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1

Repository of not readily available documents for project W-320  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a readily available source of the technical reports needed for the development of the safety documentation provided for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), designed to remove the radioactive and chemical sludge from tank 241-C-106, and transport that material to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 via a new, temporary, shielded, encased transfer line.

Conner, J.C.

1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Forecasting the Bayes factor of a future observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a new procedure to forecast the Bayes factor of a future observation by computing the Predictive Posterior Odds Distribution (PPOD). This can assess the power of future experiments to answer model selection questions and the probability of the outcome, and can be helpful in the context of experiment design. As an illustration, I consider a central quantity for our understanding of the cosmological concordance model, namely the scalar spectral index of primordial perturbations, n_S. I show that the Planck satellite has over 90% probability of gathering strong evidence against n_S = 1, thus conclusively disproving a scale-invariant spectrum. This result is robust with respect to a wide range of choices for the prior on n_S.

Roberto Trotta

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

Factor Structure in Groups Selected on Observed Scores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponding to item format ('minor' answer key and 'other' answer key). There are two quantitative factors,into the full sample answer key factors (2 and 3). The five

Muthen, Bengt O.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Shortwave Shape Factor Inversion of Earth Radiation Budget Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shape factor technique is routinely used to invert wide-angle radiometric measurements at satellite altitude to flux at the top of the atmosphere. The derivation of a shortwave shape factor requires assumptions on both the viewed radiation ...

Richard N. Green; G. Louis Smith

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Apps for Vehicles: What sort of vehicle data isn't readily available from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sort of vehicle data isn't readily available from sort of vehicle data isn't readily available from the OpenXC platform and why might I want it? Home > Groups > Developer This question relates to energy hackathons and the OpenXC platform. More information at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Help:Energy_Hackathon_Resources Submitted by Rmckeel on 24 September, 2012 - 10:37 1 answer Points: 0 Since the OpenXC platform is still under development, it is currently limited to a subset of Ford vehicles. A list can be found on http://openxcplatform.com/vehicle-interface/index.html. More vehicles should become available in the future. OpenXC will provide different information than the diagnostic tester most people are familiar with their mechanic using. Diagnostic messages work slightly differently than the CAN messages used by all other in-vehicle systems. When you turn on your car,

6

WET MARS: plentiful, readily-available martian water and its implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water and its major constituent, oxygen, in large specific quantities are essential for maintenance of human life. Providing them in adequate quantities is widely believed to be a major challenge for human Mars exploration and settlement. The Martian regolith isn't known to bear either water or hydrogen, the ice-rich Martian polar regions are thermally inhospitable, and the measured water content of Mars' thin atmosphere represents a layer of liquid water of average thickness only about 1% that of the Moon: {approximately}0.001 cm. Crucially, however, the atmospheric Martian water inventory is advected to everyplace on Mars by meteorological phenomena, so that the few cubic kilometers of liquid water-equivalent in the atmosphere are available most anywhere when, merely for the effort of condensing it. Well-engineered apparatus deployed essentially anywhere on Mars can condense water from the atmosphere in daily quantities not much smaller than its own mass, rejecting into space from radiators deployed over the local terrain the water's heat-of-condensation and the heat from non-ideality of the equipment's operation. Thus, an optimized, photovoltaically-powered 0.3 ton water-condensing system could strip 40 tons of water each year from {approximately}10{sup 4} times this mass of thin, dry Martian air. Given a 480 set I{sub sp} of H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} propulsion systems exhausting into the 6 millibar Mars-surface atmosphere and the 5.0 km/s Martian gravity well, {ge}40 tons of water two-thirds converted into 5:1 O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} cryogenic fuel could support exploration and loft a crew-of-four and their 8-ton ascent vehicle into Earth-return trajectory. The remaining water and excess oxygen would suffice for half-open-cycle life support for a year's stay on Mars. A Mars Expedition thus needs to land only explorers, dehydrated food, habitation gear and unfueled exploration I Earth-return equipment - and a water/oxygen/fuel plant with embedded power supply which operates on Martian atmospheric water. All of the oxygen, water and propellants necessary for life-support, extensive exploration and Earth-return can be provided quite readily by the host planet. The most challenging technical problem with respect to human expeditions to Mars is that of escaping from Earth's deep, 11.2 km/s gravity well. Living on Mars, exploring it extensively and returning to Earth each are technically much less difficult, thanks in no small part to the effective ''wetness'' of Mars.

Hyde, R; Ishikawa, M; Nuckolls, J; Whitehead, J; Wood, L

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

WET MARS: Plentiful, Readily-Available Martian Water and its Implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water and its major constituent, oxygen, in large specific quantities are essential for maintenance of human life. Providing them in adequate quantities is widely believed to be a major challenge for human exploration and settlement of Mars. The Martian regolith isn't known to bear either water or hydrogen, the ice-rich Martian polar regions are thermally inhospitable, and the measured water content of Mars' thin atmosphere represents a layer of liquid water of average thickness only {approx}1% that available on the Moon, or {approx}0.001 cm. Crucially, however, the atmospheric Martian water inventory is advected meteorologically to everyplace on Mars, so that the few cubic kilometers of liquid water-equivalent in the atmosphere are available anywhere when, merely for the effort of condensing it. Well-engineered apparatus deployed essentially anywhere on Mars can condense water from the atmosphere in daily quantities not much smaller than its own mass, rejecting into space from radiators deployed over the local terrain the water's heat-of-condensation and the heat from non-ideality of the equipment's operation. Thus, an optimized, photovoltaically-powered water-condensing system of {approx}0.3 tons mass could strip 40 tons of water each year from {approx} 10{sup 4} times this mