Sample records for readiness requires radical

  1. Ghana-REDD Readiness Requires Radical Reform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) | OpenSilverEnergy]Requires

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04) U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04) DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 05) U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 05), May, 11, 2015. DOE...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04), April 21, 2014.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04), April 21, 2014. doezeroenergyreadyhomerequirementsrev04.pdf More Documents &...

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04) April 21, 2014 Effective for Homes Revised April 21, 2014 Page 1 of 9 Permitted Starting 6212014 To qualify as a...

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home PV-Ready Checklist DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements Mandatory Requirement 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero Energy Ready Home PV-Ready

  8. Guam- Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Guam Energy Code, which became effective in October of 2000, requires that piping stub outs be provided for water heaters installed in low-rise residential buildings to enable the future inst...

  9. A Qualitative Readiness-Requirements Assessment Model for Enterprise Big-Data Infrastructure Investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL] [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL] [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL] [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last three decades, there has been an exponential growth in the area of information technology providing the information processing needs of data-driven businesses in government, science, and private industry in the form of capturing, staging, integrating, conveying, analyzing, and transferring data that will help knowledge workers and decision makers make sound business decisions. Data integration across enterprise warehouses is one of the most challenging steps in the big data analytics strategy. Several levels of data integration have been identified across enterprise warehouses: data accessibility, common data platform, and consolidated data model. Each level of integration has its own set of complexities that requires a certain amount of time, budget, and resources to implement. Such levels of integration are designed to address the technical challenges inherent in consolidating the disparate data sources. In this paper, we present a methodology based on industry best practices to measure the readiness of an organization and its data sets against the different levels of data integration. We introduce a new Integration Level Model (ILM) tool, which is used for quantifying an organization and data system s readiness to share data at a certain level of data integration. It is based largely on the established and accepted framework provided in the Data Management Association (DAMA-DMBOK). It comprises several key data management functions and supporting activities, together with several environmental elements that describe and apply to each function. The proposed model scores the maturity of a system s data governance processes and provides a pragmatic methodology for evaluating integration risks. The higher the computed scores, the better managed the source data system and the greater the likelihood that the data system can be brought in at a higher level of integration.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Solar Hot Water-Ready Checklist |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Hot Water-Ready Checklist DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Solar Hot Water-Ready Checklist DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program encourages, but does not require,...

  11. Emergency Readiness Assurance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the requirements of the Emergency Readiness Assurance Program with a goal of assurting that the Department of Energy (DOE) Emergency Management System (EMS) is ready to respond promptly, efficiently, and effectively to any emergency involving DOE facilities or requiring DOE assistance. Cancels DOE O 5500.10 dated 4-30-91. Chg 1 dated 2-27-92. Change 1 canceled by DOE O 151.1 of 9-25-95.

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Consolidated Renewable Energy Ready...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Consolidated Renewable Energy Ready Checklist DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Consolidated Renewable Energy Ready Checklist All homes certified as DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes must meet...

  13. Readiness Assurance

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andBHoneywell9/%2A en7/%2A en Readiness

  14. PV Solar Ready

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boudra: This report presents guidelines for designing and building new houses that are Solar Ready. Following Solar Ready guidelines will streamline the process of equipping these...

  15. Ready, set...go!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre, Melanie

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) Discuss organizational readiness for changes in an ergonomics program or intervention; (2) Assessing organizational readiness; (3) Benefits and challenges of change; and (4) Case studies of ergonomic programs that were 'not ready' and 'ready'.

  16. Technology Readiness Assessment Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Cancels DOE G 413.3-4.

  17. Community Readiness Assessments | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Community Readiness Assessments Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Community Readiness Assessments, Call Slides and...

  18. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop: Preliminary Results Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary Results Preliminary results from the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop...

  19. Ready, set, go . . . well maybe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre, Melanie M; Bartolome, Terri-Lynn C

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The agenda for this presentation is: (1) understand organizational readiness for changes; (2) review benefits and challenges of change; (3) share case studies of ergonomic programs that were 'not ready' and some that were 'ready'; and (4) provide some ideas for facilitating change.

  20. Lightning Arrestor Connectors Production Readiness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marten, Steve; Linder, Kim; Emmons, Jim; Gomez, Antonio; Hasam, Dawud; Maurer, Michelle

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lightning Arrestor Connector (LAC), part “M”, presented opportunities to improve the processes used to fabricate LACs. The A## LACs were the first production LACs produced at the KCP, after the product was transferred from Pinnellas. The new LAC relied on the lessons learned from the A## LACs; however, additional improvements were needed to meet the required budget, yield, and schedule requirements. Improvement projects completed since 2001 include Hermetic Connector Sealing Improvement, Contact Assembly molding Improvement, development of a second vendor for LAC shells, general process improvement, tooling improvement, reduction of the LAC production cycle time, and documention of the LAC granule fabrication process. This report summarizes the accomplishments achieved in improving the LAC Production Readiness.

  1. A survey of current technologies for production of oil from oil shale by in-situ retorting processes; their technical and economic readiness and requirements for further developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, C.Y.; Chazin, D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four in-situ oil shale processes; Vertical Modified In-Situ (VMIS), Horizontal Modified In-Situ (HMIS), Geokinetics, and Equity have been reviewed with respect to their developmental histories, major advantages and disadvantages, present activities, major technical problems, and present states of development. The various processes are described in detail, and up-to-date experimental data has been summarized. The preliminary designs for commercialization have been developed in order to estimate capital and operating costs. Required selling prices and sensitivities have been determined as they relate to various parameters, such as oil yields, capital costs, operating costs, and economic incentives. The technologies for the various processes have been analyzed for the purpose of identifying areas of further required research and development. Programs of technological development have been suggested for each in-situ process. The results of various process evaluations have been compared, and the best near-term solutions have been determined for producing oil from oil shale using in-situ methods.

  2. Webinar: Marketing and Sales Solutions for Zero Energy Ready Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

  3. Radical Supercomputing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014 2013 2012 2011QualityImportantRadical

  4. Ready, set, go . . . well maybe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre, Melanie M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at the 2011 Applied Ergonomics Conference By Melaniesustainable? Case study of ergonomics program that was ‘ notwas not! Case study of ergonomics program that was ‘ready

  5. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K Castle

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  6. Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13.

  7. Zero Energy Ready Home | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Home Zero Energy Ready Home Look for the Label Look for the Label The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home label is a symbol of excellence. Learn what's behind this new level of performance....

  8. EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006.

  9. Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

  10. Mission and Readiness Assessment for Fusion Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.H. Neilson, et. al.

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic fusion development toward DEMO will most likely require a number of fusion nuclear facilities (FNF), intermediate between ITER and DEMO, to test and validate plasma and nuclear technologies and to advance the level of system integration. The FNF mission space is wide, ranging from basic materials research to net electricity demonstration, so there is correspondingly a choice among machine options, scope, and risk in planning such a step. Readiness requirements to proceed with a DEMO are examined, and two FNF options are assessed in terms of the contributions they would make to closing DEMO readiness gaps, and their readiness to themselves proceed with engineering design about ten years from now. An advanced tokamak (AT) pilot plant with superconducting coils and a mission to demonstrate net electricity generation would go a long way toward DEMO. As a next step, however, a pilot plant would entail greater risk than a copper-coil FNSF-AT with its more focussed mission and technology requirements. The stellarator path to DEMO is briefly discussed. Regardless of the choice of FNF option, an accompanying science and technology development program, also aimed at DEMO readiness, is absolutely essential.

  11. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Green Extreme Homes & Carl Franklin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    certifi ed to the high performance requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy's Zero Energy Ready Home program, thanks to a successful collaboration between the non-profi t...

  12. Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy Ready Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

  13. FOOD SAFETY INFOSHEET: BE READY FOR STORMS If the power goes out what

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    (without cream or custard), cookies and muffins and certain hard cheeses. Keep the refrigerator and freezer thermometer ready to check foods. · have items that don't require refrigeration and can be eaten cold

  14. ZERH Webinar: Energy- and Water- Efficiency in the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

  15. Recycling readiness of advanced batteries for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungst, R.G.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximizing the reclamation/recycle of electric-vehicle (EV) batteries is considered to be essential for the successful commercialization of this technology. Since the early 1990s, the US Department of Energy has sponsored the ad hoc advanced battery readiness working group to review this and other possible barriers to the widespread use of EVs, such as battery shipping and in-vehicle safety. Regulation is currently the main force for growth in EV numbers and projections for the states that have zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) programs indicate about 200,000 of these vehicles would be offered to the public in 2003 to meet those requirements. The ad hoc Advanced Battery Readiness Working Group has identified a matrix of battery technologies that could see use in EVs and has been tracking the state of readiness of recycling processes for each of them. Lead-acid, nickel/metal hydride, and lithium-ion are the three EV battery technologies proposed by the major automotive manufacturers affected by ZEV requirements. Recycling approaches for the two advanced battery systems on this list are partly defined, but could be modified to recover more value from end-of-life batteries. The processes being used or planned to treat these batteries are reviewed, as well as those being considered for other longer-term technologies in the battery recycling readiness matrix. Development efforts needed to prepare for recycling the batteries from a much larger EV population than exists today are identified.

  16. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  17. Transportation System Readiness and Resiliency Assessment Framework: Readiness and Assess Resiliency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation System Readiness and Resiliency Assessment Framework: Readiness and Assess Resiliency of Transportation Systems (Infrastructure, Systems, Organization and Services) to Deter, Detect Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle

  18. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions. Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the...

  19. Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The REVi plan addresses the electric vehicle market in Richmond and then addresses a regional plan, policies, and analysis of the the communities readiness. richmondevinitiative....

  20. Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Readiness Plan | 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary...

  1. Technology Readiness Assessments | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Documents Available for Download August 1, 2013 Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This document is a guide for those involved in...

  2. Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed ... Uranium Processing Facility Site...

  3. Organizational Readiness in Specialty Mental Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Alison B.; Cohen, Amy N.; Young, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. Assessing the organizational social context (OSC) of1– 15. Rosenheck R. Organizational process: a missing linkSimpson DD. Assessing organizational readiness for change. J

  4. Are You Ready? A Texas Hurricane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are You Ready? A Texas Hurricane Survival Guide evacuation information Evacuation information ___ plastic garbage bags and ties ___ liquid soap, detergent, disinfectant, household chlorine bleach

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: verify operational readiness of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    verify operational readiness of SWiFT controller systems Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Baselining Project Accelerates Work On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News,...

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Verification...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Zero Energy Ready Home Verification Summary DRAFT REMRate - Residential Energy Analysis and Rating Software v14.5.1 This information does not constitute any warranty of energy...

  7. Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements for verifying readiness for startup of new Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations, and for restart of existing Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities, activities, and operations that have been shut down. Cancels DOE O 425.1C. Adm Chg 1, dated 4-2-13, cancels DOE O 425.1D.

  8. Effects of glyphosate over-the-top applications on the reproductive growth of Roundup Ready cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mery Suarez, Ramon Felipe

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF GLYPHOSATE OVER-THE-TOP APPLICATIONS ON THE REPRODUCTIVE GROWTH OF ROUNDUP READY COTTON A Thesis by RAMON FELIPE MERY SUAREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2003 Major Subject: Molecular and Environmental Plant Sciences EFFECTS OF GLYPHOSATE OVER-THE-TOP APPLICATIONS ON THE REPRODUCTIVE GROWTH OF ROUNDUP READY COTTON A Thesis by RAMON FELIPE MERY SUAREZ...

  9. Zero Energy Ready Home Events | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Buildings Zero Energy Ready Home Zero Energy Ready Home Events Zero Energy Ready Home Events September 2014 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 31 1 2 3 4 5...

  10. Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas Inc agency thereof. #12;1 RSB Certification Readiness Study: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii

  11. Accelerating the Electrification of U.S. Drive Trains: Ready...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ready and Affordable Technology Solutions for Domestically Manufactured Advanced Batteries Accelerating the Electrification of U.S. Drive Trains: Ready and Affordable...

  12. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ACCOMPLISHMENTS NYCLHVCC: Clean Cities 2011 EV Community Readiness DUANE Reade's Smith EV at Plug-In Day in Times Square Clean Cities 2011 Community Readiness & Planning...

  13. Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents November 8-9, 2010 Readiness Review Training...

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformation Inc., Production...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transformation Inc., Production House, Devens, MA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformation Inc., Production House, Devens, MA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  15. Ready, Set . . . Get Prepped for Monday's Launch of the 'America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ready, Set . . . Get Prepped for Monday's Launch of the 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' Challenge Ready, Set . . . Get Prepped for Monday's Launch of the 'America's Next Top...

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development LLC., Custom Home, Downers Grove, IL DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development LLC.,...

  17. Energy -- and Water -- Efficiency in the DOE Zero Energy Ready...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy -- and Water -- Efficiency in the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program Webinar (Text Version) Energy -- and Water -- Efficiency in the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Program...

  18. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  19. Modeling Renewable Energy Readiness: The UAE Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choucri, Nazli

    Modeling technology policy is becoming an increasingly important capability to steer states and societies toward sustainability. This paper presents a simulation-modeling approach to evaluate renewable energy readiness, ...

  20. Superconducting Partnership with Readiness Review Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Superconducting Partnership with Industry: Readiness Review Update Mike Gouge, ORNL Steve Ashworth, LANL Paul Bakke, DOE-Golden DOE 2004 Superconductivity Peer Review July 27-29, 2004 #12;2 SPI

  1. Are You Ready? Jimmy L. Lagunero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    Are You Ready? Jimmy L. Lagunero Emergency Management Coordinator University of Hawai,,i "Emergency ? ? ? Jimmy L. Lagunero UHM Emergency Management Coordinator phone: 808-956-0773 fax: 808-956-

  2. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NRELDOE Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Agenda Page 1 of 2 NRELDOE Workshop at the Gaylord National, Washington D.C., February 16-17, 2011 Transitioning to an...

  3. Labeling of Ready-Made Street Dresses. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, Phyllis; Grimes, Mary Anna

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bulletin reports consumers' interest in and Labels on dresses costing under $20 pr use of label information on ready-made street more of the needed information than dresses dresses, the availability of such information and in- $20 or more.... dustry practices in the provision of labels. The data were obtained in 1956-57 by interviews with 992 ur- Both retailers and manufacturers emp' ban who bought ready-made dresses in the the importance of label information concernin year previous...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home| DepartmentGetVersion)

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 05) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|

  6. Technology Readiness and the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Harold; Marinovici, Maria C.

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) originated as a way for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to monitor the development of systems being readied for space. The technique has found wide application as part of the more general topic of system engineering. In this paper, we consider the applicability of TRLs to systems being readied for the smart grid. We find that there are many useful parallels, and much to be gained by this application. However, TRLs were designed for a developer who was also a user. That is not usually the case for smart grid developments. We consider the matter from the point of view of the company responsible for implementation, typically a utility, and we find that there is a need for connecting the many standards in the industry. That connection is explored, and some new considerations are introduced.

  7. NHI Component Technical Readiness Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman; Dane F. Wilson; Steven J. Pawel

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A decision process for evaluating the technical readiness or maturity of components (i.e., heat exchangers, chemical reactors, valves, etc.) for use by the U.S. DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative is described. This system is used by the DOE NHI to assess individual components in relation to their readiness for pilot-scale and larger-scale deployment and to drive the research and development work needed to attain technical maturity. A description of the evaluation system is provided, and examples are given to illustrate how it is used to assist in component R&D decisions.

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    not required. b. Location, based on zip code, has at least 5 kWhm 2 day average daily solar radiation based on annual solar insolation using this online tool: http:...

  9. Tucson- Solar Design Requirement for Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucson adopted an ordinance in June 2008 that requires all new single-family homes and duplexes in Tucson to be "solar-ready." The ordinance was developed by a stakeholder group which included...

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zero Energy Ready Home: Montlake Modern - Seattle, Washington Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: EcoVillage: A Net Zero Energy Ready Community, Ithaca, New York...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Garbett Homes, Herriman...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Garbett Homes, Herriman, UT, Production Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Garbett Homes, Herriman, UT, Production Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in...

  12. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Zero Energy Ready Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Once a home is as good as ENERGY STAR, the modest added “lift” to bring a home up to DOE’s Zero Energy Ready specs unleashes a wave of powerful value messages.  DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes live...

  13. Solar Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing Solar Workforce Solar Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing Solar Workforce April 6, 2015 - 2:27pm...

  14. An assessment of the value of retail ready packaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Kathleen Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of retail-ready packaging reduces the costs of replenishing store shelves by eliminating the labor of removing packaging materials and stocking individual items on shelves. While reducing costs for retailers, retail-ready ...

  15. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Mandalay Homes, Pronghorn Ranch...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Zero Energy Ready Home certifi ed, every home will have a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score of 50 or less. Everson fi rst heard about the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program...

  16. Human Resources Organizational Readiness Project: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finzi, Adrien

    and easily interface with SAP software Managed by a special Human Resources project team Will be undertaken in close coordination with the BUworks program team HR Organizational Readiness Project BUworks / SAP of SAP Enhanced data security within the new system Current job "system" is 30 years old ­ it must

  17. Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable (item 2) Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean Earth Sciences

  18. Integrated Approach to Documenting Readiness for a Potential Criticality Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Bruce S.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Jones, Robert A.

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been 60 highly publicized criticality accidents1 over the last 60 years and the nature of the hazard is unique. Recent studies2 discuss the benefits of knowing what to expect during and immediately following these events. Emergency planning and response standards2 provide an effective tool for establishing an adequate level of readiness to a criticality accident. While these planning requirements cover a broad spectrum of activities to establish readiness, a concise and routinely reviewed criticality accident scenario may be the most valuable tool in developing a cohesive understanding and response to these challenging events. Using a guideline3 for criticality safety evaluations the analytical work and emergency planning to mitigate a criticality accident at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was developed. Using a single document the analysis that established the accident characteristics, response scenario based on emergency staffing and planning, and anticipated dose consequences were integrated. This single document approach provides a useful platform to integrate the initial planning and guide the review of proposed changes to emergency response plans.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Solar Hot Water-Ready Checklist

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero Energy Ready Home PV-Ready

  20. Development of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metrics and Risk Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Anderson, K. K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an internal project milestone report to document the CCSI Element 7 team's progress on developing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) metrics and risk measures. In this report, we provide a brief overview of the current technology readiness assessment research, document the development of technology readiness levels (TRLs) specific to carbon capture technologies, describe the risk measures and uncertainty quantification approaches used in our research, and conclude by discussing the next steps that the CCSI Task 7 team aims to accomplish.

  1. Getting ready for MeerKat and the SKA with KAT7 and SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    Getting ready for MeerKat and the SKA with KAT7 and SALT Claude Carignan SA SKA Research Chair READY WITH KAT 7 (LINE) gas stars #12;GETTING READY WITH KAT 7 (LINE) #12;GETTING READY WITH SALT (Fabry-Perot High Resolu4on mode) NGC 5055 observed with a 2m class telescope #12;GETTING READY WITH SALT

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Better Business for Builders Webinar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Better Business for Builders Webinar Transcript DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Better Business for Builders Webinar Transcript Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero...

  3. EV Community Readiness projects: Clean Energy Coalition (MI...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    link the Michigan PEV Community Readiness Plan to relevant websites and other appropriate media outlets; incorporate the Plan into the PEV Taskforce website. Clean Cities Recovery...

  4. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is a guide for those involved in conducting TRAs and developing TMPs for DOE-EM. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide More...

  5. EV Community Readiness projects: Center for the Commercialization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Project AccomplishmentsProgress: * Readiness Plan Completed * Private and Utility Business Models completed - Collaborations: * Wide range of local and state organizations,...

  6. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Southern Energy Homes, First...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and water heating installed or conduit and electric panel space installed for future solar equipment installation. The DOE Zero Energy Ready-certified home actually exceeded the...

  7. EV Community Readiness projects: Delaware Valley Regional Planning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy EV Community Readiness projects: Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies (TX); City of Austin, Austin Energy (TX)...

  8. Independent Oversight Review of the NNSA Production Office Readiness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RR Readiness Review SAA Startup Approval Authority SIAP Site Integrated Assessment Plan SME Subject Matter Expert SNR Startup Notification Report SSTA Senior Scientific Technical...

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Building Energy Optimization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software This webinar was presented on May 15, 2014 and gives...

  10. Influence of Agricultural Dual Credit on Student College Readiness Self-Efficacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Alanna L.

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    INFLUENCE OF AGRICULTURAL DUAL CREDIT ON STUDENT COLLEGE READINESS SELF-EFFICACY A Record of Study by ALANNA LEE NEELY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... should consider earning postsecondary degrees and credentials. The Completion Agenda states: This increased focus on college completion (not simply college access) is reflected in, for example, President Obama?s goal for the United States...

  11. LHCb commissioning and readiness for first data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helge Voss; for the LHCb Collaboration

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    LHCb has been installed by spring 2008, followed by intensive testing and commissioning of the system in order to be ready for first data taking. Despite the horizontal geometry of the LHCb detector it was possible to collect over one million useful cosmic events that allowed a first time alignment of the sub-detectors. Moreover events from beam dumps during the LHC synchronisation tests provided very useful data for further time and spacial alignment of the detector. Here we present an overview of our commissioning activities, the current status and an outlook on the startup in 2009.

  12. Readiness Review RM | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.FrequencyEO-05-01:RegulatoryReadiness

  13. Project Get Ready | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for EnergyWister|ProductionProfitCatalystReady

  14. Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2. Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2. Abstract: Using a variety of organic...

  15. ats technology readiness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ats technology readiness First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Technology Readiness Level...

  16. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 13 Shelter T aking shelter is often a critical in your home for sev- eral days without electricity or water services following a winter storm. We also an emergency toilet, if necessary. · Use a garbage container, pail or #12;14 ARE YOU READY? FEDERAL EMERGENCY

  17. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 83 National Security Emergencies I n addition uncomfortable or if something does not seem right. #12;84 ARE YOU READY? FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 4- rupted--electricity, telephone, natural gas, gasoline pumps, cash registers, ATM machines, and internet

  18. 4 ARE YOU READY? FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    4 ARE YOU READY? FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Emergency Planning and Disaster Supplies if you have questions. #12;FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY ARE YOU READY? 5 9. Take a first aid and when to shut off water, gas, and electricity at the main switches. Consult with your local utili- ties

  19. MENTOR READINESS ASSESSMENT Effective and Ineffective Characteristics of a Mentor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    MENTOR READINESS ASSESSMENT Effective and Ineffective Characteristics of a Mentor The ten characteristics below serve as a measure for determining your readiness to be a mentor. There are five effective Characteristics 1. Spot the Potential & Believe in Others Effective mentors have a positive view of others

  20. Capture-ready power plants : options, technologies and economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohm, Mark (Mark C.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plant can be considered to be capture-ready if, at some point in the future it can be retrofitted for carbon capture and sequestration and still be economical to operate. The concept of capture-ready is not a specific ...

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fairfield, CT More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project -...

