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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Guam- Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Note: Guam is in the process of adopting a [www.guamenergy.com/outreach-education/guam-tropical-energy-code/ tropical energy code]. As a result, the solar ready provisions described below may...

2

Ghana-REDD Readiness Requires Radical Reform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation, searchToInformationEnergyInformation for

3

A Qualitative Readiness-Requirements Assessment Model for Enterprise Big-Data Infrastructure Investment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last three decades, there has been an exponential growth in the area of information technology providing the information processing needs of data-driven businesses in government, science, and private industry in the form of capturing, staging, integrating, conveying, analyzing, and transferring data that will help knowledge workers and decision makers make sound business decisions. Data integration across enterprise warehouses is one of the most challenging steps in the big data analytics strategy. Several levels of data integration have been identified across enterprise warehouses: data accessibility, common data platform, and consolidated data model. Each level of integration has its own set of complexities that requires a certain amount of time, budget, and resources to implement. Such levels of integration are designed to address the technical challenges inherent in consolidating the disparate data sources. In this paper, we present a methodology based on industry best practices to measure the readiness of an organization and its data sets against the different levels of data integration. We introduce a new Integration Level Model (ILM) tool, which is used for quantifying an organization and data system s readiness to share data at a certain level of data integration. It is based largely on the established and accepted framework provided in the Data Management Association (DAMA-DMBOK). It comprises several key data management functions and supporting activities, together with several environmental elements that describe and apply to each function. The proposed model scores the maturity of a system s data governance processes and provides a pragmatic methodology for evaluating integration risks. The higher the computed scores, the better managed the source data system and the greater the likelihood that the data system can be brought in at a higher level of integration.

Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL] [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL] [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL] [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Emergency Readiness Assurance Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the requirements of the Emergency Readiness Assurance Program with a goal of assurting that the Department of Energy (DOE) Emergency Management System (EMS) is ready to respond promptly, efficiently, and effectively to any emergency involving DOE facilities or requiring DOE assistance. Cancels DOE O 5500.10 dated 4-30-91. Chg 1 dated 2-27-92. Change 1 canceled by DOE O 151.1 of 9-25-95.

1992-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DECEMBER 2012 Pathway for readying the next generation of affordable clean energy technology -Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT...

6

Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric Vehicles Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric Vehicles April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In...

7

Beamline Commissioning Readiness Review Team  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ES&H and User Safety Officer T. Kruy AES Front Ends Readiness G. Markovich AES PSS & EPS Readiness M. Merritt AES Insertion Device Readiness M. Ramanathan AES CCSM & Chair AES...

8

Technology Readiness Assessment Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Cancels DOE G 413.3-4.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications Solar Photovoltaic Specification, Checklist and Guide,...

10

Lightning Arrestor Connectors Production Readiness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lightning Arrestor Connector (LAC), part “M”, presented opportunities to improve the processes used to fabricate LACs. The A## LACs were the first production LACs produced at the KCP, after the product was transferred from Pinnellas. The new LAC relied on the lessons learned from the A## LACs; however, additional improvements were needed to meet the required budget, yield, and schedule requirements. Improvement projects completed since 2001 include Hermetic Connector Sealing Improvement, Contact Assembly molding Improvement, development of a second vendor for LAC shells, general process improvement, tooling improvement, reduction of the LAC production cycle time, and documention of the LAC granule fabrication process. This report summarizes the accomplishments achieved in improving the LAC Production Readiness.

Marten, Steve; Linder, Kim; Emmons, Jim; Gomez, Antonio; Hasam, Dawud; Maurer, Michelle

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Webinar: Marketing and Sales Solutions for Zero Energy Ready Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

12

A survey of current technologies for production of oil from oil shale by in-situ retorting processes; their technical and economic readiness and requirements for further developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four in-situ oil shale processes; Vertical Modified In-Situ (VMIS), Horizontal Modified In-Situ (HMIS), Geokinetics, and Equity have been reviewed with respect to their developmental histories, major advantages and disadvantages, present activities, major technical problems, and present states of development. The various processes are described in detail, and up-to-date experimental data has been summarized. The preliminary designs for commercialization have been developed in order to estimate capital and operating costs. Required selling prices and sensitivities have been determined as they relate to various parameters, such as oil yields, capital costs, operating costs, and economic incentives. The technologies for the various processes have been analyzed for the purpose of identifying areas of further required research and development. Programs of technological development have been suggested for each in-situ process. The results of various process evaluations have been compared, and the best near-term solutions have been determined for producing oil from oil shale using in-situ methods.

Cha, C.Y.; Chazin, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Radical Supercomputing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQualityRSS FeedsImportantRadical

14

Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The Generation, Tautomerism, and Dissociation of Isomeric ? Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile?...

15

Ready, set, go . . . well maybe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the 2011 Applied Ergonomics Conference By Melaniesustainable? Case study of ergonomics program that was ‘ notwas not! Case study of ergonomics program that was ‘ready

Alexandre, Melanie M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Question and Answers Alternative Fuel Readiness Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Question and Answers Alternative Fuel Readiness Plans PON-13-603 September 3, 2013 Eligibility Q1 to readiness plans? A1 This solicitation is limited to readiness planning only for alternative fuels. Q2 In regards to PON-13-603 - Alternative Fuel Readiness Plans, is electricity used for transportation

17

NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

Brian K Castle

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006.

20

Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Digital Forensic Readiness: Are We There Yet?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digital Forensic Readiness: Are We There Yet? Antonis Mouhtaropoulos, Chang-Tsun Li Department.co.za Abstract--Digital Forensic Readiness is defined as the pre- incident plan that deals with an organization for a common forensic readiness standard. This article reviews a number of key initiatives in order to point

Li, Chang-Tsun

22

Mission and Readiness Assessment for Fusion Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic fusion development toward DEMO will most likely require a number of fusion nuclear facilities (FNF), intermediate between ITER and DEMO, to test and validate plasma and nuclear technologies and to advance the level of system integration. The FNF mission space is wide, ranging from basic materials research to net electricity demonstration, so there is correspondingly a choice among machine options, scope, and risk in planning such a step. Readiness requirements to proceed with a DEMO are examined, and two FNF options are assessed in terms of the contributions they would make to closing DEMO readiness gaps, and their readiness to themselves proceed with engineering design about ten years from now. An advanced tokamak (AT) pilot plant with superconducting coils and a mission to demonstrate net electricity generation would go a long way toward DEMO. As a next step, however, a pilot plant would entail greater risk than a copper-coil FNSF-AT with its more focussed mission and technology requirements. The stellarator path to DEMO is briefly discussed. Regardless of the choice of FNF option, an accompanying science and technology development program, also aimed at DEMO readiness, is absolutely essential.

G.H. Neilson, et. al.

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

23

Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy Ready Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

24

ZERH Webinar: Energy- and Water- Efficiency in the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

25

Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

Valk, T.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Transportation System Readiness and Resiliency Assessment Framework: Readiness and Assess Resiliency of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation System Readiness and Resiliency Assessment Framework: Readiness and Assess Resiliency of Transportation Systems (Infrastructure, Systems, Organization and Services) to Deter, Detect Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle

27

Organizational Readiness in Specialty Mental Health Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

readiness for change (ORC) measure, and key stake- holders43 clinical staff completed the ORC, and 38 key stakeholdersdeviations (SDs) of the ORC scores are also illuminating in

Hamilton, Alison B.; Cohen, Amy N.; Young, Alexander S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions. Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the...

29

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy Ready Home 2014

30

Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13, cancels DOE O 425.1D.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Zero Energy Ready Home Events | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Zero Energy Ready Home Zero Energy Ready Home Events Zero Energy Ready Home Events November 2014 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 26 27 28 29...

32

Zero Energy Ready Home Events | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Zero Energy Ready Home Zero Energy Ready Home Events Zero Energy Ready Home Events September 2014 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 31 1 2 3 4 5...

33

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas Inc agency thereof. #12;1 RSB Certification Readiness Study: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii

34

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: John Hubert Associates...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Homes, Double Oak, TX DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, CT, Custom...

35

Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This...

36

Energy -- and Water -- Efficiency in the DOE Zero Energy Ready...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy -- and Water -- Efficiency in the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program Webinar (Text Version) Energy -- and Water -- Efficiency in the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program...

37

Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents November 8-9, 2010 Readiness Review Training...

38

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Weiss Building & Development...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Weiss Building & Development, LLC., System Home, River Forest, IL DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, CT,...

39

EV Community Readiness projects: Center for Transportation and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EV Community Readiness projects: Center for Transportation and the Environment (GA, AL, SC); Centralina Council of Governments (NC) EV Community Readiness projects: Center for...

40

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Healthy Efficient Homes - Spirit...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Old Greenwich, CT, Custom DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Caldwell and Johnson, Charlestown, RI...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

TX More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Caldwell and Johnson, Charlestown, RI DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mandalay Homes, Prescott...

42

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Caldwell and Johnson,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Caldwell and Johnson, Charlestown, RI DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Caldwell and Johnson, Charlestown, RI Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready affordable home in...

43

Oregon: Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oregon: Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and Demonstration Oregon: Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and Demonstration March 6, 2014 - 1:23pm...

44

EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ACCOMPLISHMENTS NYCLHVCC: Clean Cities 2011 EV Community Readiness DUANE Reade's Smith EV at Plug-In Day in Times Square Clean Cities 2011 Community Readiness & Planning...

45

Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

Jon Carmack

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Modeling Renewable Energy Readiness: The UAE Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling technology policy is becoming an increasingly important capability to steer states and societies toward sustainability. This paper presents a simulation-modeling approach to evaluate renewable energy readiness, ...

Choucri, Nazli

47

Shovel Ready Energy Project Grants (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program leverages Florida’s state energy grant initiatives to identify “shovel-ready” projects that can be expeditiously implemented through available SEP funding. The goal is to provide...

48

Superconducting Partnership with Readiness Review Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Superconducting Partnership with Industry: Readiness Review Update Mike Gouge, ORNL Steve Ashworth, LANL Paul Bakke, DOE-Golden DOE 2004 Superconductivity Peer Review July 27-29, 2004 #12;2 SPI

49

Are You Ready? Jimmy L. Lagunero  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are You Ready? Jimmy L. Lagunero Emergency Management Coordinator University of Hawai,,i "Emergency ? ? ? Jimmy L. Lagunero UHM Emergency Management Coordinator phone: 808-956-0773 fax: 808-956-

Dong, Yingfei

50

Toward Direct Biosynthesis of Drop-in Ready Biofuels in Plants: Rapid Screening and Functional Genomic Characterization of Plant-derived Advanced Biofuels and Implications for Coproduction in Lignocellulosic Feedstocks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Advanced biofuels that are “drop-in” ready, completely fungible with petroleum fuels, and require minimal infrastructure to process a finished fuel could provide transportation fuels in… (more)

Joyce, Blake Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department ofThe U.S.D.C. -Affordable | Department ofVA

52

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramofContract atInc.,House, Devens, MA |CustomZero

53

Technology Readiness and the Smart Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) originated as a way for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to monitor the development of systems being readied for space. The technique has found wide application as part of the more general topic of system engineering. In this paper, we consider the applicability of TRLs to systems being readied for the smart grid. We find that there are many useful parallels, and much to be gained by this application. However, TRLs were designed for a developer who was also a user. That is not usually the case for smart grid developments. We consider the matter from the point of view of the company responsible for implementation, typically a utility, and we find that there is a need for connecting the many standards in the industry. That connection is explored, and some new considerations are introduced.

Kirkham, Harold; Marinovici, Maria C.

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

ENERGY STAR Webinar: Zero Energy Ready Home Program | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

home is as good as ENERGY STAR, the modest added "lift" to bring a home up to DOE's Zero Energy Ready specs unleashes a wave of powerful value messages. DOE Zero Energy Ready...

55

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, CT, Custom DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: AquaZephyr, Ithaca, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI...

56

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in New Paltz, NY,...

57

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Caldwell and Johnson,...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Study, Caldwell and Johnson, Exeter, RI, Custom Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Caldwell and Johnson, Exeter, RI, Custom Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home...

58

An assessment of the value of retail ready packaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of retail-ready packaging reduces the costs of replenishing store shelves by eliminating the labor of removing packaging materials and stocking individual items on shelves. While reducing costs for retailers, retail-ready ...

Jackson, Kathleen Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

On Infinitely Nested Radicals Brian Thomas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Infinitely Nested Radicals Brian Thomas 1. Introduction #12;In "On Infinitely Nested Radicals nested radicals are explored. One example of a nested radical is the Golden Ratio, , which can be written as: (1.1) . . . Many questions arise from the study of nested radicals, such as: 1. What can we say

Morrow, James A.

60

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable (item 2) Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean Earth Sciences

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Global e-Readiness - For What? Readiness for e-Banking (JITD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the rapid diffusion of the Internet worldwide, there has been considerable interest in the e-potentials of developing countries giving rise to a 1st generation of e-Readiness studies. Moreover, ...

Maugis, V.

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

Tucson- Solar Design Requirement for Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tucson adopted an ordinance in June 2008 that requires all new single-family homes and duplexes in Tucson to be "solar-ready." The ordinance was developed by a stakeholder group which included...

63

Integrated Approach to Documenting Readiness for a Potential Criticality Incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been 60 highly publicized criticality accidents1 over the last 60 years and the nature of the hazard is unique. Recent studies2 discuss the benefits of knowing what to expect during and immediately following these events. Emergency planning and response standards2 provide an effective tool for establishing an adequate level of readiness to a criticality accident. While these planning requirements cover a broad spectrum of activities to establish readiness, a concise and routinely reviewed criticality accident scenario may be the most valuable tool in developing a cohesive understanding and response to these challenging events. Using a guideline3 for criticality safety evaluations the analytical work and emergency planning to mitigate a criticality accident at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was developed. Using a single document the analysis that established the accident characteristics, response scenario based on emergency staffing and planning, and anticipated dose consequences were integrated. This single document approach provides a useful platform to integrate the initial planning and guide the review of proposed changes to emergency response plans.

Carlisle, Bruce S.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Jones, Robert A.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

64

Construction Readiness RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized91Power Plant |Readiness RM

65

EV Community Readiness projects: American Lung Association of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ti027kelly2013o.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Community Readiness projects: Center for...

66

Colorado Community Readiness Efforts for PEVs Support State Policy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

electric vehicle readiness projects from throughout the country. | Photo by Ken Kelly, National Renewable Energy Laboratory EV Everywhere: 10 Ways Communities Can Pave the...

67

EV Community Readiness projects: Clean Energy Coalition (MI)...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Energy Coalition (MI); Clean Fuels Ohio EV Community Readiness projects: Clean Energy Coalition (MI); Clean Fuels Ohio 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

68

Independent Oversight Review of the NNSA Production Office Readiness...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RR Readiness Review SAA Startup Approval Authority SIAP Site Integrated Assessment Plan SME Subject Matter Expert SNR Startup Notification Report SSTA Senior Scientific Technical...

69

Jasper Johns in der Nachfolge des Ready-mades.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Die Arbeit untersucht, wie die Einführung des Ready-mades in die Kunstwelt die Arbeitsweise von Künstlern sowie die Produktion und Wahrnehmung von Kunstwerken beeinflusst hat. Dies… (more)

Mayer, Lynette Mildred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSouthAfrica-FacilitatingImplementationandReadinessforMitigation(FIRM)&oldid70000...

71

Focus Series: Program Finds Community "Readiness" Is the Key...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Community Readiness Assessments Better Buildings Network View | June 2014 It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University to Reach Employees...

72

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Homes, Russellville...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Southern Homes, Russellville, AL DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Homes, Russellville, AL Case study of the first manufactured home built to the DOE Zero Energy...

73

Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Imery Group...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Imery Group, Proud Green Home, Serenbe GA Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Imery Group, Proud Green Home, Serenbe GA Case study describing the first...

74

EV Community Readiness projects: Clean Energy Coalition (MI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

link the Michigan PEV Community Readiness Plan to relevant websites and other appropriate media outlets; incorporate the Plan into the PEV Taskforce website. Clean Cities Recovery...

75

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Better Business for Builders Webinar...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Business for Builders Webinar Transcript DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Better Business for Builders Webinar Transcript Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero...

76

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Building Energy Optimization...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software This webinar was presented on May 15, 2014 and gives...

77

EV Community Readiness projects: South Florida Regional Planning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Clean Cities EV Community Readiness Florida Gold Coast Sustainable Community Planning for Electric Vehicle and Charging Infrastructure PI: Christine Heshmati, South Florida...

78

Accelerating the Electrification of U.S. Drive Trains: Ready...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Accelerating the Electrification of U.S. Drive Trains: Ready and Affordable Technology Solutions for Domestically Manufactured Advanced...

79

Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed.

C.A. Riland; D.R. Bowman; R.J. Tighe

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Solar Ready Vets | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment of EnergyServices ServicesRenewable Energy »Ready

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NanoReady Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun JumpMuscoy,Jump9 Case Data Survey TypeTuneNanoReady

82

Influence of Agricultural Dual Credit on Student College Readiness Self-Efficacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLUENCE OF AGRICULTURAL DUAL CREDIT ON STUDENT COLLEGE READINESS SELF-EFFICACY A Record of Study by ALANNA LEE NEELY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... should consider earning postsecondary degrees and credentials. The Completion Agenda states: This increased focus on college completion (not simply college access) is reflected in, for example, President Obama?s goal for the United States...

Neely, Alanna L.

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 13 Shelter T aking shelter is often a critical in your home for sev- eral days without electricity or water services following a winter storm. We also an emergency toilet, if necessary. · Use a garbage container, pail or #12;14 ARE YOU READY? FEDERAL EMERGENCY

Tullos, Desiree

84

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 83  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 83 National Security Emergencies I n addition uncomfortable or if something does not seem right. #12;84 ARE YOU READY? FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 4- rupted--electricity, telephone, natural gas, gasoline pumps, cash registers, ATM machines, and internet

Tullos, Desiree

85

4 ARE YOU READY? FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 ARE YOU READY? FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Emergency Planning and Disaster Supplies if you have questions. #12;FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 5 9. Take a first aid and when to shut off water, gas, and electricity at the main switches. Consult with your local utili- ties

Tullos, Desiree

86

Capture-ready power plants : options, technologies and economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A plant can be considered to be capture-ready if, at some point in the future it can be retrofitted for carbon capture and sequestration and still be economical to operate. The concept of capture-ready is not a specific ...

Bohm, Mark (Mark C.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ats technology readiness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ats technology readiness First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Technology Readiness Level...

88

SCS-2005-18 Roundup Ready Flex Cotton System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCS-2005-18 6-05 Roundup Ready Flex Cotton System Robert Lemon, Ph.D., Professor and Extension Agronomist - Cotton Randy Boman, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Extension Agronomist - Cotton Todd Baughman Specialist Peter Dotray, Ph.D., Professor and Extension Weed Specialist R oundup Ready Flex cotton provides

Mukhtar, Saqib

89

Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2. Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2. Abstract: Using a variety of organic...

90

Distributed thermal energy storage in the residential sector: commercialization-readiness assessment and implementation strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The readiness of each of three candidate TES systems for near-term commercialization was examined. It was concluded that of these, TES for residential space and hot-water heating are technically and economically ready for commercialization. TES systems are unlikely to be more attractive than standard-heat-pump systems in all areas of the country; however, in many regions, particularly in the northeast and north central states, TES appears to be more attractive. In the not-too-distant future, use of TES with heat pumps may prove to be the best system nationwide. For the third system, TES for residential space cooling, it was found that those units that are presently technically viable would be too costly except in a few parts of the country; more development will be required before these systems could be commercialized on a national scale. TES systems that might be used in commercial buildings (e.g., stores and office buildings) were not examined. Environmental, market and economic, and institutional-readiness studies are presented. Market penetration and benefit analysis are summarized. Barriers to commercialization are identified along with strategies for overcoming the barriers. Schedules and resource requirements are discussed. Summaries of the study techniques and additional information are given in the appendices. (MCW)

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fast Beam Studies of Free Radical Photodissociation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radicals. 37 They employ a flash pyrolysis source, having abond on undergoing flash pyrolysis. Our approach to the

Cyr, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Using ISMS Principles and Functions in Developing an ARRA Readiness Review Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Linda K. Rogers, Assessments & Readiness Programs Manager, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Track 8-8

93

EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC) EV Community...

94

DOE Challenge Home (Now Zero Energy Ready Home) - Building America...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

a much more rigorous set of guidelines that establish a national definition for Zero Net-Energy Ready performance. Read about this Top Innovation. See an example of a DOE...

95

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Ducts in Conditioned Space  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Challenge Home is a blueprint for zero energy ready homes.  When we make that statement – it’s impossible to justify huge thermal losses from ducts in unconditioned spaces.  That’s why one of...

96

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

237–253. Burke, A. , 2007. Batteries and ultracapacitors forresults with lithium-ion batteries. In: Proceedings (CD)locate/tranpol Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Marketing and Sales Solutions for Zero Energy Ready Homes Webinar...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of resources that we'll cover. The first are marketing resources that deal with the brand of Zero Energy Ready Home and how it was configured from the very beginning to...

98

affecting school readiness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE-Golden DOE 2006 Superconductivity Peer Review July 25-27, 2006 12;2 SPI Readiness Review Program Budget: 210 Kyear from DOE 100 K - LANL (3 cable projects) 110 K - ORNL...

99

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution I...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I -- What's At Stake Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution I -- What's At Stake Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the...

100

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution II...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-- How to Get it Right Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution II -- How to Get it Right Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Green Extreme Homes &...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Green Extreme Homes & Carl Franklin Homes, Garland, TX DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Green Extreme Homes & Carl Franklin Homes, Garland, TX Case study of a DOE Zero Energy...

102

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Durable Energy Builders, Houston...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

super-insulated roof, 11,500 gallon rainwater cistern to supply most of the home's drinking water, hurricane-proof roof, and triple-pane windows. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home:...

103

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

executive director for the Habitat affiliate. "We started doing ENERGY STAR about 5 years ago, and DOE Builders Challenge 3 years ago, and then DOE Zero Energy Ready Home...

104

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero Energy-Ready...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Many Building America teams (ARBI, BA-PIRC, BSC, CARB, IBACOS, NorthernSTAR, PHI, etc.) have worked with home builders to design and test zero-energy-ready homes....

105

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

We have these homes so well-air-sealed, we need to look at things like good source control products. Obviously, these homes are so efficient, they're zero energy ready, we have...

106

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Energy Homes...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

built to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home standard. This manufactured home achieved a HERS score of 57 without PV. The home has been set up for side-by-side testing with an...

107

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ithaca, NY Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Ithaca, NY, that scored HERS 50 without PV. These 1,160 ft2 affordable town houses have R-20 advance framed walls,...

108

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Garbett Homes, Herriman...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Production Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Herriman, UT, that scored HERS 40 without PV, -1 with PV. This 4,111 ft2 production home has R-23 advanced framed...

109

Software Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Budget and schedule overruns in product development due to the use of immature technologies constitute an important matter for program managers. Moreover, unexpected lack of technology maturity is also a problem for buyers. Both sides of the situation would benefit from an unbiased measure of technology maturity. This paper presents the use of a software maturity metric called Technology Readiness Level (TRL), in the milieu of the smart grid. For most of the time they have been in existence, power utilities have been protected monopolies, guaranteed a return on investment on anything they could justify adding to the rate base. Such a situation did not encourage innovation, and instead led to widespread risk-avoidance behavior in many utilities. The situation changed at the end of the last century, with a series of regulatory measures, beginning with the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act of 1978. However, some bad experiences have actually served to strengthen the resistance to innovation by some utilities. Some aspects of the smart grid, such as the addition of computer-based control to the power system, face an uphill battle. It is our position that the addition of TRLs to the decision-making process for smart grid power-system projects, will lead to an environment of more confident adoption.

