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1

Repository of not readily available documents for project W-320  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a readily available source of the technical reports needed for the development of the safety documentation provided for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), designed to remove the radioactive and chemical sludge from tank 241-C-106, and transport that material to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 via a new, temporary, shielded, encased transfer line.

Conner, J.C.

1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Variable temperature effects on release rates of readily soluble nuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we study the effect of temperature on the release rate of readily soluble nuclides, as affected by a time-temperature dependent diffusion coefficient. In this analysis ground water fills the voids in the waste package at t = 0 and one percent of the inventories of cesium and iodine are immediately dissolved into the void water. Mass transfer resistance of partly failed container and cladding is conservatively neglected. The nuclides move through the void space into the surrounding rock under a concentration gradient. We use an analytic solution to compute the nuclide concentration in the gap or void, and the mass flux rate into the porous rock. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Kim, C.-L.; Light, W.B.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H. (Korea Advanced Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Republic of Korea); Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Measurement of Form-Factor-Independent Observables in the Decay B[ superscript 0] ? K[superscript *0]?[superscript +]?[superscript -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a measurement of form-factor-independent angular observables in the decay B[superscript 0] ? K[superscript *](892)[superscript 0]?[superscript +]?[superscript ?]. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding ...

Williams, Michael

4

SCIAMACHY MONITORING FACTORS: OBSERVATION AND END-TO-END CORRECTION OF INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEGRADATION Klaus Bramstedt1 , Stefan No¨el1 , Heinrich Bovensmann1 , John P. Burrows1 , Christophe Lerot2Y) is a grating spectrometer in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral range. SCIA- MACHY is part of the ENVISAT payload-factors. Key words: SCIAMACHY; m-factors; degradation; mon- itoring. 1. INTRODUCTION SCIAMACHY [1] is now seven

Tilstra, Gijsbert

5

Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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6

Readily Regenerable Microstructure Representations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

space exploration Users (clients) connect to initiate materials design via web-portal Web services #12;User View Users (clients) connect to initiate materials design via web-portal Web-Stability Map Generator Simulation Handler Analyzer Interaction Handler Intermediate Maps Dark region is subject

Raghavan, Padma

7

INT. J. CONTROL, 1989, VOL. 50, NO. 6, 25832597 Doubly coprime factorization, reduced-order observers, and dynamic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the results in the factorization approach to multivariable control system analysis and synthesis. In work in the factorization approach to multivariable control system analysis and synthesis (Vidyasagar 1985). In an important by Nett d d, (1984), explicit state-space realizations of these factorization are derived using results

Moore, John Barratt

8

The Metallicity Dependence of the CO-to-H$_2$ Conversion Factor from Observations of Local Group Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution CO maps of 9 molecular clouds in IC 10 are combined with the new measurement of the distance to this nearby metal poor galaxy to measure accurately the CO-to-H2 conversion factor. The result for IC 10 is combined with published data for four other Local Group galaxies (M31, M33, NGC 6822, the SMC) to trace the dependence of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor on oxygen abundance. These data show conclusively that the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor increases as the metallicity of the host galaxy decreases, with the conversion factor increasing by a factor of 4.6 for a factor of 10 decrease in metallicity.

C. D. Wilson

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

9

Observation of Discrete Oscillations in a Model-independent Plot of Cosmological Scale Factor vs. Lookback Time and a Scalar Field Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have observed damped longitudinal cosmological-scale oscillations in a unique model-independent plot of scale factor against lookback time for Type Ia supernovae data. We found several first-derivative relative maxima/minima spanning the range of reported transition-redshifts. These extrema comprise 2 full cycles with a period of approximately 0.15 Hubble times (H0=68 km/s/Mpc). This period corresponds to a fundamental frequency of approximately 7 cycles over the Hubble time. Transition-z values quoted in the literature generally fall near these minima and may explain the reported wide spread up to the predicted LCDM value of approximately z = 0.77. We also observe second and third harmonics of the fundamental. The scale factor data is analyzed several different ways including smoothing, Fourier transform and autocorrelation. We propose a cosmological scalar field harmonic oscillator model for the observation. On this time scale, for a quantum scalar field, the scalar field mass is extraordinarily small at...

Ringermacher, H I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Dust-to-gas ratio, $X_{\\rm CO}$ factor and CO-dark gas in the Galactic anticentre: an observational study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the correlation between extinction and H~{\\sc i} and CO emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes ($|b|>10\\degr$) within the footprint of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic anticentre (XSTPS-GAC) on small and large scales. In Paper I (Chen et al. 2014), we present a three-dimensional dust extinction map within the footprint of XSTPS-GAC, covering a sky area of over 6,000\\,deg$^2$ at a spatial angular resolution of 6\\,arcmin. In the current work, the map is combined with data from gas tracers, including H~{\\sc i} data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array H~{\\sc i} survey and CO data from the Planck mission, to constrain the values of dust-to-gas ratio $DGR=A_V/N({\\rm H})$ and CO-to-$\\rm H_2$ conversion factor $X_{\\rm CO}=N({\\rm H_2})/W_{\\rm CO}$ for the entire GAC footprint excluding the Galactic plane, as well as for selected star-forming regions (such as the Orion, Taurus and Perseus clouds) and a region of diffuse gas in the northern Galactic hemis...

Chen, B -Q; Yuan, H -B; Huang, Y; Xiang, M -S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Readily Deinkable Toner - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermalOxide Fuel CellsReaction of NO2,

12

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dynamic valuation model For wind development in regard to land value, proximity to transmission lines, and capacity factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a wind farm involves many variables that can make or break the success of a potential wind farm project. Some variables such as wind data (capacity factor, wind rose, wind speed, etc.) are readily available in ...

Nikandrou, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

EFFICIENT STRUCTURED MULTIFRONTAL FACTORIZATION FOR ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Such rank phenomenon is indeed observed for the .... Moreover, the HSS tree can help quickly identify any off-diagonal block of the ...... Table 4.1. Factorization cost ?fact, solution cost ?sol, and storage ?mem of the structured multifrontal.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

15

Readily Available Data Help to Overcome Geothermal Deployment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Articles Energy Department Announces National Geothermal Data System to Accelerate Geothermal Energy Development The National Geothermal Data System deploys free,...

16

Readily Available Data Help to Overcome Geothermal Deployment Barriers |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and Launches theResidential Buildings » ZeroWinsRate

17

Optical technologies for the observation of low Earth orbit objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to avoid collisions with space debris, the near Earth orbit must be continuously scanned by either ground- or spaced-based facilities. For the low Earth orbit, radar telescopes are the workhorse for this task, especially due to their continuous availability. However, optical observation methods can deliver complementary information, especially towards high accuracy measurements. Passive-optical observations are inexpensive and can yield very precise information about the apparent position of the object in the sky via comparison with background stars. However, the object's distance from the observer is not readily accessible, which constitutes a major drawback of this approach for the precise calculation of the orbital elements. Two experimental methods have been devised to overcome this problem: Using two observatories a few kilometres apart, strictly simultaneous observations of the same object yield an accurate, instantaneous 3D position determination through measurement of the parallax. If only on...

Hampf, Daniel; Riede, Wolfgang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

19

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

Knobloch,Jürgen

20

Observational Tests of Modified Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structure than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics and the ISW effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the Gravitational ``constant'' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which breaks the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions).

Bhuvnesh Jain; Pengjie Zhang

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Prospect for UV observations from the Moon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space astronomy in the last 40 years has largely been done from spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) for which the technology is proven and delivery mechanisms are readily available. However, new opportunities are arising with the surge in commercial aerospace missions. We describe here one such possibility: deploying a small instrument on the Moon. This can be accomplished by flying onboard the Indian entry to the Google Lunar X PRIZE competition, Team Indus mission, which is expected to deliver a nearly 30 kgs of payloads to the Moon, with a rover as its primary payload. We propose to mount a wide-field far-UV (130--180 nm) imaging telescope as a payload on the Team Indus lander. Our baseline operation is a fixed zenith pointing but with the option of a mechanism to allow observations of different attitudes. Pointing towards intermediate ecliptic latitude (50 deg or above) ensures that the Sun is at least 40 deg off the line of sight at all times. In this position, the telescope can cover higher galactic lat...

Safonova, Margarita; Mohan, Rekhesh; Sreejith, A G; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Arpit; Narayan, Rahul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Observables of Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

23

Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

Steels, Luc

24

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

27

History and evolution of buildup factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gamma-ray buildup factor is a term whose origin is lost in the mists of the early history of the Manhattan Project.' Its introduction stems from the observation that the calculations for the uncollided photons, i.e., those that have arrived at R without suffering any collisions, are usually a relatively simple matter, involving only an exponential kernel. The buildup factor is then a multiplicative factor, which corrects the answer that is proportional to the uncollided flux density to include the effects of the scattered photons. This paper further summarizes and traces efforts since 1954 at calculating and mathematically defining buildup factors.

Trubey, D.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Power Factor Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Factors Contributing to Ideal Instructional Interactivity Michael Yacci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Contributing to Ideal Instructional Interactivity Michael Yacci Paul Hyman Information are the factors that contribute to "ideal" instructional interactivity? In this study, subjects observed different and paralanguage. Introduction The purpose of this project was to determine factors that contribute to an "ideal

Yacci, Michael

30

Observing Massive Galaxy Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

Christopher J. Conselice

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Air Observe System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Academic Writing Observation Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

33

Academic Writing Observation Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

34

Global Warming Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

Schofield, Jeremy

35

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

36

Meson electromagnetic form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic structure of the pseudoscalar meson nonet is completely described by the sophisticated Unitary&Analytic model, respecting all known theoretical properties of the corresponding form factors.

Stanislav Dubnicka; Anna Z. Dubnickova

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

Term Structure Dynamics with Macroeconomic Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Macro Variables I present an a ne term structure model with latent factors and observable macroeco- nomic variables. I denote a state variable vector by Xt = (x1t; ;xkt;xk+1t;:::;xnt)0, where the rstk factors are unobservable and the remaining (n k...) factors are macroe- conomic variables. Suppose that Xt follows an Ito process (2.3) dXt = K[ Xt]dt+ p StdWt; where K is an n n matrix, is an n 1 vector. St is an n n diagonal matrix and the ith diagonal element is given as i + 0iXt, where i is a...

Park, Ha-Il

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Observed Cosmological Redshifts Support Contracting Accelerating Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main argument that Universe is currently expanding is observed redshift increase by distance. However, this conclusion may not be correct, because cosmological redshift depends only on the scaling factors, the change in the size of the universe during the time of light propagation and is not related to the speed of observer or speed of the object emitting the light. An observer in expanding universe will measure the same redshift as observer in contracting universe with the same scaling. This was not taken into account in analysing the SN Ia data related to the universe acceleration. Possibility that universe may contract, but that the observed light is cosmologically redshifted allows for completely different set of cosmological parameters $\\Omega_M, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}$, including the solution $\\Omega_M=1, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0$. The contracting and in the same time accelerating universe explains observed deceleration and acceleration in SN Ia data, but also gives significantly larger value for the age of the universe, $t_0 = 24$ Gyr. This allows to reconsider classical cosmological models with $\\Lambda =0$. The contracting stage also may explain the observed association of high redshifted quasars to low redshifted galaxies.

Branislav Vlahovic

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

40

Observations of Edge Turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Observing the Inflationary Reheating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

FGF growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

43

Observing alternatives to inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

P. Peter

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

Multi-factor authentication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

Predictions for Observing Protostellar Outflows with ALMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protostellar outflows provide a means to probe the accretion process of forming stars and their ability to inject energy into their surroundings. However, conclusions based on outflow observations depend upon the degree of accuracy with which their properties can be estimated. We examine the quality of Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of protostellar outflows by producing synthetic $^{12}$CO(1-0) and $^{13}$CO(1-0) observations of numerical simulations. We use various ALMA configurations, observational parameters, and outflow inclinations to assess how accurately different assumptions and setups can recover underlying properties. We find that more compact arrays and longer observing times can improve the mass and momentum recovery by a factor of two. During the first $\\sim$0.3 Myr of evolution, $^{12}$CO(1-0) is optically thick, even for velocities $|v|\\ge 1$ km s$^{-1}$, and outflow mass is severely underestimated without an optical depth correction. Likewise, $^{13}$CO(1-0) i...

Bradshaw, C; Arce, H G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

Kudela, Raphael M.

47

Public Health FAT FACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

Qian, Ning

48

Velocity coordinate spectrum: geometrical aspects of observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze a technique of obtaining turbulence power spectrum using spectral line data along the velocity coordinate, which we refer to as Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS). We formalize geometrical aspects of observation through a single factor, "geometric term". We find that all variety of particular observational configurations can be described using correspondent variants of this term, which we explicitly calculate. This allows us to obtain asymptotics for both parallel lines of sight and crossing lines of sight. The latter case is especially important for studies of turbulence within diffuse ISM in Milky Way. For verification of our results, we use direct calculation of VCS spectra, while the numerical simulations are presented in a companion paper.

A. Chepurnov; A. Lazarian

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ensemble-Based Observation Targeting for Improving Ozone Prediction in Houston and the Surrounding Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, observation targeting, observational impact factor. 1. Introduction The severity of air pollution situations is deter- mined by a complicated interaction among three factors: the emissions to the atmosphere, chemical high-pollution concentrations form on a given day is dominated principally by meteorological processes

51

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Observation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding accessa Higgs-like

53

Observation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding accessa

54

Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding accessandBusinessDevelopmentObligations

55

Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding

56

NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of managements observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&Ts MOP.

Gianotto, David

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Apps for Vehicles: What sort of vehicle data isn't readily available from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio Energy Co Ltd JumpJump to:OpenEIavailable on

58

Apps for Vehicles: What sort of vehicle data isn't readily available...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

your car, the CAN bus is very busy with so-called "normal" messages. For example, the engine control unit (ECU) continuously sends a CAN message with the engine speed (in RPM)....

59

residential environment. Electrical connections that are easily pulled apart and single, exposed conductors that are readily  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy, which sponsored code-writing activities, believed that rooftop, building-integrated, utility that additions to the code specifically addressed this technology. Making Solar Electricity Safer In the mid-1970 connections. In those early years, although the majority of PV installations were off grid, the early PV code

Johnson, Eric E.

60

Gamma Ray Burst Afterglow Observations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe. We present an overview of the observational history of GRBs and the (more)

Updike, Adria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

8, 88178846, 2008 Observed boundary-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H. Marsham et and Enviroment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2 Institut f¨ur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universit@env.leeds.ac.uk) 8817 #12;ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

Loop quantum gravity and observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

A. Barrau; J. Grain

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive a fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering in unmagnetized plasmas valid to all orders in the normalized electron velocity, beta->=v->/c. The form factor is compared to a previously derived expression where the lowest order electron velocity, beta->, corrections are included [J. Sheffield, Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation (Academic Press, New York, 1975)]. The beta-> expansion approach is sufficient for electrostatic waves with small phase velocities such as ion-acoustic waves, but for electron-plasma waves the phase velocities can be near luminal. At high phase velocities, the electron motion acquires relativistic corrections including effective electron mass, relative motion of the electrons and electromagnetic wave, and polarization rotation. These relativistic corrections alter the scattered emission of thermal plasma waves, which manifest as changes in both the peak power and width of the observed Thomson-scattered spectra.

Palastro, J. P.; Ross, J. S.; Pollock, B.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Dynamic structure factors of a dense mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the dynamic structure factors of a dense binary liquid mixture. These describe dynamics on molecular length scales, where structural relaxation is important. We find that the presence of a few large particles in a dense fluid of small particles slows down the dynamics considerably. We also observe a deep narrowing of the spectrum for a disordered mixture composed of a nearly equal packing of the two species. In contrast, a few small particles diffuse easily in the background of a dense fluid of large particles. We expect our results to describe neutron scattering from a dense mixture.

Supurna Sinha

2005-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reliability and Validity: One Factor and Third Factor Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 7 Reliability and Validity: One Factor and Third Factor Tests D. White and A. Korotayev 26 Sept 2003 Html links are live Reliability and validity are crucial issues in research. Reliability may have high validity but low reliability, in which case its correlations with other high validity

White, Douglas R.

68

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SS 433 JETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of the SS 433 jets using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer with contemporaneous optical and Very Long Baseline Array observations. The X-ray and optical emission line regions are found to be related but not coincident as the optical line emission persists for days while the X-ray emission lines fade in less than 5000 s. The line Doppler shifts from the optical and X-ray lines match well, indicating that they are less than 3 10{sup 14} cm apart. The jet Doppler shifts show aperiodic variations that could result from shocks in interactions with the local environment. These perturbations are consistent with a change in jet direction but not jet speed. The proper motions of the radio knots match the kinematic model only if the distance to SS 433 is 4.5 0.2 kpc. Observations during eclipse show that the occulted emission is very hard, seen only above 2 keV and rising to comprise >50% of the flux at 8 keV. The soft X-ray emission lines from the jet are not blocked, constraining the jet length to ?> 2 10{sup 12} cm. The base jet density is in the range 10{sup 10-13} cm{sup 3}, in contrast to our previous estimate based on the Si XIII triplet, which is likely to have been affected by UV de-excitation. There is a clear overabundance of Ni by a factor of about 15 relative to the solar value, which may have resulted from an unusual supernova that formed the compact object.

Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Nowak, Michael [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hillwig, Todd [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael [NRAO, P.O. Box 2, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heinz, Sebastian, E-mail: hermanm@space.mit.edu, E-mail: crc@space.mit.edu, E-mail: nss@space.mit.edu, E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu, E-mail: todd.hillwig@valpo.edu, E-mail: amiodusz@nrao.edu, E-mail: mrupen@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: heinzs@astro.wisc.edu [Astronomy Department, 5408 Sterling Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Observation of an Antimatter Hypernucleus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons - composed of an antiproton, antineutron, and antilambda hyperon - produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 {+-} 17 antihypertritons ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and 157 {+-} 30 hypertritons ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H). The measured yields of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and {sup 3}He ({sup 3}{ovr He}) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear/particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Observational Consequences of a Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider the implications of the "landscape" paradigm for the large scale properties of the universe. The most direct implication of a rich landscape is that our local universe was born in a tunnelling event from a neighboring vacuum. This would imply that we live in an open FRW universe with negative spatial curvature. We argue that the "overshoot" problem, which in other settings would make it difficult to achieve slow roll inflation, actually favors such a cosmology. We consider anthropic bounds on the value of the curvature and on the parameters of inflation. When supplemented by statistical arguments these bounds suggest that the number of inflationary efolds is not very much larger than the observed lower bound. Although not statistically favored, the likelihood that the number of efolds is close to the bound set by observations is not negligible. The possible signatures of such a low number of efolds are briefly described.

Ben Freivogel; Matthew Kleban; Maria Rodriguez Martinez; Leonard Susskind

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

Observations of the Icy Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Beyond the Fundamentals of Special Relativity: Full Lorentz gamma factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special relativity calculates, by means of the Lorentz gamma factor, the proper time of all inertial systems from the observer proper time, which is taken as a time standard. So, any temporal inference relies in first instance on the observer own time. The question is thus: what fixes the observer proper time? This will be the crucial point debated here. This implies analyzing at the very first why the observer can be taken as a motionless reference in spite of being himself inertial. Is this just an approximation, and if so, up to what extent can it be applied? The framework of special relativity is compared to an amended form in which the fact of taking himself as a reference does not allow the observer to overlook its own kinetics. So, the issue stands on which of two formulations of the Lorentz gamma factor is the most accurate one: its standard expression or an amended one which takes into account the fact that the observer is himself inertial, while the former disregards it. When the observer speed is ignored, the two formulations become identical. Hence, the standard relativistic expression of gamma can be seen as an approximation applicable when the observer motion is null or low, such as it is the instance on Earth.

G. Sardin

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

75

Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Avery, K.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

Electrical and Production Load Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Texas Abstract Load factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors... for each shift classification within major industry groups. The load factor based on billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand...

Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

77

OPTIMALITY, COMPUTATION, AND INTERPRETATION OF NONNEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is an observational technique within the air pollution re- search community which makes use of the ambient data that the factors are to be retrieved in the mining process. A linear model, therefore, assumes the relationship Y was supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant AFOSR-F49620

Plemmons, Robert J.

78

OPTIMALITY, COMPUTATION, AND INTERPRETATION OF NONNEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is an observational technique within the air pollution re­ search community which makes use of the ambient data that the factors are to be retrieved in the mining process. A linear model, therefore, assumes the relationship Y was supported in part by the Air Force O#ce of Scientific Research under grant AFOSR­F49620

79

Is G a conversion factor or a fundamental unit?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By using fundamental units c, h, G as conversion factors one can easily transform the dimensions of all observables. In particular one can make them all ``geometrical'', or dimensionless. However this has no impact on the fact that there are three fundamental units, G being one of them. Only experiment can tell us whether G is basically fundamental.

G. Fiorentini; L. Okun; M. Vysotsky

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

Integer factorization is in P  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be solved by a deterministic Turing machine in polynomial time(see e.g.. Cormen et al. (2009)). Theorem 5. Integer factorization is in FP. Algorithm 2 can be...

owner

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Automatic Test Factoring for Java  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

Saff, David

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Human Factors of Reporting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed.), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK. pp 715-750 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Johnson, C.W.

83

Radiant-interchange configuration factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIANT-INTERCHANGE CONFIGURATION FACTORS A Thesis By THOMAS E DW ARD RE D DIN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1965 Major... wife, Dorene, whose patience and encouragement have been a constant source of inspiration. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I . INTRODUCTION PAGE ~ 0 1 II. THE GEOMETRY OF THE BLACK BODY CONFIGURATION FACTOR. . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1...

Reddin, Thomas Edward

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic 'polars' in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n {<=} 3) is present in EF Eri and AM Her. Previously, such emission would have been presumed to be optically thick, and not provide significant orbitally modulated flux. This suggests that the accretion onto polars is more complicated than assumed in the simple models developed for these two sources. We develop a model for the near-/mid-IR light curves for WZ Sge with an L2 donor star that shows that the ellipsoidal variations from its secondary star are detected. We conclude that none of the targets surveyed have dusty circumbinary disks.

Harrison, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Ryan T. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Tappert, Claus [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Avda. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile); Hoffman, Douglas I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Campbell, Ryan K., E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu, E-mail: rthamilt@nmsu.edu, E-mail: claus.tappert@uv.cl, E-mail: dhoffman@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: Ryan.Campbell@humobldt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA 95521 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Enhancement factors for resuspended aerosol radioactivity: Effects of topsoil disturbance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enhancement factor for airborne radionuclides resuspended by wind is defined as the ratio of the activity density (Bq g{sup {minus}1}) in the aerosol to the activity density in the underlying surface of contaminated soil. Enhancement factors are useful for assessment of worst-case exposure scenarios and transport conditions, and are one of the criteria for setting environmental standards for radioactivity in soil. This paper presents results of experimental studies where resuspension of {sup 239}Pu was measured when air concentrations were equilibrated to the soil surface. Enhancement factors were observed for several types of man-made disturbances (bulldozer-blading, soil raking, vacuum-cleaning) and natural disturbances (springtime thaw, soil-drying, wildfire). For some cases, enhancement factors are compared over range of geographical locations (Bikini Atoll, California, Nevada, and South Carolina). The particle-size distributions of aerosol activity are compared to particle-size distributions of the underlying soil.

Shinn, J.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Null geodesics and observational cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe is not isotropic or spatially homogeneous on local scales. The averaging of local inhomogeneities in general relativity can lead to significant dynamical effects on the evolution of the Universe, and even if the effects are at the 1% level they must be taken into account in a proper interpretation of cosmological observations. We discuss the effects that averaging (and inhomogeneities in general) can have on the dynamical evolution of the Universe and the interpretation of cosmological data. All deductions about cosmology are based on the paths of photons. We discuss some qualitative aspects of the motion of photons in an averaged geometry, particularly within the context of the luminosity distance-redshift relation in the simple case of spherical symmetry.

A. A. Coley

2008-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Spectral dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor in quantum dot lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spectral analysis of amplified spontaneous emission is used to determine the linewidth enhancement factor (?-factor) in lasers based on InAs/InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) in a wide spectral range near the ground-state optical transition energy. The effect of the pump current and number of QDs on the spectral dependences of the ?-factor is examined. The temperature dependence of the spectra of the ?-factor is experimentally determined for the first time for lasers with InAs/InGaAs QDs. An explanation is suggested for the observed anomalous decrease in the ?-factor with increasing temperature.

Zubov, F. I., E-mail: fedyazu@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Maximov, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Livshits, D. A. [Innolume GmbH (Germany); Payusov, A. S.; Nadtochiy, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Savelyev, A. V.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Gordeev, N. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Observational Field Assessment of Invasiveness for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthesis............................................................... 8 Jatropha observations.................................................................. 9 Jatropha risk synthesis................................................................. 12 and invasiveness. Observations were made around field plantings of banagrass, Jatropha (Jatropha curcas

89

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

90

Transcription factor-based biosensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

A MULTI-YEAR STUDY OF FACTORS AFFECTING FRUIT PRODUCTION IN ARISTOLOCHIA PAUCINERVIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MULTI-YEAR STUDY OF FACTORS AFFECTING FRUIT PRODUCTION IN ARISTOLOCHIA PAUCINERVIS limitation, resource limitation, fruit abortion, and predation have all been proposed as factors explaining low fruit set in hermaphroditic plants. We conducted a 5-year study combining field observations

Herrera, Carlos M.

92

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Discrimination of quantum observables using limited resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the problem of unambiguous discrimination and identification among quantum observables. We set a general framework and investigate in details the case of qubit observables. In particular, we show that perfect discrimination with two shots is possible only for sharp qubit observables (e.g. Stern-Gerlach apparatuses) associated with mutually orthogonal directions. We also show that for sharp qubit observables associated to nonorthogonal directions unambiguous discrimination with an inconclusive result is always possible.

Mario Ziman; Teiko Heinosaari

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

94

JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;1 Disasters Health Energy Climate Water 1 Japanese Main Activities of Earth Observation Weather MTSAT (JMA) Eco Earth Observation Targets (JFY) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

95

12 Years of Stellar Activity Observations in Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an observational program we started in 1999, to systematically obtain mid-resolution spectra of late-type stars, to study in particular chromospheric activity. In particular, we found cyclic activity in four dM stars, including Prox-Cen. We directly derived the conversion factor that translates the known S index to flux in the Ca II cores, and extend its calibration to a wider spectral range. We investigated the relation between the activity measurements in the calcium and hydrogen lines, and found that the usual correlation observed is the product of the dependence of each flux on stellar color, and it is not always preserved when simultaneous observations of a particular star are considered. We also used our observations to model the chromospheres of stars of different spectral types and activity levels, and found that the integrated chromospheric radiative losses, normalized to the surface luminosity, show a unique trend for G and K dwarfs when plotted against the S index.

