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Revision 3 Effective February 1, 2008 Braking Test Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Derek Peterson...

344

techbriefs  

and a safer position to operate the emergency brake, radio, or provide flag signals to the engineer. The attached

345

WIPP - Open RFPs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be issued Contact Fabrication of CPP Commodities - POCs and CCOs 9-Oct-13 Janet.Miehls@wipp.ws DOT Open Head Steel Drums with Liners 9-Oct-13 Janet.Miehls@wipp.ws Drum Vent...

346

DOE-STD-5506-2007 DOE STANDARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RI Southwest Research Institute TDOP ten-drum overpack TRU transuranic (waste) TRUDOCK transuranic dock TRUPACT in TRUPACT or HalfPACT shipping containers. The HalfPACT containers can carry one 7-pack drum assembly

347

12-16-04.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

received as of 121504 Disposal Waste disposed as of 121504: 58,384 waste drums 4,047 standard waste boxes 1,273 ten-drum overpacks 25,598 cubic meters December 16, 2004 TRU...

348

BILL RICHARDSON Governor DIANE DENISH Lieutenant Governor NEW...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program These two concerns stemmed from the lack of evidence of dual signatures from generator site personnel who packaged the waste containers (i.e., cans into drums and drums...

349

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume III of III; Disease and Physiology Supplements, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Aquaculture Task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status of the stocks was quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains five previously published papers.

Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Centr, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Modeling Study on the Development of a Bowing Structure and Associated Rear Inflow within a Squall Line over South China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through convection-permitting simulations, this study examines a large bowing structure within a squall line that occurred during the rainy season in South China. The bowing structure is closely associated with a local enhancement of (and balance ...

Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang; Paul Markowski; Duochang Wu; Kun Zhao

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Mobile Systems Capabilities - Call for participants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation and Recovery Act Analysis Radiochemistry Repackaging Drum Venting TRUPACT Mobile Loading and Unloading Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Treatment Data...

352

DESIGN CRITERIA TO ACHIEVE INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT RELIABILITY IN SOLID WASTE PROCESSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and attemperator. · TWO DRUM BOILER DESIGN WITH SUPERHEATER INSTALLED AT CONVECTION SECTION OUTLET FIG. 12 438 #12

Columbia University

353

SRNL - Technology Transfer - Tech Briefs  

Remote Electrical Throw Device ... This device resolves a safety issue with respect to drum handling. MORE>> Human Factors Engineering Analysis ...

354

CMVRTC: Overweight Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy and overweight vehicle brake testing for combination five-axle Heavy and overweight vehicle brake testing for combination five-axle tractor-flatbed scale The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, in coordination with the Federal Highway Administration, sponsored the Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing (HOVBT) program in order to provide information about the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) on braking performance. Because the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations limit the number of braking system defects that may exist for a vehicle to be allowed to operate on the roadways, the examination of the effect of brake defects on brake performance for increased loads is also relevant. The HOVBT program seeks to provide relevant information to policy makers responsible for establishing load limits, beginning with providing test data for a

355

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L Area Waste Water Drum Deformation - Vent Drums L Area Waste Water Drum Deformation - Vent Drums Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The purpose of this activity is to puncture / vent bulging drums (or other containers) that may be found in Spent Fuel Project Facilities. This particular activity involves drums that are currently located in two storage trailers. The puncturing of the drums will be performed by Solid Waste personnel using their puncture device or by Facilitiy personnel. Once vented, the containers will be prepared for proper disposal. B6.1 - Cleanup actions Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2012.06.19 17:24:23 -04'00' 06/19/2012 Submit by E-mail OBU-L-2012-0037, Rev. 0

356

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L Area Waste Water Drum Deformation - Vent Drums L Area Waste Water Drum Deformation - Vent Drums Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The purpose of this activity is to puncture / vent bulging drums (or other containers) that may be found in Spent Fuel Project Facilities. This particular activity involves drums that are currently located in two storage trailers. The puncturing of the drums will be performed by Solid Waste personnel using their puncture device or by Facilitiy personnel. Once vented, the containers will be prepared for proper disposal. B6.1 - Cleanup actions Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2012.06.19 17:24:23 -04'00' 06/19/2012 Submit by E-mail OBU-L-2012-0037

357

CMVRTC: Past Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Past reseach projects Past reseach projects ABS Indication Lamp Study -- More to come... Brake Wear and Performance Test (BWPT) -- Performance-Based Brake Testers (PBBTs) are devices that can be used to evaluate the current braking capabilities of a vehicle through the measurement of brake forces developed as a vehicle engages in a braking event while on a PBBT machine. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) passed legislation on February 5, 2003, allowing a PBBT that meets the FMCSA functional specifications to be used as an enforcement tool. (Read more ...) Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing (HOVBT): Five-Axle Combination Tractor-Flatbed -- The HOVBT program was designed to provide information about the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) on braking performance. Because the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) limit the number of braking system defects that may exist for a vehicle to be allowed to operate on the roadways, the examination of the effect of brake defects on brake performance for increased loads is also relevant. The HOVBT program seeks to provide relevant information to policy makers responsible for establishing load limits, beginning with providing test data for a combination tractor/trailer. (Read more ... )

358

The Cray Sonexion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethernet switches standard Dual 48 port Gigabit Ethernet switches optional Standard Cooling Passive Passive Water-Cooled Option Rear Door Heat Exchange Unit Rear Door Heat...

359

Argonne TTRDC - D3 (Downloadable Dynamometer Database) - 2012...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevrolet VOLT chevy volt front chevy volt rear 2012 Chevy Volt- front 2012 Chevy Volt- rear The Chevrolet Volt is the first production extended range electric vehicle (EREV)...