Tugurlan, Maria C.; Kirkham, Harold; Chassin, David P.

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

LWRS ATR Irradiation Testing Readiness Status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors. The LWRS Program is divided into four R&D Pathways: (1) Materials Aging and Degradation; (2) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels; (3) Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems; and (4) Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization. This report describes an irradiation testing readiness analysis in preparation of LWRS experiments for irradiation testing at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) under Pathway (2). The focus of the Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuels Pathway is to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental performance of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding in nuclear power plants during both nominal and off-nominal conditions. This information will be applied in the design and development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels with improved safety, cladding integrity, and improved nuclear fuel cycle economics

Kristine Barrett

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

Chen, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

Springston, Stephen R. (Upton, NY); Lloyd, Judith (Westbury, NY); Zheng, Jun (Stony Brook, NY)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

Flavonoid Oxidation by the Radical Generator AIBN: A Unified Mechanism for Quercetin Radical Scavenging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the corresponding aroxyl radical species allow identification of the position of primary radical attack (i in the formation of the dimeric product (3) is provided. The identification of these products supports the model insight into the mechanism of quercetin radical scavenging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Chemicals. Quercetin

Paré, Paul W.

115

Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Implementation plan for WRAP Module 1 operational readiness review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP 1) will be used to receive, sample, treat, and ship contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), and low-level mixed waste (LLMW) to storage and disposal sites both on the Hanford site and off-site. The primary mission of WRAP 1 is to characterize and certify CH waste in 55-gallon and 85-gallon drums; and its secondary function is to certify CH waste standard waste boxes (SWB) and boxes of similar size for disposal. The WRAP 1 will provide the capability for examination (including x-ray, visual, and contents sampling), limited treatment, repackaging, and certification of CH suspect-TRU waste in 55-gallon drums retrieved from storage, as well as newly generated CH LLW and CH TRU waste drums. The WRAP 1 will also provide examination (X-ray and visual only) and certification of CH LLW and CH TRU waste in small boxes. The decision to perform an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was made in accordance with WHC-CM-5-34, Solid Waste Disposal Operations Administration, Section 1.4, Operational Readiness Activities. The ORR will ensure plant and equipment readiness, management and personnel readiness, and management programs readiness for the initial startup of the facility. This implementation plan is provided for defining the conduct of the WHC ORR.

Irons, L.G.

1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

117

EMERGENCY READINESS ASSURANCE PLAN (ERAP) FOR FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan (ERAP) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 in accordance with DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.” The ERAP documents the readiness of the INL Emergency Management Program using emergency response planning and preparedness activities as the basis. It describes emergency response planning and preparedness activities, and where applicable, summarizes and/or provides supporting information in tabular form for easy access to data. The ERAP also provides budget, personnel, and planning forecasts for FY-15. Specifically, the ERAP assures the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office that stated emergency capabilities at INL are sufficient to implement PLN-114, “INL Emergency Plan/RCRA Contingency Plan.

Shane Bush

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions 2005...

119

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Near Zero Maine Home II, Vassalboro...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Home: Near Zero Maine Home II, Vassalboro, Maine DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Near Zero Maine Home II, Vassalboro, Maine Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Vassalboro,...

120

Computer vs. Video Game System: Ready to Rumble in the #EnergyFaceoff...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Computer vs. Video Game System: Ready to Rumble in the EnergyFaceoff Jungle Computer vs. Video Game System: Ready to Rumble in the EnergyFaceoff Jungle November 4, 2014 - 10:20am...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Manatee County Habitat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Ready Home has a 2.5-kW PV system obtained with assistance from Florida Power and Light. All of the homes in the development are solar-energy ready with conduit in place...

122

What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from Commercial Nuclear Power Plants What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from Commercial Nuclear Power...

123

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS...

124

CCSI Technology Readiness Levels Likelihood Model (TRL-LM) User’s Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the manual for the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) Technology Readiness Level Likelihood model based on PNNL velo.

Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project- Old Greenwich, Connecticut  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study describes the builder Murphy Brothers' first DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT.

126

Text-Alternative Version: ENERGY STAR® for SSL: Getting Ready for September 30  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the ENERGY STAR® for SSL: Getting Ready for September 30 webcast.

127

Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River By Steve Ress The itinerary is set and the seats have been filled for an early June bus tour to New Mexico's lower Pecos River basin compacts on Nebraska's Republican River and New Mexico's Pecos River to see what can be learned from

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

128

U.S. Department of Energy Technology Readiness Assessment Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments and developing Technology Maturation Plans for the DOE capital acquisition asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-4A. Does not cancel other directives.

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

Energy Flow: A Multimodal `Ready' Indication For Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Flow: A Multimodal `Ready' Indication For Electric Vehicles Abstract The lack of sound and vibration while starting the drive system of an electric vehicle (EV) is one of the major differences the energy level to the driver. With Energy Flow (see Figure 1), we test if there will be a benefit in terms

130

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

panel (SIPs) walls, a 10.25-inch SIPS roof, an R-20 insulated slab, a 2-ton ground source heat pump, radiant floor heat, 7.1 kWh PV, and triple-pane windows. DOE Zero Energy Ready...

131

Operational readiness review phase-1 final report for WRAP-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the Operational Readiness Review for WRAP-1 Phase-1 operations. The report includes all criteria, lines of inquiry with resulting Findings and Observations. The review included assessing operational capability of the organization and the computer controlled process and facility systems.

Bowen, W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ready to eat breakfast cereals from food-grade sorghums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two food-grade sorghum hybrids, ATx63 I *Tx436 (non waxy), and B.BON 34, (waxy), were micronized and evaluated for their potential use in ready to eat breakfast cereals (RTE-BC). Whole and decorticated grains were exposed to infra-red burners...

Cruz y Celis Ehlinger, Laura Penelope

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Shunting passenger trains: getting ready for Marjan van den Akker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shunting passenger trains: getting ready for departure Marjan van den Akker Hilbrandt Baarsma Utrecht University P.O. Box 80.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands #12;Shunting passenger trains: getting of shunting train units on a railway station. Train units arrive at and depart from the station according

Utrecht, Universiteit

134

Capture-Ready Power Plants -Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Capture-Ready Power Plants - Options, Technologies and Economics by Mark C. Bohm Bachelor and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Capture-ready Power Plants ­ Options, Technologies and Costs by Mark C. Bohm of a plant. Power plant owners and policymakers are interested in capture-ready plants because they may offer

135

Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

Neumark, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Methyl viologen radical reactions with several oxidizing agents. [Gamma Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rates of oxidation of the methyl viologen radical by peroxodisulfate and hydrogen peroxide has been investigated. The methyl viologen free radical was produced by pulse radiolysis. The reaction of the peroxodisulfate radical with the methyl viologen radical was first order in both species, and the reaction rate constant is reported. A el-radiation study revealed a chain decomposition of the peroxodisulfate radical involving the methyl viologen radical when methanol, ethanol, or 2-propanol was present. Loss of the methyl viologen radical was then no longer observed to be a simple first-order reaction. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with the methyl viologen radical was very slow in the presence of 1 M methanol. A much faster reaction in the absence of methanol was interpreted to be a reaction of the methyl viologen radical with the peroxy radicals. Hydrogen peroxide, in contrast to the chain decomposition of peroxodisulfate radicals, does not participate in a chain reaction involving the methyl viologen radical and methanol. Rate constants for the reaction of methyl viologen radical with dichromate radical, iodate radical, and ferricyanide radical are reported.

Levey, G.; Ebbesen, T.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks.

Cercy, M; Steven P Schneider, S; Kurt D Gerdes, K

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks.

Cercy, M; Steven P Schneider, S; Kurt D Gerdes, K

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Partner Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramofContract atInc.,House, Devens, MAZero Energy Ready

140

Taking the Challenge at Singer Village--A Cold Climate Zero Energy Ready Home  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After progressively incorporating ENERGY STAR(R) for Homes Versions 1, 2, and 3 into its standard practices over the years, this builder, Brookside Development, was seeking to build an even more sustainable product that would further increase energy efficiency, while also addressing indoor air quality, water conservation, renewable-ready, and resiliency. These objectives align with the framework of the DOE Challenge Home program, which 'builds upon the comprehensive building science requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3, along with proven Building America innovations and best practices. Other special attribute programs are incorporated to help builders reach unparalleled levels of performance with homes designed to last hundreds of years.' CARB partnered with Brookside Development on the design optimization and construction of the first home in a small development of seven planned new homes being built on the old Singer Estate in Derby, CT.

Puttagunta, S.; Gaakye, O.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Resonance ionization detection of combustion radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental research on the combustion of halogenated organic compounds with emphasis on reaction pathways leading to the formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the development of continuous emission monitoring methods will assist in DOE efforts in the management and disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. Selective laser ionization techniques are used in this laboratory for the measurement of concentration profiles of radical intermediates in the combustion of chlorinated hydrocarbon flames. A new ultrasensitive detection technique, made possible with the advent of tunable VUV laser sources, enables the selective near-threshold photoionization of all radical intermediates in premixed hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon flames.

Cool, T.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Radically Configurable Six-State Compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimentally accessible redox states (0, 2+, 4+, 6+, 7+, and 8+) from within the total of nine states evaluated by quantum mechanical methods. All six of the observable redox states have been identified by electrochemical cationic state is low and the lifetimes of these radical viologen derivatives is short as a result

Goddard III, William A.

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyl radicals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Chemistry 2 Radicals and Hydroxy Radical Reactions in Troposphere Summary: : Nitrogen dioxide, 17 valence electrons 7. NO 3 : Nitrate radical 8. R CH 2 1;: alkyl...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - atom transfer radical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: atom transfer radical Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Considering Open Shell Intermediates sfn Radicals and radical ions, the commonest open shell...

145

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Ferguson Design and Constructio...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Home Case Study, Ferguson Design and Construction, Inc., Sagaponak, NY, Custom Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Ferguson Design and Construction, Inc., Sagaponak, NY,...

146

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, FL, Affordable DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, FL...

147

Search for associated Higgs boson production using like charge dilepton events in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a search for associated Higgs boson production in the process pp{yields}W/ZH{yields}l{sup {+-}l'{+-}+}X in ee, e{mu}, and {mu}{mu} final states. The search is based on data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. We require two isolated leptons (electrons or muons) with the same electric charge and additional kinematic requirements. No significant excess above background is observed, and we set 95% C.L. observed (expected) upper limits on ratio of the production cross section to the standard model prediction of 6.4 (7.3) for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV and 13.5 (19.8) for a mass of 115 GeV.

Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Jayasinghe, A.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Svoisky, P. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M.; Bazterra, V. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

ON THE DEFINABILITY OF RADICALS IN SUPERSIMPLE CDRIC MILLIET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), 20F16, 20F18 (secondary). Key words and phrases. Supersimple group, Fitting subgorup, soluble radical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

Structure of the Nucleotide Radical Formed during Reaction of CDP/TTP with the E441Q-?2?2 of E. coli Ribonucleotide Reductase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside diphosphates to deoxynucleotides and requires a diferric-tyrosyl radical cofactor for catalysis. RNR is composed of a 1:1 complex ...

Zipse, Hendrik

150

NCTCOG Solar Ready II Project: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency November 20, 2014 NCTCOG Solar Ready II Project Lori Clark Principal Air Quality Planner ESL-KT-14-11-12 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 U.S. Department of Energy Sun...Shot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge 2 ESL-KT-14-11-12 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national...

Clark,L.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Are You Ready for Fall? | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEFApril 2015 Project Dashboard AprilKeepingReady for

152

LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoffLDV HVAC ModelLEDLightsLEDLEDs Ready

153

Property:Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead Jump to:Technology Readiness Level Property Type

154

Rough and Ready Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRoosevelt Gardens is°and Ready Biomass Facility Jump to:

155

Zero Energy Ready Home Events | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment ofEnergy DECEMBER 2014 ZERO ENERGY READY HOME UPDATE-March 2015

156

Zero Energy Ready Home Events | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment ofEnergy DECEMBER 2014 ZERO ENERGY READY HOME UPDATE-March

157

Final Report on HOLODEC 2 Technology Readiness Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period of this project, the Holographic Detector for Clouds 2 (HOLODEC 2) instrument has advanced from a laboratory-proven instrument with some initial field testing to a fully flight-tested instrument capable of providing useful cloud microphysics measurements. This can be summarized as 'Technology Readiness Level 8: Technology is proven to work - Actual technology completed and qualified through test and demonstration.' As part of this project, improvements and upgrades have been made to the optical system, the instrument power control system, the data acquisition computer, the instrument control software, the data reconstruction and analysis software, and some of the basic algorithms for estimating basic microphysical variables like droplet diameter. Near the end of the project, the instrument flew on several research flights as part of the IDEAS 2011 project, and a small sample of data from the project is included as an example. There is one caveat in the technology readiness level stated above: the upgrades to the instrument power system were made after the flight testing, so they are not fully field proven. We anticipate that there will be an opportunity to fly the instrument as part of the IDEAS project in fall 2012.

Shaw, RA; Spuler, SM; Beals, M; Black, N; Fugal, JP; Lu, L

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

158

Anion photoelectron spectroscopy of radicals and clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anion photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study free radicals and clusters. The low-lying {sup 2}{Sigma} and {sup 2}{Pi} states of C{sub 2n}H (n = 1--4) have been studied. The anion photoelectron spectra yielded electron affinities, term values, and vibrational frequencies for these combustion and astrophysically relevant species. Photoelectron angular distributions allowed the author to correctly assign the electronic symmetry of the ground and first excited states and to assess the degree of vibronic coupling in C{sub 2}H and C{sub 4}H. Other radicals studied include NCN and I{sub 3}. The author was able to observe the low-lying singlet and triplet states of NCN for the first time. Measurement of the electron affinity of I{sub 3} revealed that it has a bound ground state and attachment of an argon atom to this moiety enabled him to resolve the symmetric stretching progression.

Travis, Taylor R.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Accelerator Driven System Target Requirements and R&D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-nosed assessment, addressing the technical requirements for ADS the current status and readiness of accelerator #12;Accelerator Driven Systems High-power, highly reliable proton accelerator · ~1 GeV beam energy · ~1 MW of beam power for demonstration · Tens of MW beam power for Industrial-Scale System Spallation

McDonald, Kirk

160

NREL research helps answer a fundamental question regarding electric vehicles: Is the grid ready to handle them?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NREL research helps answer a fundamental question regarding electric vehicles: Is the grid ready, including 10% post consumer waste. Tool Helps Utilities Assess Readiness for Electric Vehicle Charging) has developed a framework for utilities to evaluate the plug-in vehicle (PEV) readiness

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Measurement of Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Azimuthal decorrelations between the two central jets with the largest transverse momenta are sensitive to the dynamics of events with multiple jets. We present a measurement of the normalized differential cross section based on the full data set ({integral}Ldt=36 pb{sup -1}) acquired by the ATLAS detector during the 2010 {radical}(s)=7 TeV proton-proton run of the LHC. The measured distributions include jets with transverse momenta up to 1.3 TeV, probing perturbative QCD in a high-energy regime.

Aad, G.; Ahles, F.; Beckingham, M.; Bernhard, R.; Bitenc, U.; Bruneliere, R.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Christov, A.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dietrich, J.; Eckert, S.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Flechl, M.; Glatzer, J. [Fakultaet fuer Mathematik und Physik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg i.Br. (Germany); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma (United States); Abdallah, J.; Bosman, M.; Casado, M. P.; Cavalli-Sforza, M. [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and ICREA, Barcelona (Spain)

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

Composite Organic Radical - Inorganic Hybrid Cathode for Lithium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new organic radical inorganic hybrid cathode comprised of PTMA/LiFePO4 composite system is developed and reported for the first time. The hybrid cathodes demonstrate high pulse power capability resulting in a significant improvement over the pure PTMA or LiFePO4 cathode which is very promising for transportation and other high pulse power applications that require long cycle life and lower cost.

Huang, Qian; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip K.; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Radical Catholic resistance to the Mexican Revolution: the Cristero Rebellion and the Sinarquista Movement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADICAL CATHOLIC RESISTANCE TO THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION: THE CRISTERO REBELLION AND THE SINARQUISTA MOVEMENT A Thesis by MARTIN TOMAS VELAZQUEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by MARTIN TOMAS VELAZQUEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS Approved by: Chair of Committee, Henry C. Schmidt Committee...

Velazquez, Martin Tomas

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG&G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy and Entropy Effects in Dissociation of Peptide Radical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(SID) of peptide radical anions was studied for the first time using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for SID...

166

Participation of free radicals in the photodecomposition of active dyes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of the free radicals in the medium on the photodecomposition of these active azo and anthraquinone dyes. The semilogarithmic anamorphoses of the kinetic curves showed that the rate of consumption of nitroxyl radical decreased in time in the presence of the dyes. The efficiency of the photodecomposition of the active dyes in an ETC film in the presence and absence of benzyl was studied to evaluate the role of free radicals in the photobleaching of the dies. The kinetic dependences obtained for active yellow 2KT are shown. The relative efficiency of the photoinitiation of free radicals by some active dyes was determined.

Anisimov, V.M.; Anisimova, O.M.; Dzhanashvilli, M.E.; Krichevskii, G.E.

1985-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

167

Radiation-Induced Radicals in Polyurea-Crosslinked Silica Aerogel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Free radicals are atoms or molecules with an odd number of electrons in an outer shell. Since electrons typically occur in pairs, this leaves… (more)

Walters, Benjamin Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Tool Helps Utilities Assess Readiness for Electric Vehicle Charging (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL research helps answer a fundamental question regarding electric vehicles: Is the grid ready to handle them? Environmental, economic and security concerns regarding oil consumption make electrifying the transportation sector a high national priority. NREL's Center for Transportation Technologies & Systems (CTTS) has developed a framework for utilities to evaluate the plug-in vehicle (PEV) readiness of distribution transformers. Combining a wealth of vehicle performance statistics with load data from partner utilities including the Hawaiian Electric Company and Xcel Energy, NREL analyzed the thermal loading characteristics of distribution transformers due to vehicle charging. After running millions of simulations replicating varying climates and conditions, NREL is now able to predict aging rates for transformers when PEVs are added to existing building loads. With the NREL tool, users define simulation parameters by inputting vehicle trip and weather data; transformer load profiles and ratings; PEV penetration, charging rates and battery sizes; utility rates; the number of houses on each transformer; and public charging availability. Transformer load profiles, drive cycles, and ambient temperature data are then run through the thermal model to produce a one-year timeseries of the hotspot temperature. Annual temperature durations are calculated to help determine the annual aging rate. Annual aging rate results are grouped by independent variables. The most useful measure is transformer mileage, a measure of how many electrically-driven miles must be supplied by the transformer. Once the spectrum analysis has been conducted for an area or utility, the outputs can be used to help determine if more detailed evaluation is necessary, or if transformer replacement is required. In the majority of scenarios, transformers have enough excess capacity to charge PEVs. Only in extreme cases does vehicle charging have negative long-term impact on transformers. In those cases, upgrades to larger transformers would be recommended. NREL analysis also showed opportunity for newly-installed smart grids to offset distribution demands by time-shifting the charging loads. Most importantly, the model demonstrated synergies between PEVs and distributed renewables, not only providing clean renewable energy for vehicles, but also reducing demand on the entire distribution infrastructure by supplying loads at the point of consumption.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outcomes. This study built on this literature by investigating how child, parent, and family risk factors predicted school readiness in Head Start children using two statistical models. Specific aims of this study included identifying 1) to what degree...

Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

A FAST WAVELET-BASED VIDEO CODEC AND ITS APPLICATION IN AN IP VERSION 6-READY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,mpalkow,schmidt,mw]@fhtw-berlin.de D. MARPE Fraunhofer-Institut fĂĽr Nachrichtentechnik HHI Image Processing Department Einsteinufer 37 (MCU). It is equipped with an innovative addressing system for locating mobile users and ready for next

Marpe, Detlev

171

DOE ZERH Webinar: Technical Resources for Marketing and Selling Zero Energy Ready Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plan review… energy modeling… field inspections… certification…done!  Right?  If only it were that simple to successfully transition to Zero Energy Ready Homes.  The reality is that there’s a lot...

172

DOE ZERH Webinar: Updates to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Specs...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

updated the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home specs, we've continued to track our partner feedback and other industry issues. This brings us to the release of Revision 05, which...

173

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Going Green and Building Strong: Building...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Going Green and Building Strong: Building a FORTIFIED Home -- Part 2 Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the...

174

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy...

175

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Going Green and Building Strong: Building...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Going Green and Building Strong: Building a FORTIFIED Home -- Part 1 Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the...

176

Development of a culturally appropriate process for assessing distance learning readiness in Latin America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument for assessing distance learning readiness of institutions in Latin America for international projects of food and agriculture with higher education institutions in the U.S. The data collection...

Villalobos Peńalosa, Patricia

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home High-Performance Home Sales Training...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

include advanced technology. And with all that load reduction, let's also put in the solar-ready construction features that are low- or no-cost, so your house can now be...

178

Predicting School Readiness for Low-Income Children With Disability Risks Identified Early.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examined school readiness at kindergarten entry for low-income children whose disability indicators were identified before age 3. Data were collected as part ofthe Early Head Start Research and Evaluation ...

Jeon, Hyun-Joo; Peterson, Carla A.; Wall, Shavaun; Carta, Judith J.; Gayle, Luze; Eshbaugh, Elaine M.; Swanson, Mark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ready certified homes than any builder in the nation. One example home achieved a HERS score of HERS 55 without PV or HERS 15 with PV. The one-story, 2,654-ft2 production...

180

The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 testing for functionality, model validation, and technology readiness.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the functional, model validation, and technology readiness testing of the Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor in FY08. Functional testing of a large number of revision 4 parts showed robust and consistent performance. Model validation testing helped tune the models to match data well and identified several areas for future investigation related to high frequency sensitivity and thermal effects. Finally, technology readiness testing demonstrated the integrated elements of the sensor under realistic environments.

Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Blecke, Jill; Baker, Michael Sean; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Brake, Matthew Robert; Epp, David S.; Wittwer, Jonathan W.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effects of Parent Expectations and Involvement on the School Readiness of Children in Head Start  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF PARENT EXPECTATIONS AND INVOLVEMENT ON THE SCHOOL READINESS OF CHILDREN IN HEAD START A Dissertation by KRYSTAL TISHA? COOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of children enrolled in Head Start. The study examined how these iv parent variables were related to children?s school readiness, and differences between ethnic groups, gender groups, and level of risk. The study tested a model whereby the effect...

Cook, Krystal Tisha'

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Determination of the Kinetic Parameters of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of the Kinetic Parameters of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerizations Young-Je Kwark a novel catalyst system for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a parameter estimation method parameters of polymerization. From our model system considering small molecular atom transfer addition

183

International Symposium on Free Radicals - August 12 - 17, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant provided partial support for the 29th International Symposium on Free Radicals, held August 12-17, 2007 at the Big Sky Resort in Big Sky, Montana. This meeting dates back to 1956, and is thepremier international meeting focusing on the structure and dynamics of reactive free radicals. Free radicals and other reactive species remain topics of great interest today owing to the central role they play as reactive intermediates. Of particular relevance to the DOE mission in Basic Energy Sciences is the fact that nearly all combustion reactions are initiated by radicals, and a number of radical intermediates are important to almost any combusting system. The field has expanded to increasingly focus on the dynamics of radical reactions in addition to spectroscopy and kinetics. As we seek to understand complex environments in combustion, atmospheric chemistry, condensed phase phenomena and the interstellar medium in great detail, studies of free radicals remain essential. The meeting in Montana lived up to the long tradition of this meeting by bringing together leading researchers, including a large group of postdoctoral scholars and graduate students, from around the globe to advance this important area of science. The DOE grant helped to support participant costs (lodging and meals) for 24 invited speakers and 21 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

Continetti, Robert E

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic oxygen radical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic oxygen radical Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Considering Open Shell Intermediates sfn Radicals...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-superoxide anion radicals Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radicals Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 University of Missouri-Columbia Department of Chemistry Summary: the electronic mechanism by which the "super radical stabilizers" does its...