  2. Distributed thermal energy storage in the residential sector: commercialization-readiness assessment and implementation strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The readiness of each of three candidate TES systems for near-term commercialization was examined. It was concluded that of these, TES for residential space and hot-water heating are technically and economically ready for commercialization. TES systems are unlikely to be more attractive than standard-heat-pump systems in all areas of the country; however, in many regions, particularly in the northeast and north central states, TES appears to be more attractive. In the not-too-distant future, use of TES with heat pumps may prove to be the best system nationwide. For the third system, TES for residential space cooling, it was found that those units that are presently technically viable would be too costly except in a few parts of the country; more development will be required before these systems could be commercialized on a national scale. TES systems that might be used in commercial buildings (e.g., stores and office buildings) were not examined. Environmental, market and economic, and institutional-readiness studies are presented. Market penetration and benefit analysis are summarized. Barriers to commercialization are identified along with strategies for overcoming the barriers. Schedules and resource requirements are discussed. Summaries of the study techniques and additional information are given in the appendices. (MCW)

  3. Using ISMS Principles and Functions in Developing an ARRA Readiness Review Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Linda K. Rogers, Assessments & Readiness Programs Manager, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Track 8-8

  4. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  5. Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Durable Energy Builders, Houston...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    roof, 11,500 gallon rainwater cistern to supply most of the home's drinking water, hurricane-proof roof, and triple-pane windows. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Durable Energy...

  7. aec readiness group: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE 2006 Superconductivity Peer Review July 25-27, 2006 12;2 SPI Readiness Review Program Budget: 210 Kyear from DOE 100 K - LANL (3 cable projects) 110 K - ORNL (all 33...

  8. ats technical readiness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-Golden DOE 2006 Superconductivity Peer Review July 25-27, 2006 12;2 SPI Readiness Review Program Budget: 210 Kyear from DOE 100 K - LANL (3 cable projects) 110 K - ORNL...

  9. affecting school readiness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-Golden DOE 2006 Superconductivity Peer Review July 25-27, 2006 12;2 SPI Readiness Review Program Budget: 210 Kyear from DOE 100 K - LANL (3 cable projects) 110 K - ORNL...

  10. Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Imery Group...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    wall, spray foamed walls and attic plus rigid foam and coated OSB. The Imery Group: Proud Green Home - Serenbe, GA More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    executive director for the Habitat affiliate. "We started doing ENERGY STAR about 5 years ago, and DOE Builders Challenge 3 years ago, and then DOE Zero Energy Ready Home...

  12. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero Energy-Ready...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Many Building America teams (ARBI, BA-PIRC, BSC, CARB, IBACOS, NorthernSTAR, PHI, etc.) have worked with home builders to design and test zero-energy-ready homes....

  13. Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    higher power density batteries have reduced energy density,2008 UCD-ITS-WP-09-02 Are batteries ready for plug-in hybridprograms mischaracterize the batteries needed to start

  14. Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    237–253. Burke, A. , 2007. Batteries and ultracapacitors forresults with lithium-ion batteries. In: Proceedings (CD)locate/tranpol Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid

  15. Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid buyers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S.; Burke, Andrew

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    higher power density batteries have reduced energy density,2008 UCD-ITS-WP-09-02 Are batteries ready for plug-in hybridprograms mischaracterize the batteries needed to start

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Preferred Builders, Old...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 42 without PV or HERS 20 with PV. This 2,700-square-foot custom home has advanced framed walls with...

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Dwell Development, Seattle...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    blown cellulose, R-42 XPS under slab, triple-pane windows, and a ductless mini-split heat pump. Dwell Development - Seattle, WA More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Healthy Efficient Homes - Spirit...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    basement walls are ICF plus two 2-inch layers of EPS. The house also has a mini-split heat pump, fresh air fan intake, and a solar hot water heater. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home:...

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (SIPs) walls, a 10.25-inch SIPS roof, an R-20 insulated slab, a 2-ton ground source heat pump, radiant floor heat, 7.1 kWh PV, and triple-pane windows. DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  20. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Singer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    measures that ensure the home is wired and plumbed for solar photovoltaic and water heating panels as soon as the homeowner is ready to install them. The home was honored with a...

  1. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC) EV Community...

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution I...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I -- What's At Stake Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution I -- What's At Stake Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the...

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- How to Get it Right Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution II -- How to Get it Right Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Ducts in Conditioned Space

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Challenge Home is a blueprint for zero energy ready homes.  When we make that statement – it’s impossible to justify huge thermal losses from ducts in unconditioned spaces.  That’s why one of...

  5. academic school readiness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you're ready to develop an academic plan of study? An academic plan of study degree audit & your academic catalog. To draft your academic plan of study, you need: - a pencil...

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Caldwell and Johnson,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Exeter, Rhode Island, that scored HERS 43 without PV. This 2,000 ft2 custom home has a spray- foamed attic and walls, plus...

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Transformations, Inc....

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    House, Devens, MA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Devens, MA that scored HERS 34 without PV or HERS -21 with PV. This 3,168 ft2 custom home has R-46 double-stud...

  8. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, 2014 Model...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Challenge Home and made it a true zero energy home with a -4 Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score," said Melissa. Cobblestone's fi rst DOE Zero Energy Ready Home scored a HERS 49...

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home PV-Ready Checklist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-Ready Checklist DOE Zero

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Solar Hot Water-Ready Checklist | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-Ready ChecklistEnergy

  11. Software Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tugurlan, Maria C.; Kirkham, Harold; Chassin, David P.

    2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Budget and schedule overruns in product development due to the use of immature technologies constitute an important matter for program managers. Moreover, unexpected lack of technology maturity is also a problem for buyers. Both sides of the situation would benefit from an unbiased measure of technology maturity. This paper presents the use of a software maturity metric called Technology Readiness Level (TRL), in the milieu of the smart grid. For most of the time they have been in existence, power utilities have been protected monopolies, guaranteed a return on investment on anything they could justify adding to the rate base. Such a situation did not encourage innovation, and instead led to widespread risk-avoidance behavior in many utilities. The situation changed at the end of the last century, with a series of regulatory measures, beginning with the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act of 1978. However, some bad experiences have actually served to strengthen the resistance to innovation by some utilities. Some aspects of the smart grid, such as the addition of computer-based control to the power system, face an uphill battle. It is our position that the addition of TRLs to the decision-making process for smart grid power-system projects, will lead to an environment of more confident adoption.

  12. LWRS ATR Irradiation Testing Readiness Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristine Barrett

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors. The LWRS Program is divided into four R&D Pathways: (1) Materials Aging and Degradation; (2) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels; (3) Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems; and (4) Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization. This report describes an irradiation testing readiness analysis in preparation of LWRS experiments for irradiation testing at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) under Pathway (2). The focus of the Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuels Pathway is to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental performance of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding in nuclear power plants during both nominal and off-nominal conditions. This information will be applied in the design and development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels with improved safety, cladding integrity, and improved nuclear fuel cycle economics

  13. Flavonoid Oxidation by the Radical Generator AIBN: A Unified Mechanism for Quercetin Radical Scavenging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    and the corresponding aroxyl radical species allow identification of the position of primary radical attack (i in the formation of the dimeric product (3) is provided. The identification of these products supports the model insight into the mechanism of quercetin radical scavenging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Chemicals. Quercetin

  14. Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

  15. Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments Solar Ready Construction Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These voluntary guidelines are developed for the local governments of the OKI region to provide guidance for residential developers, home builders, and architects in the design and construction of new residential buildings. These guidelines are intended to guide a developer, architect, or other interested party through the components of building design required to prepare a building for future solar installation. These guidelines include best practices for solar-ready building design to minimize the costs of future solar installation while maximizing potential system efficiency and apply to site selection, building design, and building construction.

  16. Original article Preparation and radical scavenging activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    reaction could be applied to prepare casein antioxidant peptides with higher activity equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC). Analysis showed that all casein plasteins had improved radical / radical scavenging activity / antioxidant ­ 9.6% ; : 500 U 30 °C 50% 5.6 h 6 2 1,1- -2

  17. Implementation plan for WRAP Module 1 operational readiness review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irons, L.G.

    1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP 1) will be used to receive, sample, treat, and ship contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), and low-level mixed waste (LLMW) to storage and disposal sites both on the Hanford site and off-site. The primary mission of WRAP 1 is to characterize and certify CH waste in 55-gallon and 85-gallon drums; and its secondary function is to certify CH waste standard waste boxes (SWB) and boxes of similar size for disposal. The WRAP 1 will provide the capability for examination (including x-ray, visual, and contents sampling), limited treatment, repackaging, and certification of CH suspect-TRU waste in 55-gallon drums retrieved from storage, as well as newly generated CH LLW and CH TRU waste drums. The WRAP 1 will also provide examination (X-ray and visual only) and certification of CH LLW and CH TRU waste in small boxes. The decision to perform an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was made in accordance with WHC-CM-5-34, Solid Waste Disposal Operations Administration, Section 1.4, Operational Readiness Activities. The ORR will ensure plant and equipment readiness, management and personnel readiness, and management programs readiness for the initial startup of the facility. This implementation plan is provided for defining the conduct of the WHC ORR.

  18. Human Resources Organizational Readiness Project Over the past 18 months, hundreds of employees from across the University brought their institutional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finzi, Adrien

    Human Resources Organizational Readiness Project Over the past 18 months, hundreds of employees implement SAP. What is the Human Resources Organizational Readiness Project? In preparation for the BUworks Program, the Human Resources Organizational Readiness Project will collect, organize and standardize

  19. EMERGENCY READINESS ASSURANCE PLAN (ERAP) FOR FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, Shane

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan (ERAP) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 in accordance with DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.” The ERAP documents the readiness of the INL Emergency Management Program using emergency response planning and preparedness activities as the basis. It describes emergency response planning and preparedness activities, and where applicable, summarizes and/or provides supporting information in tabular form for easy access to data. The ERAP also provides budget, personnel, and planning forecasts for FY-15. Specifically, the ERAP assures the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office that stated emergency capabilities at INL are sufficient to implement PLN-114, “INL Emergency Plan/RCRA Contingency Plan.

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Second Production Builder Round Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero Energy Ready Home PV-Ready

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS...

  2. What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from Commercial Nuclear Power Plants What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from Commercial Nuclear Power...

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM Case study of a New Mexico-based home builder who has built more DOE Zero Energy Ready certified homes than...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Denver...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Town Builders, Denver, CO, Production Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Denver, CO, Production Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes Inc.,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Palo Duro Homes Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: KB Home, San Marcos, CA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    KB Home, San Marcos, CA, Production Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: KB Home, San Marcos, CA, Production Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in San Marcos,...

  7. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Cedarwood, Bellingham...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    installed that ensure the home is ready for solar photovoltaic and solar water heating panels when the homeowner is ready to purchase them. This is the second home Clifton...

  8. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumark, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

  9. CCSI Technology Readiness Levels Likelihood Model (TRL-LM) User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the manual for the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) Technology Readiness Level Likelihood model based on PNNL velo.

  10. Text-Alternative Version: ENERGY STAR® for SSL: Getting Ready for September 30

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the ENERGY STAR® for SSL: Getting Ready for September 30 webcast.

  11. Flue gas cleanup with hydroxyl radical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Markussen, J.M.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric discharge processes have been intensively tested for application to flue gas cleanup. Among the several means of OH- radical generation grouped as electric discharge, E-Beam irradiation is the one that has been most thoroughly studied. Corona glow discharge, especially pulsed corona glow discharge, on the other hand, has attracted attention recently, and several active research projects are being conducted in the United States, Japan, West Germany, and Italy. Other promising approaches for generating OH radicals efficiently are based on thermal or catalytic decomposition of OH-radical precursors. If mixing problems can be overcome to achieve homogeneous distribution of OH radicals in the flue gas stream, these methods may be applicable to flue gas cleanup. Because of their high OH-radical generation rates and potentially low capital costs, the following three approaches are recommended to be tested for their potential capability to remove SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}: (1) H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} combustion in a hydrogen torch, (2) thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and (3) catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}O. Ideally, the OH radicals will convert SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to sulfuric acid and nitric acid. These acids or acid precursors would easily be removed from the flue gas by conventional technology, such as spray drying and wet limestone scrubbing. 67 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. READY4SmartCities ICT Roadmap and Data Interoperability for Energy Systems in Smart Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    READY4SmartCities ­ ICT Roadmap and Data Interoperability for Energy Systems in Smart Cities and Data Interoperability for Energy Systems in Smart Cities Project Acronym: READY4SmartCities Grant of the Ready4SmartCities project is to support energy data interoperability in the context of SmartCities

  13. Guidelines for Final Camera-Ready Manuscripts and XXX ZZZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachizawa, Kazuya

    Guidelines for Final Camera-Ready Manuscripts XXX YYY* and XXX ZZZ * Department of Information to the directions reported in this document. I. INTRODUCTION This document shows guidelines for preparing a final.45 in). The space between the two columns is 4mm (0.17 in). Paragraph indentation is 3.5 mm (0.14 in). D

  14. Ready to eat breakfast cereals from food-grade sorghums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz y Celis Ehlinger, Laura Penelope

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two food-grade sorghum hybrids, ATx63 I *Tx436 (non waxy), and B.BON 34, (waxy), were micronized and evaluated for their potential use in ready to eat breakfast cereals (RTE-BC). Whole and decorticated grains were exposed to infra-red burners...

  15. Ready...Set...MENTOR! A Speed Mentoring Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Ready...Set...MENTOR! A Speed Mentoring Toolkit Introduction: Mentoring describes a developmental relationship between a mentor, who is a person with experience, skills and knowledge, and a protégé, who and work contexts. Informal mentoring may emerge between partners who spontaneously discover each other

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Technology Readiness Assessment Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments and developing Technology Maturation Plans for the DOE capital acquisition asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-4A. Does not cancel other directives.

  17. Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River By Steve Ress The itinerary is set and the seats have been filled for an early June bus tour to New Mexico's lower Pecos River basin compacts on Nebraska's Republican River and New Mexico's Pecos River to see what can be learned from

  18. Operational readiness review phase-1 final report for WRAP-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Operational Readiness Review for WRAP-1 Phase-1 operations. The report includes all criteria, lines of inquiry with resulting Findings and Observations. The review included assessing operational capability of the organization and the computer controlled process and facility systems.

  19. Fitting and Altering Ready-to-Wear: Basic Principles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Becky

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    straight to the floor with creases follow ing the lengthwise grainline in the center of each leg. 15. Hems hang straight. 16. Long sleeves end at the wrist bone . References Brinkley, Jeanne and Ann Aletti'. "Altering Ready-to-Wear Fashion." Chas. A...

  20. Methyl viologen radical reactions with several oxidizing agents. [Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, G.; Ebbesen, T.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rates of oxidation of the methyl viologen radical by peroxodisulfate and hydrogen peroxide has been investigated. The methyl viologen free radical was produced by pulse radiolysis. The reaction of the peroxodisulfate radical with the methyl viologen radical was first order in both species, and the reaction rate constant is reported. A el-radiation study revealed a chain decomposition of the peroxodisulfate radical involving the methyl viologen radical when methanol, ethanol, or 2-propanol was present. Loss of the methyl viologen radical was then no longer observed to be a simple first-order reaction. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with the methyl viologen radical was very slow in the presence of 1 M methanol. A much faster reaction in the absence of methanol was interpreted to be a reaction of the methyl viologen radical with the peroxy radicals. Hydrogen peroxide, in contrast to the chain decomposition of peroxodisulfate radicals, does not participate in a chain reaction involving the methyl viologen radical and methanol. Rate constants for the reaction of methyl viologen radical with dichromate radical, iodate radical, and ferricyanide radical are reported.

  1. RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercy, M; Steven P Schneider, S; Kurt D Gerdes, K

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks.

  2. RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercy, M; Steven P Schneider, S; Kurt D Gerdes, K

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks.

  3. How ready is `capture ready'? May 2008 SCCS for WWF -1(44) -www.geos.ed.ac.uk/sccs Nils.Markusson@ed.ac.uk S.Haszeldine@ed.ac.uk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    ..........................................................................................................12 2. Reviewing and investigating capture readiness.................................................13 2.1 The structure of the problem

  4. Resonance ionization detection of combustion radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, T.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental research on the combustion of halogenated organic compounds with emphasis on reaction pathways leading to the formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the development of continuous emission monitoring methods will assist in DOE efforts in the management and disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. Selective laser ionization techniques are used in this laboratory for the measurement of concentration profiles of radical intermediates in the combustion of chlorinated hydrocarbon flames. A new ultrasensitive detection technique, made possible with the advent of tunable VUV laser sources, enables the selective near-threshold photoionization of all radical intermediates in premixed hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon flames.

  5. Taking the Challenge at Singer Village--A Cold Climate Zero Energy Ready Home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, S.; Gaakye, O.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After progressively incorporating ENERGY STAR(R) for Homes Versions 1, 2, and 3 into its standard practices over the years, this builder, Brookside Development, was seeking to build an even more sustainable product that would further increase energy efficiency, while also addressing indoor air quality, water conservation, renewable-ready, and resiliency. These objectives align with the framework of the DOE Challenge Home program, which 'builds upon the comprehensive building science requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3, along with proven Building America innovations and best practices. Other special attribute programs are incorporated to help builders reach unparalleled levels of performance with homes designed to last hundreds of years.' CARB partnered with Brookside Development on the design optimization and construction of the first home in a small development of seven planned new homes being built on the old Singer Estate in Derby, CT.

  6. A Radically Configurable Six-State Compound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    experimentally accessible redox states (0, 2+, 4+, 6+, 7+, and 8+) from within the total of nine states evaluated by quantum mechanical methods. All six of the observable redox states have been identified by electrochemical cationic state is low and the lifetimes of these radical viologen derivatives is short as a result

  7. Structure of the Nucleotide Radical Formed during Reaction of CDP/TTP with the E441Q-?2?2 of E. coli Ribonucleotide Reductase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zipse, Hendrik

    The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside diphosphates to deoxynucleotides and requires a diferric-tyrosyl radical cofactor for catalysis. RNR is composed of a 1:1 complex ...

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BPC Green Builders: Trolle Residence - Danbury, CT More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT DOE Zero...

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home High-Performance Home Sales Training Part II Webinar (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar DOE Zero Energy Ready Home High-Performance Home Sales Training Part II, presented in February 2015.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD, Production DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD, Production This urban infill community features a...

  11. NCTCOG Solar Ready II Project: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark,L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency November 20, 2014 NCTCOG Solar Ready II Project Lori Clark Principal Air Quality Planner ESL-KT-14-11-12 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 U.S. Department of Energy Sun...Shot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge 2 ESL-KT-14-11-12 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national...

  12. NCTCOG Solar Ready II Project: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark,L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for connecting solar power to the electric grid, and increasing access to financing, teams will clear a path for rapid expansion of solar energy and serve as models for other communities across the nation. 4 ESL-KT-14-11-12 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through...Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency November 20, 2014 NCTCOG Solar Ready II Project Lori Clark Principal Air Quality Planner ESL-KT-14-11-12 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 U.S. Department of Energy Sun...

  13. Slideshow: Ready, Set, NASCAR Green at Richmond International Raceway |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready, Set, NASCAR Green at Richmond

  14. Smart Grid Ready PV Inverters with Utility Communication | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready,Smart Grid RFI Public Comments

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Partner Central | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-Ready Checklist DOE

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Partner Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-Ready Checklist DOEPartner

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-Ready Checklist

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Verification | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-Ready

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Building Energy Optimization (BEopt)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-ReadySoftware | Department

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Building America Solution Center | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-ReadySoftware |

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Durable Energy Builders, Houston, Texas |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-ReadySoftware |Department

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-ReadySoftwareDepartment of

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Montlake Modern - Seattle, Washington |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-ReadySoftwareDepartment

  4. Ghana-Climate Finance Readiness Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to: navigation, search Name: GetecGeysersforReadiness

  5. Anion photoelectron spectroscopy of radicals and clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, Taylor R.

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study free radicals and clusters. The low-lying {sup 2}{Sigma} and {sup 2}{Pi} states of C{sub 2n}H (n = 1--4) have been studied. The anion photoelectron spectra yielded electron affinities, term values, and vibrational frequencies for these combustion and astrophysically relevant species. Photoelectron angular distributions allowed the author to correctly assign the electronic symmetry of the ground and first excited states and to assess the degree of vibronic coupling in C{sub 2}H and C{sub 4}H. Other radicals studied include NCN and I{sub 3}. The author was able to observe the low-lying singlet and triplet states of NCN for the first time. Measurement of the electron affinity of I{sub 3} revealed that it has a bound ground state and attachment of an argon atom to this moiety enabled him to resolve the symmetric stretching progression.

  6. Final Report on HOLODEC 2 Technology Readiness Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, RA; Spuler, SM; Beals, M; Black, N; Fugal, JP; Lu, L

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of this project, the Holographic Detector for Clouds 2 (HOLODEC 2) instrument has advanced from a laboratory-proven instrument with some initial field testing to a fully flight-tested instrument capable of providing useful cloud microphysics measurements. This can be summarized as 'Technology Readiness Level 8: Technology is proven to work - Actual technology completed and qualified through test and demonstration.' As part of this project, improvements and upgrades have been made to the optical system, the instrument power control system, the data acquisition computer, the instrument control software, the data reconstruction and analysis software, and some of the basic algorithms for estimating basic microphysical variables like droplet diameter. Near the end of the project, the instrument flew on several research flights as part of the IDEAS 2011 project, and a small sample of data from the project is included as an example. There is one caveat in the technology readiness level stated above: the upgrades to the instrument power system were made after the flight testing, so they are not fully field proven. We anticipate that there will be an opportunity to fly the instrument as part of the IDEAS project in fall 2012.

  7. Capture-Ready Power Plants -Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Capture-Ready Power Plants - Options, Technologies and Economics by Mark C. Bohm Bachelor and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Capture-ready Power Plants ­ Options, Technologies and Costs by Mark C. Bohm for the Degree of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT A plant can be considered to be capture

  8. Weed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready Weed Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Paul D.

    substantially increase weed management costs and so discourage adoption. This paper uses survey results: glyphosate, resistance management, BMP adoption, telephone survey, herbicide #12;2 INTRODUCTION Roundup ReadyWeed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready® Weed Management

  9. Composite Organic Radical - Inorganic Hybrid Cathode for Lithium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Qian; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip K.; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new organic radical inorganic hybrid cathode comprised of PTMA/LiFePO4 composite system is developed and reported for the first time. The hybrid cathodes demonstrate high pulse power capability resulting in a significant improvement over the pure PTMA or LiFePO4 cathode which is very promising for transportation and other high pulse power applications that require long cycle life and lower cost.

  10. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experiments—a major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  11. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cyr, D R [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward.

  12. Participation of free radicals in the photodecomposition of active dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anisimov, V.M.; Anisimova, O.M.; Dzhanashvilli, M.E.; Krichevskii, G.E.

    1985-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the effect of the free radicals in the medium on the photodecomposition of these active azo and anthraquinone dyes. The semilogarithmic anamorphoses of the kinetic curves showed that the rate of consumption of nitroxyl radical decreased in time in the presence of the dyes. The efficiency of the photodecomposition of the active dyes in an ETC film in the presence and absence of benzyl was studied to evaluate the role of free radicals in the photobleaching of the dies. The kinetic dependences obtained for active yellow 2KT are shown. The relative efficiency of the photoinitiation of free radicals by some active dyes was determined.