Mauas, Pablo J D; Diaz, R; Vieytes, M; Petrucci, R; Jofre, E; Abrevaya, X; Luoni, M L; Valenzuela, P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Human Factors for Situation Assessment in Grid Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Despite advances in technology, power system operators must assimilate overwhelming amounts of data to keep the grid operating. Analyses of recent blackouts have clearly demonstrated the need to enhance the operators situation awareness (SA). The long-term objective of this research is to integrate valuable technologies into the grid operator environment that support decision making under normal and abnormal operating conditions and remove non-technical barriers to enable the optimum use of these technologies by individuals working alone and as a team. More specifically, the research aims to identify methods and principles to increase SA of grid operators in the context of system conditions that are representative or common across many operating entities and develop operationally relevant experimental methods for studying technologies and operational practices which contribute to SA. With increasing complexity and interconnectivity of the grid, the scope and complexity of situation awareness have grown. New paradigms are needed to guide research and tool development aimed to enhance and improve operations. In reviewing related research, operating practices, systems, and tools, the present study established a taxonomy that provides a perspective on research and development surrounding power grid situation awareness and clarifies the field of human factors/SA for grid operations. Information sources that we used to identify critical factors underlying SA included interviews with experienced operational personnel, available historical summaries and transcripts of abnormal conditions and outages (e.g., the August 14, 2003 blackout), scientific literature, and operational policies/procedures and other documentation. Our analysis of August 2003 blackout transcripts and interviews adopted a different perspective than previous analyses of this material, and we complemented this analysis with additional interviews. Based on our analysis and a broad literature review, we advocate a new perspective on SA in terms of sensemaking, also called situated or ecological decision making, where the focus of the investigation is to understand why the decision maker(s) experienced the situation the way they did, or why what they saw made sense to them at the time. This perspective is distinct from the traditional branch of human factors research in the field which focuses more on ergonomics and the transactional relationship between the human operator and the systems. Consistent with our findings from the literature review, we recognized an over-arching need to focus SA research on issues surrounding the concept of shared knowledge; e.g., awareness of what is happening in adjacent areas as well as ones own area of responsibility. Major findings were: a) Inadequate communication/information sharing is pervasive, b) Information is available, but not used. Many tools and mechanisms exist for operators to build awareness of the physical grid system, yet the transcripts reveal that they still need to call and exchange information with operators of neighboring areas to improve or validate their SA. The specific types of information that they request are quite predictable and, in most cases, cover information that could be available to both operators and reliability coordinators through readily available displays or other data sources, c) Shared Knowledge is Required on Operations/Actions as Well as Physical Status. In an ideal, technologically and organizationally perfect world, every control room and every reliability coordinator may have access to complete data across all regional control areas and yet, there would still be reason for the operators to call each other to gain and improve their SA of power grid operations, and d) Situation Awareness as sensemaking and shared knowledge.

Guttromson, Ross T.; Schur, Anne; Greitzer, Frank L.; Paget, Mia L.

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Natural geometric representation for electron local observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

Minogin, V.G., E-mail: minogin@isan.troitsk.ru

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

100

Guidelines for Power Factor Improvement Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor is an indication of electrical system efficiency. Low power factor, or low system efficiency, may be due to one or more causes, including lightly loaded transformers, oversized electric motors, and harmonic-generating non-linear loads...

Massey, G. W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

Follett, Jordan R.

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Crop Management Factors: What is Important?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various management factors, including specific practices and the persistence of those practices over time, can greatly influence farm profitability. Some of those factors are managing for high yield or low production cost, as well as adoption...

Kastens, Terry L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Nivens, Heather; Klinefelter, Danny A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

103

Prime Factorization in the Duality Computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give algorithms to factorize large integers in the duality computer. We provide three duality algorithms for factorization based on a naive factorization method, the Shor algorithm in quantum computing, and the Fermat's method in classical computing. All these algorithms are polynomial in the input size.

Wan-Ying Wang; Bin Shang; Chuan Wang; Gui Lu Long

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

Infrared Scales and Factorization in QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective field theory methods are used to study factorization of the deep inelastic scattering cross-section. The cross-section is shown to factor in QCD, even though it does not factor in perturbation theory for some choices of the infrared regulator. Messenger modes are not required in soft-collinear effective theory for deep inelastic scattering as x -> 1.

Aneesh V. Manohar

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL CONVERSION FACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL CONVERSION FACTORS FOR THE 2014 FISHING YEAR NOAA FISHERIES, ALASKA via the GAF electronic reporting system. If no GAF were harvested in a year, the conversion factor is the first calendar year that GAF regulations will be in effect. Therefore, the conversion factors are based

106

OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON RED AND BLUE HELIUM BURNING SEQUENCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive the optical luminosity, colors, and ratios of the blue and red helium burning (HeB) stellar populations from archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of nineteen starburst dwarf galaxies and compare them with theoretical isochrones from Padova stellar evolution models across metallicities from Z = 0.001 to 0.009. We find that the observational data and the theoretical isochrones for both blue and red HeB populations overlap in optical luminosities and colors and the observed and predicted blue to red HeB ratios agree for stars older than 50 Myr over the time bins studied. These findings confirm the usefulness of applying isochrones to interpret observations of HeB populations. However, there are significant differences, especially for the red HeB population. Specifically, we find (1) offsets in color between the observations and theoretical isochrones of order 0.15 mag (0.5 mag) for the blue (red) HeB populations brighter than M{sub V} {approx} -4 mag, which cannot be solely due to differential extinction; (2) blue HeB stars fainter than M{sub V} {approx} -3 mag are bluer than predicted; (3) the slope of the red HeB sequence is shallower than predicted by a factor of {approx}3; and (4) the models overpredict the ratio of the most luminous blue to red HeB stars corresponding to ages {approx}< 50 Myr. Additionally, we find that for the more metal-rich galaxies in our sample (Z {approx}> 0.5 Z{sub sun}), the red HeB stars overlap with the red giant branch stars in the color-magnitude diagrams, thus reducing their usefulness as indicators of star formation for ages {approx}> 100 Myr.

McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001-Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

Ellingson, Steven W.

109

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

111

Nonclassical transport processes in geologic media: Review of field and laboratory observations and basic physical concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the problem of solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous media. We first review field and laboratory observations that demonstrate nonclassical flow and transport behavior. The main physical principles causing anomalous transport regimes in fractured rock media are identified. The basic factors and physical concepts needed to describe anomalous transport in saturated and unsaturated fractured rock are discussed in detail.

Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Pruess, K.; Semenov, V.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Global inventory of nitrogen oxide emissions constrained by space-based observations of NO2 columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global inventory of nitrogen oxide emissions constrained by space-based observations of NO2 columns NO + NO2), and combine these with a priori information from a bottom- up emission inventory (with error and a factor of 2 over remote regions. We derive a top-down NOx emission inventory from the GOME data by using

Chance, Kelly

113

HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO 1861 - 1881 October 2004 Prepared By Glen Conner Center under the auspices of the Climate Database Modernization Program, NOAA's National Climatic Data;1 HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO 1861-1881 Glen Conner Kentucky State Climatologist

Maynard, J. Barry

114

Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana Fall 2010 T/Th 2:10 ­ 3:30 pm CHCB 227://www.physics.umt.edu/~nate/astr362/ Course Description Observational astronomy relies heavily on application of advanced technology astronomy is dominated by the CCD and related pixel array detectors: digital devices with unprecedented

Vonessen, Nikolaus

115

ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORTPERIOD COMETS \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORTPERIOD COMETS \\Lambda J. Crovisier 1 , T. Encrenaz 1 , E 4 , E. van Dishoeck 5 , R. Knacke 6 , T.Y. Brooke 7 1 Observatoire de Paris, Meudon, France 2 ISO are found in a shortperiod comet. The ISO observations of the Jupiterfamily comet P/Hartley 2, presum

Demoulin, Pascal

116

NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR CIVIL EARTH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for providing satellite observations. The final step in this process will be the publication of a National Plan; Homeland and National Security; Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Education; ScienceNATIONAL STRATEGY FOR CIVIL EARTH OBSERVATIONS Executive Office of the President National Science

Schrijver, Karel

117

Construction of Quantum Field Theories with Factorizing S-Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new approach to the construction of interacting quantum field theories on two-dimensional Minkowski space is discussed. In this program, models are obtained from a prescribed factorizing S-matrix in two steps. At first, quantum fields which are localized in infinitely extended, wedge-shaped regions of Minkowski space are constructed explicitly. In the second step, local observables are analyzed with operator-algebraic techniques, in particular by using the modular nuclearity condition of Buchholz, d'Antoni and Longo. Besides a model-independent result regarding the Reeh-Schlieder property of the vacuum in this framework, an infinite class of quantum field theoretic models with non-trivial interaction is constructed. This construction completes a program initiated by Schroer in a large family of theories, a particular example being the Sinh-Gordon model. The crucial problem of establishing the existence of local observables in these models is solved by verifying the modular nuclearity condition, which here amounts to a condition on analytic properties of form factors of observables localized in wedge regions. It is shown that the constructed models solve the inverse scattering problem for the considered class of S-matrices. Moreover, a proof of asymptotic completeness is obtained by explicitly computing total sets of scattering states. The structure of these collision states is found to be in agreement with the heuristic formulae underlying the Zamolodchikov-Faddeev algebra.

Gandalf Lechner

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

118

Factor Analysis for Skewed Data and Skew-Normal Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 2.7.1 The Factor Analysis Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 v 2.8 Model Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 2.8.1 The Akaike Information Criterion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 2.8.2 The Bayesian... Information Criterion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.9 Factor Scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.10 Non-uniqueness of Factor Loadings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.10.1 The Rotation of Factor Loadings...

Gaucher, Beverly Jane

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

Time changes in gradient and observed winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD DALE CARLSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillm=n of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1972 Major Subject...: Meteorology TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD D. CARLSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co , ee) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT Time Changes in Gradient and Observed Winds. (May 1972) Ronald Dale...

Carlson, Ronald Dale

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ISO observations of spirals: modelling the FIR emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISO observations at 200 micron have modified our view of the dust component in spiral galaxies. For a sample of seven resolved spirals we have retrieved a mean temperature of 20K, about 10K lower than previous estimates based on IRAS data at shorter wavelengths. Because of the steep dependence of far-infrared emission on the dust temperature, the dust masses inferred from ISO fluxes are a factor of 10 higher than those derived from IRAS data only, leading to gas-to-dust ratios close to the value observed in the Galaxy. The scale-length of the 200 micron emission is larger than for the IRAS 100 micron emission, with colder dust at larger distances from the galactic centre, as expected if the interstellar radiation field is the main source of dust heating. The 200 micron scale-length is also larger than the optical, for all the galaxies in the sample. This suggests that the dust distribution is more extended than that of the stars.A model of the dust heating is needed to derive the parameters of the dust distribution from the FIR emission. Therefore, we have adapted an existing radiative transfer code to deal with dust emission. Simulated maps of the temperature distribution within the dust disk and of the dust emission at any wavelength can be produced. The stellar spectral energy distribution is derived from observations in the ultraviolet, optical and near infrared. The parameters of the dust distribution (scale-lengths and optical depth) are chosen to reproduce the observed characteristics of the FIR emission, i.e. the shape of the spectrum, the flux and the spatial distribution. We describe the application of the model to one of the galaxies in the sample, NGC 6946.

Simone Bianchi; Paul B. Alton; Jonathan I. Davies

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

PEP Classroom Observation Protocol Project # _______ District __________________________ School ________________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEP Classroom Observation Protocol Project # _______ District __________________________ School (mark all that apply) Demonstrate or confirm known concepts/procedures Demonstrate or confirm known concepts/procedures Explore ideas, test conjectures, look for patterns Explore ideas, test conjectures

Lee, Carl

122

Near-Infrared Observations April 9, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

idea: correct wavefront distortions using a deformable secondary mirror · can achieve better correction;Energy Generation · what are we seeing when we observe solar system objects in the NIR? · reflected

Harrison, Thomas

123

INTEGRAL observations of HER X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First results of observations of the low mass X-ray binary Her X-1/HZ Her performed by the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005 are presented. A significant part of one 35 day main-on state was covered. The cyclotron line in the X-ray spectrum is well observed and its position and shape, as well as its variability with time and phase of the 1.24 s pulsation are explored. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy bands are studied throughout the observation. The pulse period is found to vary on short time scales revealing a dynamical spin-up/spin-down behavior. Results of simultaneous optical observations of HZ Her are also discussed.

D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; K. P. Postnov; N. I. Shakura; S. A. Potanin; C. Ferrigno; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

David M. Smith

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Infrasonic observations of the Northridge, California, earthquake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrasonic waves from the Northridge, California, earthquake of 17 January 1994 were observed at the St. George, Utah, infrasound array of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The distance to the epicenter was 543 kilometers. The signal shows a complex character with many peaks and a long duration. An interpretation is given in terms of several modes of signal propagation and generation including a seismic-acoustic secondary source mechanism. A number of signals from aftershocks are also observed.

Mutschlecner, J.P.; Whitaker, R.W.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Extra Spin Asymmetries From the Breakdown of TMD-Factorization in Hadron-Hadron Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that partonic correlations that would traditionally be identified as subleading on the basis of a generalized TMD-factorization conjecture can become leading-power because of TMD-factorization breaking that arises in hadron-hadron collisions with large transverse momentum back-to-back hadrons produced in the final state. General forms of TMD-factorization fail for such processes because of a previously noted incompatibility between the requirements for TMD-factorization and the Ward identities of non-Abelian gauge theories. We first review the basic steps for factorizing the gluon distribution and then show that a conflict between TMD-factorization and the non-Abelian Ward identity arises already at the level of a single extra soft or collinear gluon when the partonic subprocess involves a TMD gluon distribution. Next we show that the resulting TMD-factorization violating effects produce leading-power final state spin asymmetries that would be classified as subleading in a generalized TMD-factorization framework. We argue that similar extra TMD-factorization breaking effects may be necessary to explain a range of open phenomenological QCD puzzles. The potential to observe extra transverse spin or azimuthal asymmetries in future experiments is highlighted as their discovery may indicate an influence from novel and unexpected large distance parton correlations.

Ted C. Rogers

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nucleon Form Factor Measurements and Interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data base for the form factors of the nucleon obtained from elastic ep scattering is discussed, as well as some recent developments in their calculation.

Charles F. Perdrisat

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Optimization Online - Building a completely positive factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 21, 2009 ... Abstract: Using a bordering approach, and building upon an already known factorization of a principal block, we establish sufficient conditions...

Immanuel Bomze

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

Human factors methods in DOE nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of developing a series of guidelines for the use of human factors standards, procedures, and methods to be used in nuclear facilities. This paper discusses the philosophy and process being used to develop a DOE human factors methods handbook to be used during the design cycle. The following sections will discuss: (1) basic justification for the project; (2) human factors design objectives and goals; and (3) role of human factors engineering (HFE) in the design cycle.

Bennett, C.T.; Banks, W.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Waters, R.J. (Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

EGRET observations of bursts at MeV energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present preliminary results from the analysis of 16 bright bursts that have been observed by the EGRET NaI calorimeter, or TASC. Seven bursts have been imaged in the EGRET spark chamber above 30 MeV, but in most cases the TASC data gives the highest energy spectra available for these bursts. The TASC can obtain spectral and rate information for bursts well outside the field of view of the EGRET spark chambers, and is sensitive in the energy range from 1 to 200 MeV. The spectra for these bursts are mostly consistent with a simple power law with spectral index in the range from 1.7 to 3.7, with several of the brighter bursts showing emission past 100 MeV. No high energy cutoff has been observed. These high energy photons offer important clues to the physical processes involved at the origin of burst emission. For bursts at cosmological distances extremely high bulk Lorentz factors are implied by the presence of MeV and GeV photons which have not been attenuated by pair production with the lower energy photons from the source.

Catelli, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); NASA/GSFC Code 661, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Dingus, B. L. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Schneid, E. J. [Northrop Grumman Co., MS A01-26, Bethpage, New York 11714 (United States)

1998-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cold dark matter cosmology conflicts with fluid mechanics and observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold dark matter hierarchical clustering (CDMHC) cosmology based on the Jeans 1902 criterion for gravitational instability gives predictions about the early universe contrary to fluid mechanics and observations. Jeans neglected viscosity, diffusivity, and turbulence: factors that determine gravitational structure formation and contradict small structures (CDM halos) forming from non-baryonic dark matter particle candidates. From hydro-gravitational-dynamics (HGD) cosmology, viscous-gravitational fragmentation produced supercluster (10^46 kg), cluster, and galaxy-mass (10^42 kg) clouds in the primordial plasma with the large fossil density turbulence (rho_o ~ 3x10-17 kg m-3) of the first fragmentation at 10^12 s, and a protogalaxy linear and spiral clump morphology reflecting maximum stretching near vortex lines of the plasma turbulence at the 10^13 s plasma-gas transition. Gas protogalaxies fragmented into proto-globular-star-cluster mass (10^36 kg) clumps of protoplanet gas clouds that are now frozen as earth-mass (10^24-^25 kg) Jovian planets of the baryonic dark matter, about 30,000,000 rogue planets per star. Observations contradict the CDMHCC prediction of large explosive Population III first stars at 10^16 s, but support the immediate gentle formation of small Population II first stars at 10^13 s in globular-star-clusters from HGD.

Carl H. Gibson

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Estimating physical quantities for an observed galactic microlensing event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a given spatial distribution of the lenses and distribution of the transverse velocity of the lens relative to the line-of-sight, a probability distribution for the lens mass for a single observed event is derived. In addition, similar probability distributions are derived for the Einstein radius and the separation of the lens objects and their rotation period for a binary lens. These probability distributions are distinct from the distributions for the lens population, as investigated e.g. by the mass moment method of De Rujula, Jetzer, and Masso (1991). However, it is shown that the expectation value for the mass from the probability distribution coincides with the value from the mass moment method applied to a single observed event. The special cases of a Maxwellian velocity distribution and of a constant velocity are discussed in detail. For a rudimentary model of the Galactic halo, the probability distributions are shown and the relations between the expectation values of the physical quantities and the event timescale are given. For this model, it is shown that within a 95.4%-interval around the expectation value, the mass varies by a factor of 800.

M. Dominik

1997-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

137

Using the Galileoscope in astronomical observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project aims to attract school students and teachers from the state education system from Ca\\c{c}apava do Sul - RS to Sciences and specially to Astronomy. We made astronomical observations using a Galileoscope choosing the Moon as a primary target. We also observed others objects that present high brightness in the night sky. The selection of targets, and their identification during the observations were carried out by a free software of planetary simulation, Stellarium. The results were in qualitative form and they show the great interest demonstrated by those participating in the project. Furthermore, this project helped to improve the understanding of the physical proprieties of the night sky objects (e.g. color). Finally, the project has showed that using a simple equipment and of relatively low cost it is possible to bring more people, specially the young students, to the Science World and to Astronomy.

Oliveira, V A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

ANITA collaboration; P. W. Gorham; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; D. Z. Besson; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; Duvernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Goodhue, A; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Hoover, S; Israel, M H; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B; Miki, C; Miocinovic, P; Nam, J; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R; Palladino, K J; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Saltzberg, D; Secke, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wu, F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sources of Gravitational Waves: Theory and Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational-wave astronomy will soon become a new tool for observing the Universe. Detecting and interpreting gravitational waves will require deep theoretical insights into astronomical sources. The past three decades have seen remarkable progress in analytical and numerical computations of the source dynamics, development of search algorithms and analysis of data from detectors with unprecedented sensitivity. This Chapter is devoted to examine the advances and future challenges in understanding the dynamics of binary and isolated compact-object systems, expected cosmological sources, their amplitudes and rates, and highlights of results from gravitational-wave observations. All of this is a testament to the readiness of the community to open a new window for observing the cosmos, a century after gravitational waves were first predicted by Albert Einstein.

Alessandra Buonanno; B. S. Sathyaprakash

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

Gorham, P.W.

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

142

Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

Thomas W. Baumgarte

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

143

Observation of d-Orbital Aromaticity. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation of aObservation

144

Exploratory factor analysis in behavior genetics research: Factor recovery with small sample sizes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of a Monte Carlo study of exploratory factor analysis demonstrate that in studies characterized by low sample sizes the population factor structure can be adequately recovered if communalities are high, model error ...

Preacher, K. J.; MacCallum, R. C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The ALFALFA "Almost Darks" Campaign: Pilot VLA HI Observations of Five High Mass-to-Light Ratio Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present VLA HI spectral line imaging of 5 sources discovered by ALFALFA. These targets are drawn from a larger sample of systems that were not uniquely identified with optical counterparts during ALFALFA processing, and as such have unusually high HI mass to light ratios. These candidate "Almost Dark" objects fall into 4 categories: 1) objects with nearby HI neighbors that are likely of tidal origin; 2) objects that appear to be part of a system of multiple HI sources, but which may not be tidal in origin; 3) objects isolated from nearby ALFALFA HI detections, but located near a gas-poor early-type galaxy; 4) apparently isolated sources, with no object of coincident redshift within ~400 kpc. Roughly 75% of the 200 objects without identified counterparts in the $\\alpha$.40 database (Haynes et al. 2011) fall into category 1. This pilot sample contains the first five sources observed as part of a larger effort to characterize HI sources with no readily identifiable optical counterpart at single dish resolutio...

Cannon, John M; Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Janowiecki, Steven; Jones, Michael; Jzsa, Gyula I G; Koopmann, Rebecca A; Nichols, Nathan; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Rhode, Katherine L; Salzer, John J; Troischt, Parker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

On the filling factor of emitting material in the upper atmosphere of Epsilon Eri (K2 V)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emission measure distribution in the upper transition region and corona of Epsilon Eri is derived from observed emission line fluxes. Theoretical emission measure distributions are calculated assuming that the radiation losses are balanced by the net conductive flux. We discuss how the area factor of the emitting regions as a function of temperature can be derived from a comparison between these emission measure distributions. It is found that the filling factor varies from ~0.2 in the mid transition region to ~1.0 in the inner corona. The sensitivity of these results to the adopted ion fractions, the iron abundance and other parameters is discussed. The area factors found are qualitatively similar to the observed structure of the solar atmosphere, and can be used to constrain two-component models of the chromosphere. Given further observations, the method could be applied to investigate the trends in filling factors with indicators of stellar activity.

S. A. Sim; C. Jordan

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

147

Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

map by AVNIR-2 20m spatial resolution 1 , Bare surface 2 Water 3 Urban 4 Paddy 5 Crop 6 Atmospheric Remote Sensing External Ground Truth (Country Reports/News Services) Ag Industry Trade Industry water stress index (2010/07) · Low NDVI Land Environment Information observed by MODIS, etc. 2010

148

Direct Observation of Born-Oppenheimer Approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Observation of Born-Oppenheimer Approximation Breakdown in Carbon Nanotubes Adam W of the theoretically predicted breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes. The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) or adiabatic approximation is widely used to simplify the very complex

Cronin, Steve

149

8) Stratospheric equatorial variability a) Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speed. Phase lines inclined eastward when altitude increases indicating upward propation Signal field) Westward phase propagation but eastward group propagation Phase lines inclined westward Signal;5 Satellites wind observations (UARS, Swinbak et Ortland 1997) The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (low stratosphere

Lott, Francois

150

Energy flow observables in hadronic collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present recent QCD calculations of energy flow distributions associated with the production of jets at wide rapidity separations in high-energy hadron collisions, and discuss the role of these observables to analyze contributions from parton showering and from multiple parton collisions.

F. Hautmann

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

151

observation at CDF Dmitry Litvintsev (Fermilab CD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

b observation at CDF Dmitry Litvintsev (Fermilab CD) for CDF June 15, 2007 Special seminar #12 and plans q Conclusion June 15, 2007 Dmitry Litvintsev, Fermilab, CDF 2 #12;Introduction Happy to show, Fermilab, CDF 3 #12;Source of data: CDF II 3 ¡ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ total 2 ¢ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ on tape Analysis uses data

Quigg, Chris

152

Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier Dept. Computer Science University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia Canada, V6T 1W5 cebly@cs.ubc.ca Nir Friedman ¡£¢ Computer Research in belief revision has been dominated by work that lies firmly within the classic AGM paradigm

Halpern, Joseph Y.

153

INVENTORY MANAGEMENT WITH PARTIALLY OBSERVED NONSTATIONARY DEMAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY MANAGEMENT WITH PARTIALLY OBSERVED NONSTATIONARY DEMAND ERHAN BAYRAKTAR AND MICHAEL LUDKOVSKI Abstract. We consider a continuous-time model for inventory management with Markov mod- ulated non inventory level. We then solve this equivalent formulation and directly characterize an optimal inventory

Ludkovski, Mike

154

AN INTEGRATED GLOBAL OBSERVING SYSTEM FOR SEA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) transition of the research results into sustained operations; and 3) management ap- plications in the U, and effective data integration and dissemination. Efficient management of sustained observing sys- tem, and the management and strategic planning applications at CPO. The final discussion contains some concluding remarks

155

Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that energetic electron fluxes peak at sites of compressed density within islands, which imposes a new constraintLETTERS Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands L.-J. CHEN1 *, A. BHATTACHARJEE1, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA 2 National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2

Loss, Daniel

156

INTEGRAL observations of Her X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We investigate the X-ray spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray pulsar Her X-1 observed with the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005. Methods: The data analyzed in this work cover a substantial part of one main-on state of the source. The short-time scale pulse period development is measured. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy ranges and time intervals are constructed. Pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved broad band X-ray spectra are studied. Spectral changes during X-ray dips are explored. Results: The X-ray pulse profiles are found to change significantly during the period of observations. For the first time a strong spinup is measured within one 35 d cycle. Spectral characteristics observed during the X-ray dips are consistent with their interpretaion as due to partial covering as has been reported by several authors. The fundamental cyclotron absorption line is firmly observed in both pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved X-ray spectra. The energy, width, and the depth of the line are found to vary significantly with pulse phase.

D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; K. Postnov; N. Shakura; A. Santangelo; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

ISO observations of four active galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ISO PHOT-S spectra of four galaxies known or suspected to host a central AGN, selected from the initial Iras/Rosat sample of Boller et al. (1992). Two of them had no obvious Seyfert features in their previous optical spectra: IRAS 14201+2956, and IRAS 21582+1018. The latter was bright enough to also allow SWS observations around selected neon lines, to establish its excitation. While both PHOT-S spectra are characteristic of starburst-dominated galaxies, the neon line ratios in IRAS 21582+1018 indicate the presence of a hard excitation source. New, high-resolution, optical spectra show only a weak, broad component around Halpha, classifying now these two objects as Sey 1.9 galaxies. The two other galaxies observed are the NLS1 galaxies Mrk 359 and Mrk 1388. Their ISO spectra however do not reveal the typical, strong PAH features found in the starburst galaxies and are more like those of standard Seyferts. These results show therefore that, although IR observations were expected to be able to always reveal the presence of an active nucleus by piercing through the central obscuration, the result may be ambiguous: the broad band IR energy distribution can still be dominated by starburts located in a circumnuclear region, and the AGN appear only in specific observations (high-excitation lines in the IR, or optical spectra with better quality than classification spectra). The obscuration needs however to be patchy rather than complete, to explain the detection of the high-excitation lines or broad Balmer wings. Only high-energy observations can then establish the strength of the central AGN and the amount of extinction with certainty.