186

Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

Macdonald, R.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and photodissociation of polyatomic molecules and radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the photodissociation (PD) dynamics of triatomic molecules. However, the PD study of radicals, especially polyatomic radicals, has remained essentially an unexplored research area. Detailed state-to-state PD cross sections for radicals in the UV and VUV provide challenges not only for dynamical calculations, but also for ab initio quantum chemical studies. The authors have developed a laser based pump-probe apparatus for the measurement of absolute PD cross sections for CH{sub 3}S and HS is summarized.

Ng, C.Y. [Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENV.1 Adequate and correct environmental permit requirements and hazardous waste procedures and limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and conducting drum...

189

DOE Announces Webinars on Zero Energy Ready Homes, Wide Bandgap...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars October 16: Live Webinar on Quality...

190

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 138, 054301 (2013) Photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical at 248 nm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the photodissociation of the methyl perthiyl radical CH3SS at 248 nm. The radical was produced by flash pyrolysis

Neumark, Daniel M.

191

Readiness Assessments for the Shipment of TRU from West Jefferson, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1943 through 1986, Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) performed research and development work at its own facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies. The most highly contaminated facilities, comprising BMI's Nuclear Sciences Area, are located on 11 acres in West Jefferson, Ohio. Three buildings in this area were used to study nuclear reactor fuels, fuel element components, reactor designs, and radiochemistry analyses: one building contained nuclear hot cells, a second building contained a critical assembly and radiochemistry laboratory, and a third building once housed a nuclear research reactor. The Columbus Environmental Management Project (CEMP), one of the DOE Ohio Field Office's radioactive cleanup sites, oversees the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of BMI's Nuclear Sciences Area. The BCLDP mission is to decontaminate the Nuclear Sciences Area to a condition that is suitable for use without restrictions and to dispose of or store the associated radioactive waste at a suitable DOE-approved facility. During decontamination work, the CEMP is expected to generate approximately 120, 55-gallon drums of transuranic (TRU) waste, or about 20 truckloads. This TRU waste will be transported to DOE's Hanford nuclear facility in Washington State for temporary storage, prior to its ultimate disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This paper presents a detailed approach for conducting readiness assessments for TRU waste shipments from any DOE site. It is based on demonstrating satisfaction of the 18 core requirements contained in DOE Order 425.1B, Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities, that are derived from the seven guiding principles of DOE's integrated safety management system.

Duffy, M. A.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

On the integration of technology readiness levels at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrating technology readiness levels (TRL) into the management of engineering projects is critical to the mitigation of risk and improved customer/supplier communications. TRLs provide a common framework and language with which consistent comparisons of different technologies and approaches can be made. At Sandia National Laboratories, where technologies are developed, integrated and deployed into high consequence systems, the use of TRLs may be transformational. They are technology independent and span the full range of technology development including scientific and applied research, identification of customer requirements, modeling and simulation, identification of environments, testing and integration. With this report, we provide a reference set of definitions for TRLs and a brief history of TRLs at Sandia National Laboratories. We then propose and describe two approaches that may be used to integrate TRLs into the NW SMU business practices. In the first approach, we analyze how TRLs can be integrated within concurrent qualification as documented in TBP-100 [1]. In the second approach we take a look at the product realization process (PRP) as documented in TBP-PRP [2]. Both concurrent qualification and product realization are fundamental to the way weapons engineering work is conducted at this laboratory and the NWC (nuclear weapons complex) as a whole. Given the current structure and definitions laid out in the TBP-100 and TBP-PRP, we believe that integrating TRLs into concurrent qualification (TBP-100) rather than TBP-PRP is optimal. Finally, we note that our charter was to explore and develop ways of integrating TRLs into the NW SMU and therefore we do not significantly cover the development and history of TRLs. This work was executed under the auspices and direction of Sandia's Weapon Engineering Program. Please contact Gerry Sleefe, Deputy Program Director, for further information.

Bailey, Beatriz R.; Mitchell, John Anthony

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

Liu, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Open-air preaching as radical street performance   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I examine the ways in which analysing open-air preaching as ‘radical street performance’ can inform our understanding of this expression of Christian preaching. Open-air preaching is commonly associated ...

Blythe, Stuart McLeod

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Kinetic studies of isoprene reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetic studies of the isoprene oxidation reactions initiated by the hydroxyl radical OH and the chlorine atom Cl have been investigated using a fast-flow reactor in conjunction with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and using laser...

Suh, Inseon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

GaN-Ready Aluminum Nitride Substrates for Cost-Effective, Very Low Dislocation Density III-Nitride LED's  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and then demonstrate the efficacy of a costeffective approach for a low defect density substrate on which AlInGaN LEDs can be fabricated. The efficacy of this “GaN-ready” substrate would then be tested by growing high efficiency, long lifetime InxGa1-xN blue LEDs. The approach used to meet the project objectives was to start with low dislocation density AlN single-crystal substrates and grow graded AlxGa1-xN layers on top. Pseudomorphic AlxGa1-xN epitaxial layers grown on bulk AlN substrates were used to fabricate light emitting diodes and demonstrate better device performance as a result of the low defect density in these layers when benched marked against state-of-the-art LEDs fabricated on sapphire substrates. The pseudomorphic LEDs showed excellent output powers compared to similar wavelength devices grown on sapphire substrates, with lifetimes exceeding 10,000 hours (which was the longest time that could reliably be estimated). In addition, high internal quantum efficiencies were demonstrated at high driving current densities even though the external quantum efficiencies were low due to poor photon extraction. Unfortunately, these pseudomorphic LEDs require high Al content so they emit in the ultraviolet. Sapphire based LEDs typically have threading dislocation densities (TDD) > 108 cm-2 while the pseudomorphic LEDs have TDD ? 105 cm-2. The resulting TDD, when grading the AlxGa1-xN layer all the way to pure GaN to produce a “GaN-ready” substrate, has varied between the mid 108 down to the 106 cm-2. These inconsistencies are not well understood. Finally, an approach to improve the LED structures on AlN substrates for light extraction efficiency was developed by thinning and roughening the substrate.

Sandra Schujman; Leo Schowalter

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

Tully, F.P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of all safety, process, and utility systems and support equipment will support the safe conduct of operations. MN. 1.4 Hoisting and rigging equipment, required for the activity...

199

Organizational readiness for innovation in health care: some lessons from the recent literature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- vation) is unlikely. Furthermore, innovation must compete with other goals of health-care reformPA P E R S Organizational readiness for innovation in health care: some lessons from the recent innovation in health care, as the interaction between the innovation and the context of its introduction

Birmingham, University of

200

Philadelphia Gas Works Looking for a challenge and ready to power up your career?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Philadelphia Gas Works Looking for a challenge and ready to power up your career? The Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) is the largest municipally-owned gas utility in the nation, supplying gas service into the large, modern facility that exists today. As one of the nation's leading natural gas providers, PGW

Plotkin, Joshua B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Physics and Astronomy Department San Francisco State University Physics Readiness Exam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics and Astronomy Department San Francisco State University Physics Readiness Exam Math Qualification Test for Introductory Physics ­ Physics 111 or Physics 220 In addition to meeting course prerequisites, students wishing to enroll in Physics 111 or Physics 220 must demonstrate adequate competence

Golterman, Maarten

202

Inclusive Computer Science Education Using a Ready-made Computer Game Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inclusive Computer Science Education Using a Ready-made Computer Game Framework Joseph Distasio and Thomas P. Way Applied Computing Technology Laboratory Department of Computing Sciences Villanova the prevailing interest in computer games among college students, both for entertainment and as a possible career

Way, Thomas

203

A System Architecture for Sharing De-Identified, Research-Ready Brain Scans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A System Architecture for Sharing De-Identified, Research-Ready Brain Scans and Health Information Department of Radiology Abstract. Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover

Chervenak, Ann

204

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-hazardous solid chemicals may go in the trash. Have you disposed of "waste-like", legacy and unknown c Manage anyFocus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

Wilcock, William

205

Capture-ready coal plants--Options, technologies and Mark C. Bohm a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Interest in the construction of coal-fired power generation has increased significantly in recentCapture-ready coal plants--Options, technologies and economics Mark C. Bohm a , Howard J. Herzog a facilities, and the current challenges of availability and pricing of alternative generation technologies

206

READY FOR TODAY. PREPARING FOR TOMORROW. The Joint Operating Environment is intended to inform joint concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

READY FOR TODAY. PREPARING FOR TOMORROW. #12;The Joint Operating Environment is intended to inform. Inquiries about the Joint Operating Environment should be directed to USJFCOM Public Affairs, 1562 Mitscher R O N M E N T ( J O E ) #12;While U.S. Joint Forces Command's Joint Operating Environment (JOE

Sainudiin, Raazesh

207

MOVIE "CHICAGO CITY COUNCIL: READY FOR REFORM?" (27 minutes/color)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, transportation, and health care. 8. Investigate how many of the reform proposals were in place twenty years afterMOVIE ­ "CHICAGO CITY COUNCIL: READY FOR REFORM?" (27 minutes/color) SYNOPSIS Following the death of Mayor Harold Washington, residents and reformers of Chicago still hoped for continued reform in Chicago

Illinois at Chicago, University of

208

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, e2Homes, Winterpark, FL, Custom Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Winter Park, FL that scored HERS 57 without PV or HERS -7 with PV. This 4,305 ft2 custom home has autoclaved aerated concrete walls, a sealed attic with R-20 spray foam, and ductless mini-split heat pumps.

209

PERSPECTIVES ON SUSTAINABILITY, FOOD ACCESS, HEALTH, ENERGY AND CLIMATE READINESS Creating more  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

living is far more energy- efficient than life in sprawling suburbs or rural dwellings.The concentrationPERSPECTIVES ON SUSTAINABILITY, FOOD ACCESS, HEALTH, ENERGY AND CLIMATE READINESS Creating more of cities always depends on the transformation of surrounding rural areas, from which flow raw materials

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

210

Spin-polarized nitroxide radicals in organic glasses.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonequilibrium spin polarization formed in a stable nitroxide radical, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (Tempo) due to the occurrence of Chemically Induced Dynamic Electron Polarization (CIDEP) in photoexcited molecular complexes of this radical with 1,4-benzoquinone, 1,4-naphthaquinone, 9,10-anthraquinone, and their derivatives is observed. These complexes occur spontaneously in low-temperature organic glasses (20-70 K) upon freezing the concentrated liquid solutions. The emissive net polarization in the nitroxide radical is observed 0.1-10 {mu}s after the photoexcitation of the p-quinone moiety. No degradation of the polarized magnetic resonance signal from Tempo after >104 excitation cycles was observed. This spin polarization is shown to be mainly due to a polarization transfer from the lowest triplet state of the p-quinone. This transfer is driven by the electron spin exchange interaction between the nitroxide radical and the triplet p-quinone; it occurs simultaneously with a spin-selective electronic relaxation of the photoexcited complex. The resulting mechanism combines the features of the electron spin polarization transfer (ESPT) and radical-triplet pair mechanisms (RTPM) in liquid. A theoretical model of such a mechanism is suggested.

Tarasov, V. F.; Shkrob, I. A.; Trifunac, A. D.; Chemistry

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Transnational Islamic activism and radicalization : patterns, trends, and prognosticators.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this report developed the theoretical and conceptual framework for understanding, recognizing, and anticipating the origins, dynamic mechanisms, perceptions, and social structures of Islamic social reform movements in the Muslim homeland and in diaspora communities. This research has revealed valuable insights into the dynamic mechanisms associated with reform movements and, as such, offers the potential to provide indications and warnings of impending violence. This study produced the following significant findings: (1) A framework for understanding Islamic radicalization in the context of Social Movement Theory was developed and implemented. This framework provides a causal structure for the interrelationships among the myriad features of a social movement. (2) The degree to which movement-related activity shows early diffusion across multiple social contexts is a powerful distinguisher of successful and unsuccessful social movements. Indeed, this measurable appears to have significantly more predictive power than volume of such activity and also more power than various system intrinsics. (3) Significant social movements can occur only if both the intra-context 'infectivity' of the movement exceeds a certain threshold and the inter-context interactions associated with the movement occur with a frequency that is larger than another threshold. Note that this is reminiscent of, and significantly extends, well-known results for epidemic thresholds in disease propagation models. (4) More in-depth content analysis of blogs through the lens of Argumentation Theory has the potential to reveal new insights into radicalization in the context of Social Movement Theory. This connection has the potential to be of value from two important perspectives - first, this connection has the potential to provide more in depth insights into the forces underlying the emergence of radical behavior and second, this connection may provide insights into how to use the blogosphere to influence the emergent dialog to effectively impact the resulting actions taken by the potential radicals. The authors of this report recognize that Islamic communities are not the only source of radicalism; indeed many other groups, religious and otherwise, have used and continue to use, radicalism to achieve their ends. Further, the authors also recognize that not all Muslims use, or condone the use of, radical behavior. Indeed, only a very small segment of the Muslim communities throughout the world use and/or support such behavior. Nevertheless, the focus of this research is, indeed, on understanding, recognizing, and anticipating the origins, dynamic mechanisms, perceptions, and social structures of Islamic radicalism.

Colbaugh, Richard; Engi, Dennis; LaViolette, Randall A.; Spomer, Judith E.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Technology Readiness Assessment Guide - DOE Directives, Delegations, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR8,MaterialsTechnologistRequirements 4A,

214

Radical radiotherapy for cervix cancer: The effect of waiting time on outcome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the effect of treatment waiting time on clinical outcome for patients with cervix cancers treated with radical radiotherapy. Methods and materials: A retrospective analysis was conducted on all cervix cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy between 1990 and 2001 at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre. Analyses were performed according to the three following separate definitions of waiting times: interval from start of radiotherapy to (1) date of initial biopsy (2) date of examination under anesthesia, and (3) date of radiation oncology consultation. Associations between waiting times and patient characteristics and disease control were investigated using t-tests, analyses of variance, and Cox regression analyses. Results: A total of 195 patients were studied. The vast majority of patients were treated within 5, 6, and 8 weeks of their consultation (91%), examination under anesthesia (88%), and biopsy (81%), respectively. On average, delays between initial biopsy and treatment start were greater for older patients (p = 0.025) (5.8 weeks for <40 years old vs. 6.6 weeks for >70 years old) and those with smaller tumors (p < 0.001) (5.0 weeks for >4 cm vs. 6.3 weeks for {<=}4 cm). Univariate analysis revealed no adverse effect of treatment delay on tumor control. Multivariate analysis, with the inclusion of multiple prognostic tumor and treatment parameters, revealed an adverse effect of treatment delay on survival outcomes. Conclusions: Longer radiotherapy waiting times were found to be associated with diminished survival outcomes for patients treated radically for cervix cancer. The significance of this observed association requires further investigation.

Choan, E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: ce@ottawahospital.on.ca; Dahrouge, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Samant, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Mirzaei, Ameneh [Elisabeth Bruyere Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Price, Julie [Elisabeth Bruyere Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

A radical route to interstellar propylene formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex organic molecules, such as propylene (CH3CHCH2), are detected in molecular clouds (such as TMC1) with high fractional abundances (~2.10^{-9}, relative to hydrogen) that cannot be explained by gas-phase chemical reactions under normal dark cloud conditions. To obtain such high abundances requires an efficient grain-driven chemistry to be operating, coupled with effective desorption of the complex organics back into the gas-phase. We propose that the mechanism that we have previously described; rapid high density gas-phase chemistry in the gas released following sudden, total, ice mantle sublimation - can explain the high abundances, without recourse to ill-defined surface chemical pathways. Our model provides a natural explanation for why it is that some sources harbour high abundances of propylene, whilst others do not; based on the age and level of dynamical activity within the source (which affects the ice composition) and the chemical composition of the ambient gas.

Rawlings, J M C; Viti, S; Cecchi-Pestellini, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

For Immediate Release RADICAL CHANGES IN CONSUMER PATTERNS PREDICTED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open_House on the future of broadcast media today brought together over 100 key thinkers in the sector who debated a radical shift in the broadcast industry that is changing consumers from passive media About Open_House Open_House at Media Lab Europe is a series of monthly research driven forums

218

Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report intends to support Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nation’s energy security.

Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

219

Mechanical Devices Readiness FY04.0402.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Advanced Design and Production Technologies (ADAPT) project funded production process and tooling improvements to meet and sustain rate production for the program mechanism assemblies. Techniques were developed to allow evaluation and rework of sealed mechanisms that will result in prevention of the scrapping of future mechanisms. Future system mechanisms will likely be smaller with tighter tolerance parts that will require improved inspection equipment and techniques. During the latter phase of this project, the ISL (Intent Stronglink) PRT (Product Realization Team) developed designs and manufacturing processes at Sandia and at multiple KCP (Kansas City Plant) vendors, to produce glass ceramic headers to replace the brazed ceramic headers in the ISL. This achievement will result in significant production costs savings (unit cost and product scrap due to leaking headers).

Bender, Thomas R.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted radical cystoprostatectomy Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass... to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C3H5O radical produced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - atom tranfer radical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10, 1993" Abstract: The N-isopropylated hydrazine radical cations from 7 (22t... Bu,iPr) and 9 (22iPr2) are isolable and are the first examples of isolable hydrazine radical...

222

Carbanionic Route to Electroactive Carbon-Centered Anion and Radical Oligomers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The synthesis of poly-1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenyl allyl (BDPA) radicals via a new anionic oligomerization strategy is reported. The material displays a reversible reduction from the orange-red radical to the blue carbanion ...

Dane, Eric L.

223

Experimental Studies of Hydroxyl Radical Initiated Tropospheric Oxidation of Unsaturated Hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radical, followed by chain propagating radical reactions. Their oxidation is the major source for ground level ozone formation in both rural and urban area and understanding their chemistry is essential for regional air quality modeling. Until recently...

Ghosh, Buddhadeb

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

THE ORIENTATION OF MEMBRANE BOUND RADICALS: AN EPR INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETICALLY ORDERED SPINACH CHLOROPLASTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D RADICALS: E B A E O N AN EPR INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETICALLY135-139. re Legends EPR spectra of oriented chloroplastsBOUND RADICALS: AN EPR INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETICALLY ORDERED

Dismukes, G. Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Designing A Competency Framework For Logistics Executives: The Case Of The Ready-Made Garments Manufacturers In Egypt.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The ready-made garments (RMG) manufacturing industry in Egypt is one of the main industries that supports the Egyptian economy through exports? earnings. Egypt?s RMG exports… (more)

El-Zarka, Sara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

Ronnebro, Ewa

2012-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Free-radical reactions in glow and explosion of carbon monoxide-oxygen mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of published compilations of rate coefficients of free-radical reactions yields reactions that are associated with chain branching in mixtures of CO and O/sub 2/ and small quantities of hydrogen or water vapor. The complete mechanism included diffusion of HO/sub 2/ radicals to the vessel wall and their adsorption and reaction at the surface. This mechanism is applied to the data of E.J. Buckler and R.G.W. Norrish on the branched-chain explosion of CO-O/sub 2/ mixtures containing H/sub 2/ in the order of 1 mm Hg. Substantial agreement is found between theory and experiment. Further, the mechanism is applied to experiments of Bond, Gray, and Griffiths with an H/sub 2/ content of 0.01-0.05 mm Hg. By specifying details of the adsorption and surface reaction of HO/sub 2/ on the basis of Langmuir's adsorption the phenomenon of flow is explained and the regions of slow reaction, glow, and explosion are described in accord with the experimental data. It is confirmed that the reaction between CO and O/sub 2/ requires the presence of a hydrogenous compound such as H/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, CH/sub 4/, etc., and that ''dry'' homogenous reaction is not possible except at very high temperatures.

Von Elbe, G.; Lewis, B.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Nearest-neighbor distributions of free radicals produced within charged-particle tracks in liquid water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radicals, and hydrated electrons was tabulated in order to develop a radiochemical description of the charged-particle tracks. These radicals are of biological importance since they can damage deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) through chemical action. For low... t2 s. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for hydrated electrons at 10 s . . 13 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for OH radicals at 10-6 s . . 14 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for H radicals at 10-s s...

Smith, Miles Clay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Progress toward Producing Demand-Response-Ready Appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes several historical and ongoing efforts to make small electrical demand-side devices like home appliances more responsive to the dynamic needs of electric power grids. Whereas the utility community often reserves the word demand response for infrequent 2 to 6 hour curtailments that reduce total electrical system peak load, other beneficial responses and ancillary services that may be provided by responsive electrical demand are of interest. Historically, demand responses from the demand side have been obtained by applying external, retrofitted, controlled switches to existing electrical demand. This report is directed instead toward those manufactured products, including appliances, that are able to provide demand responses as soon as they are purchased and that require few, or no, after-market modifications to make them responsive to needs of power grids. Efforts to be summarized include Open Automated Demand Response, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturer standard CHA 1, a simple interface being developed by the U-SNAP Alliance, various emerging autonomous responses, and the recent PinBus interface that was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Sastry, Chellury

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

Unknown

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

NONE

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Kinetics of the photoreactions of some organic free radicals and lifetimes of electronically excited states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lifetimes of electronically excited states of the antraquinone radical anion and of the stable 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (DPPA) radical during their photoreactions with organic solvents have been evaluated by analyzing kinetic curves. The results obtained suggest that the anthraquinone radical anion undergoes a photoreaction in a quartet state, while DPPA does so in one of the higher doublet states.

Oginets, V.Ya.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

Unknown

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Operational Readiness Review Final Report for K Basin Fuel Transfer System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for startup of the K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS). The DOE ORR was conducted during the period November 6-18, 2002. The DOE ORR team concluded that the K Basin Fuel Transfer System is ready to start operations, subject to completion and verification of identified pre-start findings. The ORR was conducted in accordance with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) Plan of Action and the Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for K Basin Fuel Transfer System. Review activities consisted of staff interviews, procedure and document reviews, and observations of normal facility operations, operational upset conditions, and an emergency drill. The DOE ORR Team also reviewed and assessed the adequacy of the contractor ORR3 and the RL line management review. The team concurred with the findings and observations identified in these two reports. The DOE ORR for the FTS evaluated the contractor under single-shift operations. Of concern to the ORR Team was that SNF Project management intended to change from a single-shift FTS operation to a two-shift operation shortly after the completion of the DOE ORR. The ORR team did not assess two-shift FTS operations and the ability of the contractor to conduct a smooth transition from shift to shift. However, the DOE ORR team did observe an operational upset drill that was conducted during day shift and carried over into swing shift; during this drill, swing shift was staffed with fewer personnel as would be expected for two-shift operations. The facility was able to adequately respond to the event with the reduced level of staff. The ORR Team was also able to observe a Shift Manager turnover meeting when one shift manager had to be relieved during the middle of the day. The ORR Team did not have the opportunity to observe a shift turnover from one crew to another. The ORR Team has evaluated the risk of not observing this activity and considers the risk to be minimal based on the fact that operating staff are very familiar with the FTS equipment and its procedures, and because existing Conduct of Operations processes and procedures are adequate and implemented. Because the ORR Team has not observed two-shift FTS operations, we recommend that additional RL oversight be provided at the start of two-shift FTS operations to evaluate the adequacy of crew turnovers.