  13. alkyl radicals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Mass Spectrometric and ab Initio Study Chemistry Websites Summary: of the ethanol radical cation has been studied extensively. This CH2CH2OH2 + ion was...

  14. Energy and Entropy Effects in Dissociation of Peptide Radical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dissociation (SID) of peptide radical anions was studied for the first time using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for SID...

  15. Solvation studies on anion radicals of alkyl nitrobenzene derivatives in acetonitrile-alkyl alcohol solvent mixtures at 25 p0 sC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, William Wen-Chen

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLVATION STUDIES OM ANION RADICALS QF ALKYL NITROBENZENE DERIVATIVES IN ACETONITRILE- ALKYL ALCOHOL SOLVENT MIXTURES AT PS C A Thesis by WILLIAM WEN CHEN CHU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1970 Ma)or Sub)oct: Chemistry SOLVATION STUDIES ON ANION RADICALS OF ALKYL NITROBENZENE DERIVATIVES IN ACETONITRILE- ALKYL ALCOHOL SOLVENT MIXTURES AT 25'C A Thesis NILLIAM HEN-CHEN CHU Approved...

  16. Inclusive jet production at {radical}s =630 GeV and a test of scaling at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, A.A. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; CDF Collaboration

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary measurement of the inclusive jet cross section at {radical}{ital s} = 630 GeV is presented. The data are compared with NLO QCD predictions. The ratio of scaled inclusive jet cross section a {radical}{ital s} = 1800 GeV and {radical}{ital s} = 630 GeV is presented and compared with previous CDF results and QCD predictions.

  17. Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG&G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report.

  18. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J. [Research/Professor

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ?10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  19. Determination of absolute photoionization cross sections of the phenyl radical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    ; it is generally difficult to produce known concentrations of these species, although some progress in this area. This technique yields the radical PI cross section, even when the system exhibits complex dissociation dynamics measurements because no cooling of the radical occurs after its creation through the dissociation

  20. Tool Helps Utilities Assess Readiness for Electric Vehicle Charging (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL research helps answer a fundamental question regarding electric vehicles: Is the grid ready to handle them? Environmental, economic and security concerns regarding oil consumption make electrifying the transportation sector a high national priority. NREL's Center for Transportation Technologies & Systems (CTTS) has developed a framework for utilities to evaluate the plug-in vehicle (PEV) readiness of distribution transformers. Combining a wealth of vehicle performance statistics with load data from partner utilities including the Hawaiian Electric Company and Xcel Energy, NREL analyzed the thermal loading characteristics of distribution transformers due to vehicle charging. After running millions of simulations replicating varying climates and conditions, NREL is now able to predict aging rates for transformers when PEVs are added to existing building loads. With the NREL tool, users define simulation parameters by inputting vehicle trip and weather data; transformer load profiles and ratings; PEV penetration, charging rates and battery sizes; utility rates; the number of houses on each transformer; and public charging availability. Transformer load profiles, drive cycles, and ambient temperature data are then run through the thermal model to produce a one-year timeseries of the hotspot temperature. Annual temperature durations are calculated to help determine the annual aging rate. Annual aging rate results are grouped by independent variables. The most useful measure is transformer mileage, a measure of how many electrically-driven miles must be supplied by the transformer. Once the spectrum analysis has been conducted for an area or utility, the outputs can be used to help determine if more detailed evaluation is necessary, or if transformer replacement is required. In the majority of scenarios, transformers have enough excess capacity to charge PEVs. Only in extreme cases does vehicle charging have negative long-term impact on transformers. In those cases, upgrades to larger transformers would be recommended. NREL analysis also showed opportunity for newly-installed smart grids to offset distribution demands by time-shifting the charging loads. Most importantly, the model demonstrated synergies between PEVs and distributed renewables, not only providing clean renewable energy for vehicles, but also reducing demand on the entire distribution infrastructure by supplying loads at the point of consumption.

  1. Environment-induced anisotropy and the sensitivity of the radical pair mechanism in the avian compass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Carrillo; Marcio F. Cornelio; Marcos C. de Oliveira

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's magnetic field is essential for orientation in birds migration. The most promising explanation for this orientation is the photo-stimulated radical pair (RP) mechanism, conjectured to occur in cryptochrome photoreceptors. The radicals must have an intrinsic anisotropy in order to define a reference frame for the compass. This anisotropy, when introduced through hyperfine interactions, imposes immobility of the RP, and implies that entanglement between the unpaired electrons of the RP is preserved over long coherence times. We show that this kind of anisotropy, and consequently the entanglement in the model, are not necessary for the proper functioning of the compass. Classically correlated initial conditions for the RP, subjected to a fast decoherence process, are able to provide the anisotropy required. The environment in which the RP is immersed is then responsible for the reference frame of the compass, relaxing the immobility assumption. This fact significantly expands the range of applicability of the RP mechanism providing more elements for experimental search.

  2. Development of a culturally appropriate process for assessing distance learning readiness in Latin America 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villalobos Peñ alosa, Patricia

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument for assessing distance learning readiness of institutions in Latin America for international projects of food and agriculture with higher education institutions in the ...

  3. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Trolle Residence...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BPC Green Builders Trolle Residence Danbury, CT DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary...

  4. DOE ZERH Webinar: Updates to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Specs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    updated the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home specs, we've continued to track our partner feedback and other industry issues. This brings us to the release of Revision 05, which...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Bellingham, WA, that achieves HERS 43 without PV or HERS 13 with 3.2 kW of PV.

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Going Green and Building Strong: Building...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Going Green and Building Strong: Building a FORTIFIED Home -- Part 2 Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the...

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: KB Home, San Marcos...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home. The home is one of KB Homes' ZeroHouse 2.0 models, a net-zero-energy home that produces more energy each year than it consumes. "It is an honor...

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: e2 Homes, Winter Park...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Winter Park, FL, that scored HERS 57 without PV or HERS -7 with PV. This 4,305-square-foot custom home has autoclaved aerated concrete...

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Boulder ZED Design Build...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    inch of closed-cell foam below the roof deck in the vaulted ceilings, a ground-source heat pump, ERV, and triple-pane windows. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Boulder ZED Design Build,...

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: StreetScape Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    being made solar-ready with conduit and wiring installed to the roof and the electrical panel but solar panels have not yet been installed. Homeowner Quintin expresses some regret...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Mandalay Homes, Phoenix...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    owner of Mandalay Homes, fi rst heard about the U.S. Department of Energy's Zero Energy Ready Home program, he was skeptical. The production home builder was focusing much of...

  12. Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    outcomes. This study built on this literature by investigating how child, parent, and family risk factors predicted school readiness in Head Start children using two statistical models. Specific aims of this study included identifying 1) to what degree...

  13. Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Xi; Reiner, David; Gibbons, Jon; Li, Jia

    investors diversify risk, and offer global warming investors an alternative investment opportunity. As a detailed case study, we assess the value of a Capture Option and Capture Ready plant for a 600 MW supercritical pulverized coal power plant in China...

  14. DOE ZERH Webinar: Technical Resources for Marketing and Selling Zero Energy Ready Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plan review… energy modeling… field inspections… certification…done!  Right?  If only it were that simple to successfully transition to Zero Energy Ready Homes.  The reality is that there’s a lot...

  15. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 testing for functionality, model validation, and technology readiness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Blecke, Jill; Baker, Michael Sean; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Brake, Matthew Robert; Epp, David S.; Wittwer, Jonathan W.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the functional, model validation, and technology readiness testing of the Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor in FY08. Functional testing of a large number of revision 4 parts showed robust and consistent performance. Model validation testing helped tune the models to match data well and identified several areas for future investigation related to high frequency sensitivity and thermal effects. Finally, technology readiness testing demonstrated the integrated elements of the sensor under realistic environments.

  16. Effects of Parent Expectations and Involvement on the School Readiness of Children in Head Start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Krystal Tisha'

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF PARENT EXPECTATIONS AND INVOLVEMENT ON THE SCHOOL READINESS OF CHILDREN IN HEAD START A Dissertation by KRYSTAL TISHA? COOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of children enrolled in Head Start. The study examined how these iv parent variables were related to children?s school readiness, and differences between ethnic groups, gender groups, and level of risk. The study tested a model whereby the effect...

  17. International Symposium on Free Radicals - August 12 - 17, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Continetti, Robert E

    2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant provided partial support for the 29th International Symposium on Free Radicals, held August 12-17, 2007 at the Big Sky Resort in Big Sky, Montana. This meeting dates back to 1956, and is thepremier international meeting focusing on the structure and dynamics of reactive free radicals. Free radicals and other reactive species remain topics of great interest today owing to the central role they play as reactive intermediates. Of particular relevance to the DOE mission in Basic Energy Sciences is the fact that nearly all combustion reactions are initiated by radicals, and a number of radical intermediates are important to almost any combusting system. The field has expanded to increasingly focus on the dynamics of radical reactions in addition to spectroscopy and kinetics. As we seek to understand complex environments in combustion, atmospheric chemistry, condensed phase phenomena and the interstellar medium in great detail, studies of free radicals remain essential. The meeting in Montana lived up to the long tradition of this meeting by bringing together leading researchers, including a large group of postdoctoral scholars and graduate students, from around the globe to advance this important area of science. The DOE grant helped to support participant costs (lodging and meals) for 24 invited speakers and 21 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

  18. Stockpile Transition Enabling Program (STEP): Process and project requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Kwok Kee

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockpile Transition Enabling Program (STEP) is aimed at identifying weapon components suitable for use in more than one weapon and for qualifying components so identified for multiple use. Work includes identifying the means to maintain the manufacturing capability for these items. This document provides the participants in STEP a common, consistent understanding of the process and requirements. The STEP objectives are presented and the activities are outlined. The STEP project selections are based on the customer needs, product applicability, and maturity of the technology used. A formal project selection process is described and the selection criteria are defined. The concept of {open_quotes}production readiness{close_quotes} is introduced, along with a summary of the project requirements and deliverables to demonstrate production readiness.

  19. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom Homes,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Version 3.0, the insulation requirements of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code, and the indoor air quality and water saving requirements of the U.S. Environmental...

  20. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macdonald, R.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  1. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and photodissociation of polyatomic molecules and radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, C.Y. [Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the photodissociation (PD) dynamics of triatomic molecules. However, the PD study of radicals, especially polyatomic radicals, has remained essentially an unexplored research area. Detailed state-to-state PD cross sections for radicals in the UV and VUV provide challenges not only for dynamical calculations, but also for ab initio quantum chemical studies. The authors have developed a laser based pump-probe apparatus for the measurement of absolute PD cross sections for CH{sub 3}S and HS is summarized.

  2. Evaporative cooling of the dipolar radical OH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin K. Stuhl; Matthew T. Hummon; Mark Yeo; Goulven Quéméner; John L. Bohn; Jun Ye

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic physics was revolutionized by the development of forced evaporative cooling: it led directly to the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum-degenerate Fermi gases, and ultracold optical lattice simulations of condensed matter phenomena. More recently, great progress has been made in the production of cold molecular gases, whose permanent electric dipole moment is expected to generate rich, novel, and controllable phases, dynamics, and chemistry in these ultracold systems. However, while many strides have been made in both direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not yet been achieved due to unfavorable elastic-to-inelastic ratios and impractically slow thermalization rates in the available trapped species. We now report the observation of microwave-forced evaporative cooling of hydroxyl (OH) molecules loaded from a Stark-decelerated beam into an extremely high-gradient magnetic quadrupole trap. We demonstrate cooling by at least an order of magnitude in temperature and three orders in phase-space density, limited only by the low-temperature sensitivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evaporative cooling and sufficiently large initial populations, much colder temperatures are possible, and even a quantum-degenerate gas of this dipolar radical -- or anything else it can sympathetically cool -- may now be in reach.

  3. Kinetic studies of isoprene reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inseon

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic studies of the isoprene oxidation reactions initiated by the hydroxyl radical OH and the chlorine atom Cl have been investigated using a fast-flow reactor in conjunction with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and using laser...

  4. Open-air preaching as radical street performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blythe, Stuart McLeod

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I examine the ways in which analysing open-air preaching as ‘radical street performance’ can inform our understanding of this expression of Christian preaching. Open-air preaching is commonly associated ...

  5. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  6. Radical and open innovation : the challenge for established firms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leroy, Charlotte, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past research has shown that breakthrough innovations are often prevalent in the context of entrants rather than incumbents. There are many challenges associated with radical and open innovation initiatives for established ...

  7. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, F.P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  8. Readiness Assessments for the Shipment of TRU from West Jefferson, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, M. A.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1943 through 1986, Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) performed research and development work at its own facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies. The most highly contaminated facilities, comprising BMI's Nuclear Sciences Area, are located on 11 acres in West Jefferson, Ohio. Three buildings in this area were used to study nuclear reactor fuels, fuel element components, reactor designs, and radiochemistry analyses: one building contained nuclear hot cells, a second building contained a critical assembly and radiochemistry laboratory, and a third building once housed a nuclear research reactor. The Columbus Environmental Management Project (CEMP), one of the DOE Ohio Field Office's radioactive cleanup sites, oversees the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of BMI's Nuclear Sciences Area. The BCLDP mission is to decontaminate the Nuclear Sciences Area to a condition that is suitable for use without restrictions and to dispose of or store the associated radioactive waste at a suitable DOE-approved facility. During decontamination work, the CEMP is expected to generate approximately 120, 55-gallon drums of transuranic (TRU) waste, or about 20 truckloads. This TRU waste will be transported to DOE's Hanford nuclear facility in Washington State for temporary storage, prior to its ultimate disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This paper presents a detailed approach for conducting readiness assessments for TRU waste shipments from any DOE site. It is based on demonstrating satisfaction of the 18 core requirements contained in DOE Order 425.1B, Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities, that are derived from the seven guiding principles of DOE's integrated safety management system.

  9. On the integration of technology readiness levels at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Beatriz R.; Mitchell, John Anthony

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating technology readiness levels (TRL) into the management of engineering projects is critical to the mitigation of risk and improved customer/supplier communications. TRLs provide a common framework and language with which consistent comparisons of different technologies and approaches can be made. At Sandia National Laboratories, where technologies are developed, integrated and deployed into high consequence systems, the use of TRLs may be transformational. They are technology independent and span the full range of technology development including scientific and applied research, identification of customer requirements, modeling and simulation, identification of environments, testing and integration. With this report, we provide a reference set of definitions for TRLs and a brief history of TRLs at Sandia National Laboratories. We then propose and describe two approaches that may be used to integrate TRLs into the NW SMU business practices. In the first approach, we analyze how TRLs can be integrated within concurrent qualification as documented in TBP-100 [1]. In the second approach we take a look at the product realization process (PRP) as documented in TBP-PRP [2]. Both concurrent qualification and product realization are fundamental to the way weapons engineering work is conducted at this laboratory and the NWC (nuclear weapons complex) as a whole. Given the current structure and definitions laid out in the TBP-100 and TBP-PRP, we believe that integrating TRLs into concurrent qualification (TBP-100) rather than TBP-PRP is optimal. Finally, we note that our charter was to explore and develop ways of integrating TRLs into the NW SMU and therefore we do not significantly cover the development and history of TRLs. This work was executed under the auspices and direction of Sandia's Weapon Engineering Program. Please contact Gerry Sleefe, Deputy Program Director, for further information.

  10. GaN-Ready Aluminum Nitride Substrates for Cost-Effective, Very Low Dislocation Density III-Nitride LED's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandra Schujman; Leo Schowalter

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop and then demonstrate the efficacy of a costeffective approach for a low defect density substrate on which AlInGaN LEDs can be fabricated. The efficacy of this “GaN-ready” substrate would then be tested by growing high efficiency, long lifetime InxGa1-xN blue LEDs. The approach used to meet the project objectives was to start with low dislocation density AlN single-crystal substrates and grow graded AlxGa1-xN layers on top. Pseudomorphic AlxGa1-xN epitaxial layers grown on bulk AlN substrates were used to fabricate light emitting diodes and demonstrate better device performance as a result of the low defect density in these layers when benched marked against state-of-the-art LEDs fabricated on sapphire substrates. The pseudomorphic LEDs showed excellent output powers compared to similar wavelength devices grown on sapphire substrates, with lifetimes exceeding 10,000 hours (which was the longest time that could reliably be estimated). In addition, high internal quantum efficiencies were demonstrated at high driving current densities even though the external quantum efficiencies were low due to poor photon extraction. Unfortunately, these pseudomorphic LEDs require high Al content so they emit in the ultraviolet. Sapphire based LEDs typically have threading dislocation densities (TDD) > 108 cm-2 while the pseudomorphic LEDs have TDD ? 105 cm-2. The resulting TDD, when grading the AlxGa1-xN layer all the way to pure GaN to produce a “GaN-ready” substrate, has varied between the mid 108 down to the 106 cm-2. These inconsistencies are not well understood. Finally, an approach to improve the LED structures on AlN substrates for light extraction efficiency was developed by thinning and roughening the substrate.

  11. Hybrid inorganic-organic, organic charge transfer, and radical based compounds with chalcofulvalene donors and organic acceptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinheimer, Eric Wade

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HYBRID INORGANIC-ORGANIC, ORGANIC CHARGE TRANSFER, AND RADICAL BASED COMPOUNDS WITH CHALCOFULVALENE DONORS AND ORGANIC ACCEPTORS A Dissertation by ERIC WADE REINHEIMER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... COMPOUNDS WITH CHALCOFULVALENE DONORS AND ORGANIC ACCEPTORS A Dissertation by ERIC WADE REINHEIMER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  12. Is Your Home as Ready for Summer as You Are? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for Summer as You Are? Is Your Home as Ready

  13. Quality Management Systems for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the past, they've seen this chart. And I don't want to go too much into it. It's based on ISO 9001 QMS requirements. That's a standard that's been around for a while, and although...

  14. Spin-polarized nitroxide radicals in organic glasses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, V. F.; Shkrob, I. A.; Trifunac, A. D.; Chemistry

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonequilibrium spin polarization formed in a stable nitroxide radical, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (Tempo) due to the occurrence of Chemically Induced Dynamic Electron Polarization (CIDEP) in photoexcited molecular complexes of this radical with 1,4-benzoquinone, 1,4-naphthaquinone, 9,10-anthraquinone, and their derivatives is observed. These complexes occur spontaneously in low-temperature organic glasses (20-70 K) upon freezing the concentrated liquid solutions. The emissive net polarization in the nitroxide radical is observed 0.1-10 {mu}s after the photoexcitation of the p-quinone moiety. No degradation of the polarized magnetic resonance signal from Tempo after >104 excitation cycles was observed. This spin polarization is shown to be mainly due to a polarization transfer from the lowest triplet state of the p-quinone. This transfer is driven by the electron spin exchange interaction between the nitroxide radical and the triplet p-quinone; it occurs simultaneously with a spin-selective electronic relaxation of the photoexcited complex. The resulting mechanism combines the features of the electron spin polarization transfer (ESPT) and radical-triplet pair mechanisms (RTPM) in liquid. A theoretical model of such a mechanism is suggested.

  15. Detailed Studies of Hydrocarbon Radicals: C2H Dissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittig, Curt

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel experimental technique was examined whose goal was the ejection of radical species into the gas phase from a platform (film) of cold non-reactive material. The underlying principle was one of photo-initiated heat release in a stratum that lies below a layer of CO2 or a layer of amorphous solid water (ASW) and CO2. A molecular precursor to the radical species of interest is deposited near or on the film's surface, where it can be photo-dissociated. It proved unfeasible to avoid the rampant formation of fissures, as opposed to large "flakes." This led to many interesting results, but resulted in our aborting the scheme as a means of launching cold C2H radical into the gas phase. A journal article resulted that is germane to astrophysics but not combustion chemistry.

  16. READY FOR TODAY. PREPARING FOR TOMORROW. The Joint Operating Environment is intended to inform joint concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    READY FOR TODAY. PREPARING FOR TOMORROW. #12;The Joint Operating Environment is intended to inform. Inquiries about the Joint Operating Environment should be directed to USJFCOM Public Affairs, 1562 Mitscher R O N M E N T ( J O E ) #12;While U.S. Joint Forces Command's Joint Operating Environment (JOE

  17. Capture-Ready Coal Plants -Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Capture-Ready Coal Plants - Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm1 , Howard J. Herzog1 be employed during the initial design and construction of a both pulverized coal and integrated gasification the Internet in the summer of 2006 [7]. Introduction Interest in the construction of coal-fired power

  18. Capture-ready coal plants--Options, technologies and Mark C. Bohm a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capture-ready coal plants--Options, technologies and economics Mark C. Bohm a , Howard J. Herzog a. Introduction Interest in the construction of coal-fired power generation has increased significantly in recent the construction of coal-fired plants. Worldwide, the installed capacity of coal-fired plants is expected

  19. Guidelines for Final Camera-Ready Manuscripts XXXXX Miya and YYYYY ZZZZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachizawa, Kazuya

    Guidelines for Final Camera-Ready Manuscripts XXXXX Miya and YYYYY ZZZZ Department of Information to the directions reported in this document. I. INTRODUCTION This document shows guidelines for preparing a final is 4mm (0.17 in). Paragraph indentation is 3.5 mm (0.14 in). D. Style The style of the paper is single

  20. Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments Go Solar Ready – Solar Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments Go Solar Ready Map provides general information about the estimated annual solar energy potential on building rooftops in the OKI region. The intention of this tool is to provide the user a general understanding of the solar energy available on rooftops in the OKI tristate region.

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, e2Homes, Winterpark, FL, Custom Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Winter Park, FL that scored HERS 57 without PV or HERS -7 with PV. This 4,305 ft2 custom home has autoclaved aerated concrete walls, a sealed attic with R-20 spray foam, and ductless mini-split heat pumps.

  2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Four Year Plan (201213 Catalog, ready for calculus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Department of Materials Science and Engineering Four Year Plan (201213 Catalog, ready Mechanical Behavior of Materials 3 ENGR 210 Statics 3 MSE 380 Materials Science and Engineering Lab 2 MATH by the student's advisor. #12;Department of Materials Science and Engineering Four Year Plan (201213

  3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Four Year Plan (201314 Catalog, ready for calculus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Department of Materials Science and Engineering Four Year Plan (201314 Catalog, ready 360 Engineering Statistics 3 MSE 380 Materials Science and Engineering Lab 2 Technical or engineering) MSE 482 Senior Project II 3 MSE 404L Materials Analysis Lab 1 Technical or engineering elective 3

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Bellingham, WA, that achieves HERS 43 without PV or HERS 13 with 3.2 kW of PV. The 1,055-ft2 two-story production home has 6-in. SIP...

  5. Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    storage cabinet. Avoid accumulating a lot of waste ­ keep areas clear. EPO ­ Hazardous Waste Checklist 07Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

  6. MOVIE "CHICAGO CITY COUNCIL: READY FOR REFORM?" (27 minutes/color)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    , transportation, and health care. 8. Investigate how many of the reform proposals were in place twenty years afterMOVIE ­ "CHICAGO CITY COUNCIL: READY FOR REFORM?" (27 minutes/color) SYNOPSIS Following the death of Mayor Harold Washington, residents and reformers of Chicago still hoped for continued reform in Chicago

  7. Operational Readiness Review Final Report For F-Canyon Restart. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, A.F.; Spangler, J.B.