Michel Dennefeld; Thomas Boller; Dimitra Rigopoulou; Henrik Spoon

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

Flavor decomposition of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors at low $Q^2$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spatial distribution of charge and magnetization within the proton is encoded in the elastic form factors. These have been precisely measured in elastic electron scattering, and the combination of proton and neutron form factors allows for the separation of the up- and down-quark contributions. In this work, we extract the proton and neutron form factors from world's data with an emphasis on precise new data covering the low-momentum region, which is sensitive to the large-scale structure of the nucleon. From these, we separate the up- and down-quark contributions to the proton form factors. We combine cross section and polarization measurements of elastic electron-proton scattering to separate the proton form factors and two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions. We combine the proton form factors with parameterization of the neutron form factor data and uncertainties to separate the up- and down-quark contributions to the proton's charge and magnetic form factors. The extracted TPE corrections are compared to previous phenomenological extractions, TPE calculations, and direct measurements from the comparison of electron and positron scattering. The flavor-separated form factors are extracted and compared to models of the nucleon structure. With the inclusion of the precise new data, the extracted TPE contributions show a clear change ofsign at low $Q^2$, necessary to explain the high-$Q^2$ form factor discrepancy while being consistent with the known $Q^2 \\to 0$ limit. We find that the new Mainz data yield a significantly different result for the proton magnetic form factor and its flavor-separated contributions. We also observe that the RMS radius of both the up- and down-quark distributions are smaller than the RMS charge radius of the proton.

I. A. Qattan; J. Arrington; A. Alsaad

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

159

Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Phenomenology of the Deuteron Electromagnetic Form Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A rigorous extraction of the deuteron charge form factors from tensor polarization data in elastic electron-deuteron scattering, at given values of the 4-momentum transfer, is presented. Then the world data for elastic electron-deuteron scattering is used to parameterize, in three different ways, the three electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron in the 4-momentum transfer range 0-7 fm^-1. This procedure is made possible with the advent of recent polarization measurements. The parameterizations allow a phenomenological characterization of the deuteron electromagnetic structure. They can be used to remove ambiguities in the form factors extraction from future polarization data.

TheJLAB t20 collaboration; D. Abbott

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mutation of Surface Residues to Promote Crystallization of Activated Factor XI as a Complex with Benzamidine: an Essential Step for the Iterative Structure-Based Design of Factor XI Inhibitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activated factor XI (FXIa) is a key enzyme in the amplification phase of the blood-coagulation cascade. Thus, a selective FXIa inhibitor may have lesser bleeding liabilities and provide a safe alternative for antithrombosis therapy to available drugs on the market. In a previous report, the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of FXIa (rhFXI370-607) in complex with various ecotin mutants have been described [Jin et al. (2005), Journal of Biological Chemistry 280, 4704-4712]. However, ecotin forms a matrix-like interaction with rhFXI370-607 and is impossible to displace with small-molecule inhibitors; ecotin crystals are therefore not suitable for iterative structure-based ligand design. In addition, rhFXI370-607 did not crystallize in the presence of small-molecule ligands. In order to obtain the crystal structure of rhFXI370-607 with a weak small-molecule ligand, namely benzamidine, several rounds of surface-residue mutation were implemented to promote crystal formation of rhFXI370-607. A quadruple mutant of rhFXI370-607 (rhFXI370-607-S434A, T475A, C482S, K437A) readily crystallized in the presence of benzamidine. The benzamidine in the preformed crystals was easily exchanged with other FXIa small-molecule inhibitors. These crystals have facilitated the structure-based design of small-molecule FXIa inhibitors.

Jin,L.; Pandey, P.; Babine, R.; Weaver, D.; Abdel-Meguid, S.; Stricker, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and local information needs and decisions related to water-quality management and policy (httpThe Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well Vulnerability to Contamination: Understanding Observed Water Quality and Anticipating Future Water Quality National Water-Quality

163

Factors favorable to public participation success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Categories of factors linked to successful public participation (PP) program outcomes include PP process, organizational context, sociopolitical context, strategic considerations and unique (special circumstances) factors. We re-order the long list factors according to how essential, important, and unique they are and discuss their significance and interrelationships. It is argued that bureacratic structure and operational modes are basically in conflict with features of successful PP programs (openness, two-way education, communication with nonexpert outsiders). If this is so, then it is not surprising that the factors essential for PP success in bureacracies involve extraordinary management efforts by agencies to bypass, compensate for, or overcome structural constraints. We conclude by speculating about the long-term viability of PP practices in the agency setting as well as the consequences for agencies that attempt the problematic task of introducing PP into their complex, mission-oriented organizations.

Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Munro, J.; Carnes, S.; Wolfe, A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Decision making process and factors routing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research studies the decision-making process and the factors that affect truck routing. The data collection involved intercept interviews with truck drivers at three rest area and truck stops along major highways in ...

Sun, Yichen, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Repairing Tom Swift's electric factor analysis machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper use of exploratory factor analysis (EFA) requires the researcher to make a series of careful decisions. Despite attempts by Floyd and Widaman (1995), Fabrigar, Wegener, MacCallum, and Strahan (1999), and others to ...

Preacher, K. J.; MacCallum, R. C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Observations of a Correlated Gamma-Ray and Optical Flare for BL Lacertae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The latest observations of BL Lacertae with the EGRET instrument on CGRO show that the gamma-ray flux was four times higher than the previous detection. Within the 1997 July 15-22 observation there was a dramatic factor of 2.5 increase in the gamma-ray flux, with a sharp peak of about 8 hours, and apparently preceding a brief optical flare by several hours. The gamma-ray photon spectral index was significantly harder than that for the previous detection.

S. D. Bloom

1997-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

168

First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ??? production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ??? events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3?. The best fit to oscillation yields |?m?2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 ??) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) 0.01(syst.). The MINOS ?? and ??? measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

Adamson, P [Fermilab; Andreopoulos, C [Rutherford; Auty, D J [Sussex U.; Ayres, D S [Argonne; Backhouse, C [Oxford U.; Barr, G [Oxford U.; Bishai, M [Brookhaven; Blake, A [Cambridge U.; Bock, G J [Fermilab; Boehnlein, D J [/Fermilab; Bogert, D [Fermilab; Harvard U., Phys. Dept.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

169

Observation of single top at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observation of electroweak single top quark production using 3.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment. Candidate events are selected for further classification by five parallel analysis techniques: one using a likelihood discriminant, one using a matrix-element discriminant, one using decision trees, one using a neural network, and one using a complementary dataset. The results of these analyses are combined in order to improve the expected sensitivity. The significance of the observed data is 5.0 standard deviations, and the expected sensitivity is in excess of 5.9 standard deviations. We also present the most current value of the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|.

Casal, Bruno; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Observational constraints on braneworld chaotic inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine observational constraints on chaotic inflation models in the Randall-Sundrum Type II braneworld. If inflation takes place in the high-energy regime, the perturbations produced by the quadratic potential are further from scale-invariance than in the standard cosmology, in the quartic case more or less unchanged, while for potentials of greater exponent the trend is reversed. We test these predictions against a data compilation including the WMAP measurements of microwave anisotropies and the 2dF galaxy power spectrum. While in the standard cosmology the quartic potential is at the border of what the data allow and all higher powers excluded, we find that in the high-energy regime of braneworld inflation even the quadratic case is under strong observational pressure. We also investigate the intermediate regime where the brane tension is comparable to the inflationary energy scale, where the deviations from scale-invariance prove to be greater.

Andrew R Liddle; Anthony J Smith

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electron Cloud observation in the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operation of LHC with bunch trains at different spacings has revealed the formation of an electron cloud inside the machine. The main observations of electron cloud build up are the pressure rise measured at the vacuum gauges in the warm regions, as well as the increase of the beam screen temperature in the cold regions due to an additional heat load. The effects of the electron cloud were also visible as instability and emittance growth affecting the last bunches of longer trains, which could be improved running with higher chromaticity or larger transverse emittances. A summary of the 2010 and 2011 observations and measurements and a comparison with models will be presented. The efficiency of scrubbing to improve the machine running performance will be briefly discussed.

Rumolo, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Baudrenghien, P; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P; Claudet, S; De Maria, R; Esteban-Muller, J; Favier, M; Hansen, C; Hfle, W; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lanza, G; Li, K S B; Maury Cuna, G H I; Mtral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E N; Steinhagen, R J; Tavian, L J; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zimmermann, F; Iriso, U; Dominguez, O; Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Zannini, C; Bhat, C M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Observable Proxies For 26 Al Enhancement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the cospatial production of elements in supernova explosions to find observationally detectable proxies for enhancement of {sup 26}Al in supernova ejecta and stellar systems. Using four progenitors we explore a range of 1D explosions at different energies and an asymmetric 3D explosion. We find that the most reliable indicator of the presence of {sup 26}Al in unmixed ejecta is a very low S/Si ratio ({approx} 0.05). Production of N in O/S/Si-rich regions is also indicative. The biologically important element P is produced at its highest abundance in the same regions. Proxies should be detectable in supernova ejecta with high spatial resolution multi wavelength observations, but the small absolute abundance of material injected into a proto-planetary disk makes detection unlikely in existing or forming stellar/planetary systems.

Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Patrick A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ellinger, Carola I [ASU; Arnett, William D [UNIV ARIZONA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Constraining the Braneworld with Gravitational Wave Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, l, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining l via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain l at the {approx}1 {mu}m level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of l{<=}5 {mu}m.

McWilliams, Sean T. [Gravitational Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt Maryland 20771 (United States)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

174

Observation of Single Top Quark Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report first observation of the electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 2.3 fb{sup ?1} of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon and missing transverse energy, together with jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10{sup ?7}, corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance for the observation.

Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan State U. /Northeastern U.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Direct observation of time reversal violation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

Bernabeu, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Valencia, and IFIC, Joint Centre Univ. Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

Extreme commutative quantum observables are sharp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that, in the description of quantum observables, positive operator valued measures (POVMs) generalize projection valued measures (PVMs) and they also turn out be more optimal in many tasks. We show that a commutative POVM is an extreme point in the convex set of all POVMs if and only if it is a PVM. This results implies that non-commutativity is a necessary ingredient to overcome the limitations of PVMs.

Teiko Heinosaari; Juha-Pekka Pellonp

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Pion form factor with chirally improved fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results for Monte Carlo calculations of the electromagnetic vector and scalar form factors of the pion in a quenched simulation. We work at a lattice spacing of 0.15 fm and use two lattice volumes up to a spatial size of 2.4 fm. The pion form factors in the space-like region are determined for pion masses down to 340 MeV.

Stefano Capitani; Christof Gattringer; C. B. Lang

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hilbert-space factorization is a limited and expensive information-processing resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By taking the need for quantum reference frames into account, it is shown that Hilbert-space factorization is a dissipative process requiring on the order of kT to reduce by one bit an observer's uncertainty in the provenance of a classically-recorded observational outcome. This cost is neglected in standard treatments of decoherence that assume that observational outcomes are obtained by interacting with a collection of degrees of freedom identified a priori. Treating this cost explicitly leads to a natural measure of the probability of any particular quantum reference frame.

Chris Fields

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hilbert-space factorization is a limited and expensive information-processing resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By taking the need for quantum reference frames into account, it is shown that Hilbert-space factorization is a dissipative process requiring on the order of kT to reduce by one bit an observer's uncertainty in the provenance of a classically-recorded observational outcome. This cost is neglected in standard treatments of decoherence that assume that observational outcomes are obtained by interacting with a collection of degrees of freedom identified a priori. Treating this cost explicitly leads to a natural measure of the probability of any particular quantum reference frame.

Fields, Chris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

WTERT-India Observations from India's Crisis Ranjith Annepu Observations from India's Crisis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the city could not find a new landfill site. Author Ranjith Annepu, WTERT India Date February 04, 2013WTERT- India Observations from India's Crisis Ranjith Annepu Observations from India's Crisis Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) India, 89-B, NEERI Mumbai Zonal Lab, Worli

182

Apparatus for observing a hostile environment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is provided for observing a hostile environment, comprising a housing and a camera capable of insertion within the housing. The housing is a double wall assembly with an inner and outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. A housing for an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided, comprising a transparent, double wall assembly. The double wall assembly has an inner wall and an outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The double wall assembly has an opening and a void area in communication with the opening. The void area of the housing is adapted to accommodate the optical system within said void area. An apparatus for protecting an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided comprising a housing; a tube positioned within the housing; and a base for supporting the housing and the tube. The housing comprises a double wall assembly having an inner wall and an outerwall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The tube is adapted to house the optical system therein.

Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Boylston, Micah L. (Williston, SC); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Sexton, William C. (Aiken, SC); Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Spatial Corrections of ROSAT HRI Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) often have spatial smearing on the order of 10 arcsec (Morse 1994). This degradation of the intrinsic resolution of the instrument (5 arcsec) can be attributed to errors in the aspect solution associated with the wobble of the space craft or with the reacquisition of the guide stars. We have developed a set of IRAF/PROS and MIDAS/EXSAS routines to minimize these effects. Our procedure attempts to isolate aspect errors that are repeated through each cycle of the wobble. The method assigns a 'wobble phase' to each event based on the 402 second period of the ROSAT wobble. The observation is grouped into a number of phase bins and a centroid is calculated for each sub-image. The corrected HRI event list is reconstructed by adding the sub-images which have been shifted to a common source position. This method has shown approx. 30% reduction of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of an X-ray observation of the radio galaxy 3C 120. Additional examples are presented.

D. E. Harris; J. D. Silverman; G. Hasinger; I. Lehmann

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

X-ray Observations of Mrk 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

T. J. Turner

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Unsuitability of the moving light clock system for the Lorentz factor derivation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The moving light clock system was analyzed with respect to the orientation of the wavefront of the light pulse observed in the moving and stationary frames of reference. The plane wavefront of the light pulse was oriented horizontally in both the frames. The wavefront observed in the stationary frame was not perpendicular to the direction of the light pulse propagation. This showed different characteristics of the light pulse than that assumed in the Lorentz factor derivation. According to the horizontal orientation of the wavefront, velocity c was determined as the vertical component of the light pulse motion observed in the stationary frame. Application of this velocity distribution in the Lorentz factor derivation showed the same travel time for the light pulse observed in the moving and stationary frames of reference. The moving light clock system was therefore found to be unsuitable for the Lorentz factor derivation and illustration of time dilation, and shown to illustrate the relativity of the observation of light rather than the relativity of time.

Tomasz T. Wa?ek

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Magnetic changes observed in a solar flare  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of a fairly large impulsive flare (1B/M4, starting 17:22 UT, 1980 April 10). Observations of the microwave/hard X-ray burst show the time development of the impulsive energy release. Chromospheric (H..cap alpha..) and photospheric (Fe I lambda5324) filtergrams and photospheric (Fe I lambda8688) magnetograms, intensitygrams, and velocitygrams show magnetic strucutre, flare emission, mass motion, and magnetic changes. From these observations, we conclude: 1. The flare was triggered by a small emerging magnetic bipole. 2. The peak impulsive energy release occurred in the explosive eruption of a filament from over the magnetic inversion line. Hence: a) The filament eruption was the magnetic transient in the heart of the primary energy release in the chromosphere and corona. b) The primary energy release did not occur in approximately stationary magnetic loops, but on field lines undergoing violet motion and drastic changes in direction. 3. In the photospheric magnetograph lines. Fe I lambda5324 and Fe I lambda8688, the impulsive peak of the flare produced emission in a unipolar area of a sunspot. In synchrony with the emission, the polarity of this area transiently reversed in the lambda8688 magnetigrams; apparently, this was an artifact of the line emission. 4. Within a few minutes after the explosive filament eruption. a) A permanent decrease in magnetic flux accompanied the truncation of an umbra. b) A permanent increase in magnetic flux accompanied the severance of the penumbral bridge to a satellite sunspot. Apparently, thee genuine photospheric magnetic changes were consequences of strong flare-wrought magnetic changes in the chromospher and corona.

Moore, R.L.; Hurford, G.J.; Jones, H.P.; Kane, S.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Pair-Production Supernovae: Theory and Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the physical properties of pair-production supernovae (PPSNe) as well as the prospects for them to be constrained observationally. In very massive (140-260 solar mass) stars, much of the pressure support comes from the radiation field, meaning that they are loosely bound, with an adiabatic coefficient that is close to the minimum stable value. Near the end of C/O burning, the central temperature increases to the point that photons begin to be converted into electron-positron pairs, softening gamma below this critical value. The result is a runaway collapse, followed by explosive burning that completely obliterates the star. While these explosions can be up to 100 times more energetic that core collapse and Type Ia supernovae, their peak luminosities are only slightly greater. However, due both to copious Ni-56 production and hydrogen recombination, they are brighter much longer, and remain observable for ~ 1 year. Since metal enrichment is a local process, PPSNe should occur in pockets of metal-free gas over a broad range of redshifts, greatly enhancing their detectability, and distributing their nucleosyntehtic products about the Milky Way. This means that measurements of the abundances of metal-free stars should be thought of as directly constraining these objects. It also means that ongoing supernova searches, already provide weak constraints for PPSN models. A survey with the NIRCam instrument on JWST, on the other hand, would be able to extend these limits to z ~ 10. Observing a 0.3 deg^2 patch of sky for one week per year for three consecutive years, such a program would either detect or rule out the existence of these remarkable objects.

Evan Scannapieco

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Direct Observation of Paramagnons in Palladium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report an inelastic neutron scattering study of the spin fluctuations in the nearly ferromagnetic element palladium. Dispersive over-damped collective magnetic excitations or 'paramagnons' are observed up to 128 meV. We analyze our results in terms of a Moriya-Lonzarich-type spin-fluctuation model and estimate the contribution of the spin fluctuations to the low-temperature heat capacity. In spite of the paramagnon excitations being relatively strong, their relaxation rates are large. This leads to a small contribution to the low-temperature electronic specific heat.

Doubble, R. [University of Bristol, UK; Hayden, S M. [University of Bristol, UK; Dai, Pengcheng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Frost, C. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Quantum discord between relatively accelerated observers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the quantum discord between two free modes of a scalar field which start in a maximally entangled state and then undergo a relative, constant acceleration. In a regime where there is no distillable entanglement due to the Unruh effect, we show that there is a finite amount of quantum discord, which is a measure of purely quantum correlations in a state, over and above quantum entanglement. Even in the limit of infinite acceleration of the observer detecting one of the modes, we provide evidence for a non-zero amount of purely quantum correlations, which might be exploited to gain non-trivial quantum advantages.

Animesh Datta

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus?the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

Michael Lemonick

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

191

Observing AAPI Heritage Month | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National1 -OSSGas andFleetWeatherizationObserving

192

Observations and simulations improve space weather models  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofof

193

Category:Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd aMinutesMap Files JumpObservation

194

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirm UsesNuclearFirst Observation of

195

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirm UsesNuclearFirst Observation ofFirst

196

Observations and simulations improve space weather models  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access toSpeedingScientificASecurityObservation of

197

Measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors: Accuracy and comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The journal Medical Physics recently published two papers that determine beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, for large sets of ion chambers. In the first paper [McEwen Med. Phys. 37, 2179-2193 (2010)], k{sub Q} was determined experimentally, while the second paper [Muir and Rogers Med. Phys. 37, 5939-5950 (2010)] provides k{sub Q} factors calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. This work investigates a variety of additional consistency checks to verify the accuracy of the k{sub Q} factors determined in each publication and a comparison of the two data sets. Uncertainty introduced in calculated k{sub Q} factors by possible variation of W/e with beam energy is investigated further. Methods: The validity of the experimental set of k{sub Q} factors relies on the accuracy of the NE2571 reference chamber measurements to which k{sub Q} factors for all other ion chambers are correlated. The stability of NE2571 absorbed dose to water calibration coefficients is determined and comparison to other experimental k{sub Q} factors is analyzed. Reliability of Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors is assessed through comparison to other publications that provide Monte Carlo calculations of k{sub Q} as well as an analysis of the sleeve effect, the effect of cavity length and self-consistencies between graphite-walled Farmer-chambers. Comparison between the two data sets is given in terms of the percent difference between the k{sub Q} factors presented in both publications. Results: Monitoring of the absorbed dose calibration coefficients for the NE2571 chambers over a period of more than 15 yrs exhibit consistency at a level better than 0.1%. Agreement of the NE2571 k{sub Q} factors with a quadratic fit to all other experimental data from standards labs for the same chamber is observed within 0.3%. Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are in good agreement with most other Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Expected results are observed for the sleeve effect and the effect of cavity length on k{sub Q}. The mean percent differences between experimental and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are -0.08, -0.07, and -0.23% for the Elekta 6, 10, and 25 MV nominal beam energies, respectively. An upper limit on the variation of W/e in photon beams from cobalt-60 to 25 MV is determined as 0.4% with 95% confidence. The combined uncertainty on Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors is reassessed and amounts to between 0.40 and 0.49% depending on the wall material of the chamber. Conclusions: Excellent agreement (mean percent difference of only 0.13% for the entire data set) between experimental and calculated k{sub Q} factors is observed. For some chambers, k{sub Q} is measured for only one chamber of each type--the level of agreement observed in this study would suggest that for those chambers the measured k{sub Q} values are generally representative of the chamber type.

Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI), Ottawa Carleton Institute for Physics, Carleton University Campus, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI), Ottawa Carleton Institute for Physics, Carleton University Campus, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Grenoble Observ. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U.; /more authors..

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

X-Ray Observations of Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the ways that X-ray observations provide unique information on radio galaxies. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission provides detailed data on ambient densities and temperatures. These parameters in turn can be used for pressure balance calculations and can demonstrate how the ambient gas affects radio source structure. Additionally, many signatures of the interaction of radio jets and lobes with the hot gas are found in high resolution X-ray maps. Non-thermal X-ray emission from knots and hotspots of radio jets can give us constraints on the relativistic electron population for energies greater that that normally sampled in the radio (in the case of synchrotron emission) or can give us an independent estimate of the average magnetic field strength (if inverse Compton emission is the origin of the X-rays). From recent ROSAT HRI observations of 3C 390.3 and 3C 120, we show evidence that X-ray emission from knots and hotspots appears to be associated with regions of large gradients in the radio surface brightness; i.e. at the location of powerful shocks.

D. E. Harris

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Photometric defocus observations of transiting extrasolar planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out photometric follow-up observations of bright transiting extrasolar planets using the CbNUOJ 0.6m telescope. We have tested the possibility of obtaining high photometric precision by applying the telescope defocus technique allowing the use of several hundred seconds in exposure time for a single measurement. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of obtaining a root-mean-square scatter of order sub-millimagnitude over several hours for a V $\\sim$ 10 host star typical for transiting planets detected from ground-based survey facilities. We compare our results with transit observations with the telescope operated in in-focus mode. High photometric precision is obtained due to the collection of a larger amount of photons resulting in a higher signal compared to other random and systematic noise sources. Accurate telescope tracking is likely to further contribute to lowering systematic noise by probing the same pixels on the CCD. Furthermore, a longer exposure time helps reducing the eff...

Hinse, Tobias C; Yoon, Jo-Na; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Yong-Gi; Kim, Chun-Hwey

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

VERITAS Observations of the Galactic Center Ridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to its extraordinarily high concentration of known relativistic particle accelerators such as pulsar wind nebula, supernova remnants, dense molecular cloud regions, and the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*); the center of the Milky Way galaxy has long been an ideal target for high energy (HE, 0.1-100 GeV) and very high energy ( VHE, 50 GeV-50 TeV) gamma-ray emission. Indeed, detections of Sgr A* and other nearby regions of gamma-ray emission have been reported by EGRET and Fermi-LAT in the HE band, as well as CANGAROO, Whipple, HESS, VERITAS, and MAGIC in the VHE band. Here we report on the results of extended observations of the region with VERITAS between 2010-2014. Due to the visibility of the source for VERITAS in the Northern Hemisphere, these observations provide the most sensitive probe of gamma-ray emission above 2 TeV in one of the most complicated and interesting regions of our home galaxy.

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

METHYL CYANIDE OBSERVATIONS TOWARD MASSIVE PROTOSTARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a survey in the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition toward a sample of massive proto-stellar candidates. The observations were carried out with the 10 m Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, AZ. We detected this molecular line in 9 out of 21 observed sources. In six cases this is the first detection of this transition. We also obtained full beam sampled cross-scans for five sources which show that the lower K-components can be extended on the arcminute angular scale. The higher K-components, however, are always found to be compact with respect to our 36'' beam. A Boltzmann population diagram analysis of the central spectra indicates CH{sub 3}CN column densities of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, and rotational temperatures above 50 K, which confirms these sources as hot molecular cores. Independent fits to line velocity and width for the individual K-components resulted in the detection of an increasing blueshift with increasing line excitation for four sources. Comparison with mid-infrared (mid-IR) images from the SPITZER GLIMPSE/IRAC archive for six sources show that the CH{sub 3}CN emission is generally coincident with a bright mid-IR source. Our data clearly show that the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition is a good probe of the hot molecular gas near massive protostars, and provide the basis for future interferometric studies.

Rosero, V.; Hofner, P. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kurtz, S. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Bieging, J. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Araya, E. D. [Physics Department, Western Illinois University, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL 61455 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Form Factors of the Nucleons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has been greatly improved by performing double-polarization experiments, in comparison with with pre-vious unpolarized cross section data. Here we will review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton and the neutron, obtained at MIT-Bates, JLab and MAMI. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high- precision experiments will be discussed. In particular, the possibility that the proton is non-spherical in its ground state, and that the transverse charge density are model in- dependently defined in the infinite momentum frame. Likewise, flavor decomposition of the nucleon form factors into dressed u and d quark form factors, may give information about the quark-diquark structure of the nucleon. The current proton radius "crisis" will also be discussed.

Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College, JLAB

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Accelerated Gibbs Sampling for Infinite Sparse Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indian Buffet Process (IBP) gives a probabilistic model of sparse binary matrices with an unbounded number of columns. This construct can be used, for example, to model a fixed numer of observed data points (rows) associated with an unknown number of latent features (columns). Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are often used for IBP inference, and in this technical note, we provide a detailed review of the derivations of collapsed and accelerated Gibbs samplers for the linear-Gaussian infinite latent feature model. We also discuss and explain update equations for hyperparameter resampling in a 'full Bayesian' treatment and present a novel slice sampler capable of extending the accelerated Gibbs sampler to the case of infinite sparse factor analysis by allowing the use of real-valued latent features.