360

CMVRTC: PBBT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

performance based Brake tester (PBBt) performance based Brake tester (PBBt) PBBT The ORNL's Center for Transportation Analysis, in collaboration with the FMCSA and the Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) Commercial Vehicle Enforcement (CVE), conducted a Performance-Based Brake Tester (PBBT) Valuation Study. The purpose of the study was to determine the PBBT's ability to increase the number of contacts with commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) and explore how the PBBT affects the CMV out-of-service (OOS) rate. The PBBT is a roller dynamometer which measures the vehicle's established brake force and calculates brake efficiency to indicate the effectiveness of the vehicle's brakes. Several test scenarios were employed using North American Standard (NAS) Level-1, 2, and 3 CMV inspection criteria. The first three scenarios employed both an NAS inspection (Level-1, 2, or 3)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

CX-002146: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Categorical Exclusion Determination 46: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002146: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Turbine Electric Brake Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/22/2010 Location(s): Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Parker Hannifin, Aircraft Wheel and Brake Division will use Congressionally Directed Funding through DOE to develop an electric brake system for wind turbine applications. Project activities will include additional testing and design work on the brake system prototype in a laboratory setting. Additional project activities will involve testing the prototype brake system on a currently installed 60 kilowatt turbine. A negotiated arrangement with a local wind turbine manufacturer (Green Energy Technologies) to evaluate the prototype brake on this turbine has been

362

Vendor / Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

363

Vendor / Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

364

Passive Viscous Haptic Textures Gianni Campion Andrew H. C. Gosline Vincent Hayward  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

brakes e-mail: champ@cim.mcgill.ca e-mail:andrewg@cim.mcgill.ca e-mail:hayward@cim.mcgill.ca (ECB), which

Hayward, Vincent

365

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and wheel metal caused by failed axle bearings, locked brakes, or dragged blown tires. For the first experiment, heating to obtain tire ignition was ...

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... failed axle bearings, locked brakes, or dragged blown tires. Two experiments were conducted to determine the mode of penetration of a tire fire into ...

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2010 Volkswagen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Golf TDI Bluemotion VIN: WVWZZZ1KZAW388111 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control...

368

Prof. V. K. Srivastava Founder President, ICRACM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiber Reinforced Silicon CarbideCarbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/(C/SiCSiC)) ·C/C Brakes were

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

369

Microsoft Word - ffort-09.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VIN: 2CIMR5299567000106 Seating Capacity: 4 Adults Features: AMFM Radio, Heater, Battery Thermal Management, Power Steering, Power Brakes, Front Wheel Drive, Front Disc...

370

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Hydrogen Enriched CNG Production Engine Conversion,from Hydrogen Enriched CNG Production Engines, SAE 02FFL-dynamometer ...13 Figure 2. CNG Brake Thermal Efficiency (

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

FY2003 Progress Report for Energy Storage Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II-2. Analyses indicated that batteries or ultracapacitors could capture significant regenerative braking energy, enhancing the fuel economy of FCVs. Figure II-2. Energy...

372

TransForum: Volume 5, No. 2, Fall 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primarily for leveling the load on the internal combustion engine (ICE) and for capturing energy associated with regenerative braking. If fuel prices continue to rise, automakers...

373

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 61 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 43 Total number of trips 111,773 Total...

374

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 74 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 45 Total number of trips 11,462 Total...

375

Vehicle Technologies Office: Ultracapacitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

converter, which would increase the cost of the vehicle. The use of ultracapacitors for regenerative braking can greatly improve fuel efficiency under stop-and-go urban driving...

376

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 39 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 28 Total number of trips 10,624 Total...

377

DOE/ID-Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of providing the power required for acceleration. Also, the battery's ability to accept energy from regenerative braking decreased significantly during the operating period....

378

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

52 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 29 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 39 Total number of trips 22,071 Total...

379

Stop/Start: Driving  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

generator to the gasoline engine to start it. Battery: The battery is used to store energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the...

380

TransForum n4n3 - Modeling Collaboration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turns out, for example, that higher hybridization (more battery power) leads to increased regenerative braking energy but decreased fuel cell system cycle efficiency. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

INL/EXT-09-XXXXX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

power available during braking. Figures 16 and 20 are pie charts showing the sources of regenerative energy throughout the urban drive cycle for the CD and CS modes,...

382

Annual Progress Report for Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can expect, fuel economy gains are greater for driving cycles that have a high level of regenerative braking energy available (the Federal Urban Driving Schedule, or FUDS) and...

383

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

190 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 111 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 50 Total number of trips 2,055 Total...

384

Energy Conversion Devices Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell(tm) Texaco Ovonic Fuel Cell Company, LLC non-precious metal catalysts regenerative braking energy absorption capability wide temperature range instant...

385

How Plug-in Hybrids Save Money  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of gasoline's widespread availability and quick refueling. Plug-in hybrids also save energy through regenerative braking, which recovers much of the energy typically lost when...

386

Stop/Start: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

visible. Car is stopped at an intersection. Battery: The battery is used to store energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the...

387

TransForum, Vol 4, No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

out, for exam- ple, that higher hybridization (more battery power) leads to increased regenerative braking energy but decreased fuel cell system cycle efficiency. The...

388

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 29 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 39 Total number of trips 10,847 Total...

389

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test miles 4 PHEV Advantages * Reduced petroleum consumption and emissions * Recover energy during regenerative braking * Use existing gas station infrastructure * Minimal...

390

Fuel Cell Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas and oxygen into electricity to power the electric motor; High-Output Battery - Stores energy generated from regenerative braking and provides supplemental power to the electric...

391

Phase Field Model of Li-Plating in Lithium Ion Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Li plating limits the maximum safe charging rate of Li-ion batteries, and thus the amount of energy that can be captured by regenerative braking.