    1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An independent WSRC Operational Readiness Review was performed for the restart of Phase 1 processing in F-Canyon, Building 221-F. Readiness to restart the Second Plutonium Cycle process and solvent recovery was assessed. The ORR was conducted by an ORR board of ten members with the support of a subject matter expert. The chairman and four members were drawn from the Operational Safety Evaluation Department, ESH& QA Division; additional members were drawn from other WSRC divisions, independent of the F-Canyon operating division (NMPD). Based on the results of the readiness verification assessments performed according to the ORR plan and the validation of pre-restart corrective actions, the WSRC independent ORR Board has concluded that the facility has achieved the state of readiness committed to in the Restart Plan. Also, based on the scope of the ORR, it is the opinion of the board that F-Canyon Phase 1 processes can be restarted without undue risk to the safety of the public and onsite workers and without undue risk to the environment.

  8. Organizational readiness for innovation in health care: some lessons from the recent literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    PA P E R S Organizational readiness for innovation in health care: some lessons from the recent into organizational contexts and receptive climates for innovation can only be developed incrementally over time for innovation. Key organizational strategies for embedding innovation include: development of incentives

  9. An evaluation of fusion energy R&D gaps using Technology Readiness Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for prioritization. #12;The topic of fusion energy R&D gaps is receiving increased attention page 2 of 16 In EUAn evaluation of fusion energy R&D gaps using Technology Readiness Levels M. S. Tillack to develop and apply this technology assessment approach to fusion energy are reported here. #12;We adopted

  10. Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options Xi Liang, Jia supercritical pulverized coal power plant in China, using a cash flow model with Monte-Carlo simulations Defense Council) O&M (Operating & Maintenance) PC Power Plant (Pulverized Coal Fired Power Plant) ROA

  11. Transnational Islamic activism and radicalization : patterns, trends, and prognosticators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colbaugh, Richard; Engi, Dennis; LaViolette, Randall A.; Spomer, Judith E.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research described in this report developed the theoretical and conceptual framework for understanding, recognizing, and anticipating the origins, dynamic mechanisms, perceptions, and social structures of Islamic social reform movements in the Muslim homeland and in diaspora communities. This research has revealed valuable insights into the dynamic mechanisms associated with reform movements and, as such, offers the potential to provide indications and warnings of impending violence. This study produced the following significant findings: (1) A framework for understanding Islamic radicalization in the context of Social Movement Theory was developed and implemented. This framework provides a causal structure for the interrelationships among the myriad features of a social movement. (2) The degree to which movement-related activity shows early diffusion across multiple social contexts is a powerful distinguisher of successful and unsuccessful social movements. Indeed, this measurable appears to have significantly more predictive power than volume of such activity and also more power than various system intrinsics. (3) Significant social movements can occur only if both the intra-context 'infectivity' of the movement exceeds a certain threshold and the inter-context interactions associated with the movement occur with a frequency that is larger than another threshold. Note that this is reminiscent of, and significantly extends, well-known results for epidemic thresholds in disease propagation models. (4) More in-depth content analysis of blogs through the lens of Argumentation Theory has the potential to reveal new insights into radicalization in the context of Social Movement Theory. This connection has the potential to be of value from two important perspectives - first, this connection has the potential to provide more in depth insights into the forces underlying the emergence of radical behavior and second, this connection may provide insights into how to use the blogosphere to influence the emergent dialog to effectively impact the resulting actions taken by the potential radicals. The authors of this report recognize that Islamic communities are not the only source of radicalism; indeed many other groups, religious and otherwise, have used and continue to use, radicalism to achieve their ends. Further, the authors also recognize that not all Muslims use, or condone the use of, radical behavior. Indeed, only a very small segment of the Muslim communities throughout the world use and/or support such behavior. Nevertheless, the focus of this research is, indeed, on understanding, recognizing, and anticipating the origins, dynamic mechanisms, perceptions, and social structures of Islamic radicalism.

  12. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  13. Radical radiotherapy for cervix cancer: The effect of waiting time on outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choan, E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: ce@ottawahospital.on.ca; Dahrouge, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Samant, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Mirzaei, Ameneh [Elisabeth Bruyere Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Price, Julie [Elisabeth Bruyere Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the effect of treatment waiting time on clinical outcome for patients with cervix cancers treated with radical radiotherapy. Methods and materials: A retrospective analysis was conducted on all cervix cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy between 1990 and 2001 at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre. Analyses were performed according to the three following separate definitions of waiting times: interval from start of radiotherapy to (1) date of initial biopsy (2) date of examination under anesthesia, and (3) date of radiation oncology consultation. Associations between waiting times and patient characteristics and disease control were investigated using t-tests, analyses of variance, and Cox regression analyses. Results: A total of 195 patients were studied. The vast majority of patients were treated within 5, 6, and 8 weeks of their consultation (91%), examination under anesthesia (88%), and biopsy (81%), respectively. On average, delays between initial biopsy and treatment start were greater for older patients (p = 0.025) (5.8 weeks for <40 years old vs. 6.6 weeks for >70 years old) and those with smaller tumors (p < 0.001) (5.0 weeks for >4 cm vs. 6.3 weeks for {<=}4 cm). Univariate analysis revealed no adverse effect of treatment delay on tumor control. Multivariate analysis, with the inclusion of multiple prognostic tumor and treatment parameters, revealed an adverse effect of treatment delay on survival outcomes. Conclusions: Longer radiotherapy waiting times were found to be associated with diminished survival outcomes for patients treated radically for cervix cancer. The significance of this observed association requires further investigation.

  14. Are You Ready for This ? The New Uniform Guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    ! ­ 99!separate!sec1ons!and!indexes! ­ Applicable!to!all!requirements!(administra1ve,!cost! and!audit)!and!all!types!of!grantees/26/14!!! · 200.112,!Conflict!of!interest!V!NEW! ­ Federal!agencies!must!establish!COI!policies! ­ Grantees!consider!financial!stability,!performance!history,! audit!reports!! ! #12;!!!!!!!!! 11! Sec.!200.3XX,!PostV!AwardV!Grantees!!! · 200.301,!Performance

  15. A radical route to interstellar propylene formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawlings, J M C; Viti, S; Cecchi-Pestellini, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex organic molecules, such as propylene (CH3CHCH2), are detected in molecular clouds (such as TMC1) with high fractional abundances (~2.10^{-9}, relative to hydrogen) that cannot be explained by gas-phase chemical reactions under normal dark cloud conditions. To obtain such high abundances requires an efficient grain-driven chemistry to be operating, coupled with effective desorption of the complex organics back into the gas-phase. We propose that the mechanism that we have previously described; rapid high density gas-phase chemistry in the gas released following sudden, total, ice mantle sublimation - can explain the high abundances, without recourse to ill-defined surface chemical pathways. Our model provides a natural explanation for why it is that some sources harbour high abundances of propylene, whilst others do not; based on the age and level of dynamical activity within the source (which affects the ice composition) and the chemical composition of the ambient gas.

  16. Relative importance of radical families The "Ozone Hole"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    · Relative importance of radical families · The "Ozone Hole" · Introduction to heterogeneous chemistry Tuesday, March 8, 2011 #12;Review of important points so far Stratospheric ozone is only produced with these parameters Sir Sydney Chapman nearly got it right. He could account for the formation of the ozone layer

  17. Discovery of interstellar ketenyl (HCCO), a surprisingly abundant radical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agundez, Marcelino; Guelin, Michel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted radioastronomical observations of 9 dark clouds with the IRAM 30m telescope. We present the first identification in space of the ketenyl radical (HCCO) toward the starless core Lupus-1A and the molecular cloud L483, and the detection of the related molecules ketene (H2CCO) and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) in these two sources and 3 additional dark clouds. We also report the detection of the formyl radical (HCO) in the 9 targeted sources and of propylene (CH2CHCH3) in 4 of the observed sources, which extends significantly the number of dark clouds where these molecules are known to be present. We derive a beam-averaged column density of HCCO of 5e11 cm-2 in both Lupus-1A and L483, which means that the ketenyl radical is just 10 times less abundant than ketene in these sources. The non-negligible abundance of HCCO found implies that there must be a powerful formation mechanism able to counterbalance the efficient destruction of this radical through reactions with neutral atoms. The column densities d...

  18. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  19. For Immediate Release RADICAL CHANGES IN CONSUMER PATTERNS PREDICTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Open_House on the future of broadcast media today brought together over 100 key thinkers in the sector who debated a radical shift in the broadcast industry that is changing consumers from passive media About Open_House Open_House at Media Lab Europe is a series of monthly research driven forums

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted radical cystoprostatectomy Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass... to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C3H5O radical produced...

  1. Carbanionic Route to Electroactive Carbon-Centered Anion and Radical Oligomers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dane, Eric L.

    The synthesis of poly-1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenyl allyl (BDPA) radicals via a new anionic oligomerization strategy is reported. The material displays a reversible reduction from the orange-red radical to the blue carbanion ...

  2. Nearest-neighbor distributions of free radicals produced within charged-particle tracks in liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Miles Clay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radicals, and hydrated electrons was tabulated in order to develop a radiochemical description of the charged-particle tracks. These radicals are of biological importance since they can damage deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) through chemical action. For low... t2 s. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for hydrated electrons at 10 s . . 13 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for OH radicals at 10-6 s . . 14 Nearest like-neighbor distributions for H radicals at 10-s s...

  3. Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report intends to support Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nation’s energy security.

  4. Kinetics of the photoreactions of some organic free radicals and lifetimes of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oginets, V.Ya.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetimes of electronically excited states of the antraquinone radical anion and of the stable 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (DPPA) radical during their photoreactions with organic solvents have been evaluated by analyzing kinetic curves. The results obtained suggest that the anthraquinone radical anion undergoes a photoreaction in a quartet state, while DPPA does so in one of the higher doublet states.

  5. Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

  6. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Amerisips Homes, Miller-Bloch Residence, Johns Island, SC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero Energy Ready Home

  7. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: AquaZephyr, Eco-Vilage Ithaca, Ithaca NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero Energy Ready

  8. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  9. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  10. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

  11. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

  12. Progress toward Producing Demand-Response-Ready Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Sastry, Chellury

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes several historical and ongoing efforts to make small electrical demand-side devices like home appliances more responsive to the dynamic needs of electric power grids. Whereas the utility community often reserves the word demand response for infrequent 2 to 6 hour curtailments that reduce total electrical system peak load, other beneficial responses and ancillary services that may be provided by responsive electrical demand are of interest. Historically, demand responses from the demand side have been obtained by applying external, retrofitted, controlled switches to existing electrical demand. This report is directed instead toward those manufactured products, including appliances, that are able to provide demand responses as soon as they are purchased and that require few, or no, after-market modifications to make them responsive to needs of power grids. Efforts to be summarized include Open Automated Demand Response, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturer standard CHA 1, a simple interface being developed by the U-SNAP Alliance, various emerging autonomous responses, and the recent PinBus interface that was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  13. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyeon, Choi

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O, and linear C{sub n} (n = 4--6).

  14. Photofragment translational spectroscopy of three body dissociations and free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    North, S.W.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes several three-body dissociations and the photodissociation of methyl radicals studied using photofragment translational spectroscopy. The first chapter provides an introduction to three body dissociation, examines current experimental methodology, and includes a discussion on the treatment of photofragment translational spectroscopy data arising from three-body fragmentation. The ultraviolet photodissociation of azomethane into two methyl radicals and nitrogen is discussed in chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes the photodissociation of acetone at 248 nm and 193 nm. At 248 nm the translational energy release from the initial C-C bond cleavage matches the exit barrier height and a comparison with results at 266 nm suggests that is invariant to the available energy. A fraction of the nascent CH{sub 3}CO radicals spontaneously dissociate following rotational averaging. The for the second C-C bond cleavage also matches the exit barrier height. At 193 nm the experimental data can be successfully fit assuming that the dynamics are analogous to those at 248 nm. A simplified model of energy partitioning which adequately describes the experimental results is discussed. Experiments on acetyl halides provide additional evidence to support the proposed acetone dissociation mechanism. A value of 17.0{+-}1.0 kcal/mole for the barrier height, CH{sub 3}CO decomposition has been determined. The photodissociation of methyl radical at 193 nm and 212.8 nm is discussed in the chapter 5. The formation of CH{sub 2} ({sup 1}A{sub l}) and H ({sup 2}S) was the only single photon dissociation pathway observed at both wavelengths.

  15. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

  16. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

  17. Building Simulation Modelers are we big-data ready?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in computing and sensor technologies have pushed the amount of data we collect or generate to limits previously unheard of. Sub-minute resolution data from dozens of channels is becoming increasingly common and is expected to increase with the prevalence of non-intrusive load monitoring. Experts are running larger building simulation experiments and are faced with an increasingly complex data set to analyze and derive meaningful insight. This paper focuses on the data management challenges that building modeling experts may face in data collected from a large array of sensors, or generated from running a large number of building energy/performance simulations. The paper highlights the technical difficulties that were encountered and overcome in order to run 3.5 million EnergyPlus simulations on supercomputers and generating over 200 TBs of simulation output. This extreme case involved development of technologies and insights that will be beneficial to modelers in the immediate future. The paper discusses different database technologies (including relational databases, columnar storage, and schema-less Hadoop) in order to contrast the advantages and disadvantages of employing each for storage of EnergyPlus output. Scalability, analysis requirements, and the adaptability of these database technologies are discussed. Additionally, unique attributes of EnergyPlus output are highlighted which make data-entry non-trivial for multiple simulations. Practical experience regarding cost-effective strategies for big-data storage is provided. The paper also discusses network performance issues when transferring large amounts of data across a network to different computing devices. Practical issues involving lag, bandwidth, and methods for synchronizing or transferring logical portions of the data are presented. A cornerstone of big-data is its use for analytics; data is useless unless information can be meaningfully derived from it. In addition to technical aspects of managing big data, the paper details design of experiments in anticipation of large volumes of data. The cost of re-reading output into an analysis program is elaborated and analysis techniques that perform analysis in-situ with the simulations as they are run are discussed. The paper concludes with an example and elaboration of the tipping point where it becomes more expensive to store the output than re-running a set of simulations.

  18. Graduation Requirements and Procedures Graduation Requirements and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Degree Audit (DARS) or contact the department offering the major. Graduation Average Requirement The minimum

  19. OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. DeWall

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

  20. Studies of transition states and radicals by negative ion photodetachment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, R.B.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Negative ion photodetachment is a versatile tool for the production and study of transient neutral species such as reaction intermediates and free radicals. Photodetachment of the stable XHY{sup {minus}} anion provides a direct spectroscopic probe of the transition state region of the potential energy surface for the neutral hydrogen transfer reaction X + HY {yields} XH + Y, where X and Y are halogen atoms. The technique is especially sensitive to resonances, which occur at a specific energy, but the spectra also show features due to direct scattering. We have used collinear adiabatic simulations of the photoelectron spectra to evaluate trail potential energy surfaces for the biomolecular reactions and have extended the adiabatic approach to three dimensions and used it to evaluate empirical potential energy surfaces for the I + Hl and Br + HI reactions. In addition, we have derived an empirical, collinear potential energy surface for the Br + HBr reaction that reproduces our experimental results and have extended this surface to three dimensions. Photodetachment of a negative ion can be also used to study neutral free radicals. We have studied the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} by photoelectron spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, determining the electron affinity of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}, gaining insight on the bonding of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} ground state and observing the {sup 2}A{sub 2} excited state for the first time. Negative ion photodetachment also provides a novel and versatile source of mass-selected, jet-cooled free radicals. We have studied the photodissociation of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} at 270, 235, and 208 nm, obtaining information on the dissociation products by measuring the kinetic energy release in the photodissociation.

  1. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Kiselar; M Chance

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis-driven structural mass spectrometry experiments.

  2. AVTA: Reports on Plug-in Electric Vehicle Readiness at 3 DOD Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports analyze data and survey results on readiness for the use of plug-in electric vehicles on the Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, and Joint Base Lewis McChord, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  3. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  4. Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 1 (CDP)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmountCammie CroftPRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY READINESS

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Better Business for Builders Webinar Transcript

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-ReadySoftware | Department|

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Healthy Efficient Homes - Spirit Lake, Iowa |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home|PV-ReadySoftware

  7. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Trolle Residence, Danbury, CT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero Energy ReadyBPC Green

  8. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Singer Village, Derby, CT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero Energy ReadyBPC

  9. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Kaltenbach Residence, Clinton, WA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero Energy ReadyBPCKaltenbach

  10. Electron spin resonance studies of two dimethoxymethane radicals in aqueous solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Eileen Lob

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Dimethoxymethane's Two- Radical Spectrum Experimental Spectrum of Dimethoxymethane When Included as a Substrate in the Titanium(III)-Hydrogen Peroxide Flow System. Peak Height of Rl as a Function of Signal Level. Peak Height of Rl as a Function of Time at 27.... The energy of activation for the decay of each radical was calculated. A theoretical structure for each radical has been proposed which explains the experimental ESR spectrum. The reducti. on of hydrogen peroxide by transition metals yieldin...

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of organic free radicals related to combustion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisshaar, J.C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary long-term goal of this work is to develop new techniques for measuring vibrational spectra of polyatomic neutral free radicals. The authors explore a variation of resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) in which tunable {omega}{sub IR} excites the radical vibrationally and {omega}{sub UV} selectively ionizes only the vibrationally excited molecules. Development of the IR + UV R2PI experiment is underway. In the meantime, the authors have used optical R2PI and pulsed field ionization (PFI) detection to obtain new vibrational spectra of species such as the benzyl and phenylsilane cations. In benzyl, a great deal was learned about the vibronic coupling mechanism in the mixed q{sup 2}A{sub 2}-2{sup 2}B{sub 2} system near 450 nm by projecting the mixed states onto the manifold of cation vibrational states. In phenylsilane{sup +}, we find that the sixfold barrier to internal rotation of the silyl group is small (V{sub 6} = +19 cm{sup {minus}1}). We are beginning to understand the mechanisms of coupling of torsional states with vibration, overall rotation, and other electronic states. In addition, we are developing a new model of internal rotation in aromatic compounds based on Prof. Frank Weinhold`s natural resonance theory.

  12. Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy of Propargyl Radicals at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncher, S.J.; Moore, D.T.; Sveum, N.E.; Neumark, D.M.

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of propargyl radical, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}, and its perdeuterated isotopolog was investigated using photofragment translational spectroscopy. Propargyl radicals were produced by 193 nm photolysis of allene entrained in a molecular beam expansion, and then photodissociated at 248 nm. photofragment time-of-flight spectra were measured at a series of laboratory angles using electron impact ionization coupled to a mass spectrometer. Data for ion masses corresponding to C{sub 3}H{sub 2}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sup +}, C{sub 3}{sup +}, and the analogous deuterated species show that both H and H{sub 2} loss occur. The translational energy distributions for these processes have average values = 5.7 and 15.9 kcal/mol, respectively, and are consistent with dissociation on the ground state following internal conversion, with no exit barrier for H loss but a tight transition state for H{sub 2} loss. The translational energy distribution for H atom loss is similar to that in previous work on propargyl in which the H atom, rather than the heavy fragment, was detected. The branching ratio for H loss/H{sub 2} loss was determined to be 97.6/2.4 {+-} 1.2, in good agreement with RRKM results.

  13. The electronic structure and optical properties of organic mixed valence anion radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liberko, C.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of planar and helical organic mixed valence anion radicals was studied. Cyanoimine derivatives of planar diquinones were synthesized and studied by electrochemical methods. Their anion radicals were generated electrochemically and found to be stable in air. These species had electronic absorptions in the near infrared region. The Visible and near infrared spectra as well as IR vibrational data are consistent with delocalized anion radicals. The molecular orbital energy level coefficients obtained from PPP semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations on neutral quinones, imides and cyanoimine derivatives of quinones, were used to correlate experimental data of their anion radicals. The calculation correlated the long wavelength absorptions of the anion radicals confirming that the absorptions arise from electronic transitions in delocalized species. The calculation was also valuable for assigning ESR hyperfine splittings. Including minor geometric perturbations in the calculation provides a method of predicting localization in mixed valence ion radicals. Helicene diquinones were studied by cyclic voltammetry. Their anion radicals, generated electrochemically, were studied by visible, near infrared, and ESR spectroscopies. The anion radicals were found to have electronic absorptions in the near infrared region tailing into the infrared. PPP calculations were consistent with the experimental data only if transannular interaction between the ends of the helix was included. The calculations and experimental observations are consistent with an electronic structure in which the anion radical is not only delocalized around the helix but also between the ends of the helix bonding them together in a Mobius fashion.

  14. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevitt, Adam J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Productare measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactionsdetection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at

  15. Photoinitiated proton-coupled electron transfer and radical transport kinetics in class la ribonucleotide reductase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pizano, Arturo A. (Arturo Alejandro)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is a critical mechanism in biology, underpinning key processes such as radical transport, energy transduction, and enzymatic substrate activation. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) ...

  16. Outsider politics : radicalism as a political strategy in Western Europe and Latin America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyo, Verónica

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    45 The particular definition and theory of radicalism that Ipresent my own definitions, theory and analytical frameworkas an outsider’s strategy: definition, theory and analytical

  17. Report of independent consultants reviewing Integrated Test Stands (ITS) performance and readiness of DARHT for construction start

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent consultants met at Los Alamos, June 15 and 16, 1993, to review progress on the commissioning of the Integrated Test Stand (ITS) for DARHT and to provide DOE with technical input on readiness for construction of the first radiographic arm of DARHT. The consultants concluded that all milestones necessary for demonstrating the performance of the DARHT accelerator have been met and that the project is ready for construction to resume. The experimental program using ITS should be continued to quantify the comparison of experiment and theory, to test improvements on the injector insulator, and to better evaluate the interaction of the beam and the target.

  18. A versatile source to produce high-intensity, pulsed supersonic radical beams for crossed-beam experiments: The cyanogen radical CN,,X2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    CN radicals in a low- pressure fast-flow chemical reactor. Although valuable ki- netic data of the ablated species with molecular nitrogen, which acts also as a seeding gas. A chopper wheel located after

  19. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  20. Spectroscopy and reaction dynamics of collision complexes containing hydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, M.I. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE supported work in this laboratory has focused on the spectroscopic characterization of the interaction potential between an argon atom and a hydroxyl radical in the ground X{sup 2}II and excited A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +} electronic states. The OH-Ar system has proven to be a test case for examining the interaction potential in an open-shell system since it is amenable to experimental investigation and theoretically tractable from first principles. Experimental identification of the bound states supported by the Ar + OH (X {sup 2}II) and Ar + OH(A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +}) potentials makes it feasible to derive realistic potential energy surfaces for these systems. The experimentally derived intermolecular potentials provide a rigorous test of ab initio theory and a basis for understanding the dramatically different collision dynamics taking place on the ground and excited electronic state surfaces.

  1. Predicting tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical in a global, three-dimensional, chemistry, transport, and deposition model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, C.S.