Andrzejewski, D M

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Solar Wind Charge-Exchange Production Factor for Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production factor, or broad band averaged cross-section, for solar wind charge-exchange with hydrogen producing emission in the ROSAT 1/4 keV (R12) band is $3.8\\pm0.2\\times10^{-20}$ count degree$^{-2}$ cm$^4$. This value is derived from a comparison of the Long-Term (background) Enhancements in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with magnetohysdrodynamic simulations of the magnetosheath. This value is 1.8 to 4.5 times higher than values derived from limited atomic data, suggesting that those values may be missing a large number of faint lines. This production factor is important for deriving the exact amount of 1/4 keV band flux that is due to the Local Hot Bubble, for planning future observations in the 1/4 keV band, and for evaluating proposals for remote sensing of the magnetosheath. The same method cannot be applied to the 3/4 keV band as that band, being composed primarily of the oxygen lines, is far more sensitive to the detailed abundances and ionization balance in the solar wind. We also show, incidentally,...

Kuntz, K D; Collier, M R; Connor, H K; Cravens, T E; Koutroumpa, D; Porter, F S; Robertson, I P; Sibeck, D G; Snowden, S L; Thomas, N E; Wash, B M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Observables in Neutrino Mass Spectroscopy Using Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of collective de-excitation of atoms in a metastable level into emission mode of a single photon plus a neutrino pair, called radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP), is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, to the neutrino mass hierarchy and to the nature (Dirac or Majorana) of massive neutrinos. We investigate how the indicated neutrino mass and mixing observables can be determined from the measurement of the corresponding continuous photon spectrum taking the example of a transition between specific levels of the Yb atom. The possibility of determining the nature of massive neutrinos and, if neutrinos are Majorana fermions, of obtaining information about the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, is analyzed in the cases of normal hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and quasi-degenerate types of neutrino mass spectrum. We find, in particular, that the sensitivity to the nature of massive neutrinos depends critically on the atomic level energy difference relevant in the RENP.

D. N. Dinh; S. T. Petcov; N. Sasao; M. Tanaka; M. Yoshimura

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

209

Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

Novosyadlyj, B; Shtanov, Yu; Zhuk, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hnsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions and photochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and known emission factors for black carbon (BC) from South Asia yields 0.7 Tg yr?1 (upper limit of about 1 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325); KEYWORDS: Soot, black carbon, CO, emissions, India Citation of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions

Dickerson, Russell R.

212

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A0620-00 IN QUIESCENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present contemporaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the black hole binary system, A0620-00, acquired in 2010 March. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained the first FUV spectrum of A0620-00 as well as NUV observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The observed spectrum is flat in the FUV and very faint (with continuum fluxes {approx_equal} 1e - 17 erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}). The UV spectra also show strong, broad (FWHM {approx} 2000 km s{sup -1}) emission lines of Si IV, C IV, He II, Fe II, and Mg II. The C IV doublet is anomalously weak compared to the other lines, which is consistent with the low carbon abundance seen in NIR spectra of the source. Comparison of these observations with previous NUV spectra of A0620-00 shows that the UV flux has varied by factors of 2-8 over several years. We compiled the dereddened, broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of A0620-00 and compared it to previous SEDs as well as theoretical models. The SEDs show that the source varies at all wavelengths for which we have multiple samples. Contrary to previous observations, the optical-UV spectrum does not continue to drop to shorter wavelengths, but instead shows a recovery and an increasingly blue spectrum in the FUV. We created an optical-UV spectrum of A0620-00 with the donor star contribution removed. The non-stellar spectrum peaks at {approx_equal}3000 A. The peak can be fit with a T = 10,000 K blackbody with a small emitting area, probably originating in the hot spot where the accretion stream impacts the outer disk. However, one or more components in addition to the blackbody are needed to fit the FUV upturn and the red optical fluxes in the optical-UV spectrum. By comparing the mass accretion rate determined from the hot spot luminosity to the mean accretion rate inferred from the outburst history, we find that the latter is an order of magnitude smaller than the former, indicating that {approx}90% of the accreted mass must be lost from the system if the predictions of the disk instability model and the estimated interoutburst interval are correct. The mass accretion rate at the hot spot is 10{sup 5} the accretion rate at the black hole inferred from the X-ray luminosity. To reconcile these requires that outflows carry away virtually all of the accreted mass, a very low rate of mass transfer from the outer cold disk into the inner hot region, and/or radiatively inefficient accretion. We compared our broadband SED to two models of A0620-00 in quiescence: the advection-dominated accretion flow model and the maximally jet-dominated model. The comparison suggests that strong outflows may be present in the system, indicated by the discrepancies in accretion rates and the FUV upturn in flux in the SED.

Froning, Cynthia S.; France, Kevin; Khargharia, Juthika [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 593 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States); and others

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Quantitative Finance To apear Efficient Factor GARCH Models and Factor-DCC Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative Finance To apear Efficient Factor GARCH Models and Factor-DCC Models Kun Zhang KZHANG of Hong Kong Hong Kong Abstract We reveal that in the estimation of univariate GARCH or multivariate generalized or- thogonal GARCH (GO-GARCH) models, maximizing the likelihood is equivalent to making

Jegelka, Stefanie

214

2008 Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors Guidelines to Defra's GHG Conversion Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basis 5 Burning oil is also known as kerosene or paraffin used for heating systems. Aviation Turbine biomass heating systems. The emission factors are based on the factor provided in SAP2005, Table 12. Page - Imports and Exports Last updated: Jun-05 Total emissions (kg CO2) Total electricity produced Total heat

215

Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: an overviewNetworked Aquatic Microbial Observing Sys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems Ocean Research Goals · Development of autonomous networks of heterogeneous sensors to monitor and sample

Smith, Ryan N.

216

DYNAMIC INTERACTION FACTORS FOR FLOATING PILE GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-numerical formulation for two ideal- ized soil profiles (a homogeneous half-space and a half-space with modulus pro interaction factors for static deformation analysis of pile groups. INTRODUCTION Under static working loads) the sharing among individual piles of the load applied at the pile cap is generally uneven, with the corner

Entekhabi, Dara

217

Factorizations of Operator Matrices Lawrence A. Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factorizations of Operator Matrices Lawrence A. Harris Mathematics Department University matrix as a product of an upper triangular operator matrix and an involutory, unitary or J- unitary L(H, K) and (A - WC)-1 exists; moreover, S = T-1 . Theorem 1 Put R = -(A - W0C) AZ0 + W0D 0 CZ0 + D

Harris, Larry

218

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

219

Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values Mass 1 kg = 1000 g = 0.001 metric ton = 2·R 10.73 psia·ft3 lbmol·R 62.36 liter·torr mol·K 0.7302 ft3·atm lbmol·R Temperature Conversions: T

Ashurst, W. Robert

220

Impact Factors of Energy Intensity in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy intensity reflects energy usage efficiency in the production and consumption process, and leads to carbon dioxide emissions and the energy security of an economy. Liao et al. (2007) analyzed factors contribute to the fluctuation of Chinas energy intensity from 1997 to 2006, and found that efficiency effects and structural effects are the major impacting factors. Therefore, they suggested that China should attach more importance to optimizing its sectoral structure, and lowering its investment ratio in the future. However, economic development and energy intensity are influenced by many factors. In their research, Liao et al. (2007) omitted some important contributing factors to energy intensities, and their suggestions also had some practical limitations. First of all, Liao et al. (2007) did not analyze impacts from energy prices in energy usage efficiency. In the existing literature, Birol and Keppler (2000) applied economics theory and suggested that higher energy prices can induce the improvements in energy usage efficiency, thereby lowering energy intensity. Hang and Tu (2007) studied the influence of energy price on the Chinese economy's energy intensity and their empirical results also showed that higher energy prices can lower energy intensity. Because energy prices have been regulated by the

unknown authors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Traffic culture human factors & traffic safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic culture human factors & traffic safety by Dr.-Ing. Haraldur Sigþórsson and Dr.-Ing. Stefán) Culture, traffic culture and traffic safety culture are interrelated Culture www.hr.is 3 Traffic Culture Traffic safety culture What is culture? · A culture is a collection of behavioral patterns that are found

Karlsson, Brynjar

222

ASSESSING CAUSAL FACTORS IN INDIVIDUAL ROAD ACCIDENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSING CAUSAL FACTORS IN INDIVIDUAL ROAD ACCIDENTS: COLLECTIVE RESPONSIBILITY IN FREEWAY REAR accident report: Happened on I-94 in downtown Minneapolis Happened during the afternoon peak period Vehicle" is a "condition or event" such that "had the condition or event been prevented...the accident would not occur

Minnesota, University of

223

Current advances in using neurotrophic factors to treat neurodegenerative disorders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neurotrophic factors to treat neurodegenerative disorders.neurotrophic factors to treat neurodegenerative disordersCNS diseases are difficult to treat due to the Page 3 of 9

Weissmiller, April M; Wu, Chengbiao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Measured and Modeled Humidification Factors of Fresh Smoke Particles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measured and Modeled Humidification Factors of Fresh Smoke Particles From Biomass Burning: Role of Inorganic Constituents. Measured and Modeled Humidification Factors of Fresh...

225

annihilation factor analysis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

16 Correlated Bayesian Factor Analysis CiteSeer Summary: Factor analysis is a method in multivariate statistical analysis that can help scientists determine which variables to...

226

In Search of a Statistically Valid Volatility Risk Factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cross- section of volatility and expected returns, Theof a Statistically Valid Volatility Risk Factor (revised)of a Statistically Valid Volatility Risk Factor Robert M.

Anderson, Robert M.; Bianchi, Stephen W.; Goldberg, Lisa R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

affecting critical factors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

social responsibility implementation: an emphasis on values 5 Factors affecting wild turkey distribution and numbers Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: FACTORS AFFECTING...

228

Global Hydrometeor Occurrence as Observed by CloudSAT: Initial Observations from Summer 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of global hydrometeor coverage and occurrence frequencies as observed by the cloud radar on CloudSat are summarized using data collected during Summer 2006. CloudSat was launched on 28 April 2006 and began collecting data routinely on 7 June 2006. In this article we document the distribution of cloudiness from the ITCZ to the Polar regions as observed by CloudSat during the first summer of operations. The overall global hydrometeor coverage as observed by CloudSat is found to be 0.506. The vertical distribution of zonally averaged hydrometeor occurrence shows the relationship of clouds with components of the atmospheric general circulation such as the Hadley Cell, the ubiquitous storms over the Southern Ocean, and the subtropical stratocumulus regimes.

Mace, Gerald G.; Marchand, Roger T.; Zhang, Qiuqing; Stephens, Graeme L.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

Scatter factors assessment in microbeam radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The success of the preclinical studies in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) paved the way to the clinical trials under preparation at the Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Within this framework, an accurate determination of the deposited dose is crucial. With that aim, the scatter factors, which translate the absolute dose measured in reference conditions (2 x 2 cm{sup 2} field size at 2 cm-depth in water) to peak doses, were assessed. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed with two different widely used codes, PENELOPE and GEANT4, for the sake of safety. The scatter factors were obtained as the ratio of the doses that are deposited by a microbeam and by a field of reference size, at the reference depth. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained by radiochromic (ISP HD-810) films and a PTW 34070 large area chamber. Results: The scatter factors for different microbeam field sizes assessed by the two MC codes were in agreement and reproduced the experimental data within uncertainty bars. Those correction factors were shown to be non-negligible for the future MRT clinical settings: an average 30% lower dose was deposited by a 50 {mu}m microbeam with respect to the reference conditions. Conclusions: For the first time, the scatter factors in MRT were systematically studied. They constitute an essential key to deposit accurate doses in the forthcoming clinical trials in MRT. The good agreement between the different calculations and the experimental data confirms the reliability of this challenging micrometric dose estimation.

Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sanchez, M. [Laboratoire Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie IMNC-UMR 8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Campus Universitaire, Bat. 440, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Servicio de Radiofisica, Complejo Hospitalario de Santiago de Compostela, Rua Choupana S/N, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Nucleon and $?$ elastic and transition form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute nucleon and Delta elastic and transition form factors, and compare predictions made using a framework built upon a Faddeev equation kernel and interaction vertices that possess QCD-like momentum dependence with results obtained using a vector-vector contact-interaction. The comparison emphasises that experiment is sensitive to the momentum dependence of the running couplings and masses in the strong interaction sector of the Standard Model and highlights that the key to describing hadron properties is a veracious expression of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in the bound-state problem. Amongst the results we describe, the following are of particular interest: $G_E^p(Q^2)/G_M^p(Q^2)$ possesses a zero at $Q^2=9.5GeV^2$; any change in the interaction which shifts a zero in the proton ratio to larger $Q^2$ relocates a zero in $G_E^n(Q^2)/G_M^n(Q^2)$ to smaller $Q^2$; and there is likely a value of momentum transfer above which $G_E^n>G_E^p$. Regarding the $\\Delta(1232)$-baryon, we find that, inter alia: the electric monopole form factor exhibits a zero; the electric quadrupole form factor is negative, large in magnitude, and sensitive to the nature and strength of correlations in the $\\Delta(1232)$ Faddeev amplitude; and the magnetic octupole form factor is negative so long as rest-frame P- and D-wave correlations are included. In connection with the N-to-Delta transition, the momentum-dependence of the magnetic transition form factor, $G_M^\\ast$, matches that of $G_M^n$ once the momentum transfer is high enough to pierce the meson-cloud; and the electric quadrupole ratio is a keen measure of diquark and orbital angular momentum correlations.

Jorge Segovia; Ian C. Cloet; Craig D. Roberts; Sebastian M. Schmidt

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

231

Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase,...

232

Direct observations of thermally induced structural changes in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

observations of thermally induced structural changes in amorphous silicon carbide. Direct observations of thermally induced structural changes in amorphous silicon carbide....

233

Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by...

234

Direct Experimental Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials of Guanine in Free Oligonucleotides by Using Photoelectron Direct Experimental Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials of Guanine...

235

No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene. No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice...

236

Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Abstract: The...

237

X-ray Observations of Galaxies: The Importance of Deep High-Resolution Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray observations of galaxies have grown from a curiosity into a full-fledged field of astronomy. These observations provide unique information on black holes, binary stars, and the hot phase of the ISM, which can be used to constrain the chemical evolution of the Universe, and the joint evolution of galaxies and massive black holes. These exciting results are due in large part to the high-resolution capability of {\\it Chandra}. To follow on {\\it Chandra} and push forward this science past the present capabilities, our community must build a high-resolution (sub-arcsecond) large-area (several square meters) X-ray telescope.

G. Fabbiano

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain.

DiCicco-Bloom, E.; Black, I.B. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Observational tests for ?(t)CDM cosmology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the observational viability of a class of cosmological models in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, resulting in a production of cold dark matter particles at late times. Similarly to the flat ?CDM case, there is only one free parameter to be adjusted by the data in this class of ?(t)CDM scenarios, namely, the matter density parameter. To perform our analysis we use three of the most recent SNe Ia compilation sets (Union2, SDSS and Constitution) along with the current measurements of distance to the BAO peaks at z = 0.2 and z = 0.35 and the position of the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum. We show that in terms of ?{sup 2} statistics both models provide good fits to the data and similar results. A quantitative analysis discussing the differences in parameter estimation due to SNe light-curve fitting methods (SALT2 and MLCS2k2) is studied using the current SDSS and Constitution SNe Ia compilations. A matter power spectrum analysis using the 2dFGRS is also performed, providing a very good concordance with the constraints from the SDSS and Constitution MLCS2k2 data.

Pigozzo, C.; Carneiro, S. [Instituto de Fsica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Dantas, M.A.; Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br, E-mail: aldinez@on.br, E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Observatrio Nacional, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radio Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some aspects of radio continuum polarimetric imaging of high redshift radio galaxies. The correlation between extreme values of Faraday rotation observed toward radio emitting structures in nearby radio galaxies, and X-ray emitting cluster atmospheres, is presented as a method for targeting objects at high redshift for deep X-ray searches. We present an X-ray detection of the extreme rotation measure radio galaxy PKS 1138-262 at z = 2.156, and we argue that the X-ray emission is from a cluster atmosphere with a luminosity of 1.7x10^{44} h^{-2} ergs sec^{-1}. We also present results on the correlation between size and redshift for a sample of ultra-luminous radio galaxies between 0 < z < 4.3. Source sizes decrease systematically with redshift, suggesting either denser environments, or younger sources, at high redshift. An alternative explanation is significant inverse Compton losses off the microwave background at high redshift.

C. L. Carilli; H. J. A. Rottgering; G. K. Miley L. Pentericci; D. E. Harris

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nonperturbative QCD corrections to electroweak observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonperturbative QCD corrections are important to many low-energy electroweak observables, for example the muon magnetic moment. However, hadronic corrections also play a significant role at much higher energies due to their impact on the running of standard model parameters, such as the electromagnetic coupling. Currently, these hadronic contributions are accounted for by a combination of experimental measurements and phenomenological modeling but ideally should be calculated from first principles. Recent developments indicate that many of the most important hadronic corrections may be feasibly calculated using lattice QCD methods. To illustrate this, we will examine the lattice computation of the leading-order QCD corrections to the muon magnetic moment, paying particular attention to a recently developed method but also reviewing the results from other calculations. We will then continue with several examples that demonstrate the potential impact of the new approach: the leading-order corrections to the electron and tau magnetic moments, the running of the electromagnetic coupling, and a class of the next-to-leading-order corrections for the muon magnetic moment. Along the way, we will mention applications to the Adler function, the determination of the strong coupling constant and QCD corrections to muonic-hydrogen.

Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Internetwork chromospheric bright grains observed with IRIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals small-scale rapid brightenings in the form of bright grains all over coronal holes and the quiet sun. These bright grains are seen with the IRIS 1330 \\AA, 1400 \\AA\\ and 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filters. We combine coordinated observations with IRIS and from the ground with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) which allows us to have chromospheric (Ca II 8542 \\AA, Ca II H 3968 \\AA, H\\alpha, and Mg II k 2796 \\AA), and transition region (C II 1334 \\AA, Si IV 1402) spectral imaging, and single-wavelength Stokes maps in Fe I 6302 \\AA at high spatial (0.33"), temporal and spectral resolution. We conclude that the IRIS slit-jaw grains are the counterpart of so-called acoustic grains, i.e., resulting from chromospheric acoustic waves in a non-magnetic environment. We compare slit-jaw images with spectra from the IRIS spectrograph. We conclude that the grain intensity in the 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filter comes from both the Mg II k core and wings. The signal in the C II ...

Martnez-Sykora, Juan; Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart; Pereira, Tiago M D; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Kleint, Lucia; Lemen, James; Tarbell, Ted D; Title, Alan; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Hansteen, Viggo H; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy K; Saar, Steven; Testa, Paola; Tian, Hui; Jaeggli, Sarah; Kankelborg, Charles

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

D-Factor: A Quantitative Model of Application Slow-Down in Multi-Resource Shared Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scheduling multiple jobs onto a platform enhances system utilization by sharing resources. The benefits from higher resource utilization include reduced cost to construct, operate, and maintain a system, which often include energy consumption. Maximizing these benefits comes at a price - resource contention among jobs increases job completion time. In this paper, we analyze slow-downs of jobs due to contention for multiple resources in a system; referred to as dilation factor. We observe that multiple-resource contention creates non-linear dilation factors of jobs. From this observation, we establish a general quantitative model for dilation factors of jobs in multi-resource systems. A job is characterized by a vector-valued loading statistics and dilation factors of a job set are given by a quadratic function of their loading vectors. We demonstrate how to systematically characterize a job, maintain the data structure to calculate the dilation factor (loading matrix), and calculate the dilation factor of each job. We validate the accuracy of the model with multiple processes running on a native Linux server, virtualized servers, and with multiple MapReduce workloads co-scheduled in a cluster. Evaluation with measured data shows that the D-factor model has an error margin of less than 16%. We also show that the model can be integrated with an existing on-line scheduler to minimize the makespan of workloads.

Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL] [ORNL; Huh, Jae-Seok [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Many-Body Interactions of Neutrinos with Nuclei - Observables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: The total inclusive cross sections obtained for quasielastic (QE) scattering in the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) are significantly larger than those calculated by all models based on the impulse approximation and using the world average value for the axial mass of $M_A \\approx 1 \\GeV$. This discrepancy has led to various, quite different explanations in terms of increased axial masses, changes in the functional form of the axial form factor, increased vector strength in nuclei, and initial two-particle interactions. This is disconcerting since the neutrino energy reconstruction depends on the reaction mechanism. Purpose: We investigate whether exclusive observables, such as nucleon knock-out, can be used to distinguish between the various proposed reaction mechanisms. We determine the influence of 2p-2h excitations on the energy reconstruction. Method: We use the Giessen Boltzmann--Uehling--Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) model to predict numbers and spectra of knock-out nucleons. The model is extended by incorporating a simple, but realistic treatment of initial 2p-2h excitations. Results: We show numbers and spectra of knock-out nucleons and show their sensitivity to the presence of 2p-2h initial excitations. We also discuss the influence of 2p-2h excitations on the neutrino energy reconstruction. Conclusions: 2p-2h excitations do lead to an increase in the number $n$ of knock-out nucleons for $n \\ge 2$ while only the $n=1$ knock-out remains a clean signal of true QE scattering. The spectra of knock-out nucleons do also change, but their qualitative shape remains as before. In the energy reconstruction 2p-2h interactions lead to a downward shift of the reconstructed energy; this effect of 2p-2h excitations disappears at higher energies because the 2p-2h influence is spread out over a wider energy range.

O. Lalakulich; K. Gallmeister; U. Mosel

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

Collider shot setup for Run 2 observations and suggestions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note is intended to provoke discussion on Collider Run II shot setup. We hope this is a start of activities that will converge on a functional description of what is needed for shot setups in Collider Run II. We will draw on observations of the present shot setup to raise questions and make suggestions for the next Collider run. It is assumed that the reader has some familiarity with the Collider operational issues. Shot setup is defined to be the time between the end of a store and the time the Main Control Room declares colliding beams. This is the time between Tevatron clock events SCE and SCB. This definition does not consider the time experiments use to turn on their detectors. This analysis was suggested by David Finley. The operational scenarios for Run II will require higher levels of reliability and speed for shot setup. See Appendix I and II. For example, we estimate that a loss of 3 pb{sup {minus}1}/week (with 8 hour stores) will occur if shot setups take 90 minutes instead of 30 minutes. In other words: If you do 12 shots for one week and accept an added delay of one minute in each shot, you will loose more than 60 nb{sup {minus}1} for that week alone (based on a normal shot setup of 30 minutes). These demands should lead us to be much more pedantic about all the factors that affect shot setups. Shot setup will be viewed as a distinct process that is composed of several inter- dependent `components`: procedures, hardware, controls, and sociology. These components don`t directly align with the different Accelerator Division departments, but are topical groupings of the needed accelerator functions. Defining these components, and categorizing our suggestions within them, are part of the goal of this document. Of course, some suggestions span several of these components.

Annala, J.; Joshel, B.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These mitochondrial abnormalities in the unstable clones contributes to oxidative stress.

Baulch, Janet

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

Unified description of kaon electroweak form factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A calculation of the semileptonic decays of the kaon (K{sub l3}) is presented. The results are direct predictions of a covariant model of the pion and kaon introduced earlier by Ito, Buck, Gross. The weak form factors for K{sub l3} are predicted with absolutely no parameter adjustments of the model. The authors obtained for the form factor parameters: f{sub {minus}}(q{sup 2}=m{sub l}{sup 2})/f{sub +}(q{sup 2}=m{sub l}{sup 2})={minus}0.28 and {lambda}{sub +}= 0.028, both within experimental error bars. Connections of this approach to heavy quark symmetry will also be discussed.

A. Afanasev; W. Buck

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Factorization in B to V gamma Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

Becher, T

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

Observability Criteria and Estimator Design for Stochastic Linear Hybrid Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Alessandri and Coletta [5] proposed a Luenberger observer design methodology for deterministic linear hybrid

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

251

University of Hawaii#Institute for Astronomy OBSERVING TIME REQUEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the tidal features, and nuclear separation. By comparing the observed characteristics of such an optica

Hibbard, John

252

On form factors and Macdonald polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are developing the algebraic construction for form factors of local operators in the sinh-Gordon theory proposed in [B.Feigin, M.Lashkeivch, 2008]. We show that the operators corresponding to the null vectors in this construction are given by the degenerate Macdonald polynomials with rectangular partitions and the parameters $t=-q$ on the unit circle. We obtain an integral representation for the null vectors and discuss its simple applications.

Lashkevich, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

On form factors and Macdonald polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are developing the algebraic construction for form factors of local operators in the sinh-Gordon theory proposed in [B.Feigin, M.Lashkeivch, 2008]. We show that the operators corresponding to the null vectors in this construction are given by the degenerate Macdonald polynomials with rectangular partitions and the parameters $t=-q$ on the unit circle. We obtain an integral representation for the null vectors and discuss its simple applications.

Michael Lashkevich; Yaroslav Pugai

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater exposure scenario, and the development of conversion factors for assessing compliance with the groundwater protection standard. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters, their development, and the relationship between the parameters and specific features events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the groundwater exposure scenario. The objectives of this analysis are to develop BDCFs for the groundwater exposure scenario for the three climate states considered in the TSPA-LA as well as conversion factors for evaluating compliance with the groundwater protection standard. The BDCFs will be used in performance assessment for calculating all-pathway annual doses for a given concentration of radionuclides in groundwater. The conversion factors will be used for calculating gross alpha particle activity in groundwater and the annual dose from drinking water for beta- and photon-emitting radionuclides. Another objective of this analysis was to re-qualify the output of the previous revision (BSC 2003 [DIRS 164403]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

$?$ and $?'$ transition form factors from Pad approximants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ a systematic and model-independent method to extract, from space- and time-like data, the $\\eta$ and $\\eta'$ transition form factors (TFFs) obtaining the most precise determination for their low-energy parameters and discuss the $\\Gamma_{\\eta\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma}$ impact on them. Using TFF data alone, we also extract the $\\eta-\\eta'$ mixing parameters, which are compatible to those obtained from more sophisticated and input-demanding procedures.

Pablo Sanchez-Puertas; Pere Masjuan

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Transcription factor-based biosensors for detecting dicarboxylic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods and compositions for detecting dicarboxylic acids using a transcription factor biosensor.

Dietrich, Jeffrey; Keasling, Jay

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

257

Beyond position weight matrices: nucleotide correlations in transcription factor binding sites and their description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs), in which each DNA base pair independently contributes to the transcription factor (TF) binding, despite mounting evidence of interdependence between base pairs positions. The recent availability of genome-wide data on TF-bound DNA regions offers the possibility to revisit this question in detail for TF binding {\\em in vivo}. Here, we use available fly and mouse ChIPseq data, and show that the independent model generally does not reproduce the observed statistics of TFBS, generalizing previous observations. We further show that TFBS description and predictability can be systematically improved by taking into account pairwise correlations in the TFBS via the principle of maximum entropy. The resulting pairwise interaction model is formally equivalent to the disordered ...