DAVIES, T.H.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Building Simulation Modelers are we big-data ready?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in computing and sensor technologies have pushed the amount of data we collect or generate to limits previously unheard of. Sub-minute resolution data from dozens of channels is becoming increasingly common and is expected to increase with the prevalence of non-intrusive load monitoring. Experts are running larger building simulation experiments and are faced with an increasingly complex data set to analyze and derive meaningful insight. This paper focuses on the data management challenges that building modeling experts may face in data collected from a large array of sensors, or generated from running a large number of building energy/performance simulations. The paper highlights the technical difficulties that were encountered and overcome in order to run 3.5 million EnergyPlus simulations on supercomputers and generating over 200 TBs of simulation output. This extreme case involved development of technologies and insights that will be beneficial to modelers in the immediate future. The paper discusses different database technologies (including relational databases, columnar storage, and schema-less Hadoop) in order to contrast the advantages and disadvantages of employing each for storage of EnergyPlus output. Scalability, analysis requirements, and the adaptability of these database technologies are discussed. Additionally, unique attributes of EnergyPlus output are highlighted which make data-entry non-trivial for multiple simulations. Practical experience regarding cost-effective strategies for big-data storage is provided. The paper also discusses network performance issues when transferring large amounts of data across a network to different computing devices. Practical issues involving lag, bandwidth, and methods for synchronizing or transferring logical portions of the data are presented. A cornerstone of big-data is its use for analytics; data is useless unless information can be meaningfully derived from it. In addition to technical aspects of managing big data, the paper details design of experiments in anticipation of large volumes of data. The cost of re-reading output into an analysis program is elaborated and analysis techniques that perform analysis in-situ with the simulations as they are run are discussed. The paper concludes with an example and elaboration of the tipping point where it becomes more expensive to store the output than re-running a set of simulations.

Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O, and linear C{sub n} (n = 4--6).

Hyeon, Choi

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hydrogen Production via a Commerically Ready Inorganic membrane Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been known that use of the hydrogen selective membrane as a reactor (MR) could potentially improve the efficiency of the water shift reaction (WGS), one of the least efficient unit operations for production of high purity hydrogen from syngas. However, no membrane reactor technology has been reduced to industrial practice thus far, in particular for a large-scale operation. This implementation and commercialization barrier is attributed to the lack of a commercially viable hydrogen selective membrane with (1) material stability under the application environment and (2) suitability for large-scale operation. Thus, in this project, we have focused on (1) the deposition of the hydrogen selective carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane we have developed on commercially available membranes as substrate, and (2) the demonstration of the economic viability of the proposed WGS-MR for hydrogen production from coal-based syngas. The commercial stainless steel (SS) porous substrate (i.e., ZrO{sub 2}/SS from Pall Corp.) was evaluated comprehensively as the 1st choice for the deposition of the CMS membrane for hydrogen separation. The CMS membrane synthesis protocol we developed previously for the ceramic substrate was adapted here for the stainless steel substrate. Unfortunately no successful hydrogen selective membranes had been prepared during Yr I of this project. The characterization results indicated two major sources of defect present in the SS substrate, which may have contributed to the poor CMS membrane quality. Near the end of the project period, an improved batch of the SS substrate (as the 2nd generation product) was received from the supplier. Our characterization results confirm that leaking of the crimp boundary no longer exists. However, the thermal stability of the ZrO{sub 2}/SS substrate through the CMS membrane preparation condition must be re-evaluated in the future. In parallel with the SS membrane activity, the preparation of the CMS membranes supported on our commercial ceramic membrane for large-scale applications, such as coal-based power generation/hydrogen production, was also continued. A significant number (i.e., 98) of full-scale membrane tubes have been produced with an on-spec ratio of >76% during the first production trial. In addition, we have verified the functional performance and material stability of this hydrogen selective CMS membrane with a hydrocracker purge gas stream at a refinery pilot testing facility. No change in membrane performance was noted over the >100 hrs of testing conducted in the presence of >30% H{sub 2}S, >5,000 ppm NH{sub 3} (estimated), and heavy hydrocarbons on the order of 25%. The excellent stability of our hydrogen selective CMS membrane opens the door for its use in WGS-MR with a significantly reduced requirement of the feedstock pretreatment.

Paul Liu

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Photofragment translational spectroscopy of three body dissociations and free radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation describes several three-body dissociations and the photodissociation of methyl radicals studied using photofragment translational spectroscopy. The first chapter provides an introduction to three body dissociation, examines current experimental methodology, and includes a discussion on the treatment of photofragment translational spectroscopy data arising from three-body fragmentation. The ultraviolet photodissociation of azomethane into two methyl radicals and nitrogen is discussed in chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes the photodissociation of acetone at 248 nm and 193 nm. At 248 nm the translational energy release from the initial C-C bond cleavage matches the exit barrier height and a comparison with results at 266 nm suggests that is invariant to the available energy. A fraction of the nascent CH{sub 3}CO radicals spontaneously dissociate following rotational averaging. The for the second C-C bond cleavage also matches the exit barrier height. At 193 nm the experimental data can be successfully fit assuming that the dynamics are analogous to those at 248 nm. A simplified model of energy partitioning which adequately describes the experimental results is discussed. Experiments on acetyl halides provide additional evidence to support the proposed acetone dissociation mechanism. A value of 17.0{+-}1.0 kcal/mole for the barrier height, CH{sub 3}CO decomposition has been determined. The photodissociation of methyl radical at 193 nm and 212.8 nm is discussed in the chapter 5. The formation of CH{sub 2} ({sup 1}A{sub l}) and H ({sup 2}S) was the only single photon dissociation pathway observed at both wavelengths.

North, S.W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Search for Single Vectorlike Quarks in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a search for hypothetical vectorlike quarks in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. The data were collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}. We select events with a final state composed of a W or Z boson and a jet consistent with a heavy object decay. We observe no significant excess in comparison to the background prediction and set limits on production cross sections for vectorlike quarks decaying to W+jet and Z+jet. These are the most stringent limits to date for electroweak single vectorlike quark production at hadron colliders.

Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Svoisky, P. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M.; Bazterra, V. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

243

Analyses of Value-added for Case-ready Beef, with Special Emphasis on Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-added for Case-ready Beef, with Special Emphasis on Texas R.A. Dietrich, D.E. Farris, and J.B. Ward* .. espectively, associate professor, professor, and research associate, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A.... The poultry industry, for e),arnp~le, was able to reduce fabrication and mar- keting costs by adopting a centrally-packaged, 5 chill-pack system. The results have been increased efficiencies for poultry and increased retail shelf life while providing...

Dietrich, R.A.; Farris, D.E.; Ward, J.B

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

AVTA: Reports on Plug-in Electric Vehicle Readiness at 3 DOD Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports analyze data and survey results on readiness for the use of plug-in electric vehicles on the Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, and Joint Base Lewis McChord, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

245

Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: BPC Green Builders, New Fairfield, CT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy Ready Home 2014BPC

247

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Caldwell and Johnson, Exeter, RI  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy Ready Home

248

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Clifton View Homes, Coupeville, WA  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy Ready Home Clifton

249

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Dwell Development, Seattle, WA  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy Ready Home

250

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Ferguson Design and Construction, Inc., Sagaponak, NY  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy Ready HomeFerguson

251

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Garbett Homes, Herriman, UT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy Ready

252

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, Ithaca, NY  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy ReadyIthaca

253

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: KB Home, San Marcos, CA  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy ReadyIthacaKB Home

254

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, FL  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy ReadyIthacaKB

255

Zero Energy Ready Home - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment ofEnergy DECEMBER 2014 ZERO ENERGY READY HOME UPDATE- 2014 BTO

256

Readiness Assurance  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS/%2A contractor6/%2A7/%2A

257

Studies of transition states and radicals by negative ion photodetachment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Negative ion photodetachment is a versatile tool for the production and study of transient neutral species such as reaction intermediates and free radicals. Photodetachment of the stable XHY{sup {minus}} anion provides a direct spectroscopic probe of the transition state region of the potential energy surface for the neutral hydrogen transfer reaction X + HY {yields} XH + Y, where X and Y are halogen atoms. The technique is especially sensitive to resonances, which occur at a specific energy, but the spectra also show features due to direct scattering. We have used collinear adiabatic simulations of the photoelectron spectra to evaluate trail potential energy surfaces for the biomolecular reactions and have extended the adiabatic approach to three dimensions and used it to evaluate empirical potential energy surfaces for the I + Hl and Br + HI reactions. In addition, we have derived an empirical, collinear potential energy surface for the Br + HBr reaction that reproduces our experimental results and have extended this surface to three dimensions. Photodetachment of a negative ion can be also used to study neutral free radicals. We have studied the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} by photoelectron spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, determining the electron affinity of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}, gaining insight on the bonding of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} ground state and observing the {sup 2}A{sub 2} excited state for the first time. Negative ion photodetachment also provides a novel and versatile source of mass-selected, jet-cooled free radicals. We have studied the photodissociation of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} at 270, 235, and 208 nm, obtaining information on the dissociation products by measuring the kinetic energy release in the photodissociation.

Metz, R.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis-driven structural mass spectrometry experiments.

J Kiselar; M Chance

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

Kevin G. DeWall

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Graduation Requirements and Procedures Graduation Requirements and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Degree Audit (DARS) or contact the department offering the major. Graduation Average Requirement The minimum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Report of independent consultants reviewing Integrated Test Stands (ITS) performance and readiness of DARHT for construction start  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Independent consultants met at Los Alamos, June 15 and 16, 1993, to review progress on the commissioning of the Integrated Test Stand (ITS) for DARHT and to provide DOE with technical input on readiness for construction of the first radiographic arm of DARHT. The consultants concluded that all milestones necessary for demonstrating the performance of the DARHT accelerator have been met and that the project is ready for construction to resume. The experimental program using ITS should be continued to quantify the comparison of experiment and theory, to test improvements on the injector insulator, and to better evaluate the interaction of the beam and the target.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A review of "English Radicalism, 1550-1850" by Glenn Burgess and Matthew Festenstein, eds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

followed cues from Hume and Helvetius. And Bentham turned his own conversion to atheism into a wellspring for his utilitarian and reformist program. This final observation provides the basis for Professor J. C. D. Clark?s argument that English... Radicalism came into being with Bentham?s utilitarian program, reinforced by Ricardian economics. Bentham?s thoroughgoing rejection of religion, Clark claims, was the defining characteristic of his, and future, radical appeals, distinguishing radicalism from...

McJimsey, Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Infrared spectroscopy of organic free radicals related to combustion processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary long-term goal of this work is to develop new techniques for measuring vibrational spectra of polyatomic neutral free radicals. The authors explore a variation of resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) in which tunable {omega}{sub IR} excites the radical vibrationally and {omega}{sub UV} selectively ionizes only the vibrationally excited molecules. Development of the IR + UV R2PI experiment is underway. In the meantime, the authors have used optical R2PI and pulsed field ionization (PFI) detection to obtain new vibrational spectra of species such as the benzyl and phenylsilane cations. In benzyl, a great deal was learned about the vibronic coupling mechanism in the mixed q{sup 2}A{sub 2}-2{sup 2}B{sub 2} system near 450 nm by projecting the mixed states onto the manifold of cation vibrational states. In phenylsilane{sup +}, we find that the sixfold barrier to internal rotation of the silyl group is small (V{sub 6} = +19 cm{sup {minus}1}). We are beginning to understand the mechanisms of coupling of torsional states with vibration, overall rotation, and other electronic states. In addition, we are developing a new model of internal rotation in aromatic compounds based on Prof. Frank Weinhold`s natural resonance theory.

Weisshaar, J.C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Photoinitiated proton-coupled electron transfer and radical transport kinetics in class la ribonucleotide reductase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is a critical mechanism in biology, underpinning key processes such as radical transport, energy transduction, and enzymatic substrate activation. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) ...

Pizano, Arturo A. (Arturo Alejandro)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - abts radical cation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

abts radical cation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 2-Aminobenzothiazole degradation by free and Ca-alginate immobilized cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous Summary: , Chisinau,...

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting radical formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 Determination of the Barrier Height for Acetyl Radical Dissociation from Acetyl Chloride Photodissociation at 235 nm Using Velocity Map Imaging Summary: Determination of the...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Predicting Preignition...

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - artemisinin-induced radical formation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Study of Radical and Neutral Intermediates of Artemisinin Decomposition Mirian S. C. Pereira, Rudolf Kiralj, and Marcia M. C. Ferreira* Summary: -catalyzed reduction of the...

269

Search for Dilepton Resonances in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Letter reports on a search for narrow high-mass resonances decaying into dilepton final states. The data were recorded by the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider and correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 1.08 (1.21) fb{sup -1} in the e{sup +}e{sup -} ({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) channel. No statistically significant excess above the standard model expectation is observed and upper limits are set at the 95% C.L. on the cross section times branching fraction of Z{sup '} resonances and Randall-Sundrum gravitons decaying into dileptons as a function of the resonance mass. A lower mass limit of 1.83 TeV on the sequential standard model Z{sup '} boson is set. A Randall-Sundrum graviton with coupling k/M{sub Pl}=0.1 is excluded at 95% C.L. for masses below 1.63 TeV.

Aad, G.; Ahles, F.; Beckingham, M.; Bernhard, R.; Bitenc, U.; Bruneliere, R.; Caron, S.; Christov, A.; Consorti, V.; Eckert, S.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Flechl, M.; Glatzer, J. [Fakultaet fuer Mathematik und Physik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg i.Br. (Germany); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma (United States); Abdallah, J.; Bosman, M.; Casado, M. P.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Conidi, M. C.; Demirkoz, B. [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies and Departament de Fisica de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and ICREA, Barcelona (Spain)

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Equilibration of Tyrosyl Radicals (Y[• over 356], Y[• over 731], Y[• over 730]) in the Radical Propagation Pathway of the Escherichia coli Class Ia Ribonucleotide Reductase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase is an ?2?2 complex that catalyzes the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides using a diferric tyrosyl radical (Y[• over 122]) cofactor in ?2 to initiate catalysis in ?2. ...

Yokoyama, Kenichi

271

A versatile source to produce high-intensity, pulsed supersonic radical beams for crossed-beam experiments: The cyanogen radical CN,,X2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CN radicals in a low- pressure fast-flow chemical reactor. Although valuable ki- netic data of the ablated species with molecular nitrogen, which acts also as a seeding gas. A chopper wheel located after

Kaiser, Ralf I.

272

Welcome to the Operation READY 2002 collection Flexible formats: print, CD-ROM, DVD video and Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Welcome to the Operation READY 2002 collection Flexible formats: print, CD-ROM, DVD video and Web and deployment New and updated videos Family Assistance Center Workshops and sessions are shorter Scenarios are shorter Lessons are self-contained Planning and executing a FACEX added New and updated video Homecoming

273

First Commercial US Mixed Waste Vitrification Facility: Permits, Readiness Reviews, and Delisting of Final Wasteform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) contracted GTS Duratek (Duratek) to construct and operate the first commercial vitrification facility to treat an F-006 mixed (radioactive/hazardous) waste in the United States. The permits were prepared and submitted to the South Carolina state regulators by WSRC - based on a detailed design by Duratek. Readiness Assessments were conducted by WSRC and Duratek at each major phase of the operation (sludge transfer, construction, cold and radioactive operations, and a major restart) and approved by the Savannah River Department of Energy prior to proceeding. WSRC prepared the first `Upfront Delisting` petition for a vitrified mixed waste. Lessons learned with respect to the permit strategy, operational assessments, and delisting from this `privatization` project will be discussed.

Pickett, J.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Norford, S.W.; Diener, G.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Super efficient refrigeration systems: Two non-CFC designs ready for commercialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two high-efficiency prime movers for refrigeration are ready for field testing and commercialization. Either machine, combined with other advanced measures, could result in a CFC-free refrigerator using significantly less energy than units meeting the 1993 US efficiency standards. The first design is a linear motor/compressor that manufacturers could substitute for the standard rotating motor/compressor in a conventional refrigerator. The second design is a Stirling-cycle refrigeration machine that is self contained and uses helium gas as the working fluid. The results of prototype testing, the inherent simplicity of both machines, and their virtually frictionless operation point to economical and reliable service. If these features are confirmed in further testing now being conducted by appliance and compressor manufacturers, these machines will be strong candidates for inclusion in super efficient refrigerator designs over the next few years.

Stickney, B.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Spectroscopy and reaction dynamics of collision complexes containing hydroxyl radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE supported work in this laboratory has focused on the spectroscopic characterization of the interaction potential between an argon atom and a hydroxyl radical in the ground X{sup 2}II and excited A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +} electronic states. The OH-Ar system has proven to be a test case for examining the interaction potential in an open-shell system since it is amenable to experimental investigation and theoretically tractable from first principles. Experimental identification of the bound states supported by the Ar + OH (X {sup 2}II) and Ar + OH(A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +}) potentials makes it feasible to derive realistic potential energy surfaces for these systems. The experimentally derived intermolecular potentials provide a rigorous test of ab initio theory and a basis for understanding the dramatically different collision dynamics taking place on the ground and excited electronic state surfaces.

Lester, M.I. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Thermochemistry of radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction from 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and alternative-fuel com- bustion, where they are important as intermediates. Therefore reliable prediction with sparsely available group additivity data, and trends in enthalpy and free energy as a function of radical center are discussed for the isomeric radicals. © 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http

Truhlar, Donald G

277

Electronic structure calculations of radical reactions for poly(methyl methacrylate) degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exposed to UV light in low-Earth orbit (LEO) conditions experience degradation. Under LEO conditionsElectronic structure calculations of radical reactions for poly(methyl methacrylate) degradation to calculate the reaction energetics for decomposition reactions of radicals formed from UV radiation

278

2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Radically enhanced molecular recognition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stoddart1 * The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium viologen (MVĂľ ) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTFĂľ ) cation radicals, have been shown to act as guests that can

Goddard III, William A.

279

Kinetics of `living' radical polymerizations of multifunctional monomers , A. Shahar2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetics of `living' radical polymerizations of multifunctional monomers J.H. Ward1 , A. Shahar2 2001; accepted 16 November 2001 Abstract The polymerizations of multifunctional monomers photocalorimetry. The iniferter was used to simulate a `living' radical polymerization. The normal autoacceleration

Peppas, Nicholas A.

280

Polarized Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Matrix-Isolated Methylperoxyl Radicals, CH3OO X~ 2A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: October 1, 2001 We have used a tandem pair of supersonic nozzles to produce clean samples of CH3OO matrix. The CH3/O2/20 K argon radical sandwich acts to produce target methylperoxyl radicals: CH3 + O2 f that nucleate all clouds and ice particles.7 In a qualitative manner, an organic aerosol is oxidatively

Ellison, Barney

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Predicting tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical in a global, three-dimensional, chemistry, transport, and deposition model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the most important chemically reactive tropospheric gases are ozone (O{sub 3}) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Although ozone in the stratosphere is a necessary protector against the sun`s radiation, tropospheric ozone is actually a pollutant which damages materials and vegetation, acts as a respiratory irritant, and is a greenhouse gas. One of the two main sources of ozone in the troposphere is photochemical production. The photochemistry is initiated when hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) react with nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} = NO + NO{sub 2}) in the presence of sunlight. Reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH, is the main sink for many tropospheric gases. The hydroxyl radical is highly reactive and has a lifetime on the order of seconds. Its formation is initiated by the photolysis of tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric chemistry involves a complex, non-linear set of chemical reactions between atmospheric species that vary substantially in time and space. To model these and other species on a global scale requires the use of a global, three-dimensional chemistry, transport, and deposition (CTD) model. In this work, I developed two such three dimensional CTD models. The first model incorporated the chemistry necessary to model tropospheric ozone production from the reactions of nitrogen oxides with carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH{sub 4}). The second also included longer-lived alkane species and the biogenic hydrocarbon isoprene, which is emitted by growing plants and trees. The models` ability to predict a number of key variables (including the concentration of O{sub 3}, OH, and other species) were evaluated. Then, several scenarios were simulated to understand the change in the chemistry of the troposphere since preindustrial times and the role of anthropogenic NO{sub x} on present day conditions.

Atherton, C.S.

1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

Free radical formation in vivo and hepatotoxicity due to anesthesia with halothane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In vivo studies were undertaken to determine whether free radical formation in the liver during administration of various halogenated anesthetics is associated with hepatotoxicity of these agents in an animal model. In addition to the anesthetics halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane, carbon tetrachloride was studied as an example of a hepatotoxic halogenated compound acting by a free radical mechanism. Free radicals were trapped in vivo during anesthesia as stable adducts using the spin trap, alpha-phenyl-t-butyl nitrone. These adducts were extracted from the liver and studied by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Free radicals were detected after administration of halothane or carbon tetrachloride, compounds which were hepatotoxic under the conditions of the experiment, but were not found after anesthesia induced with enflurane or isoflurane, anesthetics which were not hepatotoxic under identical conditions. The free radical trapped after alpha-phenyl-t-butyl nitrone treatment of halothane-anesthetized rats appeared to be a metabolic intermediate of halothane.

Plummer, J.L.; Beckwith, A.L.; Bastin, F.N.; Adams, J.F.; Cousins, M.J.; Hall, P.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

SURFACE-INITIATED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION AS A TOOL FOR COATING OF VARIOUS SURFACES WITH FLUOROPOLYMERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE-INITIATED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION AS A TOOL FOR COATING OF VARIOUS SURFACES investigations of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) as a method of covalently binding either styrene

284

The requirements discovery process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Kinetics and intermediate products in the interaction of straight-chain and cyclic hydrocarbon radicals with 9,10-Anthraquinone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors use a pulse radiolysis technique with optical registration of the destruction of hydrocarbon radicals R in determining the rate constants for the interaction of cyclododecyl radicals and n-dodecyl radicals with 9,10-anthraquinone in the corresponding liquid hydrocarbons, at various temperatures. It is shown that in the presence of oxygen, hydrocarbon radicals with the quinone form oxygen-containing species that are capable of propagating the oxidation chain and regenerating the original quinone.

Ladygin, B.V.; Revina, A.A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Radical Coupling Reactions in Lignin Synthesis: A Density Functional Theory Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is a complex, heterogeneous polymer in plant cell walls that provides mechanical strength to the plant stem and confers resistance to degrading microbes, enzymes, and chemicals. Lignin synthesis initiates through oxidative radical-radical coupling of monolignols, the most common of which are p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols. Here, we use density functional theory to characterize radical-radical coupling reactions involved in monolignol dimerization. We compute reaction enthalpies for the initial self- and cross-coupling reactions of these monolignol radicals to form dimeric intermediates via six major linkages observed in natural lignin. The 8-O-4, 8-8, and 8-5 coupling are computed to be the most favorable, whereas the 5-O-4, 5-5, and 8-1 linkages are less favorable. Overall, p-coumaryl self- and cross-coupling reactions are calculated to be the most favorable. For cross-coupling reactions, in which each radical can couple via either of the two sites involved in dimer formation, the more reactive of the two radicals is found to undergo coupling at its site with the highest spin density.

Sangha, A. K.; Parks, J. M.; Standaert, R. F.; Ziebell, A.; Davis, M.; Smith, J. C.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions; Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a critical commercialization barrier. With major automakers focused on 2015 as a target timeframe for global FCEV commercialization, the window of opportunity is short for establishing a sufficient network of hydrogen stations to support large-volume vehicle deployments. This report describes expert feedback on the market readiness of hydrogen infrastructure technology from two activities.

Melaina, M. W.; Steward, D.; Penev, M.; McQueen, S.; Jaffe, S.; Talon, C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ammoniated electron as a solvent stabilized multimer radical anion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The excess electron in liquid ammonia ("ammoniated electron") is commonly viewed as a cavity electron in which the s-type wave function fills the interstitial void between 6-9 ammonia molecules. Herewith an alternative model is examined in which the ammoniated electron is regarded as a solvent stabilized multimer radical anion, as was originally suggested by Symons [Chem. Soc. Rev. 1976, 5, 337]. In this model, most of the excess electron density resides in the frontier orbitals of N atoms in the ammonia molecules forming the solvation cavity; a fraction of this spin density is transferred to the molecules in the second solvation shell. The cavity is formed due to the repulsion between negatively charged solvent molecules. Using density functional theory calculations for small ammonia cluster anions in the gas phase, it is demonstrated that such core anions would quantitatively account for the observed pattern of Knight shifts for 1H and 14N nuclei as observed by NMR spectroscopy and the downshifted stretchin...

Shkrob, I A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Radical-cured block copolymer-modified thermosets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Poly(ethylene-alt-propylene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEP-PEO) diblock copolymers were synthesized and added at 4 wt % to 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (BisGMA), a monomer that cures using free radical chemistry. In separate experiments, poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) was combined as a secondary monomer with BisGMA and the monomers were loaded with 4 wt % PEP-PEO. The diblock copolymers self-assembled into well-dispersed spherical micelles with PEP cores and PEO coronas. No appreciable change in the final extent of cure of the thermosets was caused by the addition of diblock copolymer, except in the case of BisGMA, where the addition of the block copolymer increased extent of cure by 12%. Furthermore, the extent of cure was increased by 29% and 37% with the addition of 25 and 50 wt % PEGDMA, respectively. Elastic modulus and fracture resistance were also determined, and the values indicate that the addition of block copolymers does not significantly toughen the thermoset materials. This finding is surprising when compared with the large increase in fracture resistance seen in block copolymer-modified epoxies, and an explanation is proposed.

Redline, Erica M.; Francis, Lorraine F.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

Time-resolved FTIR emission studies of laser photofragmentation and radical reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have focused specifically on collision processes, such as single collision energy transfer, reaction dynamics, and radical reactions. The authors employ novel FTIR techniques in the study of single collision energy transfer processes using translationally fast H atom, as well as radical-radical reactions, e.g. CH{sub 3} + O, CF{sub 3} + H(D), and Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}. The fast atoms permit unique high energy regions of certain transition states of combustion species to be probed for the first time.

Leone, S.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electron spin resonance studies of two dimethoxymethane radicals in aqueous solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-15 electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer was utili=ed in these studies. The g-values, a and y hyperfine splittings, and line widths were determined for each radical, and a com- puter program was used to generate a theoretical spectrum which... Electron Spin Resonance of Free Radicals One of the most general de initions that can be given for a f: ee radical is that of Ingram describing 15 it as "a molecule, or part of a molecule, in which the normal chemical binding has been modified so...

Lewis, Eileen Lob

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

ALUMINUM READINESS EVALUATION FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENRATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Technology Readiness Evaluation (TRE) performed by AREV A Federal Services, LLC (AFS) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) shows the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process invented and patented (pending) by AFS has reached an overall Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3. The LiHT process removes aluminum and regenerates sodium hydroxide. The evaluation used test results obtained with a 2-L laboratory-scale system to validate the process and its critical technology elements (CTEs) on Hanford tank waste simulants. The testing included detailed definition and evaluation for parameters of interest and validation by comparison to analytical predictions and data quality objectives for critical subsystems. The results of the TRE would support the development of strategies to further mature the design and implementation of the LiHT process as a supplemental pretreatment option for Hanford tank waste.

SAMS TL; MASSIE HL

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia River Gorge. Photo: C. Bruce Forster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia with juvenile bypass systems to keep the smolts out of the turbines. But given the gravity of the [salmon

295

The millimeter/sub-millimeter spectrum of the LiS radical in its 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

millimeter/sub-millimeter direct absorption methods. This radical was synthesized from lithium vapor and CS2 reactions, corrosion processes, catalysis and in stellar atmospheres [1±3]. Examining the bonding

Ziurys, Lucy M.

296

Asymmetry of will : the effect of religious radicalism on state military doctrine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How is a state's military doctrine affected by the presence of radical religious ideology in its military? Using analysis of satellite imagery, recent military exercises, and a series of source interviews, I examine the ...

Lewis, Patrick (Patrick Joseph)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nighttime Measurements of Dinitrogen Pentoxide and the Nitrate Radical via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technique, known as cavity ring-down spectroscopy, will be introduced for simultaneously measuring the nitrate radical and dinitrogen pentoxide. The cavity ring-down spectrometer was initially designed and constructed based on the experiments by Steven Brown...

Perkins, Katie C.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

298

Water-Soluble Narrow-Line Radicals for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The synthesis of air-stable, highly water-soluble organic radicals containing a 1,3-bis(diphenylene)-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) core is reported. A sulfonated derivative, SA-BDPA, retains the narrow electron paramagnetic resonance ...

Haze, Olesya

299

Oxidative capacity of the Mexico City atmosphere - Part 1: A radical source perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed analysis of OH, HO2 [HO subscript 2] and RO2 [RO subscript 2] radical sources is presented for the near field photochemical regime inside the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). During spring of 2003 (MCMA-2003 ...

Volkamer, R.

300

Membrane Separator for Redox Flow Batteries that Utilize Anion Radical Mediators.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Na + ion conducting polyethylene oxide membrane is developed for an organic electrolyte redox flow battery that utilizes anion radical mediators. To achieve high specific ionic conductivity, tetraethyleneglycol dimethylether (TEGDME) is used as a plasticizer to reduce crystallinity and increase the free volume of the gel film. This membrane is physically and chemically stable in TEGDME electrolyte that contains highly reactive biphenyl anion radical mediators.

Delnick, Frank M.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Strongly correlated mechanisms of a photoexcited radical reaction from the anti-Hermitian contracted Schroedinger equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoexcited radical reactions are critical to processes in both nature and materials, and yet they can be challenging for electronic structure methods due to the presence of strong electron correlation. Reduced-density-matrix (RDM) methods, based on solving the anti-Hermitian contracted Schroedinger equation (ACSE) for the two-electron RDM (2-RDM), are examined for studying the strongly correlated mechanisms of these reactions with application to the electrocyclic interconversion of allyl and cyclopropyl radicals. We combine recent extensions of the ACSE to excited states [G. Gidofalvi and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 80, 022507 (2009)] and arbitrary spin states [A. E. Rothman, J. J. Foley IV, and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 80, 052508 (2009)]. The ACSE predicts that the ground-state ring closure of the allyl radical has a high 52.5 kcal/mol activation energy that is consistent with experimental data, while the closure of an excited allyl radical can occur by disrotatory and conrotatory pathways whose transition states are essentially barrierless. Comparisons are made with multireference second- and third-order perturbation theories and multireference configuration interaction. While predicted energy differences do not vary greatly between methods, the ACSE appears to improve these differences when they involve a strongly and a weakly correlated radical by capturing a greater share of single-reference correlation that increases the stability of the weakly correlated radicals. For example, the ACSE predicts a -39.6 kcal/mol conversion of the excited allyl radical to the ground-state cyclopropyl radical in comparison to the -32.6 to -37.3 kcal/mol conversions predicted by multireference methods. In addition, the ACSE reduces the computational scaling with the number of strongly correlated orbitals from exponential (traditional multireference methods) to quadratic. Computed ground- and excited-state 2-RDMs are nearly N-representable.

Foley, Jonathan J. IV; Rothman, Adam E.; Mazziotti, David A. [Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

302

Niobium Complexes As Lewis Acid and Radical Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of lithium pentaphenylcyclopentadiende (Li C{sub 5}Ph{sub 5}) with niobium pentachloride in dichloromethane or toluene produces insoluble red-orange solids whose C/H/Cl analyses are not consistent with C{sub 5}Ph{sub 5}NbCl{sub 4}. Addition of an acetonitrile solution of LiC{sub 5}Ph{sub 5} with NbCl{sub 5} gives C{sub 5}Ph{sub 5}NbCl{sub 4} observed as a transient product by NMR spectroscopy, which then abstracts H from the acetonitrile solvent to give HC{sub 5}Ph{sub 5} and presumably NbCl{sub 4}CH{sub 2}CN. Reversal of the order of addition gives the {center_dot}C{sub 5}Ph{sub 5} radical as characterized by MS and EPR spectroscopy. Attempts to prepare the trimethylsilyl derivative Me{sub 3}SiC{sub 5}Ph{sub 5} (a less reducing cyclopentadienyl group) were unsuccessful. Reaction was observed only in tetrahydrofuran, producing only Me{sub 3}SiO(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}C{sub 5}Ph{sub 4}(m-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH3)) characterized by {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectroscopy. The trimethylsilyltetraphenylcyclopentadienyl derivative, Me{sub 3}Si(H)C{sub 5}Ph{sub 4}, was characterized by {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectroscopy. This compound reacts with NbCl{sub 5} to give HCl and ClSiMe{sub 3} and a mixture of HC{sub 5}Ph{sub 4}NbCl{sub 4} and Me{sub 3}SiC{sub 5}Ph{sub 4}NbCl{sub 4}.

Wayne Tikkanen

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

BER Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management and analysis of geospatial data involvingmanipulation, analysis, and display of geospatial data,Analysis and interpretation require mapping geospatial

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental...

307

Order Module--DOE O 425.1D, VERIFICATION OF READINESS TO START...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

In the second section we will discuss 1) the requirements applicable to DOE ORRs and DOE RAs, and 2) the core requirements. In the third section we will discuss the 1)...

308

FES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

309

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Photochemical generation of alkyl radicals and their reactions with methyl viologen radical cation and with transition-metal complexes in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The irradiation of aqueous solutions of RCo((14)aneN{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} (R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, 1-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}, CH{sub 2}Cl, CH{sub 2}Br, CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3}) with visible light, {lambda} {le} 400 nm, results in the homolysis of the cobalt-carbon bond. These complexes are quite unreactive toward a variety of dealkylating and redox reagents and thus represent a convenient source of small unstabilized carbon-centered radicals in the presence of potential substrates. The radicals react rapidly with the methyl viologen radical cation, k{sub MB} = (1-2) {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The kinetics of the formation of RCr{sup 2+} and RCo((14)aneN{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} in the reactions of radicals with Cr{sup 2+} and Co((14)aneN{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{sup 2+}, respectively, were studied by using MV{sup +} as a probe. The respective rate constants have values k{sub Cr} = (1.9-2.4) {times} 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and k{sub Co} = (1-2) {times} 10{sup 7} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} for all the radicals examined. 36 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Bakac, A.; Espenson, J.H. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (USA))

1989-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Strategic forces: Future requirements and options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the wake of the collapse of the Warsaw Pact and the apparent ending of the Cold War, there have been renewed calls for radical cuts in US strategic forces to levels far below the 10,000 or so warheads allowed each side under the current START proposal. Since it now appears that NATO for the first time will have the capability to defeat a Soviet conventional attack without the necessity of threatening to resort to nuclear weapons, this should pave the way for the rethinking of US strategy and the reduction of US strategic weapons requirements. In this new environment, it seems plausible that, with a modification of the Flexible Response doctrine to forego attempts to disarm the Soviet Union, deterrence could be maintained with 1500 or so survivable strategic weapons. With a new strategy that confined US strategic weapons to the role of deterring the use of nuclear weapons by other countries, a survivable force of about 500 weapons would seem sufficient. With this premise, the implications for the US strategic force structure are examined for two cases: a treaty that allows each side 3000 warheads and one that allows each side 1000 warheads. In Part 1 of this paper, the weapons requirements for deterrence are examined in light of recent changes in the geopolitical environment. In Part 2, it is assumed that the President and Congress have decided that deep cuts in strategic forces are acceptable. 128 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs. (JF)

Speed, R.D.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nutritional requirements of sesame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L)&RARYi ~st t~6~ 0F TEXACO NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis By JOE C. ELLER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in. partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of M... AS TER 0 F SCIENC E January 1958 Major Subject: Agronomy NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis JOE C. ELLER Approved. as to style and content by. ' Chairman of Committee Head qg Department January 1958 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author wishes...

Eller, Joe C

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Required Annual Notices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Required Annual Notices The Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 (WHCRA) The medical programs sponsored by LANS will not restrict benefits if you or your dependent...

314

Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: A fully compliant Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) program is implemented and maintained across the site....

315

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Phenomenological modelling for Time-Resolved Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in radical-triplet system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spin dynamics of radical-triplet system (RTS) has been calculated by using the Lindblad formalism within the theory of open quantum system. The single-radical-triplet system (SRTS) is considered here for single-qubit quantum gate operations while double-radical-triplet system (DRTS) for two-qubit operations. The environment effects taken into account include the spin-lattice relaxation of the triplet exciton and radical spin-$\\frac{1}{2}$, the inter-system crossing process that induces the transition from singlet excited state to the triplet ground state, and the rather slow relaxation process from the triplet ground state back down to the singlet ground state. These calculations shown that the line shape broadening is strongly related to the exchange interaction between triplet and exciton, which can be understood as a spontaneous magnetic field created by the triplet renormalises the original spin-$\\frac{1}{2}$ electron spin resonance spectra. This work will provide key information about the spin dynamics for building optically-controlled molecular quantum gate out of radical-bearing molecules. Moreover, this has generated the further theoretical question on how the mixture of fermion and boson behaves.

Wei Wu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Regioselective thermolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane enhanced by restricted radical mobility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal decomposition of coal has been postulated to involve the formation of free radicals by processes such as the homolysis of aliphatic or ether-containing bridges which connect polycyclic aromatic units into a macromolecular structure. Understanding the thermal reactivity of coal is important in the study of pyrolysis, liquefaction, and coking. Mechanistic insights into the chemical reactivity of coal at the molecular level can be gained from the study of model compounds which represent structural features in coal. However, radicals generated in a cross-linked macromolecular material such as coal may experience restricted mobility when the radical center remains bound to the residual molecular structure. To model the effects of restricted radical mobility on thermally induced decomposition reactions, thermolyses of model compounds covalently attached to an inert support have been studied. Thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,2-diphenylethane showed a substantially altered free radical reaction pathway compared with the corresponding liquid phase behavior, while thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approximately}DPP) showed unexpected regioselectivity resulting from conformational restrictions on hydrogen transfer reactions as the surface coverage of {approximately}DPP decreased. In order to further explore the regionselectivity of hydrogen transfer induced by restricted diffusion, the thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,4-diphenylbutane ({approximately}DPB) is being examined.

Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Biggs, C.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A review of "Radicalism in British Literary Culture: From Revolution to Revolution." by T. Morton and N. Smith, eds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?help construct and define new po- litical eras. The contributors are ?reading radicals reading other 262 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS texts? (14). If ?radicalism? seems a somewhat unusual appellation for the reform movements and protests of the long eighteenth cen... for scientific inves- tigation. By the early nineteenth century, women such as Ann Moore were using fasting for radical protest, in Moore?s case against the poverty women faced when their husbands deserted them. Sussman uses Trapnel?s fasting not only...

R. C. Taylor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

NISTIR 7933 Requirements and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NISTIR 7933 Requirements and Conformance Test Assertions for ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2011 Record Type 18 #12;ii NISTIR 7933 Requirements and Conformance Test Assertions for ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2011 Record Type/CTS designed to test implementations of ANSI/NIST-ITL 1- 2011 (AN-2011) "Data Format for the Interchange

320

Integrated Management Requirements mapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia`s approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integrated Management Requirements mapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia's approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

High School if required  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry II CHEM AP 4-5 Lab required @ UNLV; contact Chemistry PHYS 182 & 182L Engineering Physics III PHYS General Chemistry I CHEM AP 3 Lab required @ UNLV; contact Chemistry CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I & CHEM 347 Lab Techniques of Organic Chem I CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & CHEM 348 Lab Techniques

Walker, Lawrence R.

323

General Responsibilities and Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of simultaneous production of hydrogen and separated stream of CO{sub 2} was proved using a fixed bed 2 reactor system at GE-EER. This bench-scale cyclic fixed-bed reactor system designed to reform natural gas to syngas has been fabricated in another coordinated DOE project. This system was modified to reform natural gas to syngas and then convert syngas to H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The system produced 85% hydrogen (dry basis).

Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Translational energy characteristics of radicals and ions in a capillaritron supersonic nozzle discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cold translational energy distributions (T/sub s/ approx. 7 K) of OH radicals have been created by using the capillaritron, a supersonic nozzle discharge beam source. A mixture of CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ was used to produce the OH radical whose translational energy was determined by conventional time-of-flight techniques. The radicals were detected with an electron bombardment ionizer-quadrupole mass spectrometer assembly. Ions were also created in the discharge with Ar or CF/sub 4/, but the translational energy distribution was characterized by a temperature greater than or equal to f10/sup 4/ K. Ion energies were measured electrostatically. 35 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Allik, T.H.; Brady, B.B.; Flynn, G.W.; Spector, G.B.

1984-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Recommendations for Tritium Science and Technology Research and Development in Support of the Tritium Readiness Campaign, TTP-7-084  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 2006 and 2012 the Tritium Readiness Campaign Development and Testing Program produced significant advances in the understanding of in-reactor TPBAR performance. Incorporating these data into existing TPBAR performance models has improved permeation predictions, and the discrepancy between predicted and observed tritium permeation in the WBN1 coolant has been decreased by about 30%. However, important differences between predicted and observed permeation still remain, and there are significant knowledge gaps that hinder the ability to reliably predict other aspects of TPBAR performance such as tritium distribution, component integrity, and performance margins. Based on recommendations from recent Tritium Readiness Campaign workshops and reviews coupled with technical and programmatic priorities, high-priority activities were identified to address knowledge gaps in the near- (3-5 year), middle- (5-10 year), and long-term (10+ year) time horizons. It is important to note that there are many aspects to a well-integrated research and development program. The intent is not to focus exclusively on one aspect or another, but to approach the program in a holistic fashion. Thus, in addition to small-scale tritium science studies, ex-reactor tritium technology experiments such as TMED, and large-scale in-reactor tritium technology experiments such as TMIST, a well-rounded research and development program must also include continued analysis of WBN1 performance data and post-irradiation examination of TPBARs and lead use assemblies to evaluate model improvements and compare separate-effects and integral component behavior.

Senor, David J.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Transportation Infrastructure Requirement Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum...

328

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Timeline for Net Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

x By July 31 of each Forecast Year, BPA publishes all Load Following customers' Net Requirements data for the two years of the upcoming Rate Period. 17.6.1 7312010 Yes...

330

Selected Guidance & Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page contains the most requested NEPA guidance and requirement documents and those most often recommended by the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance. Documents are listed by agency, in...

331

Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Conditions Required by Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No No Sto H 2 NoIs it required by law "Violence on children"?164.512 (c) (1) H CE may disclose to government to LEO HCE may not disclose to LEO H No Yes No Required by law: "reporting certain type of injuries"? H disclose to LEO H 164.512 (f) (1) (ii) (C)(2) It provides that the request is specific and limited in scope

Khan, Javed I.

333

Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to determine the throughput capability of the coker so a scaled design could be developed that maximized feed rate for a given size of reactor. These tests were only partially successful because of equipment problems. A redesigned coker, which addressed the problems, has been build but not operated. A preliminary economic analysis conducted by MEG and an their engineering consultant concluded that the WRITE{trademark} process is a technically feasible method for upgrading bitumen and that it produces SCO that meets pipeline specifications for density. When compared to delayed coking, the industry benchmark for thermal upgrading of bitumen, WRITE{trademark} produced more SCO, less coke, less CO{sub 2} per barrel of bitumen fed, and had lower capital and operating costs. On the other hand, WRITE{trademark}'s lower processing severity yielded crude with higher density and a different product distribution for naphtha, light gas oil and vacuum oil that, taken together, might reduce the value of the SCO. These issues plus the completion of more detailed process evaluation and economics need to be resolved before WRITE{trademark} is deployed as a field-scale pilot.

Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

2009-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

334

RADICALS AND UNITS IN RAMANUJAN'S WORK Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and LiangCheng Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADICALS AND UNITS IN RAMANUJAN'S WORK Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang­Cheng Zhang. Typeset by AMS-TEX 1 #12;2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN, AND LIANG­CHENG ZHANG Radicals arise in other

Berndt, Bruce C.

335

High-Frequency (140-GHz) Time Domain EPR and ENDOR Spectroscopy: The Tyrosyl Radical-Diiron Cofactor in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Frequency (140-GHz) Time Domain EPR and ENDOR Spectroscopy: The Tyrosyl Radical EPR and ENDOR have been employed to characterize the tyrosyl radical (Y·)-diiron cofactor in the Y2 of 140-GHz time domain EPR and ENDOR to examine this system and demonstrates the capabilities

Griffin, Robert G.

336

Theoretical study of the ammoniated NH/sub 4/ radical and related structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ground- and some of the excited-state surfaces for the reaction of the Rydberg radical NH/sub 4/ to give either NH/sub 3/ + H or NH/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/ are computed. The preferred ground reaction channel is that observed experimentally, the formation of NH/sub 3/ + H. The Rydberg character, as well as the low barrier for fragmentation, is rationalized using a Rydberg extended-state structure correlation diagram. The excited-state surfaces show deep potential wells whose forms are also rationalized using this correlation diagram. Calculations on the surface of tetramethylammonium radical show no enhanced stability due to alkyl substitution. Comparative calculations on the complexation energies of HN/sub 4//sup +/ (NH/sub 3/)/sub n/ and NH/sub 4/(NH/sub 3/)/sub n/, n = 1-6, show the semiionic character of the Rydberg radical. The variation of stepwise complexation energies with n for the Rydberg species is not completely understood. The stability of solvated NH/sub 4/ radical in liquid NH/sub 3/ is estimated to be of the same order as (NH/sub 4//sup +/)/sub s/ + (e/sup -/)/sub s/.

Kassab, E.; Evleth, E.M.

1987-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

RIS-M-2366 KINETICS OF THE REACTION OF HYDROXYL RADICALS WITH ETHANE AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced by pulse radiolysis of water vapour and the kinetics of OH was followed by kinetic spectroscopy studied at atmospheric pressure and over the temperature range 300-400 K. Hydroxyl radicals were produced by pulse radiolysis of water vapour and the decay rate was studied by monitoring the tran- sient light

338

Hubs of brain functional networks are radically reorganized in comatose patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hubs of brain functional networks are radically reorganized in comatose patients S. Achard , C Human brain networks have topological properties in common with many other complex systems, prompting the question: what aspects of brain network organization are critical for distinctive functional properties

Boyer, Edmond

339

2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Highly stable tetrathiafulvalene radical dimers in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stoddart1 * Two [3]catenane `molecular flasks' have been designed to create stabilized, redox observation of p­p radical-cation dimers on the redox stimulation of electron rich or poor heterocycles, rather than the fundamental cornerstone of functional devices7 . Specifically, methyl viologen (MV2þ

Goddard III, William A.

340

The hydroxyl radical initiated oxidation of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere: a theoretical and experimental approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addition step. I then focus attention on the subsequent reactivity of the OH-isoprene adducts. Until recently, all four of the OH-isoprene adducts were supposed to have reacted with O2 via addition to form alkylperoxy radicals. Previous computational...