392

Hybrid: Starting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the gasoline engine to the electric motor to the battery. Battery: The battery stores energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the...

393

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

battery recharges), high power (to provide acceptable vehicle acceleration and to receive energy generated during vehicle deceleration, a.k.a. regenerative braking), long lifetime,...

394

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 20 mph. Regenerative braking affects energy consumptionenergy consumption is significantly affected by both the driving cycle, and to some extent, regenerative

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity source, mostly from power plants via the electric grid * Also captures energy during regenerative braking: electric motor(s) acts as a generator to slow the BEV...

396

Fuel Cell Powered Vehicles Using Supercapacitors: Device Characteristics, Control Strategies, and Simulation Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the recaptured regenerative energy are completely offsetincrease of captured regenerative energy, and will slightlythe capture of regenerative braking energy, which will

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

??? 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on hybrid electric vehicle Grade ability performance. Dynamic Performance test -HEV Regenerative braking energy reclaiming ratio test-EVHEV Developing the regenerative...

398

FEG2005_BODY_Updates.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plugged into an external source of electricity to be recharged; conventional gasoline and regenerative braking provide all the energy the vehicle needs. Potential buyers should...

399

Microsoft PowerPoint - Clean Cities Web Presentation - Francfort...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

off-board electricity source, mostly from power plants via the electric grid * Captures energy during regenerative braking: electric motor(s) acts as a generator * No...

400

Microsoft Word - Compare Driving Styles_ ETEC Hymotion Prius...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving intensity is the energy at the wheels used for propulsion. Recaptured energy through regenerative braking is not considered when calculating driving intensity....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 66 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 30 Total number of trips 725 Total distance...

402

TransForum v5n2 - Argonne's "Composite-Structure" Electrodes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primarily for leveling the load on the internal combustion engine (ICE) and for capturing energy associated with regenerative braking. If fuel prices continue to rise, automakers...

403

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

81 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 104 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 49 Total number of trips 2,810 Total...

404

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

148 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 87 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Whmi) 46 Total number of trips 6,223 Total...

405

Fuel Quality and Metering: Current Status and Future Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards is charged with enforcing the quality standards for Gasoline, Diesel, Motor Oil, Coolants, Brake Fluid, ATF, and Hydrogen (Petroleum Products Program) The...

406

Licenses Available in Energy & Utilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surgical Tools and Orthopedic Implants 200000789 Device for Separating CO2 from Fossil Power Plant Emissions 200000791 Wheel Reaction Force Sensing ApparatusWhole-Vehicle Brake...

407

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006 Honda Civic VIN: JHMFA36216S019329 Seatbelt Positions: Five Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Space...

408

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Hybrid Electric Vehicle and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

max speed, braking, & handling DOE - Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing * Fleet and accelerated reliability testing - 6 Honda Insights...

409

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Braking Energy Recovery (%) 14% City Trips ( < 5 stopsmile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 380 Number of trips 106 Distance traveled (mi) 237 Percent...

410

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stopsmile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 414 Number of trips 152 Distance traveled (mi) 131 Percent...

411

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stopsmile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 410 Number of trips 94 Distance traveled (mi) 307 Percent of...

412

Gas Mileage Tips - Driving More Efficiently  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving More Efficiently Drive Sensibly frustrated driver Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking) wastes gas. It can lower your gas mileage by 33 percent at...

413

Energy harvesting Wheel Speed Sensor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a prototype energy harvesting autonomous sensor, called the Autonomous Wheel Speed Sensor (AWSS), that is targeted for operation in the Electronic Braking (more)

Parthasarathy, Dhasarathy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Components of MMCs Currently in Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Use of metal-matrix composites (MMCs) in automotive applications...Al/SiC p front brake rotors for an electric vehicle

415

Development of a Novel Air Hybrid Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An air hybrid vehicle is an alternative to the electric hybrid vehicle that stores the kinetic energy of the vehicle during braking in the form (more)

Fazeli, Amir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-002146: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Turbine Electric Brake Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02222010 Location(s): Ohio Office(s):...

417

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design." Atlanta, American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, andRefrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers Brake horsepower Building Management System Constant air volume Center for Environmental Design

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

King County Metro Transit. Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of General Motors A: The energy storage system supplies electricity to the E V 50 Drive's electric motors. It stores electricity during normal operation and regenerative braking....

419

Bio-based Deicing/Anti-Icing Fluids - Energy Innovation Portal  

Typically 50-80% lower corrosivity towards steel, various aerospace alloys, cadmium-coated parts and aircraft brakes; ... Applications and Industries.

420

Interim Project Results: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application for Each Engine and Truck Manufacturer Hybrid Drive Unit Transmission InverterControls Partners Brakes (ABS) Eaton Hybrid Electric System UPS' hybrid-electric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Open-loop heat-recovery dryer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drying apparatus is disclosed that includes a drum and an open-loop airflow pathway originating at an ambient air inlet, passing through the drum, and terminating at an exhaust outlet. A passive heat exchanger is included for passively transferring heat from air flowing from the drum toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the ambient air inlet toward the drum. A heat pump is also included for actively transferring heat from air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the drum. A heating element is also included for further heating air flowing from the heat pump toward the drum.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward Evan

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

SPRING DRIVEN ACTUATING MECHANISM FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

l962. rod in a nuclear reactor to shut it down. The control rod or an extension thereof is wound on a drum as it is withdrawn from the reactor. When an emergency occurs requiring the reactor to be shut down, the drum is released so as to be free to rotate, and the tendency of the control rod or its extension coiled on the drum to straighten itself is used for quickly returning the control rod to the reactor. (AEC)

Bevilacqua, F.; Uecker, D.F.; Groh, E.F.