Santolini, Marc; Hakim, Vincent

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Heavy to light baryon transition form factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, Stech found form factor relations for heavy to light transitions based on two simple dynamical assumptions for a spectator particle. In this paper we generalize his approach to the case of baryons and find that for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} ({ital Q}={ital b} or {ital c}) only one independent form factor remains in the limit {ital m}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{infinity}. Furthermore, combining with the model of Guo and Kroll we determine both of the two form factors for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} in the heavy quark limit. The results are applied to {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} which is not clarified both theoretically and experimentally. It is found that the branching ratio of {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} is of order 10{sup {minus}5}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Guo, X. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil] [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil; [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Huang, T. [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China)] [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China); [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Li, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

From Saudi Arabia to Venezuela: Energy Resources, Market Factors & ConflictsEnergy Resources, Market Factors & Conflicts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Saudi Arabia to Venezuela: Energy Resources, Market Factors & ConflictsEnergy Resources, or in U.S. relations with Venezuela, Russia, China, Saudi Arabia, Israel and Nigeria? We will analyze

O'Donnell, Tom

260

Factors for conversion between human and automatic read-outs of CDMAM images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: According to the European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening (EPQCM) image quality of digital mammography devices has to be assessed using human evaluation of the CDMAM contrast-detail phantom. This is accomplished by the determination of threshold thicknesses of gold disks with different diameters (0.08-2 mm) and revealed to be very time consuming. Therefore a software solution based on a nonprewhitening matched filter (NPW) model was developed at University of Nijmegen. Factors for the conversion from automatic to human readouts have been determined by Young et al.[Proc. SPIE 614206, 1-13 (2006) and Proc. SPIE 6913, 69131C1 (2008)] using a huge amount of data of both human and automatic readouts. These factors depend on the observer groups and are purely phenomenological. The authors present an alternative approach to determine the factors by using the Rose observer model. Methods: Their method uses the Rose theory which gives a relationship between threshold contrast, diameter of the object and number of incident photons. To estimate the conversion factors for the five diameters from 0.2 to 0.5 mm they exposed with five different current-time products which resulted in 25 equations with five unknowns. Results: The theoretical conversion factors (in dependence of the diameters) amounted to be 1.61 {+-} 0.02 (0.2 mm diameter), 1.67 {+-} 0.02 (0.25 mm), 1.85 {+-} 0.02 (0.31 mm), 2.09 {+-} 0.02 (0.4 mm), and 2.28 {+-} 0.02 (0.5 mm). The corresponding phenomenological factors found in literature are 1.74 (0.2 mm), 1.78 (0.25 mm), 1.83 (0.31 mm), 1.88 (0.4 mm), and 1.93 (0.5 mm). Conclusions: They transferred the problem of determining the factors to a well known observer model which has been examined for many years and is also well established. This method reveals to be reproduceable and produces factors comparable to the phenomenological ones.

Figl, Michael; Hoffmann, Rainer; Kaar, Marcus; Semturs, Friedrich; Brasik, Natasa; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Homolka, Peter; Hummel, Johann [Center for medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Austria A-1090 (Austria); Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria A-1090 (Austria); Center for medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Austria A-1090 (Austria); Center for medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Austria A-1090 and Department of Radio-oncology, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria A-1160 (Austria)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Non-observable nature of the nuclear shell structure. Meaning, illustrations and consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of single-nucleon shells constitutes a basic pillar of our understanding of nuclear structure. Effective single-particle energies (ESPEs) introduced by French and Baranger represent the most appropriate tool to relate many-body observables to a single-nucleon shell structure. As briefly discussed in [T. Duguet, G. Hagen, Phys. Rev. C {\\bf 85}, 034330 (2012)], the dependence of ESPEs on one-nucleon transfer probability matrices makes them purely theoretical quantities that "run" with the non-observable resolution scale $\\lambda$ employed in the calculation. Given that ESPEs provide a way to interpret the many-body problem in terms of simpler theoretical ingredients, the goal is to specify the terms, i.e. the exact sense and conditions, in which this interpretation can be conducted meaningfully. State-of-the-art multi-reference in-medium similarity renormalization group and self-consistent Gorkov Green's function many-body calculations are employed to corroborate the formal analysis. This is done by comparing the behavior of several observables and of non-observable ESPEs (and spectroscopic factors) under (quasi) unitary similarity renormalization group transformations of the Hamiltonian parameterized by the resolution scale $\\lambda$. The non-observable nature of the nuclear shell structure, i.e. the fact that it constitutes an intrinsically theoretical object with no counterpart in the empirical world, must be recognized and assimilated. Eventually, practitioners can refer to nuclear shells and spectroscopic factors in their analyses of nuclear phenomena if, and only if, they use consistent structure and reaction theoretical schemes based on a fixed resolution scale they have agreed on prior to performing their analysis and comparisons.

T. Duguet; H. Hergert; J. D. Holt; V. Som

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

Observing and modeling Earths energy flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reviews, from the authors perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within {+-}2 W m{sup -2}. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute importantly to this adjustment and thus contribute both to uncertainty in estimates of radiative forcing and to uncertainty in the response. Models are indispensable to calculation of the adjustment of the system to a compositional change but are known to be flawed in their representation of clouds. Advances in tracking Earth's energy flows and compositional changes on daily through decadal timescales are shown to provide both a critical and constructive framework for advancing model development and evaluation.

Stevens B.; Schwartz S.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater exposure scenario, and the development of conversion factors for assessing compliance with the groundwater protection standards. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters, their development, and the relationship between the parameters and specific features events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the groundwater exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' (Figure 1-1). The objectives of this analysis are to develop BDCFs for the groundwater exposure scenario for the three climate states (present day, monsoon, and glacial transition) considered in the TSPA-LA, as well as conversion factors for compliance evaluation with the groundwater protection standards. The BDCFs will be used in performance assessment for calculating all-pathway annual doses for a given concentration of radionuclides in groundwater. The conversion factors will be used for calculating gross alpha particle activity in groundwater and the annual dose from drinking water for beta- and photon-emitting radionuclides.

M.A. Wasiolek

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

FULLY RESOLVED QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE OBSERVED WITH THE SUNRISE/IMAX INSTRUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Schmidt, W.; Berkefeld, T. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de AstronomIa y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: lagg@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to High Momentum Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon characterize the effect of its internal structure on its response to an electromagnetic probe as studied in elastic electronnucleon scattering. These form factors are functions of the squared four-momentum transfer Q2 between the electron and the proton. The two main classes of observables of this reaction are the scattering cross section and polarization asymmetries, both of which are sensitive to the form factors in different ways. When considering large f momentum transfers, double-polarization observables offer superior sensitivity to the electric form factor. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton at high momentum transfer using the recoil polarization technique. A polarized electron beam was scattered from a liquid hydrogen target, transferring polarization to the recoiling protons. These protons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer which was used to reconstruct their kinematics, including their scattering angles and momenta, and the position of the interaction vertex. A proton polarimeter measured the polarization of the recoiling protons by measuring the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of protons scattered in CH2 analyzers. The scattered electron was detected in a large acceptance electromagnetic calorimeter in order to suppress inelastic backgrounds. The measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the scattered proton is directly proportional to the ratio of form factors GpE=GpM. The measurements reported in this thesis took place at Q2 =5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV2, and represent the most accurate measurements of GpE in this Q2 region to date.

Andrew Puckett

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Neutron electric form factor via recoil polarimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ratio of the electric to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, G_En/G_Mn, was measured via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic d({pol-e},e'{pol-n)p reaction at three values of Q^2 [viz., 0.45, 1.15 and 1.47 (GeV/c)^2] in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Preliminary data indicate that G_En follows the Galster parameterization up to Q^2 = 1.15 (GeV/c)^2 and appears to rise above the Galster parameterization at Q^2 = 1.47 (GeV/c)^2.

Richard Madey; Andrei Semenov; Simon Taylor; Aram Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Bradley Plaster; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Chenyu Yan; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Samuel Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Lorentz Coherence and the Proton Form Factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dipole cutoff behavior for the proton form factor has been and still is one of the major issues in high-energy physics. It is shown that this dipole behavior comes from the coherence between the Lorentz contraction of the proton size and the decreasing wavelength of the incoming photon signal. The contraction rates are the same for both cases. This form of coherence is studied also in the momentum-energy space. The coherence effect in this space can be explained in terms of two overlapping wave functions.

Kim, Young S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Embeddings and factorizations of Banach spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

argument works in our context. 29 CHAPTER IV OPERATORS WHICH FACTOR THROUGH lscriptP OR c0 A. Introduction In [12], W. B. Johnson answered the following question about the relation between the structure of Lp and lscriptp. Question IV.A.1. Give a Banach... space condition so that if X is a subspace of Lp (1 < p < 2) which satisfies the condition, then X embeds isomorphically into lscriptp. The equivalent dual question would be: Question IV.A.2. Give a Banach space condition so that if X is a quotient of Lp...

Zheng, Bentuo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Factors for design of dips for roadways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limit is sub]ect to mot1on which may cause considerable discomfort to be experienced by the oocupants. If a dip is particularly critical, the vehicle may even incur damages. The most important consideration, however, 1s the fact that the driver may... lose control of the vehicle momentarily and be involved in a traffic accident. These three factors indicate the need for all dips in roadways to be nrop- erly designed, whether they are to be temporary or oermanent. The use of dips as speed checks...

McCasland, William Richard

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Prime number generation and factor elimination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

Vineet Kumar

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

271

Optimization of the transmission of observable expectation values and observable statistics in Continuous Variable Teleportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the statistics of observables in continuous variable quantum teleportation in the formalism of the characteristic function. We derive expressions for average values of output state observables in particular cumulants which are additive in terms of the input state and the resource of teleportation. Working with Squeezed Bell-like states, which may be optimized in a free parameter for better teleportation performance we discuss the relation between resources optimal for fidelity and for different observable averages. We obtain the values of the free parameter which optimize the central momenta and cumulants up to fourth order. For the cumulants the distortion between in and out states due to teleportation depends only on the resource. We obtain optimal parameters for the second and fourth order cumulants which do not depend on the squeezing of the resource. The second order central momenta which is equal to the second order cumulants and the photon number average are optimized by the same resource. We show that the optimal fidelity resource, found in reference (Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 76}, 022301 (2007)) to depend also on the characteristics of input, tends for high squeezing to the resource which optimizes the second order momenta. A similar behavior is obtained for the resource which optimizes the photon statistics which is treated here using the sum of the squared differences in photon probabilities of input and output states as the distortion measure. This is interpreted to mean that the distortions associated to second order momenta dominates the behavior of the output state for large squeezing of the resource. Optimal fidelity and optimal photon statistics resources are compared and is shown that for mixtures of Fock states they are equivalent.

L. Albano Farias; J. Stephany

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ultrashort-period MS eclipsing systems. New observations and light curve solutions of six NSVS binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We carried out photometric and low-resolution spectral observations of six eclipsing ultrashort-period binaries with MS components. The light curve solutions of the Rozhen observations show that all targets are overcontact systems. We found well-defined empirical relation "period -- semi-major axis" for the short-period binaries and used it for estimation of the global parameters of the targets. Our results revealed that NSVS 925605 is quite interesting target: (a) it is one of a few contact binaries with M components; (b) it exhibits high activity (emission in H$\\alpha$ line, X-ray emission, large cool spots, non-Planck energy distribution); (c) its components differ in temperature by 700 K. All appearances of high magnetic activity and huge fillout factor (0.7) of NSVS 925605 might be assumed as a precursor of the predicted merging of close magnetic binaries. Another unusual binary is NSVS 2700153 which reveals considerable long-term variability.

Dimitrov, Dinko

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

Voutier, Eric J.-M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

PoGOLite -The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer CECILIA MARINI BETTOLO Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2008 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer Cecilia Marini Bettolo

Haviland, David

275

Observation of Kerr nonlinearity inObservation of Kerr nonlinearity in micromicro--cavities at room temperaturecavities at room temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phenomenanonlinear phenomena nn High quality factorHigh quality factor (Q)(Q) and smalland small mode volumesmode 2 2 xC Vn n QQP P P eff pumpeff pump total probepump probe probe = sfthermal µ 52/1 == s n R DD

276

Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k{sub Q} factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k{sub Q} factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Results: Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k{sub Q} factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k{sub Q} factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k{sub Q} factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) initialization product. The 1-year deployment period enabled measurements in the dry and wet (monsoon) seasons radar. Peak surface rainfall is observed during August, and the largest daily rainfall rates are observed during the period from July to September. The lifting condensation level (LCL) is observed

278

AN ALTERNATIVE OBSERVER FOR ZERO DEFICIENCY CHEMICAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for detectability, and went on to explicitly construct a full-state observer that is guaranteed to converge 1 Email by a construction di#11;erent from the one employed in a previous paper. The new observer exhibits slower (Sontag, 2001) for background material on stability), which dealt with the construction of observers

Chaves, Madalena

279

Targeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001 show that the optimal location of observations, targeted observations. 1 Introduction Our ability to anticipate and manage changes in atmospheric pollutantTargeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models Adrian Sandu Department

Sandu, Adrian

280

Nonlinear observer and parameter estimation for electropneumatic clutch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient. General designs for nonlinear observer design are devel- oped for particular classes of nonlinear of estimate errors. They also consider a three-way proportional valve as con- trol valve while we consider on/off-solenoid valves. The presented observer in this paper is a deterministic observer with linear output

Johansen, Tor Arne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Factors affecting the lipase activity of milk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inhibit lipase. Citrate, acetate, and phthalate buffers impaired the enzymic activity, but borate and barbiturate buffers did not (6, 72). The interaction of formaldehyde with milk lipase has been studied by some investigators (56, 67) . Tarassuk... and Richardson (67) reported that aging of milk containing formaldehyde nullified the inhibitory effect of formaldehyde. Schwartz et al, (56) observed that the extent of inhibition of milk lipase by formaldehyde depends upon the time formaldehyde is added...

Tallamy, Paul Thomas

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF TWO FLARE LOOPS OBSERVED BY AIA AND EIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze and model an M1.0 flare observed by SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS to investigate how flare loops are heated and evolve subsequently. The flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. The UV 1600 A emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Such behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit and the subsequent response in overlying coronal loops that evolve through different temperatures. Using the method we recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treating them as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, reasonably agree with observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend and their magnitudes are comparable by within a factor of two. Furthermore, we also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different loops with different heating functions as inferred from their footpoint UV emission, combined with their different lengths as measured from imaging observations, give rise to different coronal plasma evolution patterns captured both in the model and in observations.

Li, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Qiu, J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Factors Inhibiting Personal Growth When Teaching Academically Diverse Classes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study seeks to identify the factors that inhibit personal growth in teaching as teachers work to meet the needs of all students in academically diverse groups of learners. To identify these factors, researchers worked ...

Lenz, B. Keith; Melvin, Jeff; Kissam, Brenda; Bulgren, Janis; Roth, Janet

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare Tuesday 2nd December 2014 safety, quality and productivity in healthcare. Showcasing enduring solutions to patient safety recognised speakers in patient safety including: Martin Bromiley, Founder, Clinical Human Factors Group Dr

Levi, Ran

286

EVALUATING NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY: PERFORMANCE MEASURES AND INFLUENTIAL FACTORS FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development, industrial structure, energy prices, environmental governance, pollution abatement and control, environmental governance, and energy prices are major influential factors, with energy prices the most important components factor analysis to help build subindices measuring waste and pollution, sustainable energy

287

affect postprandial factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

may influence the decision Cheng, Yvonne 2011-01-01 3 Factors affecting wild turkey distribution and numbers Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: FACTORS AFFECTING...

288

Deducing spectroscopic factors from wave-function asymptotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a coupled-channel model, we explore the effects of coupling between configurations on the radial behavior of the wave function and, in particular, on the spectroscopic factor (SF) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). We evaluate the extraction of a SF from the ratio of the ANC of the coupled-channel model to that of a single-particle approximation of the wave function. We perform this study within a core + n collective model, which includes two states of the core that connect by a rotational coupling. To get additional insights, we also use a simplified model that takes a delta function for the coupling potential. Calculations are performed for 11Be. Fair agreement is obtained between the SF inferred from the single-particle approximation and the one obtained within the coupled-channel models. Significant discrepancies are observed only for large coupling strength and/or large admixture, that is, a small SF. This suggests that reliable SFs can be deduced from the wave-function asymptotics when the structure is dominated by one configuration, that is, for a large SF.

P. Capel; P. Danielewicz; F. M. Nunes

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Deducing spectroscopic factors from wave-function asymptotics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a coupled-channel model, we explore the effects of coupling between configurations on the radial behavior of the wave function and, in particular, on the spectroscopic factor (SF) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). We evaluate the extraction of a SF from the ratio of the ANC of the coupled-channel model to that of a single-particle approximation of the wave function. We perform this study within a core+n collective model, which includes two states of the core that connect by a rotational coupling. To get additional insights, we also use a simplified model that takes a {delta} function for the coupling potential. Calculations are performed for {sup 11}Be. Fair agreement is obtained between the SF inferred from the single-particle approximation and the one obtained within the coupled-channel models. Significant discrepancies are observed only for large coupling strength and/or large admixture, that is, a small SF. This suggests that reliable SFs can be deduced from the wave-function asymptotics when the structure is dominated by one configuration, that is, for a large SF.

Capel, P. [Physique Quantique, C.P. 165/82, and Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, C.P. 229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Danielewicz, P.; Nunes, F. M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Partial and Complete Observables for Canonical General Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we will consider the concepts of partial and complete observables for canonical general relativity. These concepts provide a method to calculate Dirac observables. The central result of this work is that one can compute Dirac observables for general relativity by dealing with just one constraint. For this we have to introduce spatial diffeomorphism invariant Hamiltonian constraints. It will turn out that these can be made to be Abelian. Furthermore the methods outlined here provide a connection between observables in the space--time picture, i.e. quantities invariant under space--time diffeomorphisms, and Dirac observables in the canonical picture.

B. Dittrich

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

291

Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the volcanic ash exposure scenario, and the development of dose factors for calculating inhalation dose during volcanic eruption. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters, their development and the relationship between the parameters and specific features, events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the volcanic ash exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and from the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169671]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; and BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis''. The objective of this analysis was to develop the BDCFs for the volcanic ash exposure scenario and the dose factors for calculating inhalation doses during volcanic eruption (eruption phase of the volcanic event). For the volcanic ash exposure scenario, the mode of radionuclide release into the biosphere is a volcanic eruption through the repository with the resulting entrainment of contaminated waste in the tephra and the subsequent atmospheric transport and dispersion of contaminated material in the biosphere. The biosphere process model for this scenario uses the surface deposition of contaminated ash as the source of radionuclides in the biosphere. The initial atmospheric transport and dispersion of the ash as well as its subsequent redistribution by fluvial and aeolian processes are not addressed within the biosphere model. These processes influence the value of the source term that is calculated elsewhere and then combined with the BDCFs in the TSPA model to calculate expected dose to the receptor. Another objective of this analysis was to re-qualify the output of the previous revision (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163958]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

292

Extended correlations of porosity, permeability, and formation resistivity factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the second is an empirically established correlation between the individual parameters. Although the two relationships are of the same form, the empirical form permits an independent detezmination of characterizing factors that appear in the rela..., and the characterizing factors for several formations have been calculated. These characterizing factors may have some merit for characterizing formations in general. Methods are also suggested for estimating these factors when limited data is available...

Ellis, Keith Wade

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Observations of the pulsation of the Cepheid l Car with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of the southern Cepheid l Car to yield the mean angular diameter and angular pulsation amplitude have been made with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) at a wavelength of 696 nm. The resulting mean limb-darkened angular diameter is 2.990+-0.017 mas (i.e. +-0.6 per cent) with a maximum-to-minimum amplitude of 0.560+-0.018 mas corresponding to 18.7+-0.6 per cent in the mean stellar diameter. Careful attention has been paid to uncertainties, including those in measurements, in the adopted calibrator angular diameters, in the projected values of visibility squared at zero baseline, and to systematic effects. No evidence was found for a circumstellar envelope at 696 nm. The interferometric results have been combined with radial displacements of the stellar atmosphere derived from selected radial velocity data taken from the literature to determine the distance and mean diameter of l Car. The distance is determined to be 525+-26 pc and the mean radius 169+-8R{solar). Comparison with published values for the distance and mean radius show excellent agreement, particularly when a common scaling factor from observed radial velocity to pulsation velocity of the stellar atmosphere (the p-factor) is used.

J. Davis; A. P. Jacob; J. G. Robertson; M. J. Ireland; J. R. North; W. J. Tango; P. G. Tuthill

2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Observations of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance were performed on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and in-plane magnetized reference layer (abbreviated as PMF-STO in the following) for the purpose of obtaining magnetic properties in the PMF-STO structure. The measured spectra clearly showed a large main peak and multiple smaller peaks on the high frequency side. A Lorentzian fit on the main peak yielded Gilbert damping factor of 0.0041. The observed peaks moved in proportion to the out-of-plane bias field. From the slope of the main peak frequency as a function of the bias field, Lande g factor was estimated to be about 2.13. The mode intervals showed a clear dependence on the diameter of the PMF-STOs, i.e., intervals are larger for a smaller diameter. These results suggest that the observed peaks should correspond to eigenmodes of lateral spin wave resonance in the perpendicularly magnetized free layer.

Tamaru, S., E-mail: shingo.tamaru@aist.go.jp; Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Konoto, M.; Nozaki, T.; Fukushima, A.; Imamura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Arai, H.; Tsunegi, S.; Yuasa, S. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

295

X-ray/UV Observing Campaign on the Mrk 279 AGN Outflow: A Global Fitting Analysis of the UV Absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the intrinsic UV absorption in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 279 based on simultaneous long observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (41 ks) and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (91 ks). To extract the line-of-sight covering factors and ionic column densities, we separately fit two groups of absorption lines: the Lyman series and the CNO lithium-like doublets. For the CNO doublets we assume that all three ions share the same covering factors. The fitting method applied here overcomes some limitations of the traditional method using individual doublet pairs; it allows for the treatment of more complex, physically realistic scenarios for the absorption-emission geometry and eliminates systematic errors that we show are introduced by spectral noise. We derive velocity-dependent solutions based on two models of geometrical covering -- a single covering factor for all background emission sources, and separate covering factors for the continuum and emission lines. Although both models give good statistical fits to the observed absorption, we favor the model with two covering factors because: (a) the best-fit covering factors for both emission sources are similar for the independent Lyman series and CNO doublet fits; (b) the fits are consistent with full coverage of the continuum source and partial coverage of the emission lines by the absorbers, as expected from the relative sizes of the nuclear emission components; and (c) it provides a natural explanation for variability in the Ly$\\alpha$ absorption detected in an earlier epoch. We also explore physical and geometrical constraints on the outflow from these results.

Jack R. Gabel; Nahum Arav; Jelle S. Kaastra; Gerard A. Kriss; Ehud Behar; Elisa Costantini; C. Martin Gaskell; Kirk T. Korista; Ari Laor; Frits Paerels; Daniel Proga; Jessica Kim Quijano; Masao Sako; Jennifer E. Scott; Katrien C. Steenbrugge

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

IN-SERVICE LOAD & RESISTANCE FACTOR RATING METHOD FOR BRIDGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress Rating method (noted ASR in the following), Load Factor Rating method (noted LFR in the followingIN-SERVICE LOAD & RESISTANCE FACTOR RATING METHOD FOR BRIDGES Degang Li1 , Baidurya Bhattacharya2 are evaluated using allowable stress and load factor rating methods. Load rating made in these traditional

Bhattacharya, Baidurya

297

REALIZING TWO-FACTOR AUTHENTICATION FOR THE BITCOIN PROTOCOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REALIZING TWO-FACTOR AUTHENTICATION FOR THE BITCOIN PROTOCOL Christopher Mann and Daniel Loebenberger 15 August 2014 Abstract. We show how to realize two-factor authentication for a Bitcoin wal- let a prototypic implementation of a Bitcoin wallet that offers both: two-factor authentication and verification

298

New Blind Signatures Equivalent to Factorization (Extended Abstract)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Blind Signatures Equivalent to Factorization (Extended Abstract) David Pointcheval Jacques Stern Abstract In this paper, we present new blind signature schemes based on the factorization problem. They are the first blind sig- nature schemes proved secure relatively to factorization. By security, we mean

Pointcheval, David

299

UPDATE AND ENHANCEMENT OF ODOT'S CRASH REDUCTION FACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Printed on recycled paper #12;ii SI* (MODERN METRIC) CONVERSION FACTORS APPROXIMATE CONVERSIONS TO SIUPDATE AND ENHANCEMENT OF ODOT'S CRASH REDUCTION FACTORS Final Report SPR 612 by Christopher M and Enhancement of ODOT's Crash Reduction Factors 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Christopher M

Bertini, Robert L.

300

CONSTRAINING THE BULK LORENTZ FACTOR OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OUTFLOW IN THE MAGNETIC-DOMINATED JET MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observations by the Fermi-LAT showed that there are delayed arrivals of GeV photons relative to the onset of MeV photons in some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to avoid a large optical depth, the minimal value of the Lorentz factor has been estimated to be higher than 1000 in some of the brightest bursts. In this paper, we present a detailed calculation of the time delay between the MeV and GeV photons in the framework of the magnetic-dominated jet model. We find that the time delay strongly depends on the saturated bulk Lorentz factor of the jet. Inspired by this fact, we use this model to calculate the Lorentz factors of the four brightest Fermi bursts. The results indicate that the Lorentz factors are much smaller than those obtained from the 'single-zone' scenario. The short burst GRB 090510 has a minimal Lorentz factor of 385, while the three long bursts, GRB 080916c, GRB 090902b, and GRB 090926, have almost the same Lorentz factors with an average value near 260. Another interesting result is that, for long bursts, GeV photons are emitted after the bulk Lorentz factor saturates. For the short GRB, however, MeV and GeV photons are emitted at the same phase, i.e., either in the expansion phase or in the coasting phase.

Chang Zhe; Lin Hainan; Jiang Yunguo, E-mail: changz@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: linhn@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: jiangyg@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049 Beijing (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Generalized Finite Source Calibration Factor: A Natural Improvement to the Finite Source Correction Factor for Uranium Holdup Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes refinements to the finite source correction factor used in holdup measurements. Specifically it focuses on a more general method to estimate the average detector response for a finite source. This proposed method for the average detector response is based directly on the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) assay method. First, the finite source correction factor as originally proposed is reviewed in this paper. Following this review the GGH assay method is described. Lastly, a new finite area calibration factor based on GGH is then proposed for finite point and line sources. As an alternative to the direct use of the finite arca calibration factor, finite source correction factors are also derived from this calibration factor. This new correction factor can be used in a manner similar to the finite source correction factor as currently implemented.