    1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the most important chemically reactive tropospheric gases are ozone (O{sub 3}) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Although ozone in the stratosphere is a necessary protector against the sun`s radiation, tropospheric ozone is actually a pollutant which damages materials and vegetation, acts as a respiratory irritant, and is a greenhouse gas. One of the two main sources of ozone in the troposphere is photochemical production. The photochemistry is initiated when hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) react with nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} = NO + NO{sub 2}) in the presence of sunlight. Reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH, is the main sink for many tropospheric gases. The hydroxyl radical is highly reactive and has a lifetime on the order of seconds. Its formation is initiated by the photolysis of tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric chemistry involves a complex, non-linear set of chemical reactions between atmospheric species that vary substantially in time and space. To model these and other species on a global scale requires the use of a global, three-dimensional chemistry, transport, and deposition (CTD) model. In this work, I developed two such three dimensional CTD models. The first model incorporated the chemistry necessary to model tropospheric ozone production from the reactions of nitrogen oxides with carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH{sub 4}). The second also included longer-lived alkane species and the biogenic hydrocarbon isoprene, which is emitted by growing plants and trees. The models` ability to predict a number of key variables (including the concentration of O{sub 3}, OH, and other species) were evaluated. Then, several scenarios were simulated to understand the change in the chemistry of the troposphere since preindustrial times and the role of anthropogenic NO{sub x} on present day conditions.

  2. OD bond dissociation from the 3s state of deuterated hydroxymethyl radical ,,CH2OD...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisler, Hanna

    O­D bond dissociation from the 3s state of deuterated hydroxymethyl radical ,,CH2OD... Lin Feng of the deuterated hydroxymethyl radical CH2OD is investigated on the lowest excited state, the 3s Rydberg state at these wavelengths. Comparison with the conical intersection calculations of Hoffman and Yarkony suggests that O­D

  3. Various radical polymerizations of glycerol-based Phuoc Dien Pham,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , cyclocarbonate, acetal and urethane were involved in free radical polymerization and radical controlled in the modern oleochemical industry [1] obtained as a by-product in saponification of fats, in fatty acid/ester production [2], in microbial fermentation [3] and in biodiesel manufacture by trans

  4. BER Requirements Review 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attendees 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet...

  5. ASCR Requirements Review 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Attendees 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet...

  6. Free radical formation in vivo and hepatotoxicity due to anesthesia with halothane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, J.L.; Beckwith, A.L.; Bastin, F.N.; Adams, J.F.; Cousins, M.J.; Hall, P.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In vivo studies were undertaken to determine whether free radical formation in the liver during administration of various halogenated anesthetics is associated with hepatotoxicity of these agents in an animal model. In addition to the anesthetics halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane, carbon tetrachloride was studied as an example of a hepatotoxic halogenated compound acting by a free radical mechanism. Free radicals were trapped in vivo during anesthesia as stable adducts using the spin trap, alpha-phenyl-t-butyl nitrone. These adducts were extracted from the liver and studied by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Free radicals were detected after administration of halothane or carbon tetrachloride, compounds which were hepatotoxic under the conditions of the experiment, but were not found after anesthesia induced with enflurane or isoflurane, anesthetics which were not hepatotoxic under identical conditions. The free radical trapped after alpha-phenyl-t-butyl nitrone treatment of halothane-anesthetized rats appeared to be a metabolic intermediate of halothane.

  7. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yiteng; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on (1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and (2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects o...

  8. Welcome to the Operation READY 2002 collection Flexible formats: print, CD-ROM, DVD video and Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Welcome to the Operation READY 2002 collection Flexible formats: print, CD-ROM, DVD video and Web and deployment New and updated videos Family Assistance Center Workshops and sessions are shorter Scenarios are shorter Lessons are self-contained Planning and executing a FACEX added New and updated video Homecoming

  9. First Commercial US Mixed Waste Vitrification Facility: Permits, Readiness Reviews, and Delisting of Final Wasteform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, J.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Norford, S.W.; Diener, G.A.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) contracted GTS Duratek (Duratek) to construct and operate the first commercial vitrification facility to treat an F-006 mixed (radioactive/hazardous) waste in the United States. The permits were prepared and submitted to the South Carolina state regulators by WSRC - based on a detailed design by Duratek. Readiness Assessments were conducted by WSRC and Duratek at each major phase of the operation (sludge transfer, construction, cold and radioactive operations, and a major restart) and approved by the Savannah River Department of Energy prior to proceeding. WSRC prepared the first `Upfront Delisting` petition for a vitrified mixed waste. Lessons learned with respect to the permit strategy, operational assessments, and delisting from this `privatization` project will be discussed.

  10. Kinetics and intermediate products in the interaction of straight-chain and cyclic hydrocarbon radicals with 9,10-Anthraquinone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ladygin, B.V.; Revina, A.A.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors use a pulse radiolysis technique with optical registration of the destruction of hydrocarbon radicals R in determining the rate constants for the interaction of cyclododecyl radicals and n-dodecyl radicals with 9,10-anthraquinone in the corresponding liquid hydrocarbons, at various temperatures. It is shown that in the presence of oxygen, hydrocarbon radicals with the quinone form oxygen-containing species that are capable of propagating the oxidation chain and regenerating the original quinone.

  11. 3. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED NO RADIOGRAPHY REQUIRED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SHALL BE DYE PENETRANT INSPECTED. ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. 1. WELDING TO BE PERFORMED is property of 1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES 2. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3

  12. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowa, Mark J., E-mail: msowa@ultratech.com [Ultratech/Cambridge NanoTech, 130 Turner Street, Building 2, Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190?°C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition systems.

  13. Time-resolved FTIR emission studies of laser photofragmentation and radical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, S.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have focused specifically on collision processes, such as single collision energy transfer, reaction dynamics, and radical reactions. The authors employ novel FTIR techniques in the study of single collision energy transfer processes using translationally fast H atom, as well as radical-radical reactions, e.g. CH{sub 3} + O, CF{sub 3} + H(D), and Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}. The fast atoms permit unique high energy regions of certain transition states of combustion species to be probed for the first time.

  14. Radical-cured block copolymer-modified thermosets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redline, Erica M.; Francis, Lorraine F.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Poly(ethylene-alt-propylene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEP-PEO) diblock copolymers were synthesized and added at 4 wt % to 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (BisGMA), a monomer that cures using free radical chemistry. In separate experiments, poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) was combined as a secondary monomer with BisGMA and the monomers were loaded with 4 wt % PEP-PEO. The diblock copolymers self-assembled into well-dispersed spherical micelles with PEP cores and PEO coronas. No appreciable change in the final extent of cure of the thermosets was caused by the addition of diblock copolymer, except in the case of BisGMA, where the addition of the block copolymer increased extent of cure by 12%. Furthermore, the extent of cure was increased by 29% and 37% with the addition of 25 and 50 wt % PEGDMA, respectively. Elastic modulus and fracture resistance were also determined, and the values indicate that the addition of block copolymers does not significantly toughen the thermoset materials. This finding is surprising when compared with the large increase in fracture resistance seen in block copolymer-modified epoxies, and an explanation is proposed.

  15. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  16. FES Requirements Review 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2014 FES Attendees 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  17. BES Requirements Review 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 BES Attendees 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  18. Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

  19. BER Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and analysis of geospatial data involvingmanipulation, analysis, and display of geospatial data,Analysis and interpretation require mapping geospatial

  20. The readiness of ATLAS Trigger-DAQ system for the second LHC run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rammensee, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After its first shutdown, LHC will provide pp collisions with increased luminosity and energy. In the ATLAS experiment, the Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system has been upgraded to deal with the increased event rates. The updated system is radically different from the previous implementation, both in terms of architecture and expected performance. The main architecture has been reshaped in order to profit from the technological progress and to maximize the flexibility and efficiency of the data selection process. The trigger system in ATLAS consists of a hardware Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. The pre-existing two-level software filtering, known as L2 and the Event Filter, are now merged into a single process, performing incremental data collection and analysis. This design has many advantages, among which are: the radical simplification of the architec...

  1. FES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

  2. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions; Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Steward, D.; Penev, M.; McQueen, S.; Jaffe, S.; Talon, C.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a critical commercialization barrier. With major automakers focused on 2015 as a target timeframe for global FCEV commercialization, the window of opportunity is short for establishing a sufficient network of hydrogen stations to support large-volume vehicle deployments. This report describes expert feedback on the market readiness of hydrogen infrastructure technology from two activities.

  3. Production of Crosslinked, Hollow Nanoparticles by Surface-Initiated Living Free-Radical Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harth, Eva M.

    Production of Crosslinked, Hollow Nanoparticles by Surface-Initiated Living Free alkoxyamine initiating groups are attached to the surface silanol groups of silica nanoparticles. This surface Keywords: living radical; nitroxide; nanoparticles; crosslinking; core­shell; poly- mers; nanotechnology

  4. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Qiang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zheng, Jianming [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walter, Eric [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pan, Huilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lv, Dongping [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zuo, Pengjian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Honghao [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deng, Z. D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liaw, Bor Y. [School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, (United States); Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Zhang, Ji-Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xiao, Jie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  5. A review of "English Radicalism, 1550-1850" by Glenn Burgess and Matthew Festenstein, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McJimsey, Robert

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    216 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS result, prophetic discourse and female authority is presented as a tidy narrative of increased feminine consciousness and radicalism, culminating with Mary Astell, who used the politics of sexual difference to write a...

  6. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  7. The millimeter/sub-millimeter spectrum of the LiS radical in its 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    millimeter/sub-millimeter direct absorption methods. This radical was synthesized from lithium vapor and CS2 reactions, corrosion processes, catalysis and in stellar atmospheres [1±3]. Examining the bonding

  8. Oxidative capacity of the Mexico City atmosphere - Part 1: A radical source perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volkamer, R.

    A detailed analysis of OH, HO2 [HO subscript 2] and RO2 [RO subscript 2] radical sources is presented for the near field photochemical regime inside the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). During spring of 2003 (MCMA-2003 ...

  9. Synthesis of a Water-Soluble 1,3-Bis(diphenylene)2-phenylallyl Radical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy Manning

    The design and synthesis of a water-soluble 1,3-bis(diphenylene)-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) radical via the conjugate addition of a derivatized fluorene nucelophile is described. The compound is designed for use in dynamic nuclear ...

  10. Water-Soluble Narrow-Line Radicals for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haze, Olesya

    The synthesis of air-stable, highly water-soluble organic radicals containing a 1,3-bis(diphenylene)-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) core is reported. A sulfonated derivative, SA-BDPA, retains the narrow electron paramagnetic resonance ...

  11. 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    transform- ation of organic compounds5­7 , (2) electrochromic displays8­11 and (3) solar energy conversion of these radical cation dimers can be inferred from the variation in the electrochromic properties of these violo

  12. EPR determination of the rate constants of detachment of hydrogen from triethylsilane by metal carbonyl radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasanov, R.G.; Dotdaev, S.Kh.

    1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate constants of detachment of hydrogen triethylsilane by radicals of rhenium and manganese pentacarbonyls, tungsten cyclopentadienyltricarbonyl, and iron cyclopentadienyldicarbonyl were determined, and the order of the reactivity of the metal carbonyls was hypothesized.

  13. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore »cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  14. A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia River Gorge. Photo: C. Bruce Forster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia with juvenile bypass systems to keep the smolts out of the turbines. But given the gravity of the [salmon

  15. Membrane Separator for Redox Flow Batteries that Utilize Anion Radical Mediators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Na + ion conducting polyethylene oxide membrane is developed for an organic electrolyte redox flow battery that utilizes anion radical mediators. To achieve high specific ionic conductivity, tetraethyleneglycol dimethylether (TEGDME) is used as a plasticizer to reduce crystallinity and increase the free volume of the gel film. This membrane is physically and chemically stable in TEGDME electrolyte that contains highly reactive biphenyl anion radical mediators.

  16. Strongly correlated mechanisms of a photoexcited radical reaction from the anti-Hermitian contracted Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Jonathan J. IV; Rothman, Adam E.; Mazziotti, David A. [Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoexcited radical reactions are critical to processes in both nature and materials, and yet they can be challenging for electronic structure methods due to the presence of strong electron correlation. Reduced-density-matrix (RDM) methods, based on solving the anti-Hermitian contracted Schroedinger equation (ACSE) for the two-electron RDM (2-RDM), are examined for studying the strongly correlated mechanisms of these reactions with application to the electrocyclic interconversion of allyl and cyclopropyl radicals. We combine recent extensions of the ACSE to excited states [G. Gidofalvi and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 80, 022507 (2009)] and arbitrary spin states [A. E. Rothman, J. J. Foley IV, and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 80, 052508 (2009)]. The ACSE predicts that the ground-state ring closure of the allyl radical has a high 52.5 kcal/mol activation energy that is consistent with experimental data, while the closure of an excited allyl radical can occur by disrotatory and conrotatory pathways whose transition states are essentially barrierless. Comparisons are made with multireference second- and third-order perturbation theories and multireference configuration interaction. While predicted energy differences do not vary greatly between methods, the ACSE appears to improve these differences when they involve a strongly and a weakly correlated radical by capturing a greater share of single-reference correlation that increases the stability of the weakly correlated radicals. For example, the ACSE predicts a -39.6 kcal/mol conversion of the excited allyl radical to the ground-state cyclopropyl radical in comparison to the -32.6 to -37.3 kcal/mol conversions predicted by multireference methods. In addition, the ACSE reduces the computational scaling with the number of strongly correlated orbitals from exponential (traditional multireference methods) to quadratic. Computed ground- and excited-state 2-RDMs are nearly N-representable.

  17. Experimental Studies of Hydroxyl Radical Initiated Tropospheric Oxidation of Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    End Product Distribution .............................. 90 E. Conclusions .............................................................................................. 92 viii CHAPTER Page V HYDROXYL RADICAL INITIATED OXIDATION... the rate constants for the estimated error range for NO addition to hydroxyl alkyl radical rate (k3). A:[IC5H8OH] = 2.1 ? 1013 molecules cm-3, [NO] = 2.8 ? 1015 molecules cm-3, [O2] = 1.5 ? 1016 molecules cm-3 Upper limit = 20.0 ? 10-12...

  18. Niobium Complexes As Lewis Acid and Radical Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Tikkanen

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of lithium pentaphenylcyclopentadiende (Li C{sub 5}Ph{sub 5}) with niobium pentachloride in dichloromethane or toluene produces insoluble red-orange solids whose C/H/Cl analyses are not consistent with C{sub 5}Ph{sub 5}NbCl{sub 4}. Addition of an acetonitrile solution of LiC{sub 5}Ph{sub 5} with NbCl{sub 5} gives C{sub 5}Ph{sub 5}NbCl{sub 4} observed as a transient product by NMR spectroscopy, which then abstracts H from the acetonitrile solvent to give HC{sub 5}Ph{sub 5} and presumably NbCl{sub 4}CH{sub 2}CN. Reversal of the order of addition gives the {center_dot}C{sub 5}Ph{sub 5} radical as characterized by MS and EPR spectroscopy. Attempts to prepare the trimethylsilyl derivative Me{sub 3}SiC{sub 5}Ph{sub 5} (a less reducing cyclopentadienyl group) were unsuccessful. Reaction was observed only in tetrahydrofuran, producing only Me{sub 3}SiO(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}C{sub 5}Ph{sub 4}(m-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH3)) characterized by {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectroscopy. The trimethylsilyltetraphenylcyclopentadienyl derivative, Me{sub 3}Si(H)C{sub 5}Ph{sub 4}, was characterized by {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectroscopy. This compound reacts with NbCl{sub 5} to give HCl and ClSiMe{sub 3} and a mixture of HC{sub 5}Ph{sub 4}NbCl{sub 4} and Me{sub 3}SiC{sub 5}Ph{sub 4}NbCl{sub 4}.

  19. Strategic forces: Future requirements and options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speed, R.D.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of the collapse of the Warsaw Pact and the apparent ending of the Cold War, there have been renewed calls for radical cuts in US strategic forces to levels far below the 10,000 or so warheads allowed each side under the current START proposal. Since it now appears that NATO for the first time will have the capability to defeat a Soviet conventional attack without the necessity of threatening to resort to nuclear weapons, this should pave the way for the rethinking of US strategy and the reduction of US strategic weapons requirements. In this new environment, it seems plausible that, with a modification of the Flexible Response doctrine to forego attempts to disarm the Soviet Union, deterrence could be maintained with 1500 or so survivable strategic weapons. With a new strategy that confined US strategic weapons to the role of deterring the use of nuclear weapons by other countries, a survivable force of about 500 weapons would seem sufficient. With this premise, the implications for the US strategic force structure are examined for two cases: a treaty that allows each side 3000 warheads and one that allows each side 1000 warheads. In Part 1 of this paper, the weapons requirements for deterrence are examined in light of recent changes in the geopolitical environment. In Part 2, it is assumed that the President and Congress have decided that deep cuts in strategic forces are acceptable. 128 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs. (JF)

  20. Nutritional requirements of sesame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eller, Joe C

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L)&RARYi ~st t~6~ 0F TEXACO NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis By JOE C. ELLER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in. partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of M... AS TER 0 F SCIENC E January 1958 Major Subject: Agronomy NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis JOE C. ELLER Approved. as to style and content by. ' Chairman of Committee Head qg Department January 1958 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author wishes...

  1. RPAM & Energy Order Requirements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    430.1C, Real Property Asset Management and DOE O 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management Requirements, Overlap & Differences Office of...

  2. Required Annual Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Required Annual Notices The Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 (WHCRA) The medical programs sponsored by LANS will not restrict benefits if you or your dependent...

  3. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  4. Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

  5. Photochemical generation of alkyl radicals and their reactions with methyl viologen radical cation and with transition-metal complexes in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakac, A.; Espenson, J.H. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (USA))

    1989-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The irradiation of aqueous solutions of RCo((14)aneN{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} (R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, 1-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}, CH{sub 2}Cl, CH{sub 2}Br, CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3}) with visible light, {lambda} {le} 400 nm, results in the homolysis of the cobalt-carbon bond. These complexes are quite unreactive toward a variety of dealkylating and redox reagents and thus represent a convenient source of small unstabilized carbon-centered radicals in the presence of potential substrates. The radicals react rapidly with the methyl viologen radical cation, k{sub MB} = (1-2) {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The kinetics of the formation of RCr{sup 2+} and RCo((14)aneN{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} in the reactions of radicals with Cr{sup 2+} and Co((14)aneN{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{sup 2+}, respectively, were studied by using MV{sup +} as a probe. The respective rate constants have values k{sub Cr} = (1.9-2.4) {times} 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and k{sub Co} = (1-2) {times} 10{sup 7} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} for all the radicals examined. 36 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. General Responsibilities and Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

  7. Reaction Dynamics of Phenyl Radicals (C6H5) with Propylene (CH3CHCH2) and Its Deuterated Isotopologues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    ARTICLES Reaction Dynamics of Phenyl Radicals (C6H5) with Propylene (CH3CHCH2) and Its Deuterated The reactions between phenyl radicals (C6H5) and propylene (CH3CHCH2) together with its D6- and two D3 atom) of the propylene molecule at the dCH2 unit to form a radical intermediate (CH3CHCH2C6H5

  8. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yiteng Zhang; Gennady P. Berman; Sabre Kais

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on (1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and (2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the "quantum avian compass" can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.

  9. Phenomenological modelling for Time-Resolved Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in radical-triplet system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Wu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin dynamics of radical-triplet system (RTS) has been calculated by using the Lindblad formalism within the theory of open quantum system. The single-radical-triplet system (SRTS) is considered here for single-qubit quantum gate operations while double-radical-triplet system (DRTS) for two-qubit operations. The environment effects taken into account include the spin-lattice relaxation of the triplet exciton and radical spin-$\\frac{1}{2}$, the inter-system crossing process that induces the transition from singlet excited state to the triplet ground state, and the rather slow relaxation process from the triplet ground state back down to the singlet ground state. These calculations shown that the line shape broadening is strongly related to the exchange interaction between triplet and exciton, which can be understood as a spontaneous magnetic field created by the triplet renormalises the original spin-$\\frac{1}{2}$ electron spin resonance spectra. This work will provide key information about the spin dynamics for building optically-controlled molecular quantum gate out of radical-bearing molecules. Moreover, this has generated the further theoretical question on how the mixture of fermion and boson behaves.

  10. Regioselective thermolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane enhanced by restricted radical mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Biggs, C.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal decomposition of coal has been postulated to involve the formation of free radicals by processes such as the homolysis of aliphatic or ether-containing bridges which connect polycyclic aromatic units into a macromolecular structure. Understanding the thermal reactivity of coal is important in the study of pyrolysis, liquefaction, and coking. Mechanistic insights into the chemical reactivity of coal at the molecular level can be gained from the study of model compounds which represent structural features in coal. However, radicals generated in a cross-linked macromolecular material such as coal may experience restricted mobility when the radical center remains bound to the residual molecular structure. To model the effects of restricted radical mobility on thermally induced decomposition reactions, thermolyses of model compounds covalently attached to an inert support have been studied. Thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,2-diphenylethane showed a substantially altered free radical reaction pathway compared with the corresponding liquid phase behavior, while thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approximately}DPP) showed unexpected regioselectivity resulting from conformational restrictions on hydrogen transfer reactions as the surface coverage of {approximately}DPP decreased. In order to further explore the regionselectivity of hydrogen transfer induced by restricted diffusion, the thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,4-diphenylbutane ({approximately}DPB) is being examined.

  11. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  12. BES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

  13. Timeline for Net Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x By July 31 of each Forecast Year, BPA publishes all Load Following customers' Net Requirements data for the two years of the upcoming Rate Period. 17.6.1 7312010 Yes...

  14. Conditions Required by Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    No No Sto H 2 NoIs it required by law "Violence on children"?164.512 (c) (1) H CE may disclose to government to LEO HCE may not disclose to LEO H No Yes No Required by law: "reporting certain type of injuries"? H disclose to LEO H 164.512 (f) (1) (ii) (C)(2) It provides that the request is specific and limited in scope

  15. Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,Award RecipientsActMission to ChinaRequirements Requirements

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of Radically Enhanced alnico Magnets (DREaM) for Traction Drive Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ames Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Development of Radically...

  17. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: M Street Homes, Smartlux on Greenpark...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    airPLUS and WaterSense requirements, and meets 2012 International Energy Conservation Code insulation levels. Although M Street was founded in 2009, its past president Bob...

  18. Translational energy characteristics of radicals and ions in a capillaritron supersonic nozzle discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allik, T.H.; Brady, B.B.; Flynn, G.W.; Spector, G.B.

    1984-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold translational energy distributions (T/sub s/ approx. 7 K) of OH radicals have been created by using the capillaritron, a supersonic nozzle discharge beam source. A mixture of CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ was used to produce the OH radical whose translational energy was determined by conventional time-of-flight techniques. The radicals were detected with an electron bombardment ionizer-quadrupole mass spectrometer assembly. Ions were also created in the discharge with Ar or CF/sub 4/, but the translational energy distribution was characterized by a temperature greater than or equal to f10/sup 4/ K. Ion energies were measured electrostatically. 35 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  19. SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of simultaneous production of hydrogen and separated stream of CO{sub 2} was proved using a fixed bed 2 reactor system at GE-EER. This bench-scale cyclic fixed-bed reactor system designed to reform natural gas to syngas has been fabricated in another coordinated DOE project. This system was modified to reform natural gas to syngas and then convert syngas to H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The system produced 85% hydrogen (dry basis).