1962-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Shaft mines can get power without armor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Pennsylvania coal operator has been able to install neoprene jacketed mine power feeder (MPF) cable in an airshaft without the use of expensive armored power cables. Armored cables traditionally have been favored in applications where the cable is dropped vertically because their galvanized metal shielding protects the cable as it is dragged across rough ground and stretched by its own weight as it is lowered into the hole. But armored cable poses some problems. It is as much as $20 per foot more expensive than MPF cable. Also, sinking armored cables is particularly difficult when space is limited because the cable must be laid out on the ground before it is lowered into the hole. The technique that allowed Pennsylvania Mines Corp. to install two 750-ft-long, 15-kv cables at is 400,000-tpy Tunnelton mine, near New Alexandria, Pa., was devised by J.H. Service Co.'s Indianola, Pa., branch office. The method involves feeding MPF cable from a spool on a truck equipped with special braking devices, over a steel drum that acts as a sheave, directly into a mine shaft or borehole. Robert C. Kadyk, a sales manager with J.H. Service, says that while this is not the first time standard MPF cable has been used in a borehole or shaft, the cables are not usually used in these cases because there were no dependable methods for holding the cable steady as it was lowered into the hole to keep it from abrading against the sides of the borehole or shaft. Also, dragging MPF cable through the woods invariably damages it. With its cable sinking method, J.H. Service vulcanizes stainless steel kellems grips into the cable about every 100 ft. The interval varies with the weight and diameter of the cable, depth of the hole, and length of the kellems grip. One twisted steel messenger wire is attached to each kellems grip to displace the weight of the cable as it takes its trip to the mine floor.

Brezovec, D.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Metal Values from Used Beverage Cans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... A method has been investigated to remove the printed coating using organic solvents or by sand blasting technique in a rotating drum.

425

DOE SEEKS CONTRACTOR TO DISPOSITION WASTE AT THE ADVANCED MIXED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The waste includes DOE laboratory and processing wastes from the now closed Rocky Flats in Colorado, and various DOE facilities. The waste is stored in drums, boxes, and...

426

Environmental Assessment for the National Pollution Discharge...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

miscellaneous metals storage areas (e.g., scrap wire and metal, used drums, brass and copper items, empty gas cylinders), port-o-lets, office furniture stored without...

427

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the user with instructions for assembling a payload. All the steps in Subsections 1.2, Preparing 55-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly; 1.3, Preparing "Short" 85-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly (TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT); 1.4, Preparing "Tall" 85-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly (HalfPACT only); 1.5, Preparing 100-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly; 1.6, Preparing SWB Payload Assembly; and 1.7, Preparing TDOP Payload Assembly, must be completed, but may be performed in any order as long as radiological control steps are not bypassed.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. These drums containing radioactive waste from uranium enrichment operations were included in the Portsmouth site's first shipment to...

429

mar2003z  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dispositioning. The waste usually is transported on flatbed trucks in 55-gallon drums or B-25 boxes. sible for the scope, schedule and budget for projects supporting the...

430

Forensic Investigation of the Deepwater Horizon Blowout Preventer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fretting Corrosion Induced Fracture of a Floating Bearing Base Plate in a 250 Tons Yankee Paper Drum Materials Are Often More Reliable Than People.

431

Fatigue and Fracture I - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Fretting Corrosion Induced Fracture of a Floating Bearing Base Plate in a 250 Tons Yankee Paper Drum: Pierre Dupont1; 1Schaeffler Belgium...

432

Fretting Corrosion Induced Fracture of a Floating Bearing Base Plate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation will decribe the case of the rupture of a 250 Tons Yankee drum free bearing floating base plate made in a hardened low alloyed carbon steel...

433

middlesex  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

drums and containers on a poorly drained field on the Middlesex Sampling Plant grounds. Handling and transfer operations occasionally resulted in spillage of small amounts of...

434

Microsoft PowerPoint - nys.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(historical) waste drums 3. Bulk waste (larger pieces decommissioning) Disposal facility: 1. Vault type 2. Fixed steel roof attached to modules 3. Inspection room 4....

435

Ris-M-2208 MECHANICAL VELOCITY SELECTOR, NEUTRON FLUX AND Q-RANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by an electrical motor and the revolution rate of the drum may be monitored by means of pulses from a small magnet

436

Christian veneer dryer: Forest products fact sheet  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new closed rotary drum dryer for the forest products industry.

NREL

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

437

Print - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Container drums and barrels are commonly known and widely used for shipping, storage, etc. They typically have a rigid cylindrical construction, such as steel, and ...

438

Final LLNL Volume 1 - ES&H 2002.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 years) in non-optimal storage conditions (many drums are stored outside, exposed to weather). The disposition of legacy wastes, and other waste management activities, at LLNL...

439

Technologies  

Current Weather. Protocol Office. Where to stay. Tri-Valley Visitors Bureau. ... Drum Ring Tools: Removal/Installation Set; Portable Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Generator;

440

Technologies - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Current Weather. Protocol Office. Where to stay. Tri-Valley Visitors Bureau. City of Livermore. Community. Our Community. ... Drum Ring Tools: Removal/Installation Set;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 346: Areas 8, 10 Housekeeping Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report documents the closure activities conducted for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 346: Areas 8, 10 Housekeeping Sites. CAU 346 is listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and consists of the following 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8 and 10 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS): (1) CAS 08-22-04: Drums (2); (2) CAS 08-22-11: Drums; Bucket; (3) CAS 08-24-02: Battery; (4) CAS 10-14-01: Transformer; (5) CAS 10-22-06: Drum (Gas Block); (6) CAS 10-22-10: Drum (Gas Block); (7) CAS 10-22-12: Drum (Gas Block); (8) CAS 10-22-13: Drum (Gas Block); (9) CAS 10-22-16: Drum (Gas Block); (10) CAS 10-22-22: Drum; (11) CAS 10-22-25: Drum; (12) CAS 10-22-36: Paint Can; (13) CAS 10-22-37: Gas Block; and (14) CAS 10-24-11: Battery. Closure activities consisted of closing each CAS by removing debris and/or material, disposing of the generated waste, and verifying that each site was clean-closed by visual inspection and/or laboratory analysis of soil verification samples.