Gunn, C.A.; Oberer, R.B.; chiang, L.G.; Ceo, R.N.

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

No generalized transverse momentum dependent factorization in the hadroproduction of high transverse momentum hadrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has by now been established that standard QCD factorization using transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions fails in hadroproduction of nearly back-to-back hadrons with high transverse momentum. The essential problem is that gauge-invariant transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions cannot be defined with process-independent Wilson line operators, thus implying a breakdown of universality. This has led naturally to proposals that a correct approach is to instead use a type of generalized transverse momentum dependent factorization in which the basic factorized structure is assumed to remain valid, but with transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions that contain nonstandard, process-dependent Wilson line structures. In other words, to recover a factorization formula, it has become common to assume that it is sufficient to simply modify the Wilson lines in the parton correlation functions for each separate hadron. In this paper, we will illustrate by direct counterexample that this is not possible in a non-Abelian gauge theory. Since a proof of generalized transverse momentum dependent factorization should apply generally to any hard hadroproduction process, a single counterexample suffices to show that a general proof does not exist. Therefore, to make the counter-argument clear and explicit, we illustrate with a specific calculation for a double spin asymmetry in a spectator model with a non-Abelian gauge field. The observed breakdown of generalized transverse momentum dependent factorization challenges the notion that the role of parton transverse momentum in such processes can be described using separate correlation functions for each external hadron.

Rogers, Ted C.; Mulders, Piet J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

No Generalized TMD-Factorization in the Hadro-Production of High Transverse Momentum Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has by now been established that standard QCD factorization using transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions fails in hadro-production of nearly back-to-back hadrons with high transverse momentum. The essential problem is that gauge invariant transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions cannot be defined with process-independent Wilson line operators, thus implying a breakdown of universality. This has led naturally to proposals that a correct approach is to instead use a type of "generalized" transverse momentum dependent factorization in which the basic factorized structure is assumed to remain valid, but with transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions that contain non-standard, process dependent Wilson line structures. In other words, to recover a factorization formula, it has become common to assume that it is sufficient to simply modify the Wilson lines in the parton correlation functions for each separate hadron. In this paper, we will illustrate by direct counter-example that this is not possible in a non-Abelian gauge theory. Since a proof of generalized transverse momentum dependent factorization should apply generally to any hard hadro-production process, a single counter-example suffices to show that a general proof does not exist. Therefore, to make the counter-argument clear and explicit, we illustrate with a specific calculation for a double spin asymmetry in a spectator model with a non-Abelian gauge field. The observed breakdown of generalized transverse momentum dependent factorization challenges the notion that the role of parton transverse momentum in such processes can be described using separate correlation functions for each external hadron.

Ted C. Rogers; Piet J. Mulders

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Quantifier elimination for approximate Beals-Kartashova factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The only known constructive factorization algorithm for linear partial differential operators (LPDOs) is Beals-Kartashova (BK) factorization \\cite{bk2005}. One of the most interesting features of BK-factorization: at the beginning all the first-order factors are constructed and afterwards the factorization condition(s) should be checked. This leads to the important application area - namely, numerical simulations which could be simplified substantially if instead of computation with one LPDE of order $n$ we will be able to proceed computations with $n$ LPDEs all of order 1. In numerical simulations it is not necessary to fulfill factorization conditions exactly but with some given accuracy, which we call approximate factorization. The idea of the present paper is to look into the feasibility of solving problems of this kind using quantifier elinination by cylindrical algebraic decomposition.

Elena Kartashova; Scott McCallum

2007-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Maintain all SAA weekly inspection forms in your laboratory. Forms must be readily available for review. Satellite Accumulation Area -Weekly Inspection Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the corresponding date of the SAA inspection. A. Good Condition - Containers in good condition, properly labeled containment. No Corrective Action Required. B. Missing Labels - Containers not labeled in compliance with SAA storage requirements. Satellite Accumulation Area ­ Waste Storage Requirements Label Requirements: · Waste

306

NS&T Managment Observations - 1st Quarter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of managements observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&Ts MOP.

David Gianotto

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Molecular line intensities as measures of cloud masses - II. Conversion factors for specific galaxy types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretically-established values of the CO-to-H2 and C-to-H2 conversion factors that may be used to estimate the gas masses of external galaxies. We consider four distinct galaxy types, represented by M51, NGC 6946, M82 and SMC N27. The physical parameters that best represent the conditions within the molecular clouds in each of the galaxy types are estimated using a chi^2 analysis of several observed atomic fine structure and CO rotational lines. This analysis is explored over a wide range of density, radiation field, extinction, and other relevant parameters. Using these estimated physical conditions in methods that we have previously established, CO-to-H2 conversion factors are then computed for CO transitions up to J=9-8. For the conventional CO(1-0) transition, the computed conversion factor varies significantly below and above the canonical value for the Milky Way in the four galaxy types considered. Since atomic carbon emission is now frequently used as a probe of external galaxies, we also present, for the first time, the C-to-H2 conversion factor for this emission in the four galaxy types considered.

T. A. Bell; S. Viti; D. A. Williams

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.

Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; lvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Daz-Vlez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; Gonzlez, L X; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Prez-Prez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Simple analytic model for astrophysical S factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a physically transparent analytic model of astrophysical S factors as a function of a center-of-mass energy E of colliding nuclei (below and above the Coulomb barrier) for nonresonant fusion reactions. For any given reaction, the S(E) model contains four parameters [two of which approximate the barrier potential, U(r)]. They are easily interpolated along many reactions involving isotopes of the same elements; they give accurate practical expressions for S(E) with only several input parameters for many reactions. The model reproduces the suppression of S(E) at low energies (of astrophysical importance) due to the shape of the low-r wing of U(r). The model can be used to reconstruct U(r) from computed or measured S(E). For illustration, we parametrize our recent calculations of S(E) (using the Sao Paulo potential and the barrier penetration formalism) for 946 reactions involving stable and unstable isotopes of C, O, Ne, and Mg (with nine parameters for all reactions involving many isotopes of the same elements, e.g., C+O). In addition, we analyze astrophysically important {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C reaction, compare theoretical models with experimental data, and discuss the problem of interpolating reliably known S(E) values to low energies (E < or approx. 2-3 MeV).

Yakovlev, D. G.; Beard, M.; Gasques, L. R.; Wiescher, M. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Poliekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Laboratorio Pelletron, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Department of Physics and The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Chemical factors that control lignin polymerization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is a complex, branched polymer that reinforces plant tissue. Understanding the factors that govern lignin structure is of central importance to the development of technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into fuels because lignin imparts resistance to chemical, enzymatic and mechanical deconstruction. Lignin is formed by enzymatic oxidation of phenolic monomers (monolignols) of three main types, guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S) and p- hydroxyphenyl (H). It is known that increasing the relative abundance of H subunits results in lower molecular-weight lignin polymers, and hence more easily deconstructed biomass, but it is not known why. Here, we report an analysis of frontier molecular orbitals in mono-, di- and trilignols, calculated using density functional theory, which points to a requirement of strong p- electron density on the reacting phenolic oxygen atom of the neutral precursor for enzymatic oxidation to occur. This model is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism and for the first time explains why H subunits in certain linkages ( - or -5) react poorly and tend to cap the polymer. In general, -5 linkages with either a G or H terminus are predicted to inhibit elongation. More broadly, the model correctly accounts for the reactivity of the phenolic groups in a diverse set of dilignols comprising H and G subunits. Thus, we provide a coherent framework for understanding the propensity toward growth or termination of different terminal subunits in lignin.

Sangha, Amandeep K [ORNL] [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL] [ORNL; Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Intrinsic Absorption in the Spectrum of Mrk 279: Simultaneous Chandra, FUSE, and STIS Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a study of the intrinsic X-ray and far-ultraviolet absorption in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy Markarian 279 using simultaneous observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). We also present FUSE observations made at three additional epochs. We detect the Fe K-alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, and its flux is consistent with the low X-ray continuum flux level of Mrk 279 at the time of the observation. Due to low signal-to-noise ratios in the Chandra spectrum, no O VII or O VIII absorption features are observable in the Chandra data, but the UV spectra reveal strong and complex absorption from HI and high-ionization species such as O VI, N V, and C IV, as well as from low-ionization species such as C III, N III, C II, and N II in some velocity components. The far-UV spectral coverage of the FUSE data provides information on high-order Lyman series absorption, which we use to calculate the optical depths and line and continuum covering fractions in the intrinsic HI absorbing gas in a self-consistent fashion. The UV continuum flux of Mrk 279 decreases by a factor of ~7.5 over the time spanning these observations and we discuss the implications of the response of the absorption features to this change. From arguments based on the velocities, profile shapes, covering fractions and variability of the UV absorption, we conclude that some of the absorption components, particularly those showing prominent low-ionization lines, are likely associated with the host galaxy of Mrk 279, and possibly with its interaction with a close companion galaxy, while the remainder arises in a nuclear outflow.

Jennifer E. Scott; Gerard A. Kriss; Julia C. Lee; Nahum Arav; Patrick Ogle; Kenneth Roraback; Kimberly Weaver; Tal Alexander; Michael Brotherton; Richard F. Green; John Hutchings; Mary Elizabeth Kaiser; Herman Marshall; William Oegerle; Wei Zheng

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gamma-Ray Emission in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres: From Theory to Fermi Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the patterns of $\\gamma$-ray emission due to curvature radiation in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. Our ultimate goal is to construct macrophysical models that are able to reproduce the observed $\\gamma$-ray light-curve phenomenology recently published in the Second Fermi Pulsar Catalog. We apply specific forms of Ohm's law on the open field lines using a broad range for the macroscopic conductivity values that result in solutions ranging, from near-vacuum to near Force-Free. Using these solutions, we generate model $\\gamma$-ray light curves by calculating realistic trajectories and Lorentz factors of radiating particles, under the influence of both the accelerating electric fields and curvature radiation-reaction. We further constrain our models using the observed dependence of the phase-lags between the radio and $\\gamma$-ray emission on the $\\gamma$-ray peak-separation. We perform a statistical comparison of our model radio-lag vs peak-separation diagram and the one obtained for the Fermi standard pulsars. We find that for models of uniform conductivity over the entire open magnetic field line region, agreement with observations favors higher values of this parameter. We find, however, significant improvement in fitting the data with models that employ a hybrid form of conductivity; specifically, infinite conductivity interior to the light-cylinder and high but finite conductivity on the outside. In these models the $\\gamma$-ray emission is produced in regions near the equatorial current sheet but modulated by the local physical properties. These models have radio-lags near the observed values and statistically best reproduce the observed light-curve phenomenology. Additionally, these models produce GeV photon cut-off energies.

Constantinos Kalapotharakos; Alice K. Harding; Demosthenes Kazanas

2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

315

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 12 sequential images sam- pled at 7.5Hz. Observations 2,distributions of six sam- ple image sequences selected from

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ORNL researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Christopher R. Samoray Communications ORNL researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside bulk material Selected frames from a sequence of scanning transmission electron...

317

Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

318

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

average observational quantities: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

proposed observationally viable alternative to homogeneous cosmology with smooth dark energy, the timescape cosmology. In the timescape model cosmic acceleration is realized as an...

320

AAO support observations for the Hubble Deep Field Sout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present proposed ground-based support observations at the AAO for the forthcoming Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) campaign.

B. J. Boyle

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transport Regulation from Theory to Practice: General Observations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and a Case Study Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transport Regulation from Theory to Practice: General Observations and a Case Study Agency...

322

Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

323

Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

324

Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B Near-Infrared Radiative Transfer Model B.15 Near-Infrared Observations of Neptunes Clouds with the133 6.2 Near-infrared spectroscopy . . . . . .

Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Direct Observation of the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatizati...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using an Ultrahigh Field 95Mo NMR Spectroscopy. Direct Observation of the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using an...

326

airborne radar observations: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of ionospheric modication by high power radio waves Physics Websites Summary: with the Finland component of CUTLASS, and the rst observations of articial irregularities by...

327

Investigations of the g{sub K}-factors in the {sup 175,177,179}Hf Isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the intrinsic g{sub K} and effective spin g{sub s} factors of the odd-mass {sup 175-179}Hf isotopes have been investigated within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation by using the realistic Saxon-Woods potential. The theoretically calculated g{sub K} and g{sub s}{sup eff} values are compared with experimental data. The comparison of the measured and calculated values of the effective g{sub s} factor shows that the spin polarization explains quite well the observed reduction of g{sub s} from its free-nucleon value.

Yakut, Hakan; Kuliev, Ali [Sakarya University, Department of physics, Sakarya (Turkey); Guliyev, Ekber [National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

SKA Key science project: Radio observations of cosmic reionization and first light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I update the SKA key science program (KSP) on first light and cosmic reionization. The KSP has two themes: (i) Using the 21cm line of neutral hydrogen as the most direct probe into the evolution of the neutral intergalactic medium during cosmic reionization. Such HI 21cm studies are potentially the most important new window on cosmology since the discovery of the CMB. (ii) Observing the gas, dust, star formation, and dynamics, of the first galaxies and AGN. Observations at cm and mm wavelengths, provide an unobscured view of galaxy formation within 1 Gyr of the Big Bang, and are an ideal complement to the study of stars, ionized gas, and AGN done using near-IR telescopes. I summarize HI 21cm signals, challenges, and telescopes under construction. I also discuss the prospects for studying the pre-galactic medium, prior to first light, using a low frequency telescope on the Moon. I then review the current status of mm and cm observations of the most known distant galaxies (z > 6). I make the simple argument that even a 10% SKA-high demonstrator will have a profound impact on the study of the first galaxies. In particular, extending the SKA to the 'natural' atmospheric limit (set by the O_2 line) of 45 GHz, increases the effective sensitivity to thermal emission by another factor four.

C. L. Carilli

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

2002-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

330

Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early-embryonic transcriptional regulation, and a significant proportion may be nonfunctional. Surprisingly, for five of the six factors, their recognition sites are not unambiguously more constrained evolutionarily than the immediate flanking DNA, even in more highly bound and presumably functional regions, indicating that comparative DNA sequence analysis is limited in its ability to identify functional transcription factor targets.

Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

Disruptive Event Biosphere Doser Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to, and the results of, development of radionuclide-, exposure scenario-, and ash thickness-specific Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postulated postclosure extrusive igneous event (volcanic eruption) at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations were done for seventeen radionuclides. The selection of radionuclides included those that may be significant dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, as well as radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure. The approach documented in this report takes into account human exposure during three different phases at the time of, and after, volcanic eruption. Calculations of disruptive event BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. The pathway analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. BDCFs for volcanic eruption, when combined with the concentration of radioactivity deposited by eruption on the soil surface, allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculation of radioactivity deposition is outside the scope of this report and so is the transport of contaminated ash from the volcano to the location of the receptor. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), in which doses are calculated to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

M. Wasiolek

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

Wasiolek, Maryla A.

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

333

Review of critical factors affecting crude corrosivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower quality opportunity crudes are now processed in most refineries and the source of the crudes may vary daily. These feedstocks, if not properly handled, can result in reduction in service life of equipment as well as costly failure and downtime. Analytical tools are needed to predict their high temperature corrosivity toward distillation units. Threshold in total sulfur and total acid number (TAN) have been used for many years as rules of thumb for predicting crude corrosivity, However, it is now realized that they are not accurate in their predictive ability. Crudes with similar composition and comparable with respect to process considerations have been found to be entirely different in their impact on corrosion. Naphthenic acid content, sulfur content, velocity, temperature, and materials of construction are the main factors affecting the corrosion process, Despite progress made in elucidating the role of the different parameters on the crude corrosivity process, the main problem is in calculating their combined effect, especially when the corroding stream is such a complex mixture. The TAN is usually related directly to naphthenic acid content. However, discrepancies between analytical methods and interference of numerous components of the crude itself lead to unreliable reported content of naphthenic acid. The sulfur compounds, with respect to corrosivity, appear to relate more to their decomposition at elevated temperature to form hydrogen sulfide than to their total content in crude. This paper reviews the present situation regarding crude corrosivity in distillation units, with the aim of indicating the extent of available information, and areas where further research is necessary.

Tebbal, S.; Kane, R.D. [CLI International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building for constraining climate predictions based on observations of past climate change. The first uses large ensembles

335

62 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Observations and infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources in the taking and recording of observations. It strategically plans, builds and operates improving delivery efficiencies; and · facilitating both management and cultural change to ensure continued System Strategy; · Observing Network Operations; and · Infrastructure Management. The performance of each

Greenslade, Diana

336

Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru Renos Vakis, Elisabeth these transactions costs. When opportunities exist to sell a crop on alternative markets, the observed choice of market can be used to infer a monetary measure of transactions costs in market participation. The market

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

337

Data augmentation for a Bayesian spatial model involving censored observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data augmentation for a Bayesian spatial model involving censored observations Brooke L Fridley1 (fax) 1 #12;SUMMARY Spatial environmental data sometimes include below detection limit observations (i. We develop a measurement error Bayesian spatial model for the analysis of spatial data with censored

338

Nembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations. The Shewhart chart has been well-discussed in the literature and introductory texts on SPC (seeNembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts for Systems with Response Lags Engineering April 2002 Abstract Previously, it has been held that statistical process control (SPC

Nembhard, Harriet Black

339

High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability E.E. Ortiz, M.E. Mauel, D observed in high-beta plasma created in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). We have previously of anisotropic high beta equilibrium · Measuring Electrostatic Fluctuations · Hot Electron Interchange (HEI

340

Continuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication Florian D¨orfler, Fabio-permissions@ieee.org. This material is based upon work supported by NSF grants IIS-0904501 and CPS-1135819. Florian D¨orfler, Fabio, University of California, Santa Barbara, {dorfler,fabiopas,bullo}@engineering.ucsb.edu Distributed observers

Bullo, Francesco

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

What is the reference frame of an accelerated observer?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The general construction of extended refrence frames for noninertial observers in flat space is studied. It is shown that, if the observer moves inertially before and after an arbitrary acceleration and rotation, the region where reference frames can coincide with an inertial system is bounded for final velocities exceeding 0.6 c.

K. -P. Marzlin

1998-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias climatological surface wind speed probability density functions (PDFs) estimated from observations and use them to evaluate, for the first time, contemporaneous wind PDFs predicted by a GCM. The ob- servations include NASA

Zender, Charles

343

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong a,*, Soojong instruments, the far-infrared surveyor (FIS) will map the entire sky in four bands using short wavelength (SW- oped a suite of software with an aim to simulate the FIS observations (Jeong et al., 2000, 2003, 2004

Pak, Soojong

344

UAV PATH FOLLOWING FOR TARGET OBSERVATION IN WIND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UAV PATH FOLLOWING FOR TARGET OBSERVATION IN WIND Rolf Rysdyk, University of Washington, Seattle is affected by wind, aircraft performance, and camera limits. Analytic expressions are derived for paths which, and stability of its integration with aircraft dynamics is assessed. An observer estimates wind data, which

Washington at Seattle, University of

345

Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the observation of single top-quark production using 3.2??fb[superscript -1] of pp? collision data with ?s=1.96??TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The significance of the observed data is 5.0 ...

Xie, Si

346

Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

Southern California, University of

347

Infrared Observations of Soft GammaRay Repeaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared Observations of Soft Gamma­Ray Repeaters I. A. Smith Department of Space Physics been found for SGR 0525--66. This paper gives a brief overview of some recent and ongoing infrared observing programs. For a more detailed review article, see Smith (1997) [2]. INFRARED SPECTRA OF SGR 1806

Smith, Ian Andrew

348

Observations of non-conjugate theta aurora N. stgaard,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of non-conjugate theta aurora N. stgaard,1 S. B. Mende,1 H. U. Frey,1 L. A. Frank,2 particle measurements we report two events where a theta aurora was observed in one hemisphere for the occurrence of non-conjugate theta aurora. INDEX TERMS: 2475 Ionosphere: Polar cap ionosphere; 2704

California at Berkeley, University of

349

Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft F. Nemec,1,2 O. Santoli´k,3 January 2006; published 22 April 2006. [1] Results of a systematic survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation from the electric power systems which are magnetically conjugated with the place of observation

Santolik, Ondrej

350

LWA Station-Level Observing Procedure and Associated Metadata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and declination (DEC). Solar Tracking (TRK SOL). This is a beam output mode in which the beam tracks the Sun of observation "metadata"; that is, data which is produced by MCS as part of the processes of scheduling and conducting the observation. Metadata is distinct from the primary instrument output, which is captured by MCS

Ellingson, Steven W.

351

Thermal evolution of Mercury as constrained by MESSENGER observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations have constrained the rate of radiogenic heat production via measurement of uranium, thorium melting, consistent with MESSENGER observations of the planet's surface chemistry and geology. Citation, provides cru- cial context for interpreting a planet's geological history [e.g., Schubert et al., 2001

Zuber, Maria

352

absorption bands observed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

absorption bands observed First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AKARI observations of ice...

353

STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS Rick Katz Institute) Unified Modeling of Distributions (6) Resources #12;4 #12;5 (1) Background · Use of Extremal Models -- Stochastic weather generators Improved treatment of extremes #12;6 (2) Observed Tail Behavior · Extreme Value

Katz, Richard

354

Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

NS&T Management Observations - 3rd Quarter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of managements observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&Ts MOP.

David Gianotto

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The physical observer I: Absolute and relative fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Jet Theory (QJT) is a deformation of QFT where also the quantum dynamics of the observer is taken into account. This is achieved by introducing relative fields, labelled by locations measured by rods relative to the observer's position. In the Hamiltonian formalism, the observer's momentum is modified: p_i \\to p_i - P_i, where P_i is the momentum carried by the field quanta. The free scalar field, free electromagnetism and gravity are treated as examples. Standard QFT results are recovered in the limit that the observer's mass M \\to \\infty and its charge e \\to 0. This limit is well defined except for gravity, because e = M in that case (heavy mass equals inert mass). In a companion paper we describe how QJT also leads to new observer-dependent gauge and diff anomalies, which can not be formulated within QFT proper.

T. A. Larsson

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

The effect of local geologic conditions on observed seismic intensities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R+ c Iog(R+ iO) (2) We may derive the attenuation equation from a point source model where the amplitude of body waves in a homogeneous medium is given by an equation of the form (Chandra, I982a): A-(A /R) exp(-pR) (3) where R Aa, 2 ~ h2.... This attenuation equation is sImilar to equation (3) in that we have an initial source strength value Io, a geometrical spreading factor represented by bR, and an anelastic attenuation factor, c log R. In 16 order to avoid the singularity at R - 0...

Moran, David Rick

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Billing Factors for Operating Reserves September 30, 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are effective on October 1, 2014. This implements the FERC approved standard BAL-002-WECC-2. Operating Reserve - Spinning Reserve: The Billing Factor for the rates specified in...

360

QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, I briefly review several models of the heavy quarkonium production at collider energies, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation) Re-direct Destination: Fungal free enzymes and bacterial...

362

anthracis lethal factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

363

alfa como factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

364

Optimization Online - A Factorization with Update Procedures for a ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 11, 2009 ... A Factorization with Update Procedures for a KKT Matrix Arising in Direct Optimal Control. Christian Kirches (christian.kirches ***at***...

Christian Kirches

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Article Published on LED Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of a comprehensive lifetime rating - as well as the problematic relationship between SSL lifetime and lumen maintenance - determining an appropriate LLD factor for LED products...

366

Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004...

367

Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors: Free Space and Medium Modifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review recent developments in the study of electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, both in free space and in the nuclear medium. For the free nucleon case, we discuss the ratio of electric to magnetic proton form factors, and the influence of two-photon exchange on the form factor extraction. For the bound nucleon, we examine the implications of the small but non-zero modification of proton form factors in the nuclear medium suggested by recent data on polarized proton knockout reactions off He-4, and discuss constraints which it could place on models of the nuclear EMC effect.

Wally Melnitchouk

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

apoptosis inducing factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

independent cathepsins tumor necrosis factor Lasse Foghsgaard; Dorte Wissing; Daniel Mauch; Ulrik Lademann; Lone Bastholm; Marianne Boes; Folmer Elling; Marcel Leist;...

369

Factors Affecting the Battery Performance of Anthraquinone-based...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Affecting the Battery Performance of Anthraquinone-based Organic Cathode Materials. Factors Affecting the Battery Performance of Anthraquinone-based Organic Cathode Materials....

370

IDENTIFICATION OF FACTORS RELATED TO MOTORCYCLE FATAL INJURIES IN OHIO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ohio crash data for 2003-2007 were used to investigate the odds of a motorcyclist being fatally injured in a crash and the risk factors involved. (more)

Indupuru, Vamsi K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Analysis of Factors Affecting Motorcycle-Motor Vehicle Crash Characteristics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As everybody knows, there are many traffic crashes happening every day. Traffic crashes may result in injury, death, and property damage. A number of factors (more)

Zhu, Di

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Observation of interference between two Bose condensates The spatial coherence of a Bose condensate was demonstrated by observing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observation of interference between two Bose condensates The spatial coherence of a Bose condensate was demonstrated by observing interference between two Bose condensates [1]. They were created by cooling atoms the condensates expand for 40 milliseconds and overlap (see figure). This demonstrates that Bose condensed atoms

373

Observations of Transient Active Region Heating with Hinode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present observations of transient active region heating events observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. This initial investigation focuses on NOAA active region 10940 as observed by Hinode on February 1, 2007 between 12 and 19 UT. In these observations we find numerous examples of transient heating events within the active region. The high spatial resolution and broad temperature coverage of these instruments allows us to track the evolution of coronal plasma. The evolution of the emission observed with XRT and EIS during these events is generally consistent with loops that have been heated and are cooling. We have analyzed the most energetic heating event observed during this period, a small GOES B-class flare, in some detail and present some of the spectral signatures of the event, such as relative Doppler shifts at one of the loop footpoints and enhanced line widths during the rise phase of the event. While the analysis of these transient events has the potential to yield insights into the coronal heating mechanism, these observations do not rule out the possibility that there is a strong steady heating level in the active region. Detailed statistical analysis will be required to address this question definitively.

Harry P. Warren; Ignacio Ugarte-Urra; David H. Brooks; Jonathan W. Cirtain; David R. Williams; Hirohisa Harra

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

Observer-dependent optical properties of stationary axisymmetric spacetimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world lines of null particles admit arbitrary parametrizations. In the presence of a family of observers one may introduce along a null world line an extension of the so-called Cattaneo's relative standard time parameter (valid for massive particles) which plays a special role. Another possibility is to use the coordinate time itself as a parameter. The relation between relative standard time and coordinate time allows for the introduction of an observer-dependent optical path and associated refraction index. Both these quantities are studied here working out explicit examples concerning familiar null orbits and observers in black hole spacetimes.