  20. Lead Coolant Test Facility - Design Concept and Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soli Khericha, Ph. D.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements are identified in this paper: (1) Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger; (2) Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core; (3) Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control; (4) Demonstrate Safe Operation; and (5) Provision for Future Testing Across these five broad areas are supported by twenty-one specific requirements. The purpose of this facility is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  1. Requirements Definition Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses development of a Software Configuration Management Plan to track and control work products, analysis of the system owner/users' business processes and needs, translation of those processes and needs into formal requirements, and planning the testing activities to validate the performance of the software product.

  2. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  3. Competitive CH and OD bond fission channels in the UV photodissociation of the deuterated hydroxymethyl radical CH2OD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisler, Hanna

    Competitive C­H and O­D bond fission channels in the UV photodissociation of the deuterated hydroxymethyl radical CH2OD Lin Feng, Andrey V. Demyanenko, and Hanna Reisler Department of Chemistry January 2004 Photodissociation studies of the CH2OD radical in the region 28 000­41 000 cm 1 357­244 nm

  4. RADICALS AND UNITS IN RAMANUJAN'S WORK Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and LiangCheng Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    RADICALS AND UNITS IN RAMANUJAN'S WORK Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang­Cheng Zhang. Typeset by AMS-TEX 1 #12;2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN, AND LIANG­CHENG ZHANG Radicals arise in other

  5. Report on the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Replacement Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.T.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of operational readiness review (ORR) activities for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) located at Savannah River Site (SRS). The EH OA of this facility took place concurrently with an ORR conducted by the DOE Office of Defense Programs (DP). The DP ORR was conducted from January 19 through February 5, 1993. The EH OA was performed in accordance with the protocol and procedures specified in EH Program for Oversight Assessment of Operational Readiness Evaluations for Startups and Restarts,'' dated September 15, 1992. The EH OA Team evaluated the DP ORR to determine whether it was thorough and demonstrated sufficient inquisitiveness to verify that the implementation of programs and procedures adequately ensures the protection of worker safety and health. The EH OA Team performed its evaluation of the DP ORR in the following technical areas: occupational safety, industrial hygiene, and respiratory protection; fire protection; and chemical safety. In the areas of fire protection and chemical safety, the EH OA Team conducted independent vertical-slice reviews to confirm DP ORR results. Within each technical area, the EH OA Team reviewed the DP ORR Plan, including the Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs); the qualifications of individual DP ORR team members; the performance of planned DP ORR activities; and the results of the DP ORR.

  6. Process improvement to the inspection readiness plan in chemical weapons convention challenge inspections. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triplett, W.M.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis identified current Information Technology initiatives to help improve the Navy`s Inspection Readiness Plan for Chemical Warfare Convention (CWC) Challenge Inspection. The CWC is an intensive inspection. The Challenge Inspection allows for a team of international inspectors to inspect a naval facility suspected of violating the CWC on very short notice. This thesis begins with a review of the CWC Challenge Inspection timeline. It then describes the Navy`s Inspection Readiness Plan for CWC Challenge Inspections as well as the Navy Tiger Team that is sent to naval facilities to assist the Commanding Officer and base personnel during inspections. One of the initiatives evaluated by this analysis is the use of videoconferencing. To ascertain the feasibility of using videoconferencing in the CWC Challenge Inspection process, this thesis reviews the current videoconferencing systems and standards, and the results of a questionnaire that was sent to various naval commands. This thesis concludes with recommendations for inclusion of videoconferencing and various other Information Technology initiatives in the CWC Challenge Inspection process.

  7. Recommendations for Tritium Science and Technology Research and Development in Support of the Tritium Readiness Campaign, TTP-7-084

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senor, David J.

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2006 and 2012 the Tritium Readiness Campaign Development and Testing Program produced significant advances in the understanding of in-reactor TPBAR performance. Incorporating these data into existing TPBAR performance models has improved permeation predictions, and the discrepancy between predicted and observed tritium permeation in the WBN1 coolant has been decreased by about 30%. However, important differences between predicted and observed permeation still remain, and there are significant knowledge gaps that hinder the ability to reliably predict other aspects of TPBAR performance such as tritium distribution, component integrity, and performance margins. Based on recommendations from recent Tritium Readiness Campaign workshops and reviews coupled with technical and programmatic priorities, high-priority activities were identified to address knowledge gaps in the near- (3-5 year), middle- (5-10 year), and long-term (10+ year) time horizons. It is important to note that there are many aspects to a well-integrated research and development program. The intent is not to focus exclusively on one aspect or another, but to approach the program in a holistic fashion. Thus, in addition to small-scale tritium science studies, ex-reactor tritium technology experiments such as TMED, and large-scale in-reactor tritium technology experiments such as TMIST, a well-rounded research and development program must also include continued analysis of WBN1 performance data and post-irradiation examination of TPBARs and lead use assemblies to evaluate model improvements and compare separate-effects and integral component behavior.

  8. Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites by Atom Transfer Radical Nitroxide Coupling Chemistryy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites by Atom Transfer Radical Nitroxide Coupling Chemistryy Muhammed of well- dispersed clay layers such as montmorillonite (MMT) into a polymer matrix has been proved However, the dispersion of clay as indi- vidual platelets throughout the polymer is difficult to achieve

  9. Quantification of OH and HO2 radicals during the lowtemperature oxidation of hydrocarbons by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Quantification of OH and HO2 radicals during the lowtemperature oxidation of hydrocarbons of hydrocarbons and biofuels is of critical importance to allow the development of new combustion) but has never been applied to real hydrocarbons and lowtemperature oxidation. H atoms (10

  10. Hubs of brain functional networks are radically reorganized in comatose patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hubs of brain functional networks are radically reorganized in comatose patients S. Achard , C Human brain networks have topological properties in common with many other complex systems, prompting the question: what aspects of brain network organization are critical for distinctive functional properties

  11. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature11718 Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not been achieved so far-temperature sensi- tivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evapora- tive cooling and a sufficientlyLETTER doi:10.1038/nature11718 Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical Benjamin K

  12. Mechanisms for CF2 radical generation and loss on surfaces in fluorocarbon plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Mechanisms for CF2 radical generation and loss on surfaces in fluorocarbon plasmas Da Zhanga fluorocarbon plasma etching, plasma-surface reactions result in the surface acting as either a source or sink investigated. © 2000 American Vacuum Society. S0734-2101 00 05106-X I. INTRODUCTION Fluorocarbon plasmas

  13. 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Highly stable tetrathiafulvalene radical dimers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Stoddart1 * Two [3]catenane `molecular flasks' have been designed to create stabilized, redox observation of p­p radical-cation dimers on the redox stimulation of electron rich or poor heterocycles, rather than the fundamental cornerstone of functional devices7 . Specifically, methyl viologen (MV2þ

  14. Radical History Review Issue 118 (Winter 2014) doi 10.1215/01636545-2350939

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Interview with David Graeber Hannah Chadeayne Appel Odd things happened in fall 2011 as Occupy Wall Street of membership in a new kind of political dialogue about who owes what to whom.1 I sat down with David Graeber background and your own political coming of age. David Graeber: I guess my childhood was full of radical

  15. Unexpected Alternated Radical Copolymerization of Vinylidene cyanide with a Vinyl ether for Superhydrophobic and Highly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for Superhydrophobic and Highly Oleophobic Films Ahmed Meskini, Mustapha Raihane Laboratoire de Chimie Bioorganique et Radical Copolymerization of Vinylidene cyanide with a Vinyl ether for Superhydrophobic and Highly(VCN-alt-FAVE8) copolymers exhibit superhydrophobic and highly oleophobic characters as evidenced by high water

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home High-Performance Home Sales Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    With most homes, even a home built to the minimum Energy Star requirements, will be illegal to build in three to four years in most states. That is not the case with your...

  17. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact o

  18. Mineral Requirements of Sheep.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constituents in feed, residues, and excrements were estimated. In connection with other digestion experiments, estimates were made of certain ash constituents in feeds, excrements and urine. The results of this work throw light upon the mineral requirements...,11 grams phosphoric acid. The ratio of lime to phosphoric acid in tri- calcium phosphate is 1 :0.80. Table 7.-Average magnesia eaten and digested. BALANCE EXPEBIMENTS In twenty tests with ten rations, the urine was analyzed in addition to the feeds...

  19. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  20. BER Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

  1. Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

    2009-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to determine the throughput capability of the coker so a scaled design could be developed that maximized feed rate for a given size of reactor. These tests were only partially successful because of equipment problems. A redesigned coker, which addressed the problems, has been build but not operated. A preliminary economic analysis conducted by MEG and an their engineering consultant concluded that the WRITE{trademark} process is a technically feasible method for upgrading bitumen and that it produces SCO that meets pipeline specifications for density. When compared to delayed coking, the industry benchmark for thermal upgrading of bitumen, WRITE{trademark} produced more SCO, less coke, less CO{sub 2} per barrel of bitumen fed, and had lower capital and operating costs. On the other hand, WRITE{trademark}'s lower processing severity yielded crude with higher density and a different product distribution for naphtha, light gas oil and vacuum oil that, taken together, might reduce the value of the SCO. These issues plus the completion of more detailed process evaluation and economics need to be resolved before WRITE{trademark} is deployed as a field-scale pilot.

  2. Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. Part 2. Effects of inorganic anions: quenching vs. radical formation at moderate and high anion concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

    1984-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical aspects of the interactions between excited 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and various inorganic anions are examined. The anions which quench triplet AQS can be divided into two groups: Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/ (group I) photoreduce AQS to AQS/sup -/ radical anion only at concentrations higher than that required for complete triplet quenching. The effect increases with concentration and passes through a maximum, with highest quantum yields of radical formation reaching approx. 1 for Cl/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/; on the other hand, NO/sub 2//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and N/sub 3//sup -/ (group II) give AQS/sup -/ in parallel to triplet quenching. The nature of the high-concentration effect shown by group I is analyzed. Some results obtained with mixtures of anions support the conclusion that triplet AQS is also responsible for this effect, and it is suggested that triple exciplexes of the type /sup 3/(AQS/sup -/.X/sub 2//sup -/) are involved. With this view and the recently proposed intraradical spin-orbit-coupling (IRSOC) model, a quantitative interpretation of the results is presented.

  3. Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. Part II. Effects of inorganic anions; quenching vs. radical formation at moderate and high anion concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

    1983-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical aspects of the interactions between excited 9, 10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and various inorganic anions are examined. The anions which quench triplet AQS can be divided into two groups: Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/ (Group I) photoreduce the quinone to AQS/sup -/ only at concentrations higher than that required for complete triplet quenching. The effect increases with concentration and passes through a maximum with highest quantum yields of radical formation reaching approx. 1 for Cl/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/; NO/sub 2//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ and N/sub 3//sup -/ (Group II) reduce AQS in parallel to triplet quenching. The nature of the high-concentration effect shown by Group I is analyzed. Some results obtained with mixtures of anions support the conclusion that triplet AQS is also responsible for this effect and it is suggested that triple exciplexes of the type /sup 3/(AQS/sup -/.X/sub 2//sup -/) are involved. With this view and the recently proposed intra-radical-spin-orbit-coupling (IRSOC) model, a quantitative interpretation of the results is presented.

  4. HESA The Heterodox Economics Student Association in the University of Utah was established in order to promote and preserve the tradition of radical political economy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    in order to promote and preserve the tradition of radical political economy. Check out our blog! HESA

  5. BES Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  6. NERSC Requirements Workshop November

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events -ExascalemadeArchivalRequirements

  7. Requirements Review Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability TechnologyRenewalReportReportsJ.TO9Complex

  8. Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments Vision and Hearing Students, faculty, staff documentation requirements: 1. Requirements of the PRACTITIONER: A) Ophthalmologists and optometrists of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated and signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  9. Evidence for Thiol-Dependent Production of Oxygen Radicals by 4-Methyl-5-pyrazinyl-3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    to a peroxide species that undergoes a trace metal-catalyzed, Fenton-type reaction to generate oxygen radicalsEvidence for Thiol-Dependent Production of Oxygen Radicals by 4-Methyl-5-pyrazinyl-3H-1,2-dithiole the conversion of molecular oxygen to reactive oxygen radicals. Using a plasmid-based assay that monitors DNA

  10. 324 Building B-Cell Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Packaging & Shipment RL Readiness Assessment Final Report [SEC 1 Thru 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUMPHREYS, D C

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parallel readiness assessment (RA) was conducted by independent Fluor Hanford (FH) and U. S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) team to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for activities associated with the packaging and shipping of pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies from B-Cell in the 324 Building to the interim storage area at the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The RL review was conducted in parallel with the FH review in accordance with the Joint RL/FH Implementation Plan (Appendix B). The RL RA Team members were assigned a FH RA Team counterpart for the review. With this one-on-one approach, the RL RA Team was able to assess the FH Team's performance, competence, and adherence to the implementation plan and evaluate the level of facility readiness. The RL RA Team agrees with the FH determination that startup of the 324 Building B-Cell pressurized water reactor spent nuclear fuel packaging and shipping operations can safely proceed, pending completion of the identified pre-start items in the FH final report (see Appendix A), completion of the manageable list of open items included in the facility's declaration of readiness, and execution of the startup plan to operations.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: GPH RQ = Requirement Program: 01848 LN = Line Plan: 3200MPH RG 5298 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS, 643, 653, 675, 677 or 695 LN 0030 - Environmental Health Sciences: EHS 501, 506, 507 or 508 LN 0040

  12. Boston University Office of the Executive Vice President Human Resources Organizational Readiness Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finzi, Adrien

    in a coordinated format required by the SAP enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. The collection of this data Project represents an important first step in the successful launch of SAP and modernizing our human Project To: Vice Presidents, Deans, Directors and Department Heads From: Joseph P. Mercurio, Executive

  13. System Verification Through Reliability, Availability, Maintainability (RAM) Analysis & Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmanuel Ohene Opare, Jr.; Charles V. Park

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is authored by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype fourth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. A section in this document proposes that the NGNP will provide heat for process heat applications. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP is expected to meet high performance and availability targets relative to current state of the art systems and technology. One requirement for the NGNP is to provide heat for the generation of hydrogen for large scale productions and this process heat application is required to be at least 90% or more available relative to other technologies currently on the market. To reach this goal, a RAM Roadmap was developed highlighting the actions to be taken to ensure that various milestones in system development and maturation concurrently meet required availability requirements. Integral to the RAM Roadmap was the use of a RAM analytical/simulation tool which was used to estimate the availability of the system when deployed based on current design configuration and the maturation level of the system.

  14. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of gallium nitride films grown by radical-beam gettering epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogozin, I. V. [Berdyansk State Pedagogical University (Ukraine)], E-mail: rogozin@bdpu.org; Kotlyarevsky, M. B. [Academy of Management and Information Technology (Ukraine)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin GaN films were grown on GaAs(111) substrates by radical-beam gettering epitaxy. The structural quality of the films was studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction. The chemical composition of the GaAs surface and GaN film was studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is shown that Ga-N and As-N bonds are formed on the GaAs surface at initial growth stages at low temperatures. The state of the film-substrate interface was studied. It was found that prolonged annealing of GaN films in nitrogen radicals shifts the composition to nitrogen excess.

  16. Free Radical Polymerization of Styrene and Methyl Methacrylate in Various Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongwei [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional free radical polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate was carried out in various room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The RTILs used in this research encompass a wide range of cations and anions. Typical cations include imidazolium, phosphonium, pyridinium, and pyrrolidinium; typical anions include amide, borate, chloride, imide, phosphate, and phosphinate. Reactions are faster and polymers obtained usually have higher molecular weights when compared to polymerizations carried out in volatile organic solvents under the same conditions. This shows that rapid rates of polymerization and high molecular weights are general features of conventional radical polymerizations in RTILs. Attempts to correlate the polarities and viscosities of the RTILs with the polymerization behavior fail to yield discernible trends.

  17. A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To extend the semi-empirical techniques of Benson and coworkers, and to extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, the authors undertook a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical transition-state-theory procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in the case the reagent possessed more than one nonequivalent H atoms.

  18. ENGINEERING PHYSICS BSE Plan Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    ENGINEERING PHYSICS BSE Plan Requirements 1 Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 2990BSE RG 6394 ENGINEERING PHYSICS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Effective FA12/1910 (09/04/2012) RQ 4925 Physics Technical Subjects (C or higher) Effective FA12/1910 (09/04/2012) LN 0010

  19. Implementation plan for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility Restart Operational Readiness Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary technical objective for the WERF Restart Project is to assess, upgrade where necessary, and implement management, documentation, safety, and operation control systems that enable the resumption and continued operation of waste treatment and storage operations in a manner that is compliant with all environment, safety, and quality requirements of the US Department of Energy and Federal and State regulatory agencies. Specific processes that will be resumed at WERF include compaction of low-level compatible waste; size reduction of LLW, metallic and wood waste; incineration of combustible LLW and MLLW; and solidification of low-level and mixed low-level incinerator bottom ash, baghouse fly ash, and compatible sludges and debris. WERF will also provide for the operation of the WWSB which includes storage of MLLW in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

  20. The future is yours--Get ready! Career options in scientific and technical fields. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 50 page brochure was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory to encourage high school students to begin considering careers in the scientific and technical fields. The topics of the brochure include career selection, career options, a review of training required for each occupation, a collection of profiles of BNL employees describing how they chose and prepared for their careers, a description of BNL educational programs for high school students, and profiles of some of the students participating in these programs.

  1. ASCR Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

  2. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  3. Evidence for a radical relay mechanism during reaction of surface-immobilized molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Thomas, K.B.; Biggs, C.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of restricted mass transport on high-temperature, free-radical reactions has been explored through the use of organic compounds immobilized on silica surfaces by a thermally robust Si-O-C{sub aromatic} linkage. The rate of thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane(=DPP) at 375{degree}C under vacuum, by a free-radical chain pathway, was found to be very sensitive (factor of 40 variation) to the structure and orientation of a second, neighboring spacer molecule on the surface. Compared with the inert aromatic spacers, (e.g., biphenyl) it was found that spacer molecules containing reactive benzylic C-H bonds (e.g., diphenylmethane) are capable of accelerating the =DPP thermolysis by a process that is unique to diffusionally constrained systems. A mechanism involving rapid serial hydrogen transfer steps on the surface is proposed, which results in radical intermediates being relayed across the surface and hence overcoming classical diffusional limitations. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Formation of the diphenyl molecule in the crossed beam reaction of phenyl radicals with benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Fangtong; Gu Xibin; Kaiser, Ralf I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States)

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical dynamics to form the D5-diphenyl molecule, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 5}, via the neutral-neutral reaction of phenyl radicals (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) with D6-benzene (C{sub 6}D{sub 6}), was investigated in a crossed molecular beams experiment at a collision energy of 185 kJ mol{sup -1}. The laboratory angular distribution and time-of-flight spectra of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 5} product were recorded at mass to charge m/z of 159. Forward-convolution fitting of our data reveals that the reaction dynamics are governed by an initial addition of the phenyl radical to the {pi} electron density of the D6-benzene molecule yielding a short-lived C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 6} collision complex. The latter undergoes atomic deuterium elimination via a tight exit transition state located about 30 kJ mol{sup -1} above the separated reactants; the overall reaction to form D5-diphenyl from phenyl and D6-benzene was found to be weakly exoergic. The explicit identification of the D5-biphenyl molecules suggests that in high temperature combustion flames, a diphenyl molecule can be formed via a single collision event between a phenyl radical and a benzene molecule.

  5. Quantification of the solid-state charge mobility in a model radical polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradwaj, Aditya G.; Rostro, Lizbeth; Boudouris, Bryan W., E-mail: boudouris@purdue.edu [School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, 480 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, 475 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish that an oft-used radical polymer, poly(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy methacrylate) (PTMA), has a solid-state hole mobility value on the order of 10{sup ?4} cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1} in a space charge-limited device geometry. Despite being completely amorphous and lacking any ?-conjugation, these results demonstrate that the hole mobility of PTMA is comparable to many well-studied conjugated polymers [e.g., poly(3-hexylthiophene)]. Furthermore, we show that the space charge-limited charge carrier mobility of these macromolecules is only a weak function of temperature, in contrast to many thermally-activated models of charge transport in polymeric materials. This key result demonstrates that the charge transport in radical polymers is inherently different than that in semicrystalline, conjugated polymers. These results establish the mechanism of solid-state charge transport in radical polymers and provide macromolecular design principles for this emerging class of organic electronic materials.

  6. Snapshots of radical enzyme catalysis : the crystal structures of biotin synthase and lysine 5,6-aminomutase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkovitch, Frederick, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) in the same pathway. To further probe the relationship of the adenosylmethionine and adenosylcobalamin-dependent radical enzymes, the crystal structure of lysine 5,6-aminomutase was determined to 2.8 [angstroms] ...

  7. RAMANUJAN'S ASSOCIATION WITH RADICALS IN INDIA Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and LiangCheng Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    RAMANUJAN'S ASSOCIATION WITH RADICALS IN INDIA Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang of n. Typeset by AMS-TEX 1 #12;2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN, AND LIANG­CHENG ZHANG

  8. Radical anionic versus neutral 2,2'-bipyridyl coordination in uranium complexes supported by amide and ketimide ligands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaconescu, PL; Cummins, CC

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the organometallic chemistry of uranium. The radical anionicof Chemistry 2012 Journal Name present 2.4(9) at the uraniumChemistry 2013 Since our initial examples, others have also reported bridging benzene or toluene uranium

  9. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign – Part 2: Model comparison and radical budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dusanter, S.

    Measurements of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals were made during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) field campaign as part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) ...

  10. The Radical Use of Rossmann and TIM Barrel Architectures for Controlling Coenzyme B[subscript 12] Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowling, Daniel P.

    The ability of enzymes to harness free-radical chemistry allows for some of the most amazing transformations in nature, including reduction of ribonucleotides and carbon skeleton rearrangements. Enzyme cofactors involved ...

  11. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE Requirements for the General Availability User Environment Capabilities Release Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil,Benny Manuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ballance, Robert [SNL; Haskell, Karen [SNL

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cielo is a massively parallel supercomputer funded by the DOE/NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, and operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES), a partnership between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The primary Cielo compute platform is physically located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model documents the capabilities and the environment to be provided for the Q1 FY12 Level 2 Cielo Capability Computing (CCC) Platform Production Readiness Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, or Sandia National Laboratories, but also addresses the needs of users working in the unclassified environment. The Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the Production Readiness Milestone user environment capabilities of the ASC community. A description of ACE requirements met, and those requirements that are not met, are included in each section of this document. The Cielo Computing Environment, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and reviewed throughout the tri-Lab community.

  12. A review of "The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630-1660" by Nicholas McDowell.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Peacey

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REVIEWS 253 Nicholas McDowell. The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630?1660. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2003. x +219 pp. $72.00. Review by JASON PEACEY, HISTORY OF PARLIAMENT TRUST, LONDON. The ?radicals... the likes of Christopher Hill by the revisionists of the 1970s and 1980s. Historians, he argues, are still seeking to respond to this assault with weapons of its own creation, namely archival sources rather than printed pamphlets. McDowell arguably un...