K. B. Campbell

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

HYDROGEN DATA FROM LOS ALAMOS [LANL] & SAVANNAH RIVER [SRC] & ROCKY FLATS [RFE] [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A DOE letter dated August 14, 2001 requested that a detailed analysis of the expected probability of accumulation of significant quantities of hydrogen gas in unvented drums and a plan and schedule for venting drums be prepared and submitted. In response to the letter a document was prepared that included data of hydrogen concentrations in TRU waste drums. Data was collected from Savannah River Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. These data were analyzed to provide the basis for evaluating the probability that significant quantities of hydrogen will accumulate in the unvented TRU drums stored at Hanford.

DAYLEY, L.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

443

Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 WD:2012:0595 Radwaste Treatment System (RTS) Drum Cell Restrooms and Locker Rooms Remote Handled Waste Facility (RHWF) Security Systems Sewage Treatment Plant (AKA Wastewater...

444

A new structure for bidirectional power flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, methods of energy recovery for electric motors in braking mode are presented. Also for motors with low and medium regenerative power, a low cost and simple structure is proposed. In this method, for converting the high voltage of DC bus ... Keywords: bidirectional power flow, energy saving, regenerative brake

Seyed Borhan Azimi; Hassan Ghafoori Fard

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and light emitting diode brake- light messaging. These technologies all focus on improving the signal- ance, sensor, radar, fluorescence, light emitting diode. I. INTRODUCTION As a compromise between · Radar reflection-enhanced license plates · Vehicle-to-vehicle light emitting diode (LED) brake- light

Gillespie, Brent

446

interleaved clocksignal ; PWM; current balance ;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berichte Nr. 689, 243 ­ 260, 2008. [46] von Wagner, U.: Nonlinear Dynamic Behaviour of a Railway Wheelset squeal with piezoelectric actuators. Proceedings of Braking 2009 York, 159 ­ 168, 2009 #12;[50] von.: Minimal Models for Squealing of Railway Block Brakes. Archive of Applied Mechanics 81, 503-511, 2011. [65

Paderborn, Universität

447

Curriculum Vitae DANIEL J. INMAN, Chair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berichte Nr. 689, 243 ­ 260, 2008. [46] von Wagner, U.: Nonlinear Dynamic Behaviour of a Railway Wheelset squeal with piezoelectric actuators. Proceedings of Braking 2009 York, 159 ­ 168, 2009 #12;[50] von.: Minimal Models for Squealing of Railway Block Brakes. Archive of Applied Mechanics 81, 503-511, 2011. [65

Eustice, Ryan

448

Symmetrical Symplectic Capacity with Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we first introduce the concept of symmetrical symplectic capacity for symmetrical symplectic manifolds, and by using this symmetrical symplectic capacity theory we prove that there exists at least one symmetric closed characteristic (brake orbit and $S$-invariant brake orbit are two examples) on prescribed symmetric energy surface which has a compact neighborhood with finite symmetrical symplectic capacity.

Liu, Chungen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

CMR Shuffler System: Passive Mode Calibration and Certification Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1 to 2 inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. As debris is removed from the vessels, material will be placed in waste drums. Far-field gamma ray assay will be used to determine when a drum is nearing a {sup 239}Pu equivalent mass of less than 200 g. The drum will then be assayed using a waste drum shuffler operated in passive mode using a neutron coincidence counting method for accountability. This report focuses on the testing and calibration of the CMR waste drum shuffler in passive mode operation. Initial testing was performed to confirm previously accepted measurement parameters. The system was then calibrated using a set of weapons grade Pu (WGPu, {sup 239}Pu > 93%) oxide standards placed inside a 55 gallon drum. The calibration data ranges from Pu mass of 0.5 g to 188.9 g. The CMR waste drum shuffler has been tested and calibrated in passive mode in preparation for safeguards accountability measurements of waste drums containing material removed from CVs for the CVD project.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano D. [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

450

SRNL - News Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device for Sampling Storage Drums LIcensed by Florida Company Device for Sampling Storage Drums LIcensed by Florida Company ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (May 10, 2007) - A device invented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory for sampling drums of stored material has been licensed to a maker of waste storage and related equipment, for manufacture and sale to customers in the environmental and other industries. UltraTech International, Inc., of Jacksonville, Fla., entered into an agreement with Washington Savannah River Company, the company that operates SRNL for the DOE, for a device that safely and efficiently vents or samples storage drums remotely. Like many SRNL inventions, this device was created to meet a specific need at the Savannah River Site, but has applications well beyond the Site and its specialized operations. The Site had stored drums of heavy water, which had been used to cool the Site's reactors during the years that they operated. A method was needed to sample the headspace in the drums - the area between the surface of the stored liquid and the top of the drum - to determine what gases were present. In particular, they needed a way to perform this sampling while protecting employee safety and the environment, and without damaging the expensive stainless steel drums.