Donato Bini; Fernando de Felice; Andrea Geralico

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

Polarization Observables in the Photoproduction of Two Pseudoscalar Mesons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The many polarization observables that can be measured in process like {gamma}N {yields} M{sub 1}M{sub 2}B, where M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} are pseudoscalar mesons and B is a spin-1/2 baryon, are discussed. The relationships among these observables, their symmetries, as well as inequalities that they satisfy are briefly discussed. Within the context of a particular model for {gamma}N {yields} NKK, some of the observables are calculated, and their sensitivity to the ingredients of the model, and hence to the underlying dynamics of the process, are discussed.

Winston Roberts

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Suzaku And Multi-Wavelength Observations of OJ 287 During the Periodic Optical Outburst in 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suzaku observations of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be {Lambda} = 1.65 {+-} 0.02 and S{sub 1keV} = 215 {+-} 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum ({Lambda} = 1.50 {+-} 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S{sub 1keV} = 404{sub -5}{sup +6} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to {approx} 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy {gamma}-ray observations of OJ 287 were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 {+-} 0.46 Jy and 8.93 {+-} 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 than those in the quiescent state (1.73 {+-} 0.26 Jy and 3.03 {+-} 0.01 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively). No notable {gamma}-ray events were detected in either observation. The spectral energy distribution of OJ 287 indicated that the X-ray spectrum was dominated by inverse Compton radiation in both observations, while synchrotron radiation exhibited a spectral cutoff around the optical frequency. Furthermore, no significant difference in the synchrotron cutoff frequency was found between the quiescent and flaring states. According to a simple synchrotron self-Compton model, the change of the spectral energy distribution is due to an increase in the energy density of electrons with small changes of both the magnetic field strength and the maximum Lorentz factor of electrons.

Seta, Hiromi; /Saitama U.; Isobe, N.; /Kyoto U.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; /Saitama U.; Yaji, Yuichi; /Saitama U.; Arai, Akira; /Hiroshima U.; Fukuhara, Masayuki; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Kohno, Kotaro; /Tokyo U.; Nakanishi, Koichiro; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Sasada, Mahito; /Hiroshima U.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Tosaki, Tomoka; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Uemura, Makoto; /Hiroshima U.; Anderhub, Hans; /Zurich, ETH; Antonelli, L.A.; /INFN, Rome; Antoranz, Pedro; /Madrid U.; Backes, Michael; /Dortmund U.; Baixeras, Carmen; /Barcelona, Autonoma U.; Balestra, Silvia; /Madrid U.; Barrio, Juan Abel; /Madrid U.; Bastieri, Denis; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; /IAC, La Laguna /Dortmund U. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /DESY /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /INFN, Rome /Dortmund U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /IAC, La Laguna /Madrid, CIEMAT /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Zurich, ETH /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Wurzburg U. /Barcelona, IFAE /UC, Davis /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Rome /UC, Davis /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Wurzburg U. /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Wurzburg U. /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /UC, Santa Cruz /Madrid U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Trieste /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Dortmund U. /Barcelona, IEEC /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /Zurich, ETH /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Wurzburg U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /INFN, Rome /Sierra Nevada Observ. /DESY /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /Wurzburg U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Zurich, ETH /Turku U. /INFN, Rome /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Barcelona, IFAE /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

378

Measuring star formation with resolved observations: the test case of M33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. Measuring star formation at a local scale is important to constrain star formation laws. Yet, it is not clear whether and how the measure of star formation is affected by the spatial scale at which a galaxy is observed. Aims. We want to understand the impact of the resolution on the determination of the spatially resolved star formation rate (SFR) and other directly associated physical parameters such as the attenuation. Methods. We have carried out a multi-scale, pixel-by-pixel study of the nearby galaxy M33. Assembling FUV, Halpha, 8, 24, 70, and 100 micron maps, we have systematically compared the emission in individual bands with various SFR estimators from a resolution of 33 pc to 2084 pc. Results. We have found that there are strong, scale-dependent, discrepancies up to a factor 3 between monochromatic SFR estimators and Halpha+24 micron. The scaling factors between individual IR bands and the SFR show a strong dependence on the spatial scale and on the intensity of star formation. Finally, str...

Boquien, M; Aalto, S; Boselli, A; Braine, J; Buat, V; Combes, F; Israel, F; Kramer, C; Lord, S; Relano, M; Rosolowsky, E; Stacey, G; Tabatabaei, F; van der Tak, F; van der Werf, P; Verley, S; Xilouris, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Observation of contemporaneous optical radiation from a gamma-ray burst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been enigmatic since their discovery. The situation improved dramatically in 1997, when the rapid availability of precise coordinates for the bursts allowed the detection of faint optical and radio afterglows - optical spectra thus obtained have demonstrated conclusively that the bursts occur at cosmological distances. But, despite efforts by several groups, optical detection has not hitherto been achieved during the brief duration of a burst. Here we report the detection of bright optical emission from GRB990123 while the burst was still in progress. Our observations begin 22 seconds after the onset of the burst and show an increase in brightness by a factor of 14 during the first 25 seconds; the brightness then declines by a factor of 100, at which point (700 seconds after the burst onset) it falls below our detection threshold. The redshift of this burst, approximately 1.6, implies a peak optical luminosity of 5 times 10^{49} erg per second. Optical emission from gamma-ray bursts has been generally thought to take place at the shock fronts generated by interaction of the primary energy source with the surrounding medium, where the gamma-rays might also be produced. The lack of a significant change in the gamma-ray light curve when the optical emission develops suggests that the gamma-rays are not produced at the shock front, but closer to the site of the original explosion.

C. Akerlof; R. Balsano; S. Barthelmy; J. Bloch; P. Butterworth; D. Casperson; T. Cline; S. Fletcher; F. Frontera; G. Gisler; J. Heise; J. Hills; R. Kehoe; B. Lee; S. Marshall; T. McKay; R. Miller; L. Piro; W. Priedhorsky; J. Szymanski; J. Wren

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

380

Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

Li, Qing, 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sivers and Boer-Mulders observables from lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a first calculation of transverse momentum-dependent nucleon observables in dynamical lattice QCD employing nonlocal operators with staple-shaped, process-dependent Wilson lines. The use of staple-shaped Wilson ...

Musch, B. U.

382

Observations on the JWKB treatment of the quadratic barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations on the JWKB treatment of the quadratic barrier Hujun Shen1 and Harris J. Silverstone2 June, 2006. Accepted 11 July, 2006. #12;238 Hujun Shen and Harris J. Silverstone where ±x0 = ± -2E

Silverstone, Harris J.

383

BOWHUNTER OBSERVATIONS VERSUS SPOTLIGHTING AS AN INDEX TO DEER ABUNDANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arboretum (MFCA) in southeastern New York State since 1970 (Davis 1975, Winchcombe 1993). The objective and observations of deer by bowhunters) were used at the MFCA to assess effectiveness in reaching the objective

384

OBSERVATIONS ON JUVENILE OCEANIC SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONS ON JUVENILE OCEANIC SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM HAWAIIAN WATERS AND SIERRA SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM HAWAIIAN WATERS AND SIERRA MACKEREL (SCOMBEROMORUS SIERRA) FROM September 1948. While operating in Hawaiian waters, seven juvenile KatsllwollllS pelamis (Linnaeus) 1758

385

Integrating spacecraft and aircraft in Earth Observation System architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) is the essential data gathering network that enables the advancement of Earth science. In recent years, efforts have been made to understand the major GEOS architectural tradeoffs. ...

Suarez, Brandon H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Einstein-aether gravity: theory and observational constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Einstein-aether theory is general relativity coupled to a dynamical unit timelike vector field. A brief review of current theoretical understanding and observational constraints on the four coupling parameters of the theory is given.

Ted Jacobson

2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

Observation of molecular orbital gating Hyunwook Song1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Heejun Jeong3 , Mark A. Reed4 & Takhee Lee1,2 The control of charge transport in an active electronic to be observed in an electrochemical break junction11 , but until now proof of directorbitalgate controlofa solid

Reed, Mark

388

Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires and nanotubes December 1, 2011 at 3pm36-428 Eric Stach Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National...

389

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), thought to be produced by the core-collapse of massive stars or merging compact objects, are the most luminous events observed since the (more)

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray...

391

Observation of suppressed terahertz absorption in photoexcited graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When light is absorbed by a semiconductor, photoexcited charge carriers enhance the absorption of far-infrared radiation due to intraband transitions. We observe the opposite behavior in monolayer graphene, a zero-gap ...

Frenzel, Alex James

392

Observation of Two New ? [subscript b][superscript ?] Baryon Resonances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the ?[0 over b]?[superscript -] mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0??fb[superscript ...

Aaij, R.

393

Observing Healthcare Interior Environments and the Effect on Patient Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variables in the interior environments that have the greatest impact, whether positive or negative, on patients. The methods used to perform this research include: inspections of the facility, observations, and surveys. By combining all of these methods...

Rice, Courtney R.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Frictional properties of faults: from observation on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frictional properties of faults: from observation on the Longitudinal Valley Fault, Taiwan myself lucky to do what I love and to wake up every day, happy and excited about the day to come

Winfree, Erik

395

Designed for: Ocean Observing Demo: A collaboration between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

off of Fire Island, NY. The Wave Glider records data on the wind, water temperature and salinity pressure, temperature and sound velocity. The Wave Glider is an autonomous ocean observing platform

396

Observer Variability in Metameric Color Matches using Color  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* Correspondence to: R. L. Alfvin, Eastman Kodak Company, Build- to another observer. This phenomenon is caused by ob- ing 65, Rochester, NY 14650-1829 server metamerism. Contract grant sponsor: NSF-NYS

Fairchild, Mark D.

397

agn feedback observations: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Christopher S; Heinz, Sebastian 2008-01-01 18 Feeding Versus Feedback in AGNs from Near-Infrared IFU Observations: The Case of Mrk79 CERN Preprints Summary: We have mapped the...

398

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

399

Integrated assessment of packaging architectures in earth observing programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When designing Earth observation missions, it is essential to take into account the programmatic context. Considering individual missions as part of a whole enables overall program optimization, which may bring important ...

Selva Valero, Daniel

400

Observable signatures of general relativistic dynamics in compact binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of general relativity (GR) in astrophysical systems are often difficult to calculate, but they can have important consequences for observables. This thesis considers the impact of previously-ignored GR effects ...

Lang, Ryan N. (Ryan Nathan)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Observation of New Charmless Decays of Bottom Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We search for new charmless decays of neutral b hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons, using 1??fb[superscript -1] of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report the first observation of the ...

Xie, Si

402

A multisensory observer model for human spatial orientation perception  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative "observer" models for spatial orientation and eye movements have been developed based on 1-G data from humans and animals (e.g. Oman 1982, 1991, Merfeld, et al 1993, 2002; Haslwanter 2000, Vingerhoets 2006). ...

Newman, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Inventory of NMFS Fishery-Independent Surveys and Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Inventory of NMFS Fishery-Independent Surveys and Observations Phase 1: A One-year Snapshot of Appendixes Appendix I. Inventory working group .............................................................. 22 Appendix II. Glossary for terms used in the inventory

404

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-CRUZ OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AT EXTREME ENERGIES AAncient Unvierse with Gamma-Ray Bursts, pages 330333. AIP,

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

MACHO Mass Determination Based on Space Telescope Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the possibility of lens mass determination for a caustic crossing microlensing event based on a space telescope observation. We demonstrate that the parallax due to the orbital motion of a space telescope causes a periodic fluctuation of the light curve, from which the lens distance can be derived. Since the proper motion of the lens relative to the source is also measurable for a caustic crossing event, one can find a full solution for microlensing properties of the event, including the lens mass. To determine the lens mass with sufficient accuracy, the light curve near the caustic crossing should be observed within uncertainty of $\\sim$ 1%. We argue that the Hubble Space Telescope observation of the caustic crossing supplied with ground-based observations of the full light curve will enable us to determine the mass of MACHOs, which is crucial for understanding the nature of MACHOs.

Mareki Honma

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

406

H$\\alpha$ and EUV observations of a partial CME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have obtained H$\\alpha$ high spatial and time resolution observations of the upper solar chromosphere and supplemented these with multi-wavelength observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and the {\\it Hinode} ExtremeUltraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The H$\\alpha$ observations were conducted on 11 February 2012 with the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics Camera (HARDcam) instrument at the National Solar Observatory's Dunn Solar Telescope. Our H$\\alpha$ observations found large downflows of chromospheric material returning from coronal heights following a failed prominence eruption. We have detected several large condensations ("blobs") returning to the solar surface at velocities of $\\approx$200 km s$^{-1}$ in both H$\\alpha$ and several SDO AIA band passes. The average derived size of these "blobs" in H$\\alpha$ is 500 by 3000 km$^2$ in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the direction of travel, respectively. A comparison of our "blob" widths to those found from coronal rain, indicate...

Christian, Damian J; Antolin, Patrick; Mathioudakis, Mihalis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Measurement of the Neutron electric form factor at Q2=0.8 2(GeV\\\\c)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nucleon form factors allow a sensitive test for models of the nucleon. Recent experiments utilising polarisation observables have resulted, for the first time, in a model-independent determination of the neutron electric form factor GnE. This method employed an 80% longitudinally polarised, high intensity (10 uA) electon beam (883 MeV) that was quasi-elastically scattered off a liquid deuterium target in the reaction D (e, en)p. A neutron polarimeter was designed and installed to measure the ratio of transverse-to-longitudinal polarisation using neutron scattering asymmetries. This ratio allowed a determination of the neutron elastic form factor, GnE, free of the previous large systematic uncertainties associated with the deuterium wave function. The experiment took place in the A1 experimental hall at MAMI taking advantage of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer. A detailed investigation was carried out into the performance of the neutron polarimeter.

Derek Glazier

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Observation of the photodielectric effect in an amorphous semiconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATION OF THE PHOTODIELECTRIC EFFECT IN AN AHGRPBGUS SFNICONDUCTOR A THESIS by STEPHEN ANTHONY COLLINS Subqitted tu the Graduate College of Texas A&M University iu Partial fulfillment of. the requirement for the. degree of 1IASTER OI...' SCIFNCE August 1971 Hajcr Suhjec '. Fleqtricel magic. earing OBSERVATION OF THE PHOTODIELECTRIC EFFECT IN AN AMORPHOUS SEMICONDUCTOR A THESIS by STEPHEN ANTHONY COLLINS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of epartm...

Collins, Stephen Anthony

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Observations from Australasia using the Gravitational Microlensing Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new astronomical technique of gravitational microlensing enables measurements of high precision to be made in certain circumstances. Useful advances have been made in the fields of galactic astronomy, stellar astronomy and planetary science. The technique is best suited to the southern sky, and several observations have been made from Australasia. A sample of these observations is described here. A case is also made for a telescope at the Antarctic dedicated to gravitational microlensing.

Philip Yock

1999-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

Multi-Factor Energy Price Models Exotic Derivatives Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-Factor Energy Price Models and Exotic Derivatives Pricing by Samuel Hikspoors A thesis of Statistics University of Toronto c Copyright by Samuel Hikspoors 2008 #12;Multi-Factor Energy Price Models and practitioners alike recently started to develop the tools of energy derivatives pricing

Jaimungal, Sebastian

411

Human Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into utility control centers. For example, [1] and [2] describe the on-line usage of animated flows, voltageHuman Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation Douglas A. Wiegmann, Gavin R. Essenberg flow information, including transmission line MW flow and power transfer distribution factor (PTDF

412

Nucleon Form Factors experiments with 12 GeV CEBAF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of precision form factor experiments at high momentum transfer will be performed with the 11 GeV electron beam of CEBAF. We review the approved proposals and the conceptual schemes of several new suggestions. Form factor data will serve as a major input for the construction of a tomographic image of the nucleon.

Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

INNOVATION AS A FACTOR (DETERMINANT) FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INNOVATION AS A FACTOR (DETERMINANT) FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF SMES IN THE KNOWLEDGE, e-mail: stryjski@post.pl, e-mail: j.patalas@iizp.uz.zgora.pl, 3 Brandenburg University of Technology development of SMES are presented. Consequently, the innovation in SMEs as the one of the factor

414

Heavy quark impact factor for the LHC phenomenology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We comment on the calculation of the finite part of the heavy quark impact factor at next-to-leading logarithmic (NLx) accuracy. The result is presented in a form suitable for phenomenological studies such as the calculation of the cross-section for single heavy quark production at the LHC within the kT-factorization scheme.

Grigorios Chachamis; Michal Deak; German Rodrigo

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

HighPerformance Library Software for QR Factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factorization. Using recursion leads us to a natural way to choose the k­way aggregating Householder transform604e node. Keywords: Serial and parallel library software, QR factorization, recur­ sion, register utilize the memory hierarchy is the key to high performance on uniprocessors as well as on SMP systems

Elmroth, Erik

416

FRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE. REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART THREE FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE OF FISHERY PRODUCTS Taking Place During Cold Storage of Fish Section 3 - Protective Coverings for Frozen Fish · · Pages 1

417

Scaling Factor Inconsistencies in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half life can be suppressed by 15-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, $$ is overestimated.

S. Cowell

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Appendix II. Calculation of Slope Factors for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix II. Calculation of Slope Factors for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides In developing calculates the slope factors for the naturally occurring radionuclides under consideration. The Radionuclide products with half-lives of less than 6 months). As explained below, naturally occurring radionuclides

419

Scaling factor inconsistencies in neutrinoless double beta decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half-life can be suppressed by 15%-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, is overestimated.

Cowell, S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Diagnostic relapse in Borderline Personality Disorder: risk and protective factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIAGNOSTIC RELAPSE IN BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER: RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS A Dissertation by BRIAN DAVID QUIGLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2003 Major Subject: Psychology DIAGNOSTIC RELAPSE IN BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER: RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS A Dissertation by BRIAN DAVID QUIGLEY...

Quigley, Brian David

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness. C. 2006. Agronomic and environmental factors influence weed composition and canola competitiveness in southern Manitoba. Can. J. Plant Sci. 86: 591­599. Canola yield in Manitoba has reached a plateau in recent

Kenkel, Norm

422

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted wildland fire greenhouse gas and aerosol (organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) emission inventories

423

A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

Young, Joseph G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Dynamics and variability of the plasmasphere observed from synchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of the cold ions in the outer plasmasphere is studied using data obtained with the magnetospheric plasma analyzers from multiple geosynchronous satellites. Dense (10-100 cm{sup {minus}3}), cold ({approx}1 eV) regions of plasma are often observed at geosynchronous orbit; in this study the authors refer to these as plasmaspheric intervals. The duration, local time of observation, density variability, and temperature behavior within these regions often depend in a systematic way on geomagnetic and substorm activity. With increasing geomagnetic activity (as indicated by Kp) the plasmaspheric regions are generally observed over shorter durations and at earlier local times. With increasing substorm activity (as indicated by geosynchronous energetic electron injections) the density becomes increasingly variable in these regions. Occasionally, up to order-of-magnitude density variations are observed over several minute timescales corresponding to regions with physical dimensions on the order of 1000 km or less. The appearance of these short-duration, cold-plasma intervals is strongly correlated with energetic ion and electron signatures both at the spacecraft making the plasmaspheric observations and at other spacecraft observing simultaneously in the midnight region. Such energetic particle signatures are indicative of the growth and expansive phase of geomagnetic substorms. The authors conclude that the appearance of these short-duration, plasmaspheric intervals is due to a reconfiguration of the duskside magnetosphere during geomagnetic substorms.

Moldwin, M.B.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1 - 2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference (cellular phones) causing a spurious symmetric pattern in the spectrogram at 1.4 GHz. Symmetric features in the 1 - 2 GHz range, some already reported in the literature, therefore must be considered with utmost caution.

Arnold O. Benz; Peter Messmer; Christian Monstein

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

426

Autonomous observing strategies for the ocean carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the exchanges of carbon between the atmosphere and ocean and the fate of carbon delivered to the deep sea is fundamental to the evaluation of ocean carbon sequestration options. An additional key requirement is that sequestration must be verifiable and that environmental effects be monitored and minimized. These needs can be addressed by carbon system observations made from low-cost autonomous ocean-profiling floats and gliders. We have developed a prototype ocean carbon system profiler based on the Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer (SOLO; Davis et al., 1999). The SOLO/ carbon profiler will measure the two biomass components of the carbon system and their relationship to physical variables, such as upper ocean stratification and mixing. The autonomous observations within the upper 1500 m will be made on daily time scales for periods of months to seasons and will be carried out in biologically dynamic locations in the world's oceans that are difficult to access with ships (due to weather) or observe using remote sensing satellites (due to cloud cover). Such an observational capability not only will serve an important role in carbon sequestration research but will provide key observations of the global ocean's natural carbon cycle.

Bishop, James K.; Davis, Russ E.

2000-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

427

Gray, W. D. (2003). Cognitive factors in homeland defense: The role of human factors in the novel intelligence from massive data (NIMD) project, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 1017-1018). Santa Monica, CA: Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intelligence from massive data (NIMD) project, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 1017-1018). Santa Monica, CA: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. COGNITIVE FACTORS IN HOMELAND DEFENSE: THE ROLE

Gray, Wayne

428

Analysis of IFR driver fuel hot channel factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal-hydraulic uncertainty factors for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) driver fuels have been determined based primarily on the database obtained from the predecessor fuels used in the IFR prototype, Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The uncertainty factors were applied to the channel factors (HCFs) analyses to obtain separate overall HCFs for fuel and cladding for steady-state analyses. A ``semistatistical horizontal method`` was used in the HCFs analyses. The uncertainty factor of the fuel thermal conductivity dominates the effects considered in the HCFs analysis; the uncertainty in fuel thermal conductivity will be reduced as more data are obtained to expand the currently limited database for the IFR ternary metal fuel (U-20Pu-10Zr). A set of uncertainty factors to be used for transient analyses has also been derived.

Ku, J.Y.; Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The effects of growth factors on testicular germ cell apoptosis in the stallion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recombinant growth factors, stem cell factor (SCF), leukemia inhibiting factor (LIF), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and one hormone, estradiol (E?), alone or in combination, to prevent apoptosis of germ cells in short-term equine...

Donnelly, Casey Leanne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Quenching Factor for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils in a Plastic Scintillator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plastic scintillators are widely used in industry, medicine and scientific research, including nuclear and particle physics. Although one of their most common applications is in neutron detection, experimental data on their response to low-energy nuclear recoils are scarce. Here, the relative scintillation efficiency for neutron-induced nuclear recoils in a polystyrene-based plastic scintillator (UPS-923A) is presented, exploring recoil energies between 125 keV and 850 keV. Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating light collection efficiency and energy resolution effects, are used to generate neutron scattering spectra which are matched to observed distributions of scintillation signals to parameterise the energy-dependent quenching factor. At energies above 300 keV the dependence is reasonably described using the semi-empirical formulation of Birks and a kB factor of (0.014+/-0.002) g/MeVcm^2 has been determined. Below that energy the measured quenching factor falls more steeply than predicted by the Birks formalism.

L. Reichhart; D. Yu. Akimov; H. M. Araujo; E. J. Barnes; V. A. Belov; A. A. Burenkov; V. Chepel; A. Currie; L. DeViveiros; B. Edwards; V. Francis; C. Ghag; A. Hollingsworth; M. Horn; G. E. Kalmus; A. S. Kobyakin; A. G. Kovalenko; V. N. Lebedenko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; P. Majewski; A. St J. Murphy; F. Neves; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; R. Preece; J. J. Quenby; P. R. Scovell; C. Silva; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; P. F. Smith; V. N. Stekhanov; T. J. Sumner; C. Thorne; R. J. Walker

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Measuring the bulk Lorentz factors of gamma-ray bursts with Fermi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powered by ultra-relativistic jets. Usually a minimum value of the Lorentz factor of the relativistic bulk motion is obtained based on the argument that the observed high energy photons ($\\gg {\\rm MeV}$) can escape without suffering from absorption due to pair production. The exact value, rather than a lower limit, of the Lorentz factor can be obtained if the spectral cutoff due to such absorption is detected. With the good spectral coverage of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on {\\em Fermi}, measurements of such cutoff become possible, and two cases (GRB 090926A and GRB 100724B) have been reported to have high-energy cutoffs or breaks. We systematically search for such high energy spectral cutoffs/breaks from LAT and GBM observations of the prompt emission of GRBs detected since August 2011. Seven more GRBs are found to have cutoff-like spectral feature at energies of $\\sim20-300$ MeV. Assuming that these cutoffs are caused by pair-production absorption within the source, the bulk L...

Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The linear model and experimentally observed resonant field amplification in tokamaks and reversed field pinches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is given of the experimentally observed effects related to the resonant field amplification (RFA) and the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). This includes the feedback rotation of RWM in RFX-mod RFP, dependence of the RWM growth rate on the plasma-wall separation observed in JT-60U, appearance of the slowly growing RWM precursors in JT-60U and similar phenomena in other devices. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the model comprising the Maxwell equations, Ohm's law for the conducting wall, the boundary conditions and assumption of linear plasma response to the external magnetic perturbations. The model describes the plasma reaction to the error field as essentially depending on two factors: the plasma proximity to the RWM stability threshold and the natural rotation frequency of the plasma mode. The linear response means that these characteristics are determined by the plasma equilibrium parameters only. It is shown that the mentioned effects in different devices under different conditions can be described on a common basis with only assumption that the plasma behaves as a linear system. To extend the range of the model validation, some predictions are derived with proposals for experimental studies of the RFA dynamics.

Pustovitov, V. D. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Tokamak Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Structure of W3(OH) from Very High Spectral Resolution Observations of 5 Centimeter OH Masers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent studies of methanol and ground-state OH masers at very high spectral resolution have shed new light on small-scale maser processes. The nearby source W3(OH), which contains numerous bright masers in several different transitions, provides an excellent laboratory for high spectral resolution techniques. We present a model of W3(OH) based on EVN observations of the rotationally-excited 6030 and 6035 MHz OH masers taken at 0.024 km/s spectral resolution. The 6.0 GHz masers are becoming brighter with time and show evidence for tangential proper motions. We confirm the existence of a region of magnetic field oriented toward the observer to the southeast and find another such region to the northeast in W3(OH), near the champagne flow. The 6.0 GHz masers trace the inner edge of a counterclockwise rotating torus feature. Masers at 6030 MHz are usually a factor of a few weaker than at 6035 MHz but trace the same material. Velocity gradients of nearby Zeeman components are much more closely correlated than in the ground state, likely due to the smaller spatial separation between Zeeman components. Hydroxyl maser peaks at very long baseline interferometric resolution appear to have structure on scales both smaller than that resolvable as well as on larger scales.

Vincent L. Fish; Lornt O. Sjouwerman

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

The 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF12): Observational Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128-orbit Cycle 19 \\HST\\ program aimed at extending previous WFC3/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at $z$$\\,\\gtrsim\\,$8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at $z$$\\,\\sim\\,7\\,-\\,$8, facilitate the construction of new samples of $z$$\\,\\sim\\,9\\,-\\,$10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to $z$$\\,\\sim\\,$12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset, to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky currently achievable. In this paper we present the observational overview of the pr...

Koekemoer, Anton M; McLure, Ross J; Dunlop, James S; Robertson, Brant E; Ono, Yoshiaki; Schenker, Matthew A; Ouchi, Masami; Bowler, Rebecca A A; Rogers, Alexander B; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Schneider, Evan; Charlot, Stephane; Stark, Daniel P; Furlanetto, Steven R; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V; Targett, T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Optimization of radio astronomical observations using Allan variance measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability tests based on the Allan variance method have become a standard procedure for the evaluation of the quality of radio-astronomical instrumentation. They are very simple and simulate the situation when detecting weak signals buried in large noise fluctuations. For the special conditions during observations an outline of the basic properties of the Allan variance is given, and some guidelines how to interpret the results of the measurements are presented. Based on a rather simple mathematical treatment clear rules for observations in ``Position-Switch'', ``Beam-'' or ``Frequency-Switch'', ``On-The-Fly-'' and ``Raster-Mapping'' mode are derived. Also, a simple ``rule of the thumb'' for an estimate of the optimum timing for the observations is found. The analysis leads to a conclusive strategy how to plan radio-astronomical observations. Particularly for air- and space-borne observatories it is very important to determine, how the extremely precious observing time can be used with maximum efficiency. The analysis should help to increase the scientific yield in such cases significantly.

R. Schieder; C. Kramer

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

438

NuSTAR Observations of X-Ray Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As of 2014 August, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) had observed ~30 X-ray binaries either as part of the planned program, as targets of opportunity, or for instrument calibration. The main science goals for the observations include probing the inner part of the accretion disk and constraining black hole spins via reflection components, providing the first observations of hard X-ray emission from quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs), measuring cyclotron lines from accreting pulsars, and studying type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Here, we describe the science objectives in more depth and give an overview of the NuSTAR observations that have been carried out to achieve the objectives. These include observation of four "IGR" High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) discovered by INTEGRAL. We also summarize the results that have been obtained and their implications. Among the IGR HMXBs, we focus on the discovery of a cyclotron line in the spectrum of IGR J17544-2619.

Tomsick, John A; Fuerst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bhalerao, Varun; Chakrabarty, Deepto; King, Ashley; Miller, Jon M; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Detection of CFIRB with AKARI/FIS Deep Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cosmic Far-Infrared Background (CFIRB) contains information about the number and distribution of contributing sources and thus gives us an important key to understand the evolution of galaxies. Using a confusion study to set a fundamental limit to the observations, we investigate the potential to explore the CFIRB with AKARI/FIS deep observations. The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) is one of the focal-plane instruments on the AKARI (formerly known as ASTRO-F) satellite, which was launched in early 2006. Based upon source distribution models assuming three different cosmological evolutionary scenarios (no evolution, weak evolution, and strong evolution), an extensive model for diffuse emission from infrared cirrus, and instrumental noise estimates, we present a comprehensive analysis for the determination of the confusion levels for deep far-infrared observations. We use our derived sensitivities to suggest the best observational strategy for the AKARI/FIS mission to detect the CFIRB fluctuations. If the source distribution follows the evolutionary models, observations will be mostly limited by source confusion. We find that we will be able to detect the CFIRB fluctuations and that these will in turn provide information to discriminate between the evolutionary scenarios of galaxies in most low-to-medium cirrus regions.

Woong-Seob Jeong; Chris P. Pearson; Hyung Mok Lee; Shuji Matsuura; Mitsunobu Kawada; Takao Nakagawa; Sang Hoon Oh; Mai Shirahata; Sungho Lee; Ho Seong Hwang; Hideo Matsuhara

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

440

Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

PHARMACOLOGIC AND TRANSGENIC ACTIVATION OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-ERYTHROID 2-RELATED FACTOR 2 (NRF2) ALTERS KINETICS AND TOXICODYNAMICS OF XENOBIOTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor, which, upon translocation into the nucleus, is capable of inducing a variety of cytoprotective genes, such as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), glutamate...

Reisman, Scott Aaron

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

REALITY AND GEOMETRY OF STATES AND OBSERVABLES IN QUANTUM THEORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The determination of the quantum state of a single system by protective observation is used to justify operationally a formulation of quantum theory on the quantum state space (projective Hilbert space) $\\cal P$. Protective observation is extended to a more general quantum theory in which the Schrodinger evolution is generalized so that it preserves the symplectic structure but not necessarily the metric in $\\cal P$. The relevance of this more general evolution to the apparant collapse of the state vector during the usual measurement, and its possible connection to gravity is suggested. Some criticisms of protective observation are answered. A comparison is made between the determination of quantum states using the geometry of $\\cal P$ by protective measurements, via a reconstruction theorem, and the determination of space-time points by means of the space-time geometry, via Einstein's hole argument. It is argued that a protective measurement may not determine a time average.

J. Anandan

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Observational Constraints on the Topology (Global Geometry) of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe is a physical object. Physical objects have shapes and sizes. General relativity is insufficient to describe the global shape and size of the Universe: the Hilbert-Einstein equations only treat limiting quantities towards an arbitrary point. Empirical work on measuring the shape and size of the Universe (formally: the ``3-manifold of the spatial hypersurface at constant cosmological time'', and, e.g. the ``injectivity diameter'' respectively) has progressed significantly in the late 1980's and the 1990's, using observational catalogues of galaxy clusters, of quasars and of the microwave background, though the analyses are still hindered by simplifying (and often observationally unsupported) assumptions. A review of the different observational strategies and claimed constraints was presented at the meeting.

B. F. Roukema

2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

Reasonable conditions for joint probabilities of non-commuting observables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the operator formalism of quantum mechanics, the density operator describes the complete statistics of a quantum state in terms of d^2 independent elements, where d is the number of possible outcomes for a precise measurement of an observable. In principle, it is therefore possible to express the density operator by a joint probability of two observables that cannot actually be measured jointly because they do not have any common eigenstates. However, such joint probabilities do not refer to an actual measurement outcome, so their definition cannot be based on a set of possible events. Here, I consider the criteria that could specify a unique mathematical form of joint probabilities in the quantum formalism. It is shown that a reasonable set of conditions results in the definition of joint probabilities by ordered products of the corresponding projection operators. It is pointed out that this joint probability corresponds to the quasi probabilities that have recently been observed experimentally in weak measurements.

Holger F. Hofmann

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

446

Observation of the negative muonium ion in vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The negative muonium ion (M/sup /minus//), which is the bound system of a positive muon and two electrons, has been produced and observed for the first time. Its counterpart H/sup /minus// is well known, and spectroscopy and collision studies with H/sup /minus// have yielded many fruitful results. Noteworthy are recent investigations of the photoionization of a relativistic H/sup /minus// beam. The negative positronium ion has also been formed and observed. The discovery of M/sup /minus// provides us with a new leptonic system for spectroscopy and collision studies, which may reveal interesting physics associated with mass effects. Since M/sup /minus// is a charged particle, it can also be used to produce a beam of exotic atoms with a small phase space. This dissertation is a detailed account of the observation of M/sup /minus//. 93 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

Kuang, Yunan

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Testing protostellar disk formation models with ALMA observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abridged: Recent simulations have explored different ways to form accretion disks around low-mass stars. We aim to present observables to differentiate a rotationally supported disk from an infalling rotating envelope toward deeply embedded young stellar objects and infer their masses and sizes. Two 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) formation simulations and 2D semi-analytical model are studied. The dust temperature structure is determined through continuum radiative transfer RADMC3D modelling. A simple temperature dependent CO abundance structure is adopted and synthetic spectrally resolved submm rotational molecular lines up to $J_{\\rm u} = 10$ are simulated. All models predict similar compact components in continuum if observed at the spatial resolutions of 0.5-1$"$ (70-140 AU) typical of the observations to date. A spatial resolution of $\\sim$14 AU and high dynamic range ($> 1000$) are required to differentiate between RSD and pseudo-disk in the continuum. The peak-position velocity diagrams indicate that the...

Harsono, Daniel; Bruderer, Simon; Li, Zhi-Yun; Jorgensen, Jes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Observational Constraints of New Variable Modified Chaplygin Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assuming the flat FRW universe in Einstein's gravity filled with New Variable Modified Chaplygin gas (NVMCG) dark energy and dark matter having negligible pressure. In this research work we analyze the viability on the basis of recent observation. Hubble parameter $H$ is expressed in terms of the observable parameters $H_0$, $\\Omega_m^0$ and the model parameters $A_0$, $B_0$, $C_0$, $m$, $n$, $\\alpha$ and the red shift parameter $z$. Here we find a best fitted parameter range of $A_0$, $B_0$ keeping $0\\leq \\alpha \\leq 1$ and using Stern data set (12 points) by minimizing the $\\chi^2$ test at 66%, 90% and 99% confidence levels. Next we do the joint analysis with BAO and CMB observations. Again evaluating the distance modulus $\\mu(z)$ vs redshift ($z$) curve obtained in the model NVMCG with dark matter with the best fitted value of the parameters and comparing with that derived from the union2 compilation data.

Jhumpa Bhadra; Ujjal Debnath

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

449

FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fan Yizhong, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

451

VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF THE NOVA IN V407 CYGNI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of V407 Cygni, a symbiotic binary that underwent a nova outburst producing 0.1-10 GeV gamma rays during 2010 March 10-26. Observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System during 2010 March 19-26 at relatively large zenith angles due to the position of V407 Cyg. An improved reconstruction technique for large zenith angle observations is presented and used to analyze the data. We do not detect V407 Cygni and place a differential upper limit on the flux at 1.6 TeV of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (at the 95% confidence level). When considered jointly with data from Fermi-LAT, this result places limits on the acceleration of very high energy particles in the nova.

Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Decerprit, G. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Duke, C., E-mail: daniel-d-gall@uiowa.edu, E-mail: kazuma-tsurusaki@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); and others

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

452

Purcell factor of Mie resonators featuring electric and magnetic modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a modal approach to compute the Purcell factor in Mie resonators exhibiting both electric and magnetic resonances. The analytic expressions of the normal modes are used to calculate the effective volumes. We show that important features of the effective volume can be predicted thanks to the translation-addition coefficients of a displaced dipole. Using our formalism, it is easy to see that, in general, the Purcell factor of Mie resonators is not dominated by a single mode, but rather by a large superposition. Finally we consider a silicon resonator homogeneously doped with electric dipolar emitters, and we show that the average electric Purcell factor dominates over the magnetic one.

Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

455

Twisted mass QCD for the pion electromagnetic form factor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pion form factor is computed using quenched twisted mass QCD and the GMRES-DR matrix inverter. The momentum averaging procedure of Frezzotti and Rossi is used to remove leading lattice spacing artifacts, and numerical results for the form factor show the expected improvement with respect to the standard Wilson action. Although some matrix inverters are known to fail when applied to twisted mass QCD, GMRES-DR is found to be a viable and powerful option. Results obtained for the pion form factor are consistent with the published results from other O(a) improved actions and are also consistent with the available experimental data.

Abdel-Rehim, Abdou M.; Lewis, Randy [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of the primordial B-mode spectrum of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal may provide a probe of inflation. However, observation of such a faint signal requires excellent control of systematic errors. Interferometry proves to be a promising approach for overcoming such a challenge. In this paper we present a complete simulation pipeline of interferometric observations of CMB polarization, including systematic errors. We employ two different methods for obtaining the power spectra from mock data produced by simulated observations: the maximum likelihood method and the method of Gibbs sampling. We show that the results from both methods are consistent with each other as well as, within a factor of six, with analytical estimates. Several categories of systematic errors are considered: instrumental errors, consisting of antenna gain and antenna coupling errors; and beam errors, consisting of antenna pointing errors, beam cross-polarization, and beam shape (and size) errors. In order to recover the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, within a 10% tolerance level, which ensures the experiment is sensitive enough to detect the B-signal at r = 0.01 in the multipole range 28 < l < 384, we find that, for a QUBIC-like experiment, Gaussian-distributed systematic errors must be controlled with precisions of |g{sub rms}| = 0.1 for antenna gain, |{epsilon}{sub rms}| = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} for antenna coupling, {delta}{sub rms} Almost-Equal-To 0. Degree-Sign 7 for pointing, {zeta}{sub rms} Almost-Equal-To 0. Degree-Sign 7 for beam shape, and {mu}{sub rms} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} for beam cross-polarization. Although the combined systematic effects produce a tolerance level on r twice as large for an experiment with linear polarizers, the resulting bias in r for a circular experiment is 15% which is still on the level of desirable sensitivity.

Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Zhang Le; Timbie, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D. [Department of Physics, 1110 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bunn, Emory F., E-mail: ata_karakci@brown.edu [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Accretion onto Supermassive Black Holes in Quasars: Learning from Optical/UV Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accretion processes in quasars and active galactic nuclei are still poorly understood, especially as far as the connection between observed spectral properties and physical parameters is concerned. Quasars show an additional degree of complexity compared to stars that is related to anisotropic emission/obscuration influencing the observed properties in most spectral ranges. This complicating factor has hampered efforts to define the equivalent of an Hertzsprung-Russel diagram for quasars. Even if it has recently become possible to estimate black hole mass and Eddington ratio for sources using optical and UV broad emission lines, the results are still plagued by large uncertainties. Nevertheless, robust trends are emerging from multivariate analysis of large spectral datasets of quasars. A firm observational basis is being laid out by accurate measurements of broad emission line properties especially when the source rest-frame is known. We consider the most widely discussed correlations (i.e. the so-called "eigenvector 1 parameter space" and the "Baldwin effect") and analyze how they can be explained in terms of accretion properties, broad line region structure, and source evolution. We critically review recent estimates of black hole mass, accretion rate, spin and possible orientation indicators, stressing that any improvement in these parameters will provide a much better understanding of the physics and dynamics of the region producing the optical and UV broad emission lines. More accurate measurements of Eddington ratio and black hole mass may have a significant impact on our ideas about evolution of quasar properties with redshift and luminosity as well as on broader cosmological issues.

Paola Marziani; Deborah Dultzin-Hacyan; Jack W. Sulentic

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Physical processes shaping GRB X-ray afterglow lightcurves: theoretical implications from the Swift XRT observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) The Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) reveals some interesting features of early X-ray afterglows, including a distinct rapidly decaying component preceding the conventional afterglow component in many sources, a shallow decay component before the more ``normal'' decay component observed in a good fraction of GRBs (e.g. GRB 050128, GRB 050315, GRB 050319, and GRB 050401), and X-ray flares in nearly half of the afterglows (e.g. GRB 050406, GRB 050502B, GRB 050607, and GRB 050724). In this paper, we systematically analyze the possible physical processes that shape the properties of the early X-ray afterglow lightcurves, and use the data to constrain various models. We suggest that the steep decay component is consistent with the tail emission of the prompt gamma-ray bursts and/or of the X-ray flares. This provides clear evidence that the prompt emission and afterglow emission are two distinct components, supporting the internal origin of the GRB prompt emission. The shallow decay segment observed in a group of GRBs suggests that the forward shock keeps being refreshed for some time. This might be caused either by a long-lived central engine, or by a power law distribution of the shell Lorentz factors, or else by the deceleration of a Poynting flux dominated flow. X-ray flares suggest that the GRB central engine is still active after the prompt gamma-ray emission is over, but with a reduced activity at later times. In some cases, the central engine activity even extends days after the burst trigger. Analyses of early X-ray afterglow data reveal that GRBs are indeed highly relativistic events. Early afterglow data of many bursts, starting from the beginning of the XRT observations, are consistent with the afterglow emission from an interstellar medium (ISM) environment.

Bing Zhang; Y. Z. Fan; Jaroslaw Dyks; Shiho Kobayashi; Peter Meszaros; David N. Burrows; John A. Nousek; Neil Gehrels

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

459

Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of {+-}0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N. [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)] [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Properties of solar gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further evidence has been found that a significant fraction of the gravity mode power density in the total irradiance observations appears in sidebands of classified eigenfrequencies. These sidebands whose amplitudes vary from year to year are interpreted as harmonics of the rotational frequencies of the nonuniform solar surface. These findings are for non axisymmetric modes and corroborate the findings of Kroll, Hill and Chen for axisymmetric modes. It is demonstrated the the generation of the sidebands lifts the usual restriction on the parity of the eigenfunctions for modes detectable in total irradiance observations. 14 refs.

Kroll, R.J.; Chen, J.; Hill, H.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

On the performance of infrared sensors in earth observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE PERFORMANCE OF INFRARED SENSORS IN EARTH OBSERVATIONS A Thesis by LUTHER FRANKLIN JOHNSON III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... Augus t 19 72 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ON THE PERFORMANCE O'F INFRARED SENSORS IN EARTH OBSERVATIONS A Thesis by LUTHER FRANKLIN JOHNSON III Approved as to style and content by: r rman o ommr t Hea o Depart ent Mem er em er, em er...

Johnson, Luther Franklin

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The physical observer II: Gauge and diff anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a companion paper we studied field theory in the presence of a physical observer with quantum dynamics. Here we describe the most striking consequence of this assumption: new gauge and diff anomalies arise. The relevant cocycles depend on the observer's spacetime trajectory and can hence not appear in QFT, where this quantity is never introduced. Diff anomalies necessarily arise in every locally nontrivial, non-holographic theory of quantum gravity. Cancellation of the divergent parts of the anomalies only works if spacetime has four dimensions.

T. A. Larsson

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation of aObservation of

465

Observing the Sparks of Life | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservationObserved

466

High-resolution radio observations of X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present an overview of important results obtained using high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of X-ray binary systems. These results derive from both astrometric observations and resolved imaging of sources, from black holes to neutron star and even white dwarf systems. I outline a number of upcoming developments in instrumentation, both new facilities and ongoing upgrades to existing VLBI instruments, and I conclude by identifying a number of important areas of investigation where VLBI will be crucial in advancing our understanding of X-ray binaries.

James Miller-Jones

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Factors influencing field performance: utilizing the drug evaluation and classificaiton (DEC) program to identify suspected impaired drivers as reported by selected certified police officers in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impaired drivers. Specifically, this study explored how particular factors observed as part of the DEC Programs decision-making process influence the DREs prediction of a drug category that was impairing a suspected impaired driver in the enforcement...

Walden, Melissa Noggle

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

SciTech Connect: Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

factor is a way of measuring the percentage of reactive power in an electrical system. Reactive power represents wasted energy--electricity that does no useful work because the...

469

astrophysical s170 factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is predicted to be 10.1 10-20 keV b, a factor of five larger than the standard-solar-model value. The P-wave transitions are found to be important, contributing about 40 %...

470

Flavor decomposition of the elastic nucleon electromagnetic form factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The u- and d-quark contributions to the elastic nucleon electromagnetic form factors have been determined using experimental data on GEn , GMn , GpE , and GpM . Such a flavor separation of the form factors became possible up to 3.4 GeV2 with recent data on GEn from Hall A at JLab. At a negative four-momentum transfer squared Q2 above 1 GeV2, for both the u- and d-quark components, the ratio of the Pauli form factor to the Dirac form factor, F2/F1, was found to be almost constant, and for each of F2 and F1 individually, the d-quark component drops continuously with increasing Q2.

C.D. Cates, C.W. Jager, S. Riordan, B. Wojtsekhowski

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

472

Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect...

Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Role of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 alpha in Hepatocyte Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 alpha (HNF4?) is the master regulator of hepatocyte differentiation. It is involved in the up-regulation of genes involved in many classic hepatic functions including: bile acid metabolism, ...

Walesky, Chad Michael

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Factors influencing the efficiency of arsenic extraction by phosphate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, phosphate concentration, principal counterion, reaction pH, and reaction time. The extraction efficiency was impacted by the influence of these individual factors on reaction kinetics and accessibility of arsenic adsorption sites for ligand exchange...

Yean, Su Jin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Geography: Critical Factors in the Analysis of Complex Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geography is a disciple of discovery and exploration. From earliest human endeavor until today, it remains the key to understanding human interaction with the landscape. A conceptual framework of geographic factors provides ...

Welch, Ivan

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

Characterizing and engineering antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling leads to cellular proliferation and migration, and thus EGFR dysregulation can significantly contribute to the survival of tumor cells. Aberrant EGFR signaling due to ...

Chao, Ginger

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

activated transcription factors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vijaya L. Krishnan; Ian M. Adcock; Peter J. Barnes; K. Fan Chung 1998-01-01 4 The Turkey Transcription Factor Pit-1GHF-1 Can Activate the Turkey Prolactin and Growth Hormone...

478

An analysis of factors contributing to train-involved crashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Crashes involving trains and vehicles are a significant safety problem in Texas each year. This research attempts to identify and analyze contributing factors to train-involved accidents in Texas. Three years of accident data (1328 total accidents) were...

Cooner, Scott Allen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

aspects risk factors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010-01-01 51 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

480

additional risk factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010-01-01 47 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

atherosclerosis risk factors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010-01-01 58 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

482

adolescent risk factors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010-01-01 77 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

483

adulthood risk factors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010-01-01 52 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

484

additional risk factors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010-01-01 47 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

485

aureus risk factors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010-01-01 58 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

486

antitumor necrosis factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

single-nucleo- tide polymorphisms (SNPs) or haplotypes in the TNF Nyholt, Dale R. 10 Maximum-entropy network analysis reveals a role for tumor necrosis factor in peripheral...

487

Sample size in factor analysis: The role of model error  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article examines effects of sample size and other design features on correspondence between factors obtained from analysis of sample data and those present in the population from which the samples were drawn. We extend ...

MacCallum, R. C.; Widaman, K. F.; Preacher, K. J.; Hong, Sehee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer ? emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical ? discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

Dixon, Sam, E-mail: sam.dixon@anu.edu.au; Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah [Department of Physics, York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

Nonspecific transcription factor binding reduces variability in transcription factor and target protein expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transcription factors (TFs) interact with a multitude of binding sites on DNA and partner proteins inside cells. We investigate how nonspecific binding/unbinding to such decoy binding sites affects the magnitude and time-scale of random fluctuations in TF copy numbers arising from stochastic gene expression. A stochastic model of TF gene expression, together with decoy site interactions is formulated. Distributions for the total (bound and unbound) and free (unbound) TF levels are derived by analytically solving the chemical master equation under physiologically relevant assumptions. Our results show that increasing the number of decoy binding sides considerably reduces stochasticity in free TF copy numbers. The TF autocorrelation function reveals that decoy sites can either enhance or shorten the time-scale of TF fluctuations depending on model parameters. To understand how noise in TF abundances propagates downstream, a TF target gene is included in the model. Intriguingly, we find that noise in the expression of the target gene decreases with increasing decoy sites for linear TF-target protein dose-responses, even in regimes where decoy sites enhance TF autocorrelation times. Moreover, counterintuitive noise transmissions arise for nonlinear dose-responses. In summary, our study highlights the critical role of molecular sequestration by decoy binding sites in regulating the stochastic dynamics of TFs and target proteins at the single-cell level.

Mohammad Soltani; Pavol Bokes; Zachary Fox; Abhyudai Singh

2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

490

Observation of B ->phi K and B ->phi K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied two-body charmless hadronic decays of R mesons into the final states phiK and phiK(*). Using 9.7 million B (B) over bar pairs collected with the CLEO II detector, we observe the decays B- --> phiK(-) and ...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Observations of Non-radial Pulsations in Radio Pulsars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a model for pulsars in which non-radial oscillations of high spherical degree (l) aligned to the magnetic axis of a spinning neutron star reproduce the morphological features of pulsar beams. In our model, rotation of the pulsar carries a pattern of pulsation nodes underneath our sightline, reproducing the longitude stationary structure seen in average pulse profiles, while the associated time-like oscillations reproduce "drifting subpulses"--features that change their longitude between successive pulsar spins. We will show that the presence of nodal lines can account for observed 180 degree phase jumps in drifting subpulses and their otherwise poor phase stability, even if the time-like oscillations are strictly periodic. Our model can also account for the "mode changes" and "nulls" observed in some pulsars as quasiperiodic changes between pulsation modes of different l or radial overtone n, analogous to pulsation mode changes observed in oscillating white dwarf stars. We will discuss other definitive and testable requirements of our model and show that they are qualitatively supported by existing data. While reserving judgment until the completion of quantitative tests, we are inspired enough by the existing observational support for our model to speculate about the excitation mechanism of the non-radial pulsations, the physics we can learn from them, and their relationship to the period evolution of pulsars.

J. Christopher Clemens; R. Rosen

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

492

Observational evidence of an intensifying hydrological cycle in northern Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observational evidence of an intensifying hydrological cycle in northern Canada Stephen J. De´ry,1 for 45 rivers spanning 5.2 ? 106 km2 of northern Canada are investigated. Discharge averages 1153 km3 yr of northern Canada, excluding some rivers with outlets to the Labrador Sea and eastern James Bay

Dery, Stephen

493

PRICING COMMODITY DERIVATIVES WITH BASIS RISK AND PARTIAL OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LUDKOVSKI Abstract. We study the problem of pricing claims written on an over-the-counter energy con- tractPRICING COMMODITY DERIVATIVES WITH BASIS RISK AND PARTIAL OBSERVATIONS REN´E CARMONA AND MICHAEL. Because the underlying is illiquid, we work with an indifference pricing framework based on a liquid

Ludkovski, Mike

494

Sponsored by: Texas Soil Observation Network (TxSON)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsored by: Texas Soil Observation Network (TxSON) A Program for Monitoring SOIL MOISTURE Across the State of Texas Refined soil moisture satellite data products for operational use and improved to meet water, wind, and energy demands Real-time emergency response data for natural disasters

Yang, Zong-Liang

495

MingJie Zhao Herbert Jaeger Norm observable operator models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(HMMs). Nevertheless, there is a critical issue, the negative probability problem (NPP), which remains. To avoid the NPP we introduce in this report a variation of OOM, the norm observable operator models (norm-product space D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.2 Constructing norm-OOMs in the space D

496

Observations and Theories of Langmuir Circulation: A Story of Mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occasion to review the history of this field of study. An underlying theme here is that the study interdisciplinary history; the first half of this work is a brief and eclectic review of this. Much of the research recent observations and the nature of this unexplained variability. 1 Introduction The oceanic surface

Smith, Jerome A.

497

Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer D.G. Long', P.J. Hardin2, and RA to SASS data for the study of Greenland's ice sheet. We present a time series of the radar backscatter images over Greenland covering the time period July-September 1978. The images provide an island

Long, David G.

498

INTEGRATING THE OCEAN OBSERVING SYSTEM: MOBILE PLATFORMS Dean Roemmich(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/AOML, 4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami FL 33149 USA, Email: rick.lumpkin@noaa.gov (12) Center for Ocean, including oxygen, chlorophyll-A, and particulate organic carbon, and coordination with shipboard and moored. The observing system infrastructure must evolve in parallel with the system's scope and complexity. Expanded