Tullos, Erin Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

From the schematic to the symbolic: the radical possibilities of the imagination in Kant's third Critique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has more radical possibilities than those of his post-Kantian critics. To display this, it is first pointed out that the crucial role the imagination plays in Kant's Copernican turn is not fully developed in his first Critique. Next, it is argued...

Camp, Ty D.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Radical History Review Issue 118 (Winter 2014) doi 10.1215/01636545-2350939  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Interview with David Graeber Hannah Chadeayne Appel Odd things happened in fall 2011 as Occupy Wall Street of membership in a new kind of political dialogue about who owes what to whom.1 I sat down with David Graeber background and your own political coming of age. David Graeber: I guess my childhood was full of radical

343

Polymer Reaction Engineering Laboratory -University of Maryland at College Park Free Radical Polymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymerization Micro-Dispersive Suspension Polymerization 1. Polymerization of methyl methacrylate polymerization (Y.J. Jung, C. Luciani, K.Y. Choi), J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 116, 3648-3658 (2010). 2. Inverse free radical suspension polymerization as a route to encapsulate biologically active materials (C.V. Luciani, K

Rubloff, Gary W.

344

Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Fused-Ring Persistent [1,2,4]Thiadiazinyl Radicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´zef Zienkiewicz and Piotr Kaszynski* Organic Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minnesota 55455 piotr.kaszynski@vanderbilt.edu Received. Halogenated radicals 1d and 1e were sufficiently stable for chromatographic isolation and vacuum sublimation

Kaszynski, Piotr

345

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature11718 Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not been achieved so far-temperature sensi- tivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evapora- tive cooling and a sufficientlyLETTER doi:10.1038/nature11718 Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical Benjamin K

346

Mechanisms for CF2 radical generation and loss on surfaces in fluorocarbon plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanisms for CF2 radical generation and loss on surfaces in fluorocarbon plasmas Da Zhanga fluorocarbon plasma etching, plasma-surface reactions result in the surface acting as either a source or sink investigated. © 2000 American Vacuum Society. S0734-2101 00 05106-X I. INTRODUCTION Fluorocarbon plasmas

Kushner, Mark

347

Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact o

Jochen Stutz

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

An electrocyclic strategy to poly(triarylmethyl radical) polymers: Potential organic ferromagnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent interest in organic ferromagnetism has been stimulated by the idea that large poly(triarylmethyl radical) polymers in which the radical centers are connected by [open quotes]meta[close quotes]-aryl groups may possess ferromagnetic properties. However, synthesis of these polyradicals has been limited by stepwise methods that are unsuitable for the preparation of large polymers. This limitation represents a primary challenge confronting the field. The authors have developed the first polymeric strategy to poly (m-triarylmethyl radical) precursors that involves an electrocyclic formation of the [open quotes]meta[close quotes]-substituted triarylmethyl chloride repeating unit from a polypropynol precursor. Poly[(E)-6-[beta]-chloroethenyl-1,3-phenylene-1-phenylpropynol-1,3-ylene] was prepared by palladium-catalyzed coupling of a bifunctional acetylene-aryl iodide monomer. The stable polymer reacted with thionyl chloride to form an unstable polychloroallene intermediate that underwent an electrocyclic conversion to the polyradical precursor, poly(1-chloro-2,7-naphthalenechlorobenzylidene). The reduced polyradicals exhibited properties of radical-radical coupling, and preparation of a second generation polymer that would overcome this problem has been initiated. The polymeric strategy was based on model studies that showed that (E)-3-(2-[beta]-chloroethenylphenyl)-1,1-diphenylpropynol, when converted to the corresponding chloroallene with thionyl chloride, underwent an electrocyclic conversion to [beta]-(1-chlornaphthyl)diphenylmethyl chloride. The strategy expanded upon the use of triarylpropynes as precursors to triarylmethyl chlorides, and extension of both approaches to higher analogs was demonstrated with dimeric systems. The electrocyclic processes were found to occur only for the trans-vinyl chlorides; the cis-isomers were found to undergo an alternative concerted cyclization to benzofluorene products.

Morelli, J.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

EPR Line Shifts and Line Shape Changes Due to Spin Exchange of Nitroxide Free Radicals in Liquids 2. Extension to High Spin Exchange Frequencies and Inhomogeneously  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPR Line Shifts and Line Shape Changes Due to Spin Exchange of Nitroxide Free Radicals in Liquids 2 for the EPR spectrum of a nitroxide free radical undergoing spin exchange in the slow exchange limit following

Bales, Barney

350

Requirements Definition Stage  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter addresses development of a Software Configuration Management Plan to track and control work products, analysis of the system owner/users' business processes and needs, translation of those processes and needs into formal requirements, and planning the testing activities to validate the performance of the software product.

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Minor in Philosophy Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012-05-23 Minor in Philosophy Requirements: 1. 18 hours of work in philosophy with grades of C- or better. 2. A 2.0 grade point average for all work attempted in philosophy. 3. 9 hours of upper division work in philosophy, with grades of C- or better. 4. Completion of at least one course, with a grade

Stowell, Michael

352

Requirements for Xenon International  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

353

324 Building B-Cell Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Packaging & Shipment RL Readiness Assessment Final Report [SEC 1 Thru 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A parallel readiness assessment (RA) was conducted by independent Fluor Hanford (FH) and U. S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) team to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for activities associated with the packaging and shipping of pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies from B-Cell in the 324 Building to the interim storage area at the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The RL review was conducted in parallel with the FH review in accordance with the Joint RL/FH Implementation Plan (Appendix B). The RL RA Team members were assigned a FH RA Team counterpart for the review. With this one-on-one approach, the RL RA Team was able to assess the FH Team's performance, competence, and adherence to the implementation plan and evaluate the level of facility readiness. The RL RA Team agrees with the FH determination that startup of the 324 Building B-Cell pressurized water reactor spent nuclear fuel packaging and shipping operations can safely proceed, pending completion of the identified pre-start items in the FH final report (see Appendix A), completion of the manageable list of open items included in the facility's declaration of readiness, and execution of the startup plan to operations.

HUMPHREYS, D C

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Are you ready to QUIT smoking or using other tobacco products? Help is now available on campus through Quit Smoking NOW (QSN). This FREE six-week tobacco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are you ready to QUIT smoking or using other tobacco products? Help is now available on campus tobacco-free. With the help of a trained smoking cessation facilitator, you can learn how to: Combat cravings, identify triggers, manage your moods and develop strategies that will help you quit for good

Weston, Ken

355

In 2006, the Alliance of Coastal Technology (ACT) evaluated the performance of five commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at eight test sites located throughout North America (Fig. 1, and a freshwater lake (Fig. 1) . The sensors used in this study consisted of: A backscatter Turbidity Probe ( =660 A transmissometer ( =660nm) ­ data denoted by cp Both scattering sensors were equipped with integrated copper wipers

Boss, Emmanuel S.

356

System Verification Through Reliability, Availability, Maintainability (RAM) Analysis & Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is authored by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype fourth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. A section in this document proposes that the NGNP will provide heat for process heat applications. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP is expected to meet high performance and availability targets relative to current state of the art systems and technology. One requirement for the NGNP is to provide heat for the generation of hydrogen for large scale productions and this process heat application is required to be at least 90% or more available relative to other technologies currently on the market. To reach this goal, a RAM Roadmap was developed highlighting the actions to be taken to ensure that various milestones in system development and maturation concurrently meet required availability requirements. Integral to the RAM Roadmap was the use of a RAM analytical/simulation tool which was used to estimate the availability of the system when deployed based on current design configuration and the maturation level of the system.

Emmanuel Ohene Opare, Jr.; Charles V. Park

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. Part 2. Effects of inorganic anions: quenching vs. radical formation at moderate and high anion concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical aspects of the interactions between excited 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and various inorganic anions are examined. The anions which quench triplet AQS can be divided into two groups: Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/ (group I) photoreduce AQS to AQS/sup -/ radical anion only at concentrations higher than that required for complete triplet quenching. The effect increases with concentration and passes through a maximum, with highest quantum yields of radical formation reaching approx. 1 for Cl/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/; on the other hand, NO/sub 2//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and N/sub 3//sup -/ (group II) give AQS/sup -/ in parallel to triplet quenching. The nature of the high-concentration effect shown by group I is analyzed. Some results obtained with mixtures of anions support the conclusion that triplet AQS is also responsible for this effect, and it is suggested that triple exciplexes of the type /sup 3/(AQS/sup -/.X/sub 2//sup -/) are involved. With this view and the recently proposed intraradical spin-orbit-coupling (IRSOC) model, a quantitative interpretation of the results is presented.

Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

1984-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. Part II. Effects of inorganic anions; quenching vs. radical formation at moderate and high anion concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical aspects of the interactions between excited 9, 10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and various inorganic anions are examined. The anions which quench triplet AQS can be divided into two groups: Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/ (Group I) photoreduce the quinone to AQS/sup -/ only at concentrations higher than that required for complete triplet quenching. The effect increases with concentration and passes through a maximum with highest quantum yields of radical formation reaching approx. 1 for Cl/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/; NO/sub 2//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ and N/sub 3//sup -/ (Group II) reduce AQS in parallel to triplet quenching. The nature of the high-concentration effect shown by Group I is analyzed. Some results obtained with mixtures of anions support the conclusion that triplet AQS is also responsible for this effect and it is suggested that triple exciplexes of the type /sup 3/(AQS/sup -/.X/sub 2//sup -/) are involved. With this view and the recently proposed intra-radical-spin-orbit-coupling (IRSOC) model, a quantitative interpretation of the results is presented.

Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

1983-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Evidence for Thiol-Dependent Production of Oxygen Radicals by 4-Methyl-5-pyrazinyl-3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a peroxide species that undergoes a trace metal-catalyzed, Fenton-type reaction to generate oxygen radicalsEvidence for Thiol-Dependent Production of Oxygen Radicals by 4-Methyl-5-pyrazinyl-3H-1,2-dithiole the conversion of molecular oxygen to reactive oxygen radicals. Using a plasmid-based assay that monitors DNA

Gates, Kent. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EPR Line Shifts and Line Shape Changes Due to Spin Exchange of Nitroxide Free Radicals Barney L. Bales* and Miroslav Peric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPR Line Shifts and Line Shape Changes Due to Spin Exchange of Nitroxide Free Radicals in Liquids; In Final Form: July 22, 1997X An expression for the EPR line shape of a nitroxide free radical undergoing,7,10-19 work has been devoted to the EPR spectral changes induced by spin exchange between radicals in liquids

Bales, Barney

362

LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

BER Science Network Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Implementation plan for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility Restart Operational Readiness Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary technical objective for the WERF Restart Project is to assess, upgrade where necessary, and implement management, documentation, safety, and operation control systems that enable the resumption and continued operation of waste treatment and storage operations in a manner that is compliant with all environment, safety, and quality requirements of the US Department of Energy and Federal and State regulatory agencies. Specific processes that will be resumed at WERF include compaction of low-level compatible waste; size reduction of LLW, metallic and wood waste; incineration of combustible LLW and MLLW; and solidification of low-level and mixed low-level incinerator bottom ash, baghouse fly ash, and compatible sludges and debris. WERF will also provide for the operation of the WWSB which includes storage of MLLW in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The future is yours--Get ready! Career options in scientific and technical fields. Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 50 page brochure was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory to encourage high school students to begin considering careers in the scientific and technical fields. The topics of the brochure include career selection, career options, a review of training required for each occupation, a collection of profiles of BNL employees describing how they chose and prepared for their careers, a description of BNL educational programs for high school students, and profiles of some of the students participating in these programs.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend the semi-empirical techniques of Benson and coworkers, and to extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, the authors undertook a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical transition-state-theory procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in the case the reagent possessed more than one nonequivalent H atoms.

Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Free Radical Polymerization of Styrene and Methyl Methacrylate in Various Room Temperature Ionic Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional free radical polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate was carried out in various room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The RTILs used in this research encompass a wide range of cations and anions. Typical cations include imidazolium, phosphonium, pyridinium, and pyrrolidinium; typical anions include amide, borate, chloride, imide, phosphate, and phosphinate. Reactions are faster and polymers obtained usually have higher molecular weights when compared to polymerizations carried out in volatile organic solvents under the same conditions. This shows that rapid rates of polymerization and high molecular weights are general features of conventional radical polymerizations in RTILs. Attempts to correlate the polarities and viscosities of the RTILs with the polymerization behavior fail to yield discernible trends.

Zhang, Hongwei [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments Vision and Hearing Students, faculty, staff documentation requirements: 1. Requirements of the PRACTITIONER: A) Ophthalmologists and optometrists of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated and signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

369

BES Science Network Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Required Annual Notices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergy Request For Report7Required

371

Required Annual Notices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergy Request For Report7RequiredAnnual

372

AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for NASA White Sands Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evidence for a radical relay mechanism during reaction of surface-immobilized molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of restricted mass transport on high-temperature, free-radical reactions has been explored through the use of organic compounds immobilized on silica surfaces by a thermally robust Si-O-C{sub aromatic} linkage. The rate of thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane(=DPP) at 375{degree}C under vacuum, by a free-radical chain pathway, was found to be very sensitive (factor of 40 variation) to the structure and orientation of a second, neighboring spacer molecule on the surface. Compared with the inert aromatic spacers, (e.g., biphenyl) it was found that spacer molecules containing reactive benzylic C-H bonds (e.g., diphenylmethane) are capable of accelerating the =DPP thermolysis by a process that is unique to diffusionally constrained systems. A mechanism involving rapid serial hydrogen transfer steps on the surface is proposed, which results in radical intermediates being relayed across the surface and hence overcoming classical diffusional limitations. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Thomas, K.B.; Biggs, C.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: GPH RQ = Requirement Program: 01848 LN = Line Plan: 3200MPH RG 5298 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS, 643, 653, 675, 677 or 695 LN 0030 - Environmental Health Sciences: EHS 501, 506, 507 or 508 LN 0040

Shyy, Wei

375

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING BSE PLAN REQUIREMENTS Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING BSE PLAN REQUIREMENTS Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 0880BSE Sub-Plan: RG 6856 BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Effective FA05/1560 (09/06/2005) RQ 4996 Program Subjects Effective FA05/1560 (09/06/2005) LN 0010 BIOMEDE

Shyy, Wei

376

RAMANUJAN'S ASSOCIATION WITH RADICALS IN INDIA Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and LiangCheng Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAMANUJAN'S ASSOCIATION WITH RADICALS IN INDIA Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang of n. Typeset by AMS-TEX 1 #12;2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN, AND LIANG­CHENG ZHANG

Berndt, Bruce C.

377

The electronic structure of the Tyr-Cys· free radical in galactose oxidase determined by EPR spectroscopy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The EPR spectrum of the Tyr-Cys· free radical in oxidized apoGAOX has been investigated, using a combination of approaches. Power saturation analysis has been used… (more)

Lee, Yuk Ki

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A review of "Radical Religion from Shakespeare to Milton: Figures of Nonconformity in Early Modern England." by Kristen Poole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

early modern radical religion has preoccupied his- torians like B. Reay, Phyllis Mack, Brian Manning, Christopher Hill, and Patrick Collinson for decades, literary scholars, with the exception of critics like Nigel Smith and David Loewenstein, are only...

Elizabeth Sauer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Snapshots of radical enzyme catalysis : the crystal structures of biotin synthase and lysine 5,6-aminomutase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) in the same pathway. To further probe the relationship of the adenosylmethionine and adenosylcobalamin-dependent radical enzymes, the crystal structure of lysine 5,6-aminomutase was determined to 2.8 [angstroms] ...

Berkovitch, Frederick, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A review of "The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630-1660" by Nicholas McDowell.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEWS 253 Nicholas McDowell. The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630?1660. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2003. x +219 pp. $72.00. Review by JASON PEACEY, HISTORY OF PARLIAMENT TRUST, LONDON. The ?radicals... the likes of Christopher Hill by the revisionists of the 1970s and 1980s. Historians, he argues, are still seeking to respond to this assault with weapons of its own creation, namely archival sources rather than printed pamphlets. McDowell arguably un...

Jason Peacey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Study of thermally activated radical pair separation in the anthraquinone/triethylamine photoredox system by fourier transform EPR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using fourier tranform electron paramagnetic resonance, the free radicals in the photoreduction of anthraquinone by triethylamine in alcohol solutions have been investigated. The detrapping kinetics have been described using some analytical form of the potential and the thermally averaged distance distribution of trapped radical pairs. This analytical form relates the binding potential, the diffusion constant, and the equilibrium distance. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Beckert, D. [Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Plueschau, M.; Dinse, K.P. [Univ. of Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Strasse (Germany)

1992-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Equipment Operational Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cielo is a massively parallel supercomputer funded by the DOE/NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, and operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES), a partnership between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The primary Cielo compute platform is physically located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model documents the capabilities and the environment to be provided for the Q1 FY12 Level 2 Cielo Capability Computing (CCC) Platform Production Readiness Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, or Sandia National Laboratories, but also addresses the needs of users working in the unclassified environment. The Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the Production Readiness Milestone user environment capabilities of the ASC community. A description of ACE requirements met, and those requirements that are not met, are included in each section of this document. The Cielo Computing Environment, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and reviewed throughout the tri-Lab community.

Vigil,Benny Manuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ballance, Robert [SNL; Haskell, Karen [SNL

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2002 and ending December 31, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Software and House Requirements Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a requirements engineer who puts her knowledge of software construction together with her creativity to come upSoftware and House Requirements Engineering: Lessons Learned in Combatting Requirements Creep creativity to try to come up with a plan for a house that will meet the customer's requirements. The customer

Berry, Daniel M.

386

Match Pumps to System Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency matching pumps to system requirements

Not Available

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Pyrolytic carbon free-radical evolution and irradiation damage of polyimide under low-energy proton irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionization and displacement effects are basic phenomena in damage processes of materials under space-particle irradiation. In this paper, the damage behaviors were investigated on the polyimide under proton irradiation using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra analysis and optical absorbance valuation. The results indicate that the proton irradiation induces the formation of pyrolytic carbon free-radical with a g value of 2.0025, and the population of free radicals increases with the irradiation fluence. The most important finding is that the irradiation-induced free-radical population increases linearly with the displacement damage dose, as does the optical degradation, whereas the ionization effect alone, during the irradiation, cannot induce the formation of pyrolytic carbon free radical. Furthermore, during the post storage, after irradiation, the free-radical population decreases following a sum of an exponential and a linear mode with the storage time. It is interesting that, during the post storage, the recovery of the degraded optical absorbance of the polyimide follows a similar mode to that of free radicals, and the characteristic time constant changes with the wavelength of the optical spectra.

Sun Chengyue; Wu Yiyong; Xiao Jingdong; Li Ruifeng; Yang Dezhuang; He Shiyu [National Key Lab in Materials Behaviors and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

Report of the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Rocky Flats Plant, Building 707  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of the Operational Readiness Review (ORR) activities for the resumption of Building 707 operations at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). The EH OA was simultaneously conducted with the Office of Defense Programs (DP) line management ORR, which was conducted from September 21 to October 2, 1992, and November 2 to 13, 1992. The EH OA evaluated the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the DP ORR. Based on its oversight assessment, the EH OA believes that Building 707 operations may be safely resumed contingent upon satisfactory resolution of all DP ORR findings. The EH OA determined that the DP ORR was conducted in a comprehensive and effective manner and represents an adequate basis for recommending resumption of Building 707 operations. The EH OA was based primarily on an evaluation of the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the DP ORR and addressed the following areas: Management and Organization, Industrial Safety, Fire Protection, Industrial Hygiene, Conduct of Operations, Maintenance, Quality Assurance, and Training. In a limited number of these areas, the EH OA conducted independent vertical-slice reviews DP ORR results.

Krupar, J.J. Jr.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

390

Report of the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Rocky Flats Plant, Building 707  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of the Operational Readiness Review (ORR) activities for the resumption of Building 707 operations at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). The EH OA was simultaneously conducted with the Office of Defense Programs (DP) line management ORR, which was conducted from September 21 to October 2, 1992, and November 2 to 13, 1992. The EH OA evaluated the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the DP ORR. Based on its oversight assessment, the EH OA believes that Building 707 operations may be safely resumed contingent upon satisfactory resolution of all DP ORR findings. The EH OA determined that the DP ORR was conducted in a comprehensive and effective manner and represents an adequate basis for recommending resumption of Building 707 operations. The EH OA was based primarily on an evaluation of the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the DP ORR and addressed the following areas: Management and Organization, Industrial Safety, Fire Protection, Industrial Hygiene, Conduct of Operations, Maintenance, Quality Assurance, and Training. In a limited number of these areas, the EH OA conducted independent vertical-slice reviews DP ORR results.

Krupar, J.J. Jr.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GE Global Research is developing an innovative energy technology for coal gasification with high efficiency and near-zero pollution. This Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology simultaneously converts coal, steam and air into three separate streams of hydrogen-rich gas, sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and high-temperature, high-pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in gas turbines. This is the draft final report for the first stage of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program. The UFP technology development program encompassed lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP concept. Modeling and economic assessments were also key parts of this program. The chemical and mechanical feasibility were established via lab and bench-scale testing, and a pilot plant was designed, constructed and operated, demonstrating the major UFP features. Experimental and preliminary modeling results showed that 80% H{sub 2} purity could be achieved, and that a UFP-based energy plant is projected to meet DOE efficiency targets. Future work will include additional pilot plant testing to optimize performance and reduce environmental, operability and combined cycle integration risks. Results obtained to date have confirmed that this technology has the potential to economically meet future efficiency and environmental performance goals.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Raul Subia; Arnaldo Frydman; Parag Kulkarni; Jennifer Schwerman; Valadimir Zamansky; John Reinker; Kanchan Mondal; Lubor Stonawski; Hana Loreth; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Szymanski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Materials Handling Equipment Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a manufacturing readiness assessment (MRA) of fuel cell systems and fuel cell stacks for back-up power and material handling applications (MHE). To facilitate the MRA, manufacturing readiness levels (MRL) were defined that were based on the Technology Readiness Levels previously established by the US Department of Energy (DOE). NREL assessed the extensive existing hierarchy of MRLs developed by Department of Defense (DoD) and other Federal entities, and developed a MRL scale adapted to the needs of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) and to the status of the fuel cell industry. The MRL ranking of a fuel cell manufacturing facility increases as the manufacturing capability transitions from laboratory prototype development through Low Rate Initial Production to Full Rate Production. DOE can use MRLs to address the economic and institutional risks associated with a ramp-up in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell production. In 2010, NREL updated this assessment, including additional manufacturers, an assessment of market developments since the original report, and a comparison of MRLs between 2008 and 2010.

Wheeler, D.; Ulsh, M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q98.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

None

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

New oxygen radical source using selective sputtering of oxygen atoms for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a new oxygen radical source based on the reactive sputtering phenomena of a titanium target for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films. In this oxygen radical source, oxygen radicals are mainly produced by two mechanisms: selective sputter-emission of oxygen atoms from the target surface covered with a titanium oxide layer, and production of high-density oxygen plasma in the space near the magnetron-sputtering cathode. Compared with molecular oxygen ions, the amount of atomic oxygen radicals increased significantly with an increase in discharge current so that atomic oxygen radicals were mainly produced by this radical source. It should be noted that oxygen atoms were selectively sputtered from the target surface, and titanium atoms sputter-emitted from the target cathode were negligibly small. The amount of oxygen radicals supplied from this radical source increased linearly with increasing discharge current, and oxygen radicals of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/s/cm{sup 2} were supplied to the substrate surface at a discharge current of 1.2 A. We conclude that our newly developed oxygen radical source can be a good tool to achieve high rate deposition and to control the structure of TiO{sub 2} films for many industrial design applications.