451

Compiled by James A. Zeidler, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the importance of underwater resources and the best ways to identify, manage, and research these resources; Dr, especially in light of the U.S. Senate's recent ratification of the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection Division Public Works (IMNE-DRM-PWE) 10th MTN (LI) & Fort Drum 85 First Street West Fort Drum, NY 13602

452

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) We are applying our unique capabilities in actinide and repository  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Nondestructive Testing Facility load drums containing transuranic waste into a TRUPACT container. The TRUPACT is then bolted onto a flatbed. A TRUPACT container has a stainless steel skin over a 10-inch layer in diameter. One TRUPACT can hold up to 14 waste drums, so a normal truckload of three containers can carry up

453

DOE/WIPP-10-2171 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Nondestructive Testing Facility load drums containing transuranic waste into a TRUPACT container. The TRUPACT is then bolted onto a flatbed. A TRUPACT container has a stainless steel skin over a 10-inch layer in diameter. One TRUPACT can hold up to 14 waste drums, so a normal truckload of three containers can carry up

454

A design framework for overlapping controllers and its industrial application Adarsha Swarnakar , Horacio Jose Marquez, Tongwen Chen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control air and fuel flow), and attemperator spray flow rate; the outputs are drum level, header pressure is then fanned out into fuel demand and air demand), and attemperator spray flow rate; the outputs are drum water and u3 is the attemperator spray flow rate (in kg/s). The intermediate variables x3 and x6 affect

Marquez, Horacio J.

455

Analysis and stabilization of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s multiphase mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five drums of mixed waste were accepted from LBL during FY 1994; they contain inorganic acids and compounds, as well as organic reagents and radioactive materials. This document defines the work plan for stabilization and characterization of the waste in three of these 5 drums.

Crawford, B.A.

1995-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

Relative Condition Factors of Fish as Bioindicators One Year after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creel surveys were performed over a three week period in late spring, 2011, in the Lafourche and Calcasieu area estuaries of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. Weights and lengths were measured for black drum (Pogonias cromis), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), and spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), and relative condition factors were calculated relative to expected weights from the long term (5 year) Louisiana data for each species. A normal relative condition factor is 1.00. The mean relative condition factors in the Lafourche area were black drum, 0.955 (0.020); red drum, 0.955 (0.011); spotted seatrout, 0.994 (0.009). In the Calcasieu area, the mean relative condition factors were black drum, 0.934 (0.017); red drum, 0.965 (0.014); spotted seatrout, 0.971 (0.010). Uncertainties are in parentheses. Results suggest that the abundance of primary food sources for black drum and red drum in Lafourche, including oysters and crab, were likely affected by the oil spill and continued to be reduced one year later. Increa...

Courtney, Joshua; Courtney, Amy; Torano, Joseph; Courtney, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Direct Casting Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 10   Alternative sheet, strip, and slab casting techniques...Armco Single roll Allegheny-Ludlum Single roll Argonne National Labs Electromagnetic levitation United Technologies Single roll LTV Drum in drum Japan Nippon Steel Twin roll Kawasaki Steel Twin roll Nippon Kokan Twin roll Nippon Metals Twin roll Kobe Twin roll Nippon Yakin Twin roll France IRSID Twin...

458

NDA BATCH 2008-05  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QC sample results (daily background check drums and 100-gram standard) were within acceptance criteria established by WIPPs Quality Assurance objectives for TRU Waste characterization. Replicate run was performed on the following drums LL85234292 and LL85101617. Replicate measurement results are acceptable at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

459

Quality Assurance Lessons Learned 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quality Council Lessons Learned Quality Council Lessons Learned Vendor Supplier Deficiencies: Myers Drum Concerns at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) The Office of Packaging and Transportation, in the DOE Office of Environmental Management, issued a Safety Alert in January 12, 2010, (Issue Number: DOE/OPT/SA-01) alerting the DOE packaging and transportation community about potential failure associated with 55 and 30-gallon carbon steel drum closure rings. On January 13, 2010, HSS issued a Data Collection Sheet (DCS) to all DOE sites citing the concerns as well. Those concerns arose while contractors were performing receipt inspections on several lots of drums and drum rings received at the Hanford site and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It was determined that the drum

460

CX-008627: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008627: Categorical Exclusion Determination L Area Waste Water Drum Deformation - Vent Drums CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 06/19/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office The purpose of this activity is to puncture / vent bulging drums (or other containers) that may be found in Spent Fuel Project Facilities. This particular activity involves drums that are currently located in two storage trailers. The puncturing of the drums will be performed by Solid Waste personnel using their puncture device or by Facility personnel. Once vented, the containers will be prepared for proper disposal. CX-008627.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010023: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007671: Categorical Exclusion Determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

VELOCITY INDICATOR FOR EXTRUSION PRESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indicator is presented for measuring the lowspeed velocity of an object in one direction where the object returns in the opposite direction at a high speed. The indicator comprises a drum having its axis of rotation transverse to the linear movement of the object and a tape wound upon the drum with its free end extending therefrom and adapted to be connected to the object. A constant torque is applied to the drum in a direction to wind the tape on the drum. The speed of the tape in the unwinding direction is indicated on a tachometer which is coupled through a shaft and clutch means to the drum only when the tape is unwinding.

Digney, F.J. Jr.; Bevilacqua, F.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

463

Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

Gold, Raymond (1393 George Washington Way, Suite No. 7, P.O. Box 944, Richland, WA 99352); Roberts, James H. (1393 George Washington Way, Suite No. 7, P.O. Box 944, Richland, WA 99352)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - HANDSS-55 TRANSURANIC WASTE REPACKAGING MODULE  

SciTech Connect

The Transuranic waste generated at the Savannah River Site from nuclear weapons research, development, and production is currently estimated to be over 10,000 cubic meters. Over half of this amount is stored in 55-gallon drums. The waste in drums is primarily job control waste and equipment generated as the result of routine maintenance performed on the plutonium processing operations. Over the years that the drums have been accumulating, the regulatory definitions of materials approved for disposal have changed. Consequently, many of the drums now contain items that are not approved for disposal at DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The HANDSS-55 technology is being developed to allow remote sorting of the items in these drums and then repackaging of the compliant items for disposal at WIPP.