  13. Study of thermally activated radical pair separation in the anthraquinone/triethylamine photoredox system by fourier transform EPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckert, D. [Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Plueschau, M.; Dinse, K.P. [Univ. of Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Strasse (Germany)

    1992-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    By using fourier tranform electron paramagnetic resonance, the free radicals in the photoreduction of anthraquinone by triethylamine in alcohol solutions have been investigated. The detrapping kinetics have been described using some analytical form of the potential and the thermally averaged distance distribution of trapped radical pairs. This analytical form relates the binding potential, the diffusion constant, and the equilibrium distance. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Application of Reinforcement Learning to Requirements Engineering: Requirements Tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    of the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) can be appreciated by the customers who request and expect delivery the phases of the SDLC, a number of steps can be taken. Requirements tracing ensures that requirements

  15. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for National Institute of Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the National Institute of Health (NIH) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  16. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for NASA White Sands Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  17. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for NASA Glenn Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s study seeks to collect and evaluate data to validate the utilization of advanced plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) transportation. This report focuses on the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of PEVs into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively referred to as PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  18. Guidelines for Correctly Using the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Name and Logo

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment ofofthePerformance Requirements of Section 543|

  19. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  20. National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data: Community Requirements and Information Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Arlene [United States Department of Energy; Blackwell, David [Southern Methodist University; Chickering, Cathy [Southern Methodist University; Boyd, Toni [Oregon Institute of Technology; Horne, Roland [Stanford University; MacKenzie, Matthew [Uberity Technology Corporation; Moore, Joseph [University of Utah; Nickull, Duane [Uberity Technology Corporation; Richard, Stephen [Arizona Geological survey; Shevenell, Lisa A. [University of Nevada, Reno

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to advance geothermal energy as a viable renewable energy contender, the U.S. Department of Energy is investing in the development of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). This paper outlines efforts among geothermal data providers nationwide to supply cutting edge geo-informatics. NGDS geothermal data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are discussed. In particular, this paper addresses the various types of data required to effectively assess geothermal energy potential and why simple links to existing data are insufficient. To create a platform for ready access by all geothermal stakeholders, the NGDS includes a work plan that addresses data assets and resources of interest to users, a survey of data providers, data content models, and how data will be exchanged and promoted, as well as lessons learned within the geothermal community.

  1. FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2002 and ending December 31, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

  2. FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Vladimir Zamansky; Linda Denton; Hana Loreth; Tomasz Wiltowski

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the third quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2001 and ending June 30, 2001. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, objectives of this program, and provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in first year tasks including lab- and bench-scale design, facilities preparation, and engineering studies.

  3. The Use of the Active Breathing Coordinator Throughout Radical Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Juliet, E-mail: juliet.brock@icr.ac.uk [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen A.; Panakis, Niki; Symonds-Tayler, Richard; Evans, Phil M.; Brada, Michael [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess feasibility and reproducibility of an Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) used throughout radical radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer, and compare lung dosimetric parameters between free-breathing and ABC plans. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients, recruited into an approved study, had free-breathing and ABC breath-hold treatment plans generated. Lung volume, the percentage volume of lung treated to a dose of {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}), and mean lung dose (MLD) were compared. Treatment (64 Gy in 32 fractions, 5 days/week) was delivered in breath-hold. Repeat breath-hold computed tomography scans were used to assess change in gross tumor volume (GTV) size and position. Setup error was also measured and potential GTV-planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated. Results: Seventeen of 18 patients completed radiotherapy using ABC daily. Intrafraction tumor position was consistent, but interfraction variation had mean (range) values of 5.1 (0-25), 3.6 (0-9.7), and 3.5 (0-16.6) mm in the superoinferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Tumor moved partially outside the PTV in 5 patients. Mean reduction in GTV from planning to end of treatment was 25% (p = 0.003). Potentially required PTV margins were 18.1, 11.9, and 11.9 mm in SI, RL, and AP directions. ABC reduced V{sub 20} by 13% (p = 0.0001), V{sub 13} by 12% (p = 0.001), and MLD by 13% (p < 0.001) compared with free-breathing; lung volume increased by 41% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Clinically significant movements of GTV were seen during radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer using ABC. Image guidance is recommended with ABC. The use of ABC can reduce dose volume parameters determining lung toxicity, and might allow for equitoxic radiotherapy dose escalation.

  4. Radical kinetics in an inductively-coupled plasma in CF4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, J.P.; Abada, H.; Chabert, P. [Laboratoire de Physique et Technologie des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Graves, D.B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency discharges in low pressure fluorocarbon gases are used for anisotropic and selective etching of dielectric materials (SiO2 and derivatives), a key step in the manufacture of integrated circuits. Plasmas in these gases are capable not only of etching, but also of depositing fluorocarbon films, depending on a number of factors including the ion bombardment energy, the gas composition and the surface temperature: this behavior is indeed responsible for etch selectivity between materials and plays a role in achieving the desired etched feature profiles. Free radical species, such as CFx and fluorine atoms, play important but complex roles in these processes. We have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), with time and space resolution in pulsed plasmas, to elucidate the kinetics of CF and CF2 radicals, elucidating their creation, destruction and transport mechanisms within the reactor. Whereas more complex gas mixtures are used in industrial processes, study of the relatively simple system of a pure CF4 plasma is more appropriate for the study of mechanisms. Previously the technique was applied to the study of single-frequency capacitively-coupled 'reactive ion etching' reactors, where the substrate (placed on the powered electrode) is always bombarded with high-energy CF{sub x}{sup +} ions. In this case it was found that the major source of CFx free radicals was neutralization, dissociation and backscattering of these incident ions, rather than direct dissociation of the feedstock gas. Subsequently, an inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) in pure CF4 was studied. This system has a higher plasma density, leading to higher gas dissociation, whereas the energy of ions striking the reactor surfaces is much lower (in the absence of additional RF biasing). The LIF technique also allows the gas temperature to be measured with good spatial and temporal resolution. This showed large gas temperature gradients within the ICP reactor, which must be taken into account in reactive species transport. In the ICP reactor we saw significant production of CF and CF2 radicals at the reactor top and bottom surfaces, at rates that cannot be explained by the neutralization of incident CF{sub x}{sup +} ions. These two species are also lost at very high rates in the gas phase. We postulate that these two phenomena are caused by electron-impact excitation of these radicals into low-lying metastable levels. The metastable molecules produced (that are invisible to LIF) diffuse to the reactor walls where they are quenched back to their ground state. In the afterglow the gas cools rapidly and contracts, causing gas convection. Whereas the density of the more reactive species decays monotonically in the afterglow, the density of CF2 initially increases. This is partly due to the gas contraction, bringing back CF2 (which is a relatively stable species) from the outer regions of the reactor, and partly due to chemical reactions producing CF2, as it is more thermodynamically stable than the other radical species such as CF and CF3.

  5. Study of radicals, clusters and transition state species by anion photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, D.W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free radicals, elemental and van der Waals clusters and transition state species for bimolecular chemical reactions are investigated using anion photoelectron spectroscopy. Several low-lying electronic states of ozone have been identified via photoelectron spectroscopy of O{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. A characterization of these states is important to models for atmospheric ozone reaction kinetics. The fluoroformyloxyl radical, FCO{sub 2}, has been investigated, providing vibrational frequencies and energies for two electronic states. The technique has also been employed to make the first direct observation and characterization of the NNO{sub 2} molecule. Several electronic states are observed for this species which is believed to play a role as a reactive intermediate in the N + NO{sub 2} reaction. The experimental results for all three of these radicals are supplemented by ab initio investigations of their molecular properties. The clusters investigations include studies of elemental carbon clusters (C{sub 2}{sup {minus}} {minus} C{sub 11}{sup {minus}}), and van der Waals clusters (X{sup {minus}}(CO{sub 2}){sub n}, X = I, Br, Cl; n {le} 13 and I{sup {minus}} (N{sub 2}O){sub n=1--11}). Primarily linear clusters are observed for the smaller carbon clusters, while the spectra of the larger clusters contain contribution from cyclic anion photodetachment. Very interesting ion-solvent interactions are observed in the X{sup {minus}}(CO{sub 2})n clusters. The transition state regions for several bimolecular chemical reactions have also been investigated by photodetachment of a negative ion precursor possessing a geometry similar to that of the transition state species. These spectra show features which are assigned to motions of the unstable neutral complex existing between reactants and products.

  6. Electron attachment to C{sub 2} fluorocarbon radicals at high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A., E-mail: afrl.rvborgmailbox@kirtland.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicle Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal electron attachment to the radical species C{sub 2}F{sub 3} and C{sub 2}F{sub 5} has been studied over the temperature range 300–890 K using the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry technique. Both radicals exclusively undergo dissociative attachment to yield F{sup ?}. The rate constant for C{sub 2}F{sub 5} shows little dependence over the temperature range, remaining ?4 × 10{sup ?9}?cm{sup 3}?s{sup ?1}. The rate constant for C{sub 2}F{sub 3} attachment rises steeply with temperature from 3 × 10{sup ?11} cm{sup 3} s{sup ?1} at 300?K to 1 × 10{sup ?9} cm{sup 3} s{sup ?1} at 890 K. The behaviors of both species at high temperature are in agreement with extrapolations previously made from data below 600?K using a recently developed kinetic modeling approach. Measurements were also made on C{sub 2}F{sub 3}Br and C{sub 2}F{sub 5}Br (used in this work as precursors to the radicals) over the same temperature range, and, for C{sub 2}F{sub 5}Br as a function of electron temperature. The attachment rate constants to both species rise with temperature following Arrhenius behavior. The attachment rate constant to C{sub 2}F{sub 5}Br falls with increasing electron temperature, in agreement with the kinetic modeling. The current data fall in line with past predictions of the kinetic modeling approach, again showing the utility of this simplified approach.

  7. 2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Materials Handling Equipment Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D.; Ulsh, M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a manufacturing readiness assessment (MRA) of fuel cell systems and fuel cell stacks for back-up power and material handling applications (MHE). To facilitate the MRA, manufacturing readiness levels (MRL) were defined that were based on the Technology Readiness Levels previously established by the US Department of Energy (DOE). NREL assessed the extensive existing hierarchy of MRLs developed by Department of Defense (DoD) and other Federal entities, and developed a MRL scale adapted to the needs of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) and to the status of the fuel cell industry. The MRL ranking of a fuel cell manufacturing facility increases as the manufacturing capability transitions from laboratory prototype development through Low Rate Initial Production to Full Rate Production. DOE can use MRLs to address the economic and institutional risks associated with a ramp-up in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell production. In 2010, NREL updated this assessment, including additional manufacturers, an assessment of market developments since the original report, and a comparison of MRLs between 2008 and 2010.

  8. Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Requirements...

  9. Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Rizeq; Janice West; Raul Subia; Arnaldo Frydman; Parag Kulkarni; Jennifer Schwerman; Valadimir Zamansky; John Reinker; Kanchan Mondal; Lubor Stonawski; Hana Loreth; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Szymanski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    GE Global Research is developing an innovative energy technology for coal gasification with high efficiency and near-zero pollution. This Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology simultaneously converts coal, steam and air into three separate streams of hydrogen-rich gas, sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and high-temperature, high-pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in gas turbines. This is the draft final report for the first stage of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program. The UFP technology development program encompassed lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP concept. Modeling and economic assessments were also key parts of this program. The chemical and mechanical feasibility were established via lab and bench-scale testing, and a pilot plant was designed, constructed and operated, demonstrating the major UFP features. Experimental and preliminary modeling results showed that 80% H{sub 2} purity could be achieved, and that a UFP-based energy plant is projected to meet DOE efficiency targets. Future work will include additional pilot plant testing to optimize performance and reduce environmental, operability and combined cycle integration risks. Results obtained to date have confirmed that this technology has the potential to economically meet future efficiency and environmental performance goals.

  10. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

  11. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q98.

  12. Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald R. Barden

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

  13. DECREASE Final Technical Report: Development of a Commercial Ready Enzyme Application System for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teter, Sarah A

    2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of biomass to sugars plays a central in reducing our dependence on petroleum, as it allows production of a wide range of biobased fuels and chemicals, through fermentation of those sugars. The DECREASE project delivers an effective enzyme cocktail for this conversion, enabling reduced costs for producing advanced biofuels such as cellulosic ethanol. Benefits to the public contributed by growth of the advanced biofuels industry include job creation, economic growth, and energy security. The DECREASE primary project objective was to develop a two-fold improved enzyme cocktail, relative to an advanced cocktail (CZP00005) that had been developed previously (from 2000- 2007). While the final milestone was delivery of all enzyme components as an experimental mixture, a secondary objective was to deploy an improved cocktail within 3 years following the close of the project. In February 2012, Novozymes launched Cellic CTec3, a multi-enzyme cocktail derived in part from components developed under DECREASE. The externally validated performance of CTec3 and an additional component under project benchmarking conditions indicated a 1.8-fold dose reduction in enzyme dose required for 90% conversion (based on all available glucose and xylose sources) of NREL dilute acid pretreated PCS, relative to the starting advanced enzyme cocktail. While the ability to achieve 90% conversion is impressive, targeting such high levels of biomass digestion is likely not the most cost effective strategy. Novozymes techno economic modeling showed that for NREL's dilute acid pretreated corn stover (PCS), 80% target conversion enables a lower total production cost for cellulosic ethanol than for 90% conversion, and this was also found to be the case when cost assumptions were based on the NREL 2002 Design Report. A 1.8X dose-reduction was observed for 80% conversion in the small scale (50 g) DECREASE benchmark assay for CTec3 and an additional component. An upscaled experiment (in 0.5 kg kettle reactors) was performed to compare the starting enzyme mixture CZP00005 with CTec3 alone; these results indicated a 1.9X dose- reduction for 80% conversion. The CTec3 composition does not include the best available enzyme components from the DECREASE effort. While these components are not yet available in a commercial product, experimental mixtures were assayed in a smaller scale assay using DECREASE PCS, at high solids loadings (21.5% TS). The results indicated that the newer mixtures required 2.9X-less enzyme for 90% conversion, and 3.2X-less enzyme for 80% conversion, relative to the starting enzyme cocktail. In conclusion, CTec3 delivers a 1.8-1.9X dose reduction on NREL PCS at high solids loadings, and the next generation enzyme from Novozymes will continue to show dramatically improved biochemical performance. CTec3 allows reduced costs today, and the experimental cocktails point to continued biotechnological improvements that will further drive down costs for biorefineries of tomorrow.

  14. Economic Incentives for Cybersecurity: Using Economics to Design Technologies Ready for Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishik, Claire [Intel Corporation] [Intel Corporation; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL] [ORNL; Ott, David [Intel Corporation] [Intel Corporation

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cybersecurity practice lags behind cyber technology achievements. Solutions designed to address many problems may and do exist but frequently cannot be broadly deployed due to economic constraints. Whereas security economics focuses on the cost/benefit analysis and supply/demand, we believe that more sophisticated theoretical approaches, such as economic modeling, rarely utilized, would derive greater societal benefits. Unfortunately, today technologists pursuing interesting and elegant solutions have little knowledge of the feasibility for broad deployment of their results and cannot anticipate the influences of other technologies, existing infrastructure, and technology evolution, nor bring the solutions lifecycle into the equation. Additionally, potentially viable solutions are not adopted because the risk perceptions by potential providers and users far outweighs the economic incentives to support introduction/adoption of new best practices and technologies that are not well enough defined. In some cases, there is no alignment with redominant and future business models as well as regulatory and policy requirements. This paper provides an overview of the economics of security, reviewing work that helped to define economic models for the Internet economy from the 1990s. We bring forward examples of potential use of theoretical economics in defining metrics for emerging technology areas, positioning infrastructure investment, and building real-time response capability as part of software development. These diverse examples help us understand the gaps in current research. Filling these gaps will be instrumental for defining viable economic incentives, economic policies, regulations as well as early-stage technology development approaches, that can speed up commercialization and deployment of new technologies in cybersecurity.

  15. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  16. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Division, and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. This isFusion Energy Sciences NetworkRequirements Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Energy

  17. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  18. Reconstitution of ThiC in thiamine pyrimidine biosynthesis expands the radical SAM superfamily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Li, Yue; Zhang, Yang; Grove, Tyler L.; Lee, Michael; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Penn)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    4-Amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate (HMP-P) synthase catalyzes a complex rearrangement of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) to form HMP-P, the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine phosphate. We determined the three-dimensional structures of HMP-P synthase and its complexes with the product HMP-P and a substrate analog imidazole ribotide. The structure of HMP-P synthase reveals a homodimer in which each protomer comprises three domains: an N-terminal domain with a novel fold, a central ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and a disordered C-terminal domain that contains a conserved CX{sub 2}CX{sub 4}C motif, which is suggestive of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Biochemical studies have confirmed that HMP-P synthase is iron sulfur cluster-dependent, that it is a new member of the radical SAM superfamily and that HMP-P and 5{prime}-deoxyadenosine are products of the reaction. Moessbauer and EPR spectroscopy confirm the presence of one [4Fe-4S] cluster. Structural comparisons reveal that HMP-P synthase is homologous to a group of adenosylcobalamin radical enzymes. This similarity supports an evolutionary relationship between these two superfamilies.

  19. Ready to Retrofit: The Process of Project Team Selection, Building Benchmarking, and Financing Commercial Building Energy Retrofit Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Mark D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential  oversight  of  retrofit  and  construction  projects   •   familiarity  with  ASHRAE  energy  efficiency  and  ventilation  requirements   •   familiarity  with  renewable  

  20. Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7 2 x>16Forms of1, 2

  1. Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    /dissertation documents have a uniform appearance and are suitable for archiving. The requirements follow the guidelines to the following guidelines are acceptable. · All margins must be at least 1.25" and may not be more than 1/dissertation should be double-spaced. #12;Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements 2012 version Paragraph Indentation

  2. Calibration Requirements and Procedures for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuceryan, Mihran

    Calibration Requirements and Procedures for Augmented Reality Mihran Tuceryan Douglas S. Greer Ross Graphics, Sept 1995) Calibration Requirements and Procedures for Augmented Reality Mihran Tuceryan Douglas of calibration procedures are necessary so that the location and parameters of each of the system components

  3. MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

  4. Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

  5. 3. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED. 100% DYE PENETRANT INSPECTION REQUIRED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    WELDS SHOULD BE MINIMIZED. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASME SECTION IX. 1. WELDING and applicable 1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES 2. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3. MACHINED

  6. Meeting Federal Energy Security Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the opportunity to increase the scope of federal-utility partnerships for meeting energy security requirements.

  7. Fusion technology status and requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

  8. POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Procedures and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    Engineering, Materials Science, Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Technology and Photonics Statistics), Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Photonics Science and Engineering(1) POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Procedures and Requirements INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY KANPUR

  9. Carbons and hydrogen by persistent metal radicals. Final report, April 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of complexed rhenium radicals is demonstrated from the reaction of sterically demanding phosphine with the triphenylmethyl complex [n{sup 5}-CPh{sub 3}]Re(CO){sub 3}. Low yields are experienced unless high concentrations of phosphine ligands are employed with the mechanism of this reaction yet unknown. A complexed rhenium dimer is also synthesized, but in low yield. X-ray crystallography reveals that the sixth coordination site of the electron deficient rhenium cation (an extremely strong Lewis acid) is occupied by an agostic interaction with one of the pendant C-H bonds of the cyclohexyl ring of the complex. Preliminary results show that the rhenium complexes have a significantly different chemistry from similar tungsten analogs in reactivity and isotope exchange rates. It is hypothesized that the rhenium complexes would be useful in catalyzing the isotope exchange between water and hydrogen.

  10. Predictions for {radical} (s) =200A; GeV Au+Au collisions from relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlei, B.R. [Physics Division, P-25, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Physics Division, P-25, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Schlei, B.R.; Strottman, D. [Theoretical Division, DDT-DO, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, DDT-DO, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic hydrodynamical model HYLANDER-C is used to give estimates for single inclusive particle momentum spectra in {radical} (s) =200 GeV/nucleon Au+Au collisions that will be investigated experimentally in the near future. The predictions are based on initial conditions that the initial fireball has a longitudinal extension of 1.6 fm and an initial energy density of 30.8 GeV/fm{sup 3} as obtained from a cascade model. For the collision energy considered here, different stopping scenarios are explored for the first time. Our calculations give particle yields of the order of 10thinsp000 to 20thinsp000 charged particles per event. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Radical improvements to blast hole drilling cost and productivity thru integrated teams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, R.W. [Baker Hughes Mining Tools, Inc., Grand Prairie, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the possibilities of generating radical improvements in the drilling costs and productivity of blastholes through the efforts of integrated teams as opposed to traditional customer/vendor relationships. The formation and operation of teams comprising both mine operations personnel and key vendors will be presented and explained. Further, the author will present an expanded Total Drilling Cost Formula, followed by a hypothetical example of how the formula and teams can be applied to a mining project to produce significant improvement in value and drilling/producing efficiency. The primary driving force to achieve the aforementioned benefits is the rate of production, or in drilling vernacular, the rate of penetration (ROP). For the purpose of this paper, ROP will refer to the net production rate of footage drilled, rather than the instantaneous rate of penetration achieved during the drilling process. This definition opens up an array of issues that can be addressed to improve actual production rates.

  12. Molecular ageing: Free radical initiated epimerization of thymopentin – A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheykhkarimli, Dayag; Choo, Ken-Loon [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Owen, Michael; Csizmadia, Imre G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Department of Chemical Informatics, Faculty of Education, University of Szeged, Boldogasszony sgt. 6, H-6725 Szeged (Hungary); Global Institute of Computational Molecular and Material Science (GIOCOMMS), Szentkirályi utca 47, H-1088 Budapest (Hungary); Drug Discovery Research Center, Boldogasszony sgt. 6. H-6725 Szeged (Hungary); Fiser, Béla; Jójárt, Balázs [Department of Chemical Informatics, Faculty of Education, University of Szeged, Boldogasszony sgt. 6, H-6725 Szeged (Hungary); Drug Discovery Research Center, Boldogasszony sgt. 6. H-6725 Szeged (Hungary); Viskolcz, Béla, E-mail: viskolcz@jgypk.u-szeged.hu [Department of Chemical Informatics, Faculty of Education, University of Szeged, Boldogasszony sgt. 6, H-6725 Szeged (Hungary); Global Institute of Computational Molecular and Material Science (GIOCOMMS), Szentkirályi utca 47, H-1088 Budapest (Hungary); Drug Discovery Research Center, Boldogasszony sgt. 6. H-6725 Szeged (Hungary)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The epimerization of amino acid residues increases with age in living organisms. In the present study, the structural consequences and thermodynamic functions of the epimerization of thymopentin (TP-5), the active site of the thymic hormone thymopoietin, were studied using molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods. The results show that free radical-initiated D-amino acid formation is energetically favoured (?130 kJmol{sup ?1}) for each residue and induces significant changes to the peptide structure. In comparison to the wild-type (each residue in the L-configuration), the radius of gyration of the D-Asp{sup 3} epimer of the peptide decreased by 0.5 Å, and disrupted the intramolecular hydrogen bonding of the native peptide. Beyond establishing important structural, energetic and thermodynamic benchmarks and reference data for the structure of TP-5, these results disseminate the understanding of molecular ageing, the epimerization of amino acid residues.