Yasuda, Yoji; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi [Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Surface Engineering of Materials Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

DECREASE Final Technical Report: Development of a Commercial Ready Enzyme Application System for Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion of biomass to sugars plays a central in reducing our dependence on petroleum, as it allows production of a wide range of biobased fuels and chemicals, through fermentation of those sugars. The DECREASE project delivers an effective enzyme cocktail for this conversion, enabling reduced costs for producing advanced biofuels such as cellulosic ethanol. Benefits to the public contributed by growth of the advanced biofuels industry include job creation, economic growth, and energy security. The DECREASE primary project objective was to develop a two-fold improved enzyme cocktail, relative to an advanced cocktail (CZP00005) that had been developed previously (from 2000- 2007). While the final milestone was delivery of all enzyme components as an experimental mixture, a secondary objective was to deploy an improved cocktail within 3 years following the close of the project. In February 2012, Novozymes launched Cellic CTec3, a multi-enzyme cocktail derived in part from components developed under DECREASE. The externally validated performance of CTec3 and an additional component under project benchmarking conditions indicated a 1.8-fold dose reduction in enzyme dose required for 90% conversion (based on all available glucose and xylose sources) of NREL dilute acid pretreated PCS, relative to the starting advanced enzyme cocktail. While the ability to achieve 90% conversion is impressive, targeting such high levels of biomass digestion is likely not the most cost effective strategy. Novozymes techno economic modeling showed that for NREL's dilute acid pretreated corn stover (PCS), 80% target conversion enables a lower total production cost for cellulosic ethanol than for 90% conversion, and this was also found to be the case when cost assumptions were based on the NREL 2002 Design Report. A 1.8X dose-reduction was observed for 80% conversion in the small scale (50 g) DECREASE benchmark assay for CTec3 and an additional component. An upscaled experiment (in 0.5 kg kettle reactors) was performed to compare the starting enzyme mixture CZP00005 with CTec3 alone; these results indicated a 1.9X dose- reduction for 80% conversion. The CTec3 composition does not include the best available enzyme components from the DECREASE effort. While these components are not yet available in a commercial product, experimental mixtures were assayed in a smaller scale assay using DECREASE PCS, at high solids loadings (21.5% TS). The results indicated that the newer mixtures required 2.9X-less enzyme for 90% conversion, and 3.2X-less enzyme for 80% conversion, relative to the starting enzyme cocktail. In conclusion, CTec3 delivers a 1.8-1.9X dose reduction on NREL PCS at high solids loadings, and the next generation enzyme from Novozymes will continue to show dramatically improved biochemical performance. CTec3 allows reduced costs today, and the experimental cocktails point to continued biotechnological improvements that will further drive down costs for biorefineries of tomorrow.

Teter, Sarah A

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

397

Radical kinetics in an inductively-coupled plasma in CF4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiofrequency discharges in low pressure fluorocarbon gases are used for anisotropic and selective etching of dielectric materials (SiO2 and derivatives), a key step in the manufacture of integrated circuits. Plasmas in these gases are capable not only of etching, but also of depositing fluorocarbon films, depending on a number of factors including the ion bombardment energy, the gas composition and the surface temperature: this behavior is indeed responsible for etch selectivity between materials and plays a role in achieving the desired etched feature profiles. Free radical species, such as CFx and fluorine atoms, play important but complex roles in these processes. We have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), with time and space resolution in pulsed plasmas, to elucidate the kinetics of CF and CF2 radicals, elucidating their creation, destruction and transport mechanisms within the reactor. Whereas more complex gas mixtures are used in industrial processes, study of the relatively simple system of a pure CF4 plasma is more appropriate for the study of mechanisms. Previously the technique was applied to the study of single-frequency capacitively-coupled 'reactive ion etching' reactors, where the substrate (placed on the powered electrode) is always bombarded with high-energy CF{sub x}{sup +} ions. In this case it was found that the major source of CFx free radicals was neutralization, dissociation and backscattering of these incident ions, rather than direct dissociation of the feedstock gas. Subsequently, an inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) in pure CF4 was studied. This system has a higher plasma density, leading to higher gas dissociation, whereas the energy of ions striking the reactor surfaces is much lower (in the absence of additional RF biasing). The LIF technique also allows the gas temperature to be measured with good spatial and temporal resolution. This showed large gas temperature gradients within the ICP reactor, which must be taken into account in reactive species transport. In the ICP reactor we saw significant production of CF and CF2 radicals at the reactor top and bottom surfaces, at rates that cannot be explained by the neutralization of incident CF{sub x}{sup +} ions. These two species are also lost at very high rates in the gas phase. We postulate that these two phenomena are caused by electron-impact excitation of these radicals into low-lying metastable levels. The metastable molecules produced (that are invisible to LIF) diffuse to the reactor walls where they are quenched back to their ground state. In the afterglow the gas cools rapidly and contracts, causing gas convection. Whereas the density of the more reactive species decays monotonically in the afterglow, the density of CF2 initially increases. This is partly due to the gas contraction, bringing back CF2 (which is a relatively stable species) from the outer regions of the reactor, and partly due to chemical reactions producing CF2, as it is more thermodynamically stable than the other radical species such as CF and CF3.

Booth, J.P.; Abada, H.; Chabert, P. [Laboratoire de Physique et Technologie des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Graves, D.B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data: Community Requirements and Information Engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to advance geothermal energy as a viable renewable energy contender, the U.S. Department of Energy is investing in the development of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). This paper outlines efforts among geothermal data providers nationwide to supply cutting edge geo-informatics. NGDS geothermal data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are discussed. In particular, this paper addresses the various types of data required to effectively assess geothermal energy potential and why simple links to existing data are insufficient. To create a platform for ready access by all geothermal stakeholders, the NGDS includes a work plan that addresses data assets and resources of interest to users, a survey of data providers, data content models, and how data will be exchanged and promoted, as well as lessons learned within the geothermal community.

Anderson, Arlene [United States Department of Energy; Blackwell, David [Southern Methodist University; Chickering, Cathy [Southern Methodist University; Boyd, Toni [Oregon Institute of Technology; Horne, Roland [Stanford University; MacKenzie, Matthew [Uberity Technology Corporation; Moore, Joseph [University of Utah; Nickull, Duane [Uberity Technology Corporation; Richard, Stephen [Arizona Geological survey; Shevenell, Lisa A. [University of Nevada, Reno

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Economic Incentives for Cybersecurity: Using Economics to Design Technologies Ready for Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cybersecurity practice lags behind cyber technology achievements. Solutions designed to address many problems may and do exist but frequently cannot be broadly deployed due to economic constraints. Whereas security economics focuses on the cost/benefit analysis and supply/demand, we believe that more sophisticated theoretical approaches, such as economic modeling, rarely utilized, would derive greater societal benefits. Unfortunately, today technologists pursuing interesting and elegant solutions have little knowledge of the feasibility for broad deployment of their results and cannot anticipate the influences of other technologies, existing infrastructure, and technology evolution, nor bring the solutions lifecycle into the equation. Additionally, potentially viable solutions are not adopted because the risk perceptions by potential providers and users far outweighs the economic incentives to support introduction/adoption of new best practices and technologies that are not well enough defined. In some cases, there is no alignment with redominant and future business models as well as regulatory and policy requirements. This paper provides an overview of the economics of security, reviewing work that helped to define economic models for the Internet economy from the 1990s. We bring forward examples of potential use of theoretical economics in defining metrics for emerging technology areas, positioning infrastructure investment, and building real-time response capability as part of software development. These diverse examples help us understand the gaps in current research. Filling these gaps will be instrumental for defining viable economic incentives, economic policies, regulations as well as early-stage technology development approaches, that can speed up commercialization and deployment of new technologies in cybersecurity.

Vishik, Claire [Intel Corporation] [Intel Corporation; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL] [ORNL; Ott, David [Intel Corporation] [Intel Corporation

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Electron attachment to C{sub 2} fluorocarbon radicals at high temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal electron attachment to the radical species C{sub 2}F{sub 3} and C{sub 2}F{sub 5} has been studied over the temperature range 300–890 K using the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry technique. Both radicals exclusively undergo dissociative attachment to yield F{sup ?}. The rate constant for C{sub 2}F{sub 5} shows little dependence over the temperature range, remaining ?4 × 10{sup ?9}?cm{sup 3}?s{sup ?1}. The rate constant for C{sub 2}F{sub 3} attachment rises steeply with temperature from 3 × 10{sup ?11} cm{sup 3} s{sup ?1} at 300?K to 1 × 10{sup ?9} cm{sup 3} s{sup ?1} at 890 K. The behaviors of both species at high temperature are in agreement with extrapolations previously made from data below 600?K using a recently developed kinetic modeling approach. Measurements were also made on C{sub 2}F{sub 3}Br and C{sub 2}F{sub 5}Br (used in this work as precursors to the radicals) over the same temperature range, and, for C{sub 2}F{sub 5}Br as a function of electron temperature. The attachment rate constants to both species rise with temperature following Arrhenius behavior. The attachment rate constant to C{sub 2}F{sub 5}Br falls with increasing electron temperature, in agreement with the kinetic modeling. The current data fall in line with past predictions of the kinetic modeling approach, again showing the utility of this simplified approach.

Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A., E-mail: afrl.rvborgmailbox@kirtland.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicle Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Study of radicals, clusters and transition state species by anion photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free radicals, elemental and van der Waals clusters and transition state species for bimolecular chemical reactions are investigated using anion photoelectron spectroscopy. Several low-lying electronic states of ozone have been identified via photoelectron spectroscopy of O{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. A characterization of these states is important to models for atmospheric ozone reaction kinetics. The fluoroformyloxyl radical, FCO{sub 2}, has been investigated, providing vibrational frequencies and energies for two electronic states. The technique has also been employed to make the first direct observation and characterization of the NNO{sub 2} molecule. Several electronic states are observed for this species which is believed to play a role as a reactive intermediate in the N + NO{sub 2} reaction. The experimental results for all three of these radicals are supplemented by ab initio investigations of their molecular properties. The clusters investigations include studies of elemental carbon clusters (C{sub 2}{sup {minus}} {minus} C{sub 11}{sup {minus}}), and van der Waals clusters (X{sup {minus}}(CO{sub 2}){sub n}, X = I, Br, Cl; n {le} 13 and I{sup {minus}} (N{sub 2}O){sub n=1--11}). Primarily linear clusters are observed for the smaller carbon clusters, while the spectra of the larger clusters contain contribution from cyclic anion photodetachment. Very interesting ion-solvent interactions are observed in the X{sup {minus}}(CO{sub 2})n clusters. The transition state regions for several bimolecular chemical reactions have also been investigated by photodetachment of a negative ion precursor possessing a geometry similar to that of the transition state species. These spectra show features which are assigned to motions of the unstable neutral complex existing between reactants and products.

Arnold, D.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

403

Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Requirements...

404

Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli T. Khericha

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

Ronald R. Barden

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ANSI Essential Requirements: Due process requirements for American  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANSI Essential Requirements: Due process requirements for American National Standards Edition: January 2010 Copyright by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), 25 West 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, New York 10036. This material may be copied without permission from ANSI only

407

Requirements Identification, Analysis and Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis, and Management adds detail and rigor to the Mission Analysis output by: Refining the initial customer input into formal Customer Requirements Identifying any...

408

Study of b{anti b} production in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation at {radical}s = 29 GeV with the aid of neural networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author presents a measurement of {sigma}(b{anti b})/{sigma}(q{anti q}) in the annihilation process e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} q{anti q} {yields} hadrons at {radical}s = 29 GeV. The analysis is based on 66 pb{sup {minus}1} of data collected between 1984 and 1986 with the TPC/2{gamma} detector at PEP. To identify bottom events, he uses a neural network with inputs that are computed from the 3-momenta of all of the observed charged hadrons in each event. He also presents a study of bias in techniques for measuring inclusive {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, and p/{anti p} production in the annihilation process e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} b{anti b} {yields} hadrons at {radical}s = 29 GeV, using a neural network to identify bottom-quark jets. In this study, charged particles are identified by a simultaneous measurement of momentum and ionization energy loss (dE/dx).

Lambert, D.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Physics Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

Evans, R.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry/Biotechnology Graduate Program. A detailed account of the academic requirements and procedures is provided for graduate students in chemistry; to promote consistency in procedures and standards; and to provide a basis for communication between

Kounaves, Samuel P.

411

Degree Requirements COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or better is required in ECON 2000 (Engineering Economics), Philosophy 2244 (Engineering Ethics), and ENGLDegree Requirements COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING B.S. in Electrical Engineering Effective Date: 08) 6 Total 30 MUST SELECT ONE Computer Engineering Concentration Course Name/ # Credit Hours Course

Kulp, Mark

412

Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergy Request ForForms of1, 2

413

Predictions for {radical} (s) =200A; GeV Au+Au collisions from relativistic hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relativistic hydrodynamical model HYLANDER-C is used to give estimates for single inclusive particle momentum spectra in {radical} (s) =200 GeV/nucleon Au+Au collisions that will be investigated experimentally in the near future. The predictions are based on initial conditions that the initial fireball has a longitudinal extension of 1.6 fm and an initial energy density of 30.8 GeV/fm{sup 3} as obtained from a cascade model. For the collision energy considered here, different stopping scenarios are explored for the first time. Our calculations give particle yields of the order of 10thinsp000 to 20thinsp000 charged particles per event. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Schlei, B.R. [Physics Division, P-25, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Physics Division, P-25, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Schlei, B.R.; Strottman, D. [Theoretical Division, DDT-DO, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, DDT-DO, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ready, set...go!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

any proof participatory ergonomics works? • What does thefor changes in an ergonomics program or intervention •of change • Changes in ergonomics program or intervention

Alexandre, Melanie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Readiness Review RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoansDepartment ofScoreEO-05-01:Department

416

ARM - Ingest Readiness Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAXAssociated Status ReportsFormsIngest

417

Construction Readiness RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI:FresnoM-WG Idaho,Construction Project Safety

418

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystemsU.S. TALKS BPA

419

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystemsU.S. TALKS BPADECEMBER 2012

420

Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommitteeRenewable1234DepartmentDepartment of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Density Functional Theory Study of the Mechanism of Free Radical Generation in the System Vanadate/PCA/H2O2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with H2O2 releases HOO· free radicals and generates V(IV) species, which are capable of generating HOA Density Functional Theory Study of the Mechanism of Free Radical Generation in the System for HOO· generation. It is also found that species containing two pca ligands and an H2O2 molecule do

Bell, Alexis T.

422

Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

to support the determinations and findings (D&F) required by FAR 17.502-2 to the contracting officer. Provide this information as an attachment or coordinate with the...

423

Effect of xenobiotics on the respiratory activity of rat heart mitochondria and the concomitant formation of superoxide radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the xenobiotics atrazine, benzene, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), lindane, toluene, and xylenol on the respiration of isolated rate heart mitochondria were studied. Bioenergetic parameters such as respiratory control (RC) and ATP/oxygen (P/O) values decreased considerably in the presence of these substances, and a concomitant increase of superoxide radical (O[sub 2][sup [minus

Stolze, K.; Nohl, H. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

RADICALS AND UNITS IN RAMANUJAN'S WORK Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang--Cheng Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADICALS AND UNITS IN RAMANUJAN'S WORK Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang--Cheng Zhang's lost notebook. Typeset by A M S­T E X 1 #12; 2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN, AND LIANG--CHENG ZHANG

Berndt, Bruce C.

425

RAMANUJAN'S ASSOCIATION WITH RADICALS IN INDIA Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang--Cheng Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAMANUJAN'S ASSOCIATION WITH RADICALS IN INDIA Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang and g n for certain even values of n. Typeset by A M S­T E X 1 #12; 2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN

Berndt, Bruce C.

426

Internal Energy Dependence of the H + Allene/H + Propyne Product Branching from the Unimolecular Dissociation of 2-Propenyl Radicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Energy Dependence of the H + Allene/H + Propyne Product Branching from the Unimolecular product channels as a function of internal energy in the dissociating radical isomer. The data resolve with internal energy to the two isomeric product channels: Based on energetic considerations alone, one expects

Butler, Laurie J.

427

A Pulse Radiolysis Investigation of the Reactions of Tributyl Phosphate with the Radical Products of Aqueous Nitric Acid Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tributyl phosphate (TBP) is the most common organic compound used in liquid-liquid separations for the recovery of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium from acidic nuclear fuel dissolutions. The goal of these processes is to extract the actinides while leaving fission products in the acidic, aqueous, phase. However, the radiolytic degradation of TBP has been shown to reduce the separation factors for fission products, and to impede the back-extraction of the actinides during stripping. As most previous investigations of the radiation chemistry of TBP have focused on steady state radiolysis and stable product identification, with dibutylphosphoric acid (HDBP) invariably being the major product, here we have determined room temperature rate constants for the reactions TBP and HDBP with the hydroxyl radical ((5.00 +/- 0.02) x 109, (4.40 +/- 0.10) x 109), hydrogen atom ((1.8 +/- 0.2) x 108, (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 108), nitrate radical ((4.3 +/- 0.7) x 106, (2.9 +/- 0.2) x 106) and nitrite radical (< 2 x 105, < 2 x 105) M-1 s-1 with TBP and HDBP, respectively. These data are used to discuss the mechanism of TBP radical-induced degradation.

Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen R. Mezyk; Leigh R. Martin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Synthesis of photo-and pH-responsive composite nanoparticles using a two-step controlled radical polymerization method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polymerization method Haike Feng a,b , Yi Zhao a , Maxime Pelletier a , Yi Dan b,*, Yue Zhao a,* a De polymerizations Stimuli-responsive polymers a b s t r a c t We present a versatile synthetic method for photo transfer (RAFT) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Crosslinked nanoparticles of a random

Zhao, Yue

429

Photodissociation dynamics of the CNN free radical Ryan T. Bise, Alexandra A. Hoops, Hyeon Choi,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V. These values, coupled with recent D0 RH and D298 RH values from Clifford et al. J. Phys. Chem. 102, 7100 1998 of the CNN radical in combustion processes, accurate values for the dissociation energy, heat of formation is the 3 overtone. With this new value for the 3 frequency, similar force constants were found for the C

Neumark, Daniel M.

430

ROFESSOR SUSAN J SMITH doesn't look like a radical. Tall, elegant and softly spoken she  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

26 CAM 59 #12;P ROFESSOR SUSAN J SMITH doesn't look like a radical. Tall, elegant and softly spoken she might be, but under that calm exterior, Professor Smith has a startling ­ and seemingly highly, Susan J Smith (the initial, she says, essential in a world dictated by Google) rather enjoys swimming

431

Fusion technology status and requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

Thomassen, K.I.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

432

Meeting Federal Energy Security Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the opportunity to increase the scope of federal-utility partnerships for meeting energy security requirements.

433

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Hazardous Air Pollutant Requirements and the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the US Department of Energy -- Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCTP) is to provide the US energy marketplace with advanced, efficient, and environmentally sound coal-based technologies. The design, construction, and operation of Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects (CCTDP) will generate data needed to make informed, confident decisions on the commercial readiness of these technologies. These data also will provide information needed to ensure a proactive response by DOE and its industrial partners to the establishment of new regulations or a reactive response to existing regulations promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The objectives of this paper are to: (1) Present a preliminary examination of the potential implications of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) -- Title 3 Hazardous Air Pollutant requirements to the commercialization of CCTDP; and (2) help define options available to DOE and its industrial partners to respond to this newly enacted Legislation.

Moskowitz, P.D.; DePhillips, M.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hemenway, A. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Hazardous Air Pollutant Requirements and the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the US Department of Energy -- Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCTP) is to provide the US energy marketplace with advanced, efficient, and environmentally sound coal-based technologies. The design, construction, and operation of Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects (CCTDP) will generate data needed to make informed, confident decisions on the commercial readiness of these technologies. These data also will provide information needed to ensure a proactive response by DOE and its industrial partners to the establishment of new regulations or a reactive response to existing regulations promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The objectives of this paper are to: (1) Present a preliminary examination of the potential implications of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) -- Title 3 Hazardous Air Pollutant requirements to the commercialization of CCTDP; and (2) help define options available to DOE and its industrial partners to respond to this newly enacted Legislation.

Moskowitz, P.D.; DePhillips, M.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hemenway, A. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H{yields}WW{yields}l{nu}jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H{yields}WW{yields}l{nu}jj channel in 1.04 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at {radical}(s)=7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeV

Aad, G.; Ahles, F.; Beckingham, M.; Bernhard, R.; Bitenc, U.; Bruneliere, R.; Caron, S.; Christov, A.; Consorti, V.; Eckert, S.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Flechl, M.; Glatzer, J. [Fakultaet fuer Mathematik und Physik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg i. Br. (Germany); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma (United States); Abdallah, J.; Bosman, M.; Casado, M. P.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Conidi, M. C.; Demirkoz, B. [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies and Departament de Fisica de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and ICREA, Barcelona (Spain)

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

436

Network Requirements Workshop - Documents and Background Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science...

437

SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Requirements Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements Management Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners,...

438

HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents additional resources on loan standards and requirements from Elise Avers' presentation on HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements.

439

Johnson Noise Thermometry System Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is intended to capture the requirements for the architecture of the developmental electronics for the ORNL-lead drift-free Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) project conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development (R&D) program. The requirements include not only the performance of the system but also the allowable measurement environment of the probe and the allowable physical environment of the associated electronics. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [1].

Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Roberts, Michael [ORNL; Ezell, N Dianne Bull [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the vinoxy (CH{sub 2}CHO) radical  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the vinoxy (CH{sub 2}CHO) radical have been studied using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photodissociation cross section over the B{sup 2}A{double_prime} {l_arrow} X{sup 2}A{double_prime} band is measured, and photofragment translational energy and angular distributions are obtained at several excitation energies. For CH{sub 2}CHO, predissociation is observed over the entire band, including several transitions near the band origin which were seen previously in laser-induced fluorescence experiments. Two dissociation channels are seen: CH{sub 3} + CO and H + CH{sub 2}CO. The CH{sub 3} + CO channel was investigated in considerable detail and appears to proceed via internal conversion to the CH{sub 2}CHO ground state followed by isomerization to CH{sub 3}CO and subsequent dissociation. The translational energy distributions for this channel suggest an isomerization barrier in the range of 2 eV with respect to CH{sub 3} + CO products.

Osborn, D.L.; Choi, H.; Neumark, D.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Theoretical study of radiative electron attachment to CN, C2H, and C4H radicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A first-principle theoretical approach to study the process of radiative electron attachment is developed and applied to the negative molecular ions CN$^-$, C$_4$H$^-$, and C$_2$H$^-$. Among these anions, the first two have already been observed in the interstellar space. Cross sections and rate coefficients for formation of these ions by radiative electron attachment to the corresponding neutral radicals are calculated. For completeness of the theoretical approach, two pathways for the process have been considered: (i) A direct pathway, in which the electron in collision with the molecule spontaneously emits a photon and forms a negative ion in one of the lowest vibrational levels, and (ii) an indirect, or two-step pathway, in which the electron is initially captured through non-Born-Oppenheimer coupling into a vibrationally resonant excited state of the anion, which then stabilizes by radiative decay. We develop a general model to describe the second pathway and show that its contribution to the formation o...

Douguet, Nicolas; Raoult, Maurice; Dulieu, Olivier; Orel, Ann E; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF OH AND CN RADICALS IN THE COMA OF COMET ENCKE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple potential parent species have been proposed to explain CN abundances in comet comae, but the parent has not been definitively identified for all comets. This study examines the spatial distribution of CN radicals in the coma of comet Encke and determines the likelihood that CN is a photodissociative daughter of HCN in the coma. Comet Encke is the shortest orbital period (3.3 years) comet known and also has a low dust-to-gas ratio based on optical observations. Observations of CN were obtained from 2003 October 22 to 24, using the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. To determine the parent of CN, the classical vectorial model was modified by using a cone shape in order to reproduce Encke's highly aspherical and asymmetric coma. To test the robustness of the modified model, the spatial distribution of OH was also modeled. This also allowed us to obtain CN/OH ratios in the coma. Overall, we find the CN/OH ratio to be 0.009 {+-} 0.004. The results are consistent with HCN being the photodissociative parent of CN, but we cannot completely rule out other possible parents such as CH{sub 3}CN and HC{sub 3}N. We also found that the fan-like feature spans {approx}90 Degree-Sign , consistent with the results of Woodney et al..

Ihalawela, Chandrasiri A.; Pierce, Donna M.; Dorman, Garrett R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 5167, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5167 (United States); Cochran, Anita L., E-mail: cai11@msstate.edu, E-mail: ci856509@ohio.edu, E-mail: dmp149@msstate.edu, E-mail: grd33@msstate.edu, E-mail: anita@barolo.as.utexas.edu [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1402, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

PROTO-PLANETARY DISK CHEMISTRY RECORDED BY D-RICH ORGANIC RADICALS IN CARBONACEOUS CHONDRITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Insoluble organic matter (IOM) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites has preserved its chemical composition and isotopic heterogeneity since the solar system formed {approx}4.567 billion years ago. We have identified the carrier moieties of isotopically anomalous hydrogen in IOM isolated from the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite. Data from high spatial resolution, quantitative isotopic NanoSIMS mapping of Orgueil IOM combined with data from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that organic radicals hold all the deuterium excess (relative to the bulk IOM) in distinct, micrometer-sized, D-rich hotspots. Taken together with previous work, the results indicate that an isotopic exchange reaction took place between pre-existing organic compounds characterized by low D/H ratios and D-rich gaseous molecules, such as H{sub 2}D{sup +} or HD{sub 2} {sup +}. This exchange reaction most likely took place in the diffuse outer regions of the proto-planetary disk around the young Sun, offering a model that reconciles meteoritic and cometary isotopic compositions of organic molecules.

Remusat, Laurent; Robert, Francois; Meibom, Anders; Mostefaoui, Smail [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et Cosmochimie du Museum, UMR7202, Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 57 rue Cuvier, Case 52, 75005 Paris (France); Delpoux, Olivier; Binet, Laurent; Gourier, Didier [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, UMR CNRS 7574, ENSCP, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Derenne, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Geochimie organique et minerale de l'environnement, UMR CNRS 7618, BioEMCo, UPMC, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2008 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

Zadok, Erez

445

Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2009 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

Zadok, Erez

446

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE and procedures is provided. The intent is to describe the programs and explain the rationale behind them of the Department; to promote consistency in procedures and standards; and to provide a basis for communication

Kounaves, Samuel P.

447

AMS vs. NWS: Educational Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Reconstruction of past climates · Climate models · Causes of past and future climate change #12;Capstone methods · Oral, written, and multimedia communication ­ Ability to create and deliver scientific ­ Ability to effectively communicate with technical and lay audiences using scientific evidence #12;Required

448

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in the technology programs must satisfy the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS for the technology programs are listed by subject matter in three major categories: (A) Basic Subjects, (B) Advanced

Walter, M.Todd

449

Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities Students, faculty, staff, and campus guests wishing to request accommodations due to learning disabilities should refer to the following documentation of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated, signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

450

Determining when a set of compute nodes participating in a barrier operation on a parallel computer are ready to exit the barrier operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for determining when a set of compute nodes participating in a barrier operation on a parallel computer are ready to exit the barrier operation that includes, for each compute node in the set: initializing a barrier counter with no counter underflow interrupt; configuring, upon entering the barrier operation, the barrier counter with a value in dependence upon a number of compute nodes in the set; broadcasting, by a DMA engine on the compute node to each of the other compute nodes upon entering the barrier operation, a barrier control packet; receiving, by the DMA engine from each of the other compute nodes, a barrier control packet; modifying, by the DMA engine, the value for the barrier counter in dependence upon each of the received barrier control packets; exiting the barrier operation if the value for the barrier counter matches the exit value.

Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

ESR lineshape and {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals – Joint analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d{sub 16} containing {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz–20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the {sup 1}H relaxation of the solvent. The {sup 1}H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin–nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

Kruk, D., E-mail: danuta.kruk@matman.uwm.edu.pl [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Sloneczna 54, PL-10710 Olsztyn (Poland); Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan (Poland)] [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan (Poland); Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpa?a, A.; Oglodek, I.; Moscicki, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)] [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kowalewski, J. [Arrhenius Laboratory, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Arrhenius Laboratory, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Rössler, E. A. [Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

The effect of spin-orbit splitting on the association kinetics of barrierless halogen atom-hydrocarbon radical reactions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of the geometry dependence of spin-orbit splitting on transition state theory (TST) predictions for radical-radical recombination rate coefficients is examined. The effects are illustrated with direct ab initio variable-reaction-coordinate (VRC)-TST calculations for the reactions of two types of hydrocarbon radicals (R = CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2}) with three halogen atoms (X = F, Cl, and Br). These halogen atoms exhibit a range of spin-orbit interaction strengths, while their interactions with the two hydrocarbon radicals exhibit a range of attractiveness. The transition state dividing surfaces for these barrierless reactions occur over a range of R-X fragment separations ({approx}3-7 {angstrom}) where the magnitude of the spin-orbit splitting is strongly geometry dependent. Perturbative models for incorporating the energetic effect of spin-orbit splitting into barrierless kinetics are presented and tested. Simply neglecting the variation in the spin-orbit splitting is demonstrated to contribute an error of less than 15% to the predicted rate coefficients for all but the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, where its neglect increases the rate by up to a factor of 2. For the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, the effect of spin-orbit splitting is not perturbative and instead qualitatively changes the long-range interaction potential and association dynamics. The present theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental measurements and previous theoretical work. For the CH{sub 3} + F association reaction, the errors associated with limitations in the basis set and in the active space are studied, and a detailed comparison is made between VRC-TST and rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator variational TST.

Jasper, A. W.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (SNL)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Thermolysis of surface-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane: radical chain induced decomposition under conditions of restricted diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane (/approximately//approximately/Ph(CH/sub 2/)/sub 3/Ph, or /approximately//approximately/DPP) has been prepared by the condensation of p-(3-phenylpropyl)phenol with the surface hydroxyl groups of an amorphous, fumed silica. Thermolysis studies of the covalently attached /approximately//approximately/DPP have been conducted to explore the effects of restricted radical and substrate diffusion on a free-radical chain induced decomposition reaction, which has been reported to underlie the thermal reactivity of fluid-phase DPP at /<=/400/degrees/C. Thermolysis of /approximately//approximately/DPP has been studied at 345-400/degrees/C as a function of /approximately//approximately/DPP conversion (0.3-23%) and initial surface coverage (0.132-0.586 mmol g/sup -1/; 0.43-1.97 DPP molecules nm/sup -2/). Decomposition of surface-immobilized /approximately//approximately/DPP occurs readily in this temperature range by parallel free-radical chain pathways, whose rates are quite sensitive to surface coverage, producing PhCH/sub 3/ + /approximately//approximately/PhCH/double bond/CH/sub 2/ and /approximately//approximately/PhCH/sub 3/ + PhCH/double bond/CH/sub 2/ as the major product pairs. An unusual regiospecific hydrogen transfer process is observed that favors formation of /approximately//approximately/PhCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/CHPh over /approximately//approximately/PhCHCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/Ph as the proximity of /approximately//approximately/DPP molecules and hydrogen abstracting radicals on the surface decreases. This phenomenon results in regioselective cracking of /approximately//approximately/DPP favoring the /approximately//approximately/PhCH/sub 3/ + PhCH/double bond/CH/sub 2/ product pair. Implications are discussed for the thermal degradation of related structural features in a diffusionally restricted, macromolecular network such as occurs in coal. 31 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

Buchanan, A.C. III; Biggs, C.A.

1989-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

454

The UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process in UV disinfection units : removal of selected phosphate esters by hydroxyl radical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the issue of how to remove phosphate esters from drinking water is examined. From the various treatment processes available, the oxidation of phosphate esters through hydroxyl radical generated by the UV/H202 ...

Machairas, Alexandros, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

PAH Formation under Single Collision Conditions: Reaction of Phenyl Radical and 1,3-Butadiene to Form 1,4-Dihydronaphthalene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radicals from a helium- seeded nitrosobenzene precursor. The flash pyrolysis approach generated phenyl,19-22 such as 1,3-butadiene,23 utilizing a modified flash pyrolytic source24,25 to produce phenyl

Kaiser, Ralf I.

456

Neo-Rentier Theory: The Case of Saudi Arabia (1950-2000) Global dependence on oil has not only radically transformed our economies, but also  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neo-Rentier Theory: The Case of Saudi Arabia (1950-2000) Global dependence on oil has not only radically transformed our economies, but also altered domestic and international politics of consuming

Hille, Sander

457

High Field EPR Study of the Pheophytin Anion Radical in Wild Type and D1-E130 Mutants of Photosystem II in Chlamydomonas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Field EPR Study of the Pheophytin Anion Radical in Wild Type and D1-E130 Mutants insufficient to accurately determine such interactions. In this paper, we re- port on HF-EPR measurements

Sayre, Richard

458

EPR Line Shifts and Line Shape Changes due to Spin Exchange of Nitroxide Free Radicals in Liquids: 6. Separating Line Broadening due to Spin Exchange and Dipolar Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPR Line Shifts and Line Shape Changes due to Spin Exchange of Nitroxide Free Radicals in Liquids 23, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: January 12, 2009 EPR spectra of perdeuterated 2

Bales, Barney

459

Velocity requirements for causality violation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

Giovanni Modanese

2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

460

OH radical imaging in a DI diesel engine and the structure of the early diffusion flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-sheet imaging studies have considerably advanced our understanding of diesel combustion; however, the location and nature of the flame zones within the combusting fuel jet have been largely unstudied. To address this issue, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical has been applied to the reacting fuel jet of a direct-injection diesel engine of the ``heavy-duty`` size class, modified for optical access. An Nd:YAG-based laser system was used to pump the overlapping Q{sub 1}9 and Q{sub 2}8 lines of the (1,0) band of the A{yields}X transition at 284.01 nm, while the fluorescent emission from both the (0,O) and (1, I) bands (308 to 320 nm) was imaged with an intensified video camera. This scheme allowed rejection of elastically scattered laser light, PAH fluorescence, and laser-induced incandescence. OH PLIF is shown to be an excellent diagnostic for diesel diffusion flames. The signal is strong, and it is confined to a narrow region about the flame front because the threebody recombination reactions that reduce high flame-front OH concentrations to equilibrium levels occur rapidly at diesel pressures. No signal was evident in the fuel-rich premixed flame regions where calculations and burner experiments indicate that OH concentrations will be below detectable limits. Temporal sequences of OH PLIF images are presented showing the onset and development of the early diffusion flame up to the time that soot obscures the images. These images show that the diffusion flame develops around the periphery of the-downstream portion of the reacting fuel jet about half way through the premixed burn spike. Although affected by turbulence, the diffusion flame remains at the jet periphery for the rest of the imaged sequence.

Dec, J.E.; Coy, E.B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

462

AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Grand Canyon National Park  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on the Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of PEVs into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort; Ian Nienhueser

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

DOE-STD-1104 Requirements Crosswalk  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

09 to DOE-STD-1104-2014 Requirements Matrix - 1 - No. Section Page Number DOE-STD-1104-2009 Requirement DOE-STD-1104-2014 Requirements Comment Gen DOE-STD-1104-2009 was broadly...

464

Physics Degree Requirements 2008 -2010 Bulletin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics Degree Requirements 2008 -2010 Bulletin Professional Option Student: __________________________ Advisor: ____________________________ Updated 2/8/08 Physics Required Cr Gr Taken PHYS 137 1 ___ ______ PHYS 461 4 ___ ______ PHYS 490 3 ___ ______ Subtotal 47 (C- or better required) Physics Electives (8 cr

Dyer, Bill

465

A Requirements Analyst's Apprentice: A Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Requirements Analyst's APprentice (RAAP) partially automates the modeling process involved in creating a software requirement. It uses knowledge of the specific domain and general experience regarding software requirements ...

Reubenstein, Howard

466

Dipole aperture and superconductor requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of an accelerator is not proportional to the aperture. A change in aperture by a certain percentage results in an overall accelerator cost change by only a fraction of that percentage; the fraction may be between 0.1 and 0.5 and is almost independent of the bending field. This estimate is obtained by analyzing the superconductor requirements as a function of aperture and by making rough estimates of the largest cost items of the accelerator such as magnets and ring tunnel.

Wipf, S.L.

1983-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

467

New Solutions Require New Thinking  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy SecondWellsWinsRules HelpSolutions Require

468

AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste and other land uses. The regulations require an...

470

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet Fall 2010 #12;Contents Course Requirements Bioinformatics and Genomics Curriculum -------------------------------------------------------8 General #12;Bioinformatics and Genomics Option (BG

dePamphilis, Claude

471

NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Honeywell Responses To...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities To Inform Federal Smart NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Honeywell Responses To...

472

Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...

474

Free radical production from the interaction of 2-chloroethyl vesicants (mustard gas) with pyridine nucleotide-driven flavoprotein electron transport systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biochemical sequelae to chloroethyl mustard exposure correspond very well to toxic processes initiated by free radicals. Additionally, mustard solutions contain spontaneously formed cyclic onium ions which produce carbon free radicals when reduced electrochemically. Therefore, we hypothesized that the onium ions of sulfur or nitrogen mustards might produce carbon free radicals upon being reduced enzymatically, and that these radicals might constitute a metabolic activation. We set out to document radical production using an in vitro metabolic system and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Our system consisted of NADPH, one of several pyridine nucleotide-driven flavoprotein reductases, cytochrome c as a terminal electron acceptor, various sulfur or nitrogen mustards and the spin trap {alpha}-[4-pyridyl-1-oxide]-N-tert-butylnitrone in buffer. Reactions were started by adding the reductase to the other materials, vortexing and immediately transferring the mixture to a 10 mm EPR flat cell. Repeated scans on a Bruker ESP 300E EPR spectrometer produced a triplet of doublets with hyperfine splitting constants of a{sub N} = 15.483 G and a{sub H} = 2.512 G. The outcome supported our hypothesis that carbon-centered free radicals are produced when mustard-related onium ions are enzymatically reduced. The EPR results varied little with the chloroethyl compound used or with porcine or human cytochrome P450 reductase, the reductase domain of rat brain neuronal nitric oxide synthase or rat liver thioredoxin reductase. Our results offer new insight into the basis for mustard-induced vesication and the outcome of exposure to different mustards. The free radical model provides an explanation for similarities in the lesions arising from mustard exposure and energy-based lesions such as those from heat, ultraviolet and nuclear radiation as well as damage across tissue types such as skin, eyes or airway epithelium.

Brimfield, A.A. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21010 (United States)], E-mail: alan.a.brimfield@us.army.mil; Mancebo, A.M. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21010 (United States); Mason, R.P.; Jiang, J.J.; Siraki, A.G. [Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27709 (United States); Novak, M.J. [Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL, 32901 (United States)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q97.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q97.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A review of "Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity 1650-1750." by Jonathan Israel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

movement played out on any one national stage but rather a drama whose cast was drawn from many countries, albeit centered on north-western Europe. The Enlightenment did, however, owe more to one country than modern scholars let on. The importance... over western and central Europe after 1650. This radical shift was one inspired by ?lites, but evident to common people who de- bated its implications and felt its effects. The central figure in Israel?s account is Benedict de Spinoza. Spinoza?s notion...

Mark G. Spencer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Grantee Checklist for the Inspection & Monitoring Requirement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document walks Grantees through the Inspection & Monitoring requirement of the Quality Work Plan.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readiness requires radical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Logical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documents I. INTRODUCTION Requirements management (RM) tools store and manipu- late software requirementsLogical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents Rehan Rauf, Michal Antkiewicz,mantkiew,kczarnec}@gsd.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software requirements documents (SRDs) are often authored in general-purpose rich-text editors

Czarnecki, Krzysztof

482

Measurement of the W and Z boson production cross sections in p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the D0 detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis reports on the measurement of the W and Z boson inclusive production cross sections ({sigma}{sub W} and {sigma}{sub Z}) times electronic branching ratios (Br(W {r_arrow} e{nu}) and Br(Z {r_arrow} ee)) in p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The analysis is based on 12.8 pb{sup {minus}1} of data taken in the 1992--1993 run by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider; the cross sections were measured to be: {sigma}{sub W} {center_dot} Br(W {r_arrow} e{nu}) = 2.36 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.13 nb and {sigma}{sub Z} {center_dot} Br(Z {r_arrow} ee) = 0.218 {+-} 0.008 {+-} 0.008 {+-} 0.012 nb. The first error is statistical, the second error represents the non-luminosity systematic error, and the third error shows the uncertainty in the luminosity determination. Future prospects for similar measurements based on larger samples of data are discussed.

Grudberg, P.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Measurement of the W and Z boson production cross sections in p {anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the D-Zero detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis reports on the measurement of the W and Z boson inclusive production cross sections ({sigma}{sub W} and {sigma}{sub Z}) times electronic branching ratios (Br(W {yields} e{nu}) and Br(Z {yields} ee)) in p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The analysis is based on 12.8 pb{sup -1} of data taken in the 1992-1993 run by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider; the cross sections were measured to be: {sigma}{sub W} {center_dot} Br(W {yields} e{nu}) = 2. 36 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.13 nb and {sigma}{sub Z} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} ee) = 0.218 {+-} 0.008 {+-} 0.008 {+-} 0.012 nb. The first error is statistical, the second error represents the non- luminosity systematic error, and the third error shows the uncertainty in the luminosity determination. Future prospects for similar measurements based on larger samples of data are discussed.

Grudberg, P.M. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Near Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready {sup 14}C Isotopic Analyzer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for the development of a field ready multi-isotopic analyzer for {sup 12}CO{sub 2}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and applications for carbon capture and storage (CCS) containment performance are described. A design goal of the field platform was to provide isotopic data with a high data rate, a standardized reference baseline and acceptable precision (e.g., ~ ±50 per mil D{sup 14}CO{sub 2}) for detection and quantification of fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} CCS leakage scenarios. The instrument platform was not designed to replace high precision accelerator mass spectrometry. An additional goal was to combine project scale isotopic data and associated fluxes with unique financial instruments linking CCS containment performance to a publicly traded security providing project revenue to stakeholders. While the primary goals of the project were attained additional work is needed for the instrument platform and deployment within a full scale CCS site that was not available during the project timeframe.

Marino, Bruno

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

485

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 4Q97.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Golden Gate National Recreation Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity's Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the utilization of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies' fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. GGNRA identified 182 vehicles in its fleet, which are under the management of the U.S. General Services Administration. Fleet vehicle mission categories are defined in Section 4, and while the GGNRA vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and law enforcement missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The selected vehicles included sedans, trucks, and sport-utility vehicles. This report will show that battery electric vehicles and/or PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for support vehicles and PHEVs provide the same for law enforcement, because each has a sufficient range for individual trips and time is available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle home base, high-use work areas, or intermediately along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in the emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The San Francisco Bay Area is a leader in the adoption of PEVs in the United States. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the GGNRA facility would be a benefit for both GGNRA fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned PEVs benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the GGNRA site to identify the optimal placement of the electric vehicle supply equipment station. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and GGNRA for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and GGNRA personnel.

Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the use of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (FVNHS) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of electric vehicles (EVs) into the agencies’ fleet. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to EV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles) could fulfill the mission requirements. FVNHS identified three vehicles in its fleet for consideration. While the FVNHS vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and pool missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The logged vehicles included a pickup truck and a minivan. This report will show that BEVs and PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for both mission categories, because each has sufficient range for individual trips and time available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle’s home base, high-use work areas, or in intermediate areas along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The Vancouver, Washington area and neighboring Portland, Oregon are leaders in adoption of PEVs in the United States1. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the FVNHS facility would be a benefit for both FVNHS fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned plug-in electric vehicles benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the FVNHS site to identify the optimal station placement for electric vehicle supply equipment. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and FVNHS for participation in this study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and FVNHS personnel

Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300–630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10{sup 11} and 5.0 × 10{sup 11} molecule s{sup ?1} cm{sup ?3} of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup •} (ethyl) and t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}{sup •} (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K.

Leplat, N.; Rossi, M. J. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry (LAC), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry (LAC), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Physics Degree Requirements 2008-2010 Bulletin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics Degree Requirements 2008-2010 Bulletin Interdisciplinary Option Student: ___________________ Advisor: ________________ Option: ________________ Updated 2/8/08 Physics Required Cr Gr Taken PHYS 137 1) Physics Electives (3 cr; 253 and 300) PHYS _____ ___ ___ ______ PHYS _____ ___ ___ ______ PHYS

Dyer, Bill

490

Secondary Mathematics Teacher Certification Requirements Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secondary Mathematics Teacher Certification Requirements Mathematics Undergraduate Program:______________ Date:______________ Date:______________ Date:______________ MATHEMATICS CORE REQUIREMENTS MATH 151 Introduction to Mathematical Analysis I CMSC 201 Computer Science I MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CONCENTRATION

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

491

City of Dubuque- Solar Thermal Licensing Requirement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Dubuque requires a Solar Thermal License in order for a person to install a solar thermal project on a home or business. The requirement does not apply to solar photovoltaics. The...

492

Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

493

Delegation Procedures - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy's primary means of establishing policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. Directives Program Management Camille...

494

Secondary Science Teacher Certification Requirements Undergraduate Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:____________________________________________ Initial GPA: _________ Campus ID: ____________________ Advisor _________ _________ _____ _____ Mathematics Requirements: STAT 350 Statistics with Applications OR STAT 351 Applied Statistics for Business

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

495

Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick requirements for operating uranium mill tailings (Subpart W) Status update on Subpart W activities Outreach/Communications #12;3 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Operating Uranium Mill Tailings (Clean Air Act) · 40 CFR 61

496

Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program Requirements The Department of Materials Science-Thesis option requires a Special Project, and the Ph.D. degree requires a Doctoral Dissertation. MASTER (6034), Advanced Materials Techniques: Experiment, Theory, and Characterization (6011), and Engineering

Simons, Jack

497

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Information requirements analysis for holonic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Information requirements analysis for holonic manufacturing systems in a virtual and development of holonic manu- facturing systems requires careful, and sometimes risky, decision making, the authors propose a methodology for a holonic manufacturing systems requirement analysis that is based

498

FCEDS General Education Requirements (Updated 2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FCEDS General Education Requirements (Updated 2013) This proposal outlines a plan that would allow a transfer student to apply an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree to meet the General Education requirements of the Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Studies (FCEDS) curriculum. The required

Mayfield, John

499

Special Contract Requirements Enclosure 2 INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRACTING OFFICERS: The Special Contract Requirement "Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special Contract Requirements Enclosure 2 INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRACTING OFFICERS: The Special Contract Requirement "Workers Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) (APRIL 2011)" shall be included in the contract as applicable. Whenever Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance is required under the contract

US Army Corps of Engineers

500

Requirements in DOE O 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Requirements in DOE O 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities Cross-referenced to DOE O 422.1, Conduct of Operations. Requirements in DOE O 5480.19, Conduct...