Unknown

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Momentum Flux by Lines of Cumulonimbus over the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of aircraft and rawinsonde data gathered in nine tropical mesoscale convective line cases indicates that all but two lines systematically increased front-to-rear momentum at heights greater than about 4 km, and rear-to-front momentum ...

Margaret A. LeMone; Gary M. Barnes; Edward J. Zipser

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Argonne TTRDC - D3 (Downloadable Dynamometer Database) - 2010...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

door compact sedan. The Insight remains a dedicated HEV platform; as such the battery and power electronics bay is situated between the rear wheels, not behind the rear seat as in...

467

W-026 integrated engineering cold run operational test report for balance of plant (BOP)  

SciTech Connect

This Cold Run test is designed to demonstrate the functionality of systems necessary to move waste drums throughout the plant using approved procedures, and the compatibility of these systems to function as an integrated process. This test excludes all internal functions of the gloveboxes. In the interest of efficiency and support of the facility schedule, the initial revision of the test (rev 0) was limited to the following: Receipt and storage of eight overpacked drums, four LLW and four TRU; Receipt, routing, and staging of eleven empty drums to the process area where they will be used later in this test; Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 9); Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 1). The above listed operations were tested using the rev 0 test document, through Section 5.4.25. The document was later revised to include movement of all staged drums to and from the LLW and TRU process and RWM gloveboxes. This testing was performed using Sections 5.5 though 5.11 of the rev 1 test document. The primary focus of this test is to prove the functionality of automatic operations for all mechanical and control processes listed. When necessary, the test demonstrates manual mode operations as well. Though the gloveboxes are listed, only waste and empty drum movement to, from, and between the gloveboxes was tested.

Kersten, J.K.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

468

Tube Forming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The rear-axle housing shown in Fig. 19 was produced from 1035 steel tubing in seven manufacturing operations.

469

Oblique subduction of the Gagua Ridge beneath the Ryukyu accretionary wedge system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Ryukyu Arc. Taking into account the opening of the Okinawa backarc basin and partitioning at the rear

Demouchy, Sylvie

470

Manchester Spring Chinook Broodstock Project, 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This yearly report concerned facilities upgrade and endangered Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon captive broodstock rearing.

McAuley, W.Carlin; Wastel, Michael R.; Flagg, Thomas A. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Waste heat boiler with feed mixing nozzle  

SciTech Connect

A waste heat boiler of the type which is particularly suited for use in marine applications and which incorporates a feed mixing nozzle that is operative for purposes of effecting, by utilizing steam taken from the steam generating bank, a preheating of the feedwater that is fed to the steam drum. In addition to the aforesaid feed mixing nozzle, the subject waste heat boiler includes a feedwater control valve, a steam drum, a circulation pump, a steam generating bank and a centrifugal water separator. The feedwater control valve is employed to modulate the flow rate of the incoming feedwater in order to maintain the desired level of water in the steam drum. In turn the latter steam drum is intended to function in the manner of a reservoir for the circulating water that through the operation of the circulating pump is supplied to the steam generating bank. The circulating water which is supplied to the steam generating bank is heated therein to saturation temperature, and steam is generated thus. A water-steam mixture is returned from the steam generating bank to the steam drum and is directed into the centrifugal water separator that is suitably located within the steam drum. It is in the centrifugal water separator that the separation of the water-steam mixture is effected such that water is returned to the lower portion of the steam drum and the steam is supplied to the upper portion of the steam drum. The preheating of the feedwater is accomplished by directing the incoming feedwater through an internal feed pipe to the mixing nozzle, the latter being positioned in the line through which the water-steam mixture is returned to the steam drum.

Mastronarde, Th.P.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

An intelligent inspection and survey robot. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ARIES {number_sign}1 (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed for the Department of Energy to survey and inspect drums containing low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at DOE facilities. The drums are typically stacked four high and arranged in rows with three-foot aisle widths. The robot will navigate through the aisles and perform an inspection operation, typically performed by a human operator, making decisions about the condition of the drums and maintaining a database of pertinent information about each drum. A new version of the Cybermotion series of mobile robots is the base mobile vehicle for ARIES. The new Model K3A consists of an improved and enhanced mobile platform and a new turret that will permit turning around in a three-foot aisle. Advanced sonar and lidar systems were added to improve navigation in the narrow drum aisles. Onboard computer enhancements include a VMEbus computer system running the VxWorks real-time operating system. A graphical offboard supervisory UNIX workstation is used for high-level planning, control, monitoring, and reporting. A camera positioning system (CPS) includes primitive instructions for the robot to use in referencing and positioning the payload. The CPS retracts to a more compact position when traveling in the open warehouse. During inspection, the CPS extends up to deploy inspection packages at different heights on the four-drum stacks of 55-, 85-, and 110-gallon drums. The vision inspection module performs a visual inspection of the waste drums. This system will locate and identify each drum, locate any unique visual features, characterize relevant surface features of interest and update a data-base containing the inspection data.

NONE

1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit Coalc1ale Rearing Unit ) Crystal River Ree.ring Unit Denver He.tchery Dolores Rearing Unit Durango~1 River Hatchery Moccasin Cl"eek Hatchery Moja:ve River Hatchery MoorehQ~se Springs Hatchery M~ington Hatchery Voluntown Rearing Station Windsor Locks Hatchery FLORIDA Blackwater River Hatchery Wewahitchka

474

Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method as described for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

Oakley, D.J.; Groves, O.J.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

475

Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

Talmud, Fred M. (Berkeley Heights, NJ); Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio (Morristown, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Internal dust recirculation system for a fluidized bed heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided in a heat exchange relation to the bed and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the bed and a tube bank extending between the steam drum and a water drum. The tube bank is located in the path of the effluent gases exiting from the bed and a baffle system is provided to separate the solid particulate matter from the effluent gases. The particulate matter is collected and injected back into the fluidized bed.