  13. HTS wire requirements for SMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, S.; Schafer, W.J.

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation/paper gives an overview of the Sandia National Lab`s sponsorship of W.J. Schafer Associates, Inc. to examine the following topics: the refrigeration savings possible by using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), the impact of duty cycle on refrigeration requirements, and outline the required HTS wire performance. Included are specifications for SMES applications, advantages, cost components, assumed conductor performance parameters, and the effects of duty cycle and conductor twist pitch.

  14. Requirements for GNEP Transmutation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. C. Crawford; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a baseline set of requirements to guide fuel fabrication development and irradiation testing performed as part of the AFCRD Transmutation Fuel Development Program. This document can be considered a supplement to the GNEP TRU Fuel Development and Qualification Plan, and will be revised as necessary to maintain a documented set of fuel testing objectives and requirements consistent with programmatic decisions and advances in technical knowledge.

  15. A Density Functional Theory Study of the Mechanism of Free Radical Generation in the System Vanadate/PCA/H2O2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    with H2O2 releases HOO· free radicals and generates V(IV) species, which are capable of generating HOA Density Functional Theory Study of the Mechanism of Free Radical Generation in the System for HOO· generation. It is also found that species containing two pca ligands and an H2O2 molecule do

  16. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements (Text Version) Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements,"...

  17. ROFESSOR SUSAN J SMITH doesn't look like a radical. Tall, elegant and softly spoken she

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    26 CAM 59 #12;P ROFESSOR SUSAN J SMITH doesn't look like a radical. Tall, elegant and softly spoken she might be, but under that calm exterior, Professor Smith has a startling ­ and seemingly highly, Susan J Smith (the initial, she says, essential in a world dictated by Google) rather enjoys swimming

  18. UNUSUAL STABILITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON RADICAL CATIONS IN AMORPHOUS WATER ICES UP TO 120 K: ASTRONOMICAL IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during warm-up above 120 K. Earlier we found that PAH ionization is quantitative in water ice and PAH studies of PAHs in water ice. These optical studies were undertaken to overcome the limitations of severeUNUSUAL STABILITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON RADICAL CATIONS IN AMORPHOUS WATER ICES UP

  19. RADICALS AND UNITS IN RAMANUJAN'S WORK Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang--Cheng Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    RADICALS AND UNITS IN RAMANUJAN'S WORK Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang--Cheng Zhang's lost notebook. Typeset by A M S­T E X 1 #12; 2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN, AND LIANG--CHENG ZHANG

  20. RAMANUJAN'S ASSOCIATION WITH RADICALS IN INDIA Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang--Cheng Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    RAMANUJAN'S ASSOCIATION WITH RADICALS IN INDIA Bruce C. Berndt, Heng Huat Chan, and Liang and g n for certain even values of n. Typeset by A M S­T E X 1 #12; 2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN

  1. The influence of simplified peroxy radical chemistry on the interpretation of NO2–NO–O3 surface exchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Mathew R

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions of NO with peroxy radicals XO2 (=HO2+RO2) are shown to be the most important chemical reactions causing flux divergence of NO2 and NO close to the surface, in addition to the "NOx–O3 only" reactions of ...

  2. A review of "Radicalism in British Literary Culture: From Revolution to Revolution." by T. Morton and N. Smith, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Taylor

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    culture. The past, in short, is up for grabs, a valued set of icons to be marshaled in the service of inspiring reform, a text to be decoded for a new historical moment. In a chapter that draws its title from a radical pub toast, ?May the last king...

  3. Photodissociation dynamics of the CNN free radical Ryan T. Bise, Alexandra A. Hoops, Hyeon Choi,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    V. These values, coupled with recent D0 RH and D298 RH values from Clifford et al. J. Phys. Chem. 102, 7100 1998 of the CNN radical in combustion processes, accurate values for the dissociation energy, heat of formation is the 3 overtone. With this new value for the 3 frequency, similar force constants were found for the C

  4. Ready, set...go!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre, Melanie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    any proof participatory ergonomics works? • What does thefor changes in an ergonomics program or intervention •of change • Changes in ergonomics program or intervention

  5. TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Fuels) Advanced H 2 Membranes 2 11 13 Coal-Biomass to Liquids 1 15 16 Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anode Electrolyte Cathode (AEC) Development 10 10 Atmospheric Pressure Systems...

  6. TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Advanced Combustion Turbines Supercritical CO 2 Power Cycles Feed Systems Gasi er Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Syngas Processing Oxy-Combustion Chemical...

  7. Construction Readiness RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment.AttachmentEnergyGeneratingConstruction

  8. Readiness Review RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.FrequencyEO-05-01:Regulatory

  9. ARM - Ingest Readiness Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events,

  10. TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(InsertAbout theSystems3,SOLID OXIDE

  11. TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(InsertAbout theSystems3,SOLID OXIDEDECEMBER

  12. Technology Readiness Assessment Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the PassingRoutingEnergy TechnologistDepartment

  13. Disposal requirements for PCB waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic chemicals that had become widely used in industrial applications due to their practical physical and chemical properties. Historical uses of PCBs include dielectric fluids (used in utility transformers, capacitors, etc.), hydraulic fluids, and other applications requiring stable, fire-retardant materials. Due to findings that PCBs may cause adverse health effects and due to their persistence and accumulation in the environment, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), enacted on october 11, 1976, banned the manufacture of PCBs after 1978 [Section 6(e)]. The first PCB regulations, promulgated at 40 CFR Part 761, were finalized on February 17, 1978. These PCB regulations include requirements specifying disposal methods and marking (labeling) procedures, and controlling PCB use. To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in its efforts to comply with the TSCA statute and implementing regulations, the Office of Environmental Guidance has prepared the document ``Guidance on the Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).`` That document explains the requirements specified in the statute and regulations for managing PCBs including PCB use, storage, transport, and disposal. PCB materials that are no longer in use and have been declared a waste must be disposed of according to the requirements found at 40 CFR 761.60. These requirements establish disposal options for a multitude of PCB materials including soil and debris, liquid PCBs, sludges and slurries, containers, transformers, capacitors, hydraulic machines, and other electrical equipment. This Information Brief supplements the PCB guidance document by responding to common questions concerning disposal requirements for PCBs. It is one of a series of Information Briefs pertinent to PCB management issues.

  14. Johnson Noise Thermometry System Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Roberts, Michael [ORNL; Ezell, N Dianne Bull [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to capture the requirements for the architecture of the developmental electronics for the ORNL-lead drift-free Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) project conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development (R&D) program. The requirements include not only the performance of the system but also the allowable measurement environment of the probe and the allowable physical environment of the associated electronics. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [1].

  15. Project X functional requirements specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support a world-leading program in Intensity Frontier physics at Fermilab. The facility is designed to support programs in elementary particle and nuclear physics, with possible applications to nuclear energy research. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions, and to assure that the facility is designed with sufficient upgrade capability to provide U.S. leadership for many decades to come. This paper will briefly review the previously described Functional Requirements, and then discuss their recent evolution.

  16. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements Management Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners,...

  17. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Hazardous Air Pollutant Requirements and the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; DePhillips, M.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hemenway, A. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the US Department of Energy -- Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCTP) is to provide the US energy marketplace with advanced, efficient, and environmentally sound coal-based technologies. The design, construction, and operation of Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects (CCTDP) will generate data needed to make informed, confident decisions on the commercial readiness of these technologies. These data also will provide information needed to ensure a proactive response by DOE and its industrial partners to the establishment of new regulations or a reactive response to existing regulations promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The objectives of this paper are to: (1) Present a preliminary examination of the potential implications of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) -- Title 3 Hazardous Air Pollutant requirements to the commercialization of CCTDP; and (2) help define options available to DOE and its industrial partners to respond to this newly enacted Legislation.

  18. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Hazardous Air Pollutant Requirements and the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; DePhillips, M.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hemenway, A. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the US Department of Energy -- Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCTP) is to provide the US energy marketplace with advanced, efficient, and environmentally sound coal-based technologies. The design, construction, and operation of Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects (CCTDP) will generate data needed to make informed, confident decisions on the commercial readiness of these technologies. These data also will provide information needed to ensure a proactive response by DOE and its industrial partners to the establishment of new regulations or a reactive response to existing regulations promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The objectives of this paper are to: (1) Present a preliminary examination of the potential implications of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) -- Title 3 Hazardous Air Pollutant requirements to the commercialization of CCTDP; and (2) help define options available to DOE and its industrial partners to respond to this newly enacted Legislation.

  19. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in the technology programs must satisfy the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS for the technology programs are listed by subject matter in three major categories: (A) Basic Subjects, (B) Advanced

  20. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Admission Applica on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    basis. An interview may be required. MS Educa onal Technology Program: A state issued teaching cer: State issued teaching cer ficate. Three years of professional experience as a teacher:_____________ ­ __________ ­ ________________ Sex: Male Female Street Address Town or City County State Zip Code Home Telephone

  1. SRS control system upgrade requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.F.

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines requirements for an upgrade of the Sodium Removal System (SRS) control system. The upgrade is being performed to solve a number of maintainability and operability issues. The upgraded system will provide the same functions, controls and interlocks as the present system, and in addition provide enhanced functionality in areas discussed in this document.

  2. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2008 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

  3. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2009 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

  4. AMS vs. NWS: Educational Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Reconstruction of past climates · Climate models · Causes of past and future climate change #12;Capstone methods · Oral, written, and multimedia communication ­ Ability to create and deliver scientific ­ Ability to effectively communicate with technical and lay audiences using scientific evidence #12;Required

  5. ALLOCATION OF REACTIVE SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    the voltage setting point s kV of each bus Qk and the voltage profile for the buses c j Q . Recall that Q for these transactions so that all bus voltages meet the specified voltage profile requirements. Consequently load is locally met at the bus. In other words, we assume that at each load bus the power factor is 1

  6. Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities Students, faculty, staff, and campus guests wishing to request accommodations due to learning disabilities should refer to the following documentation of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated, signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  7. Reaction Dynamics on the Formation of 1-and 3-Cyanopropylene in the Crossed Beams Reaction of Ground-State Cyano Radicals (CN) with Propylene (C3H6) and Its Deuterated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    of Ground-State Cyano Radicals (CN) with Propylene (C3H6) and Its Deuterated Isotopologues Xibin Gu + ), with propylene (CH3CHCH2) together with two d3-isotopologues (CD3CHCH2, CH3CDCD2) as potential pathways to form with its radical center to the R-carbon atom of the propylene molecule yielding a doublet radical

  8. The LLNL Heavy Element Facility -- Facility Management, Authorization Basis, and Readiness Assessment Lessons Learned in the Heavy Element Facility (B251) Transition from Category II Nuclear Facility to Radiological Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Brown, E; Gray, L

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents Facility Management, Readiness Assessment, and Authorization Basis experience gained and lessons learned during the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program (RRP). The RRP was tasked with removing contaminated glove boxes, radioactive inventory, and contaminated ventilation systems from the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The RRP was successful in its goal in April 2005 with the successful downgrade of B251 from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. The expertise gained and the lessons learned during the planning and conduct of the RRP included development of unique approaches in work planning/work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected'') and facility management. These approaches minimized worker dose and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. These lessons learned can help similar operational and management activities at other sites, including facilities restarting operations or new facility startup. B251 was constructed at LLNL to provide research areas for conducting experiments in radiochemistry using transuranic elements. Activities at B251 once included the preparation of tracer sets associated with the underground testing of nuclear devices and basic research devoted to a better understanding of the chemical and nuclear behavior of the transuranic elements. Due to the age of the facility, even with preventative maintenance, facility safety and experimental systems were deteriorating. A variety of seismic standards were used in the facility design and construction, which encompassed eight building increments constructed over a period of 26 years. The cost to bring the facility into compliance with the current seismic and other requirements was prohibitive, and simply maintaining B251 as a Category II nuclear facility posed serious cost considerations under a changing regulatory environment. Considering the high cost of maintenance and seismic upgrades, the RRP was created to mitigate the risk of dispersal of radioactive material during an earthquake by removing the radioactive materials inventory and glove box contamination. LLNL adopted the goal of reducing the hazard categorization of the Facility from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. To support the RRP, B251 transitioned from a standby to a fully operational Category II Nuclear Facility, compliant with current regulations. A work control process was developed, procedures were developed, Authorization Basis Documents were created, work plans were written, off-normal drills practiced, a large number of USQ reviews were conducted, and a ''Type II'' Readiness Assessment (RA) was conducted to restart operations. Subsequent RA's focused on specific operations. Finally, a four-step process was followed to reach Radiological Status: (1) Inventory Reduction and D&D activities reduced the inventory and radiological contamination of the facility below the Category III threshold (DOE-STD-1027), (2) Radiological Safety Basis Document (SBD aka HAR) was approved by NNSA, (3) the inventory control system for a Radiological Facility was implemented, and (4) verification by NNSA of radiological status was completed.

  9. Requirements | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability

  10. PROTO-PLANETARY DISK CHEMISTRY RECORDED BY D-RICH ORGANIC RADICALS IN CARBONACEOUS CHONDRITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remusat, Laurent; Robert, Francois; Meibom, Anders; Mostefaoui, Smail [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et Cosmochimie du Museum, UMR7202, Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 57 rue Cuvier, Case 52, 75005 Paris (France); Delpoux, Olivier; Binet, Laurent; Gourier, Didier [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, UMR CNRS 7574, ENSCP, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Derenne, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Geochimie organique et minerale de l'environnement, UMR CNRS 7618, BioEMCo, UPMC, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites has preserved its chemical composition and isotopic heterogeneity since the solar system formed {approx}4.567 billion years ago. We have identified the carrier moieties of isotopically anomalous hydrogen in IOM isolated from the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite. Data from high spatial resolution, quantitative isotopic NanoSIMS mapping of Orgueil IOM combined with data from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that organic radicals hold all the deuterium excess (relative to the bulk IOM) in distinct, micrometer-sized, D-rich hotspots. Taken together with previous work, the results indicate that an isotopic exchange reaction took place between pre-existing organic compounds characterized by low D/H ratios and D-rich gaseous molecules, such as H{sub 2}D{sup +} or HD{sub 2} {sup +}. This exchange reaction most likely took place in the diffuse outer regions of the proto-planetary disk around the young Sun, offering a model that reconciles meteoritic and cometary isotopic compositions of organic molecules.

  11. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the vinoxy (CH{sub 2}CHO) radical

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, D.L.; Choi, H.; Neumark, D.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the vinoxy (CH{sub 2}CHO) radical have been studied using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photodissociation cross section over the B{sup 2}A{double_prime} {l_arrow} X{sup 2}A{double_prime} band is measured, and photofragment translational energy and angular distributions are obtained at several excitation energies. For CH{sub 2}CHO, predissociation is observed over the entire band, including several transitions near the band origin which were seen previously in laser-induced fluorescence experiments. Two dissociation channels are seen: CH{sub 3} + CO and H + CH{sub 2}CO. The CH{sub 3} + CO channel was investigated in considerable detail and appears to proceed via internal conversion to the CH{sub 2}CHO ground state followed by isomerization to CH{sub 3}CO and subsequent dissociation. The translational energy distributions for this channel suggest an isomerization barrier in the range of 2 eV with respect to CH{sub 3} + CO products.

  12. The production mechanisms of OH radicals in a pulsed direct current plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X. Y.; Pei, X. K.; Lu, X. P.; Liu, D. W., E-mail: liudw@hust.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, Hubei 430074 (China); Ostrikov, K. [Plasma Nanoscience, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P. O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); School of Chemistry, Physics, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The production mechanism of OH radicals in a pulsed DC plasma jet is studied by a two-dimensional (2-D) plasma jet model and a one-dimensional (1-D) discharge model. For the plasma jet in the open air, electron-impact dissociation of H{sub 2}O, electron neutralization of H{sub 2}O{sup +}, as well as dissociation of H{sub 2}O by O(1D) are found to be the main reactions to generate the OH species. The contribution of the dissociation of H{sub 2}O by electron is more than the others. The additions of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, air, and H{sub 2}O into the working gas increase the OH density outside the tube slightly, which is attributed to more electrons produced by Penning ionization. On the other hand, the additions of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O into the working gas increase the OH density inside the tube substantially, which is attributed to the increased O (1D) and H{sub 2}O concentration, respectively. The gas flow will transport high density OH out of the tube during pulse off period. It is also shown that the plasma chemistry and reactivity can be effectively controlled by the pulse numbers. These results are supported by the laser induced fluorescence measurements and are relevant to several applications of atmospheric-pressure plasmas in health care, medicine, and materials processing.

  13. Uranium Recovery from Seawater: Development of Fiber Adsorbents Prepared via Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Kim, Jungseung [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gill, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel adsorbent preparation method using atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) combined with radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) was developed to synthesize an adsorbent for uranium recovery from seawater. The ATRP method allowed a much higher degree of grafting on the adsorbent fibers (595 2818%) than that allowed by RIGP alone. The adsorbents were prepared with varied composition of amidoxime groups and hydrophilic acrylate groups. The successful preparation revealed that both ligand density and hydrophilicity were critical for optimal performance of the adsorbents. Adsorbents synthesized in this study showed a relatively high performance (141 179 mg/g at 49 62 % adsorption) in laboratory screening tests using a uranium concentration of ~6 ppm. This performance is much higher than that of known commercial adsorbents. However, actual seawater experiment showed impeded performance compared to the recently reported high-surface-area-fiber adsorbents, due to slow adsorption kinetics. The impeded performance motivated an investigation of the effect of hydrophilic block addition on the graft chain terminus. The addition of hydrophilic block on the graft chain terminus nearly doubled the uranium adsorption capacity in seawater, from 1.56 mg/g to 3.02 mg/g. The investigation revealed the importance of polymer chain conformation, in addition to ligand and hydrophilic group ratio, for advanced adsorbent synthesis for uranium recovery from seawater.

  14. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF OH AND CN RADICALS IN THE COMA OF COMET ENCKE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ihalawela, Chandrasiri A.; Pierce, Donna M.; Dorman, Garrett R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 5167, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5167 (United States); Cochran, Anita L., E-mail: cai11@msstate.edu, E-mail: ci856509@ohio.edu, E-mail: dmp149@msstate.edu, E-mail: grd33@msstate.edu, E-mail: anita@barolo.as.utexas.edu [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1402, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple potential parent species have been proposed to explain CN abundances in comet comae, but the parent has not been definitively identified for all comets. This study examines the spatial distribution of CN radicals in the coma of comet Encke and determines the likelihood that CN is a photodissociative daughter of HCN in the coma. Comet Encke is the shortest orbital period (3.3 years) comet known and also has a low dust-to-gas ratio based on optical observations. Observations of CN were obtained from 2003 October 22 to 24, using the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. To determine the parent of CN, the classical vectorial model was modified by using a cone shape in order to reproduce Encke's highly aspherical and asymmetric coma. To test the robustness of the modified model, the spatial distribution of OH was also modeled. This also allowed us to obtain CN/OH ratios in the coma. Overall, we find the CN/OH ratio to be 0.009 {+-} 0.004. The results are consistent with HCN being the photodissociative parent of CN, but we cannot completely rule out other possible parents such as CH{sub 3}CN and HC{sub 3}N. We also found that the fan-like feature spans {approx}90 Degree-Sign , consistent with the results of Woodney et al..

  15. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Modanese

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  16. Characteristics of molecular hydrogen and CH* radicals in a methane plasma in a magnetically enhanced capacitive RF discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avtaeva, S. V.; Lapochkina, T. M. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The parameters of a methane-containing plasma in an asymmetric RF capacitive discharge in an external magnetic field were studied using optical emission spectroscopy. The power deposited in the discharge was 90 W and the gas pressure and magnetic field were varied in the ranges 1-5 Pa and 50-200 G, respectively. The vibrational and rotational temperatures of hydrogen molecules and CH* radicals were measured as functions of the magnetic field and methane pressure. The ratio between the densities of atomic and molecular hydrogen was estimated. The processes responsible for the excitation of molecular hydrogen and CH* radicals in a methane-containing plasma in an RF capacitive discharge are analyzed.

  17. ESR lineshape and {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals – Joint analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruk, D., E-mail: danuta.kruk@matman.uwm.edu.pl [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Sloneczna 54, PL-10710 Olsztyn (Poland); Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan (Poland)] [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan (Poland); Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpa?a, A.; Oglodek, I.; Moscicki, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)] [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kowalewski, J. [Arrhenius Laboratory, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Arrhenius Laboratory, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Rössler, E. A. [Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d{sub 16} containing {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz–20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the {sup 1}H relaxation of the solvent. The {sup 1}H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin–nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  18. Thermolysis of surface-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane: radical chain induced decomposition under conditions of restricted diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Biggs, C.A.

    1989-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane (/approximately//approximately/Ph(CH/sub 2/)/sub 3/Ph, or /approximately//approximately/DPP) has been prepared by the condensation of p-(3-phenylpropyl)phenol with the surface hydroxyl groups of an amorphous, fumed silica. Thermolysis studies of the covalently attached /approximately//approximately/DPP have been conducted to explore the effects of restricted radical and substrate diffusion on a free-radical chain induced decomposition reaction, which has been reported to underlie the thermal reactivity of fluid-phase DPP at /<=/400/degrees/C. Thermolysis of /approximately//approximately/DPP has been studied at 345-400/degrees/C as a function of /approximately//approximately/DPP conversion (0.3-23%) and initial surface coverage (0.132-0.586 mmol g/sup -1/; 0.43-1.97 DPP molecules nm/sup -2/). Decomposition of surface-immobilized /approximately//approximately/DPP occurs readily in this temperature range by parallel free-radical chain pathways, whose rates are quite sensitive to surface coverage, producing PhCH/sub 3/ + /approximately//approximately/PhCH/double bond/CH/sub 2/ and /approximately//approximately/PhCH/sub 3/ + PhCH/double bond/CH/sub 2/ as the major product pairs. An unusual regiospecific hydrogen transfer process is observed that favors formation of /approximately//approximately/PhCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/CHPh over /approximately//approximately/PhCHCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/Ph as the proximity of /approximately//approximately/DPP molecules and hydrogen abstracting radicals on the surface decreases. This phenomenon results in regioselective cracking of /approximately//approximately/DPP favoring the /approximately//approximately/PhCH/sub 3/ + PhCH/double bond/CH/sub 2/ product pair. Implications are discussed for the thermal degradation of related structural features in a diffusionally restricted, macromolecular network such as occurs in coal. 31 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Laser studies of the SiH radical/surface interaction during deposition of a thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, P.; Buss, R.J.; Breiland, W.G.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new method for studying the interaction of radicals with the surface of a depositing film using a combination of laser spectroscopy and molecular beam techniques. The reactivity of SiH molecules with the surface of a depositing a-Si:H film is measured to be at least 0.95, with no significant dependence on rotational state. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Jordan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.