Gamble, Robert L. (Wayne, NJ); Garcia-Mallol, Juan A. (Morristown, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Information Gathering Document 0321-1437-30-R-OG  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fines and turnings from machining depleted uranium (Dep-U), natural uranium (Nat-U), and Thorium-232, and stainless steel and aluminum. This IGO allows only small, oxidizable pieces of Dep-U/Nat-U/Th-232, with regulated metal contaminants below regulatory limits. Fines and turnings will be in 30 gallon vented drums immersed in mineral oil. The 30 gallon drums will be overpacked in 55 gallon vented drums. The waste will be stored on site until sent for stabilization & disposal with approved TSOFs.

Hollister, R

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA); Groves, Oliver J. (Seattle, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Layout 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE ROADSIDE TECHNOLOGY CORRIDOR October 2009 Issue !4 Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Office of Analysis, Research, and Technology "In about 96 percent of cases there was not a statistically significant degradation of the brakes during the FOT." (Page 1) "Nearly 64 percent of vehicles flagged by SIRIS were placed OOS, and fully 77 percent were found to exhibit one or more safety flaws." (Page 3) Brake Wear and Performance FOT The Oak Ridge National Laboratory com- pleted the Brake Wear and Performance Test (BWPT) field operation test (FOT) and data analysis in September 2009. This effort in- cluded assisting the Tennessee Department of Safety (TDOS) in the procurement and installa- tion of a Performance-Based Brake Testing

480

VIN# JTNBB46K773007129 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K773007129 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,109 lbs Features: Four-wheel disk brakes ABS w...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rear drum brakes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E27C177982 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 981 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

482

VIN# JHMZE2H59AS011748 Vehicle Specifications  

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H59AS011748 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 10 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 907 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

483

VIN# KMHEC4A43BA004932 Vehicle Specifications  

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3BA004932 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L Electric Motor: 30 kW Battery: Lithium Polymer Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1074 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

484

Vehicle Specifications  

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E87C172351 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 981 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

485

VIN# JTNBB46K673006330 Vehicle Specifications  

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K673006330 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,109 lbs Features: Four-wheel disk brakes ABS w...

486

Vehicle Specifications  

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Z07S838122 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4 cylinder Electric Motor: 14.5 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,244 lbs Features: Regenerative braking wABS 4...

487

Vehicle Specifications  

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2AR194699 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

488

VIN# JHMZE2H78AS010141 Vehicle Specifications  

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H78AS010141 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 10 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 907 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

489

Vehicle Specifications  

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4AR144757 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

490

VIN# JTDKN3DU5A0006063 Vehicle Specifications  

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DU5A0006063 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.8 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 885 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

491

Vehicle Specifications  

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Z37S813344 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4 cylinder Electric Motor: 14.5 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,244 lbs Features: Regenerative braking wABS 4...

492

VIN# JTDKN3DU2A5010462 Vehicle Specifications  

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DU2A5010462 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.8 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 885 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

493

VIN# KMHEC4A47BA003539 Vehicle Specifications  

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7BA003539 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L Electric Motor: 30 kW Battery: Lithium Polymer Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1074 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

494

Microsoft Word - chvs10.html  

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7 Chevrolet S-10 Electric 7 Chevrolet S-10 Electric VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS PURPOSE-BUILT VEHICLE Base Vehicle: 1997 Chevrolet S-10 VIN: 1GCDE14H4V80003EX Seatbelt Positions: Three Standard Features: Heat Pump Climate Control System Auxillary Diesel Fuel Fired Heater (Only operates Below 40 F) Cruise Control Tilt Steering Wheel Front Wheel Drive Power Steering Power Brakes Anti-Lock Brakes Front Disk Brakes Regenerative Braking Drivers Side Air Bags AM/FM Stereo Radio Half-Bed Tonneau Cover BATTERY Manufacturer: Delphi Energy Type: Valve Regulated Lead Acid Number of Modules: 26 Weight of Module: 19 kg Weight of Pack(s): 575 kg Pack Locations: Underbody Nominal Module Voltage: 12 V Nominal System Voltage: 312 V Nominal Capacity (C/2): 48 Ah WEIGHTS Design Curb Weight: 4300 lbs

495

Particulate matter emissions from a DISI engine under cold-fast-idle conditions for ethanol-gasoline blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to build internal combustion engines with both reduced brake-specific fuel consumption and better emission control, engineers developed the Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engine. DISI engines combine ...

Dimou, Iason

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2007 Progress Report for Advanced...  

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meet future Federal emissions regulations. The primary goal of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program is to improve the brake thermal efficiency of internal combustion...

497

MaintenanceRecords  

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brake system, and replaced coolant 134.85 252010 33292 Replaced and balanced tire 166.01 3162010 38459 Changed oil and filter 45.10 492010 40591 Reprogrammed...

498

MaintenanceRecords  

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Activity HEV Fleet Testing Date Mileage Description Cost 11212012 1,582 Replaced one tire due to road hazard 201.66 12102012 4,291 Replaced brake line - under warranty NC 3...

499

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2011 Hyundai  

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1 Hyundai Sonata VIN: KMEHC4A43BA004932 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc...

500

Design and component integration of a T63-A-700 gas turbine engine test facility ; .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A gas turbine engine test cell was developed integrating an Allison T63-A-700 helicopter engine with a superflow water brake dynamometer power absorber. Design specifications were (more)

Eckerle, Brian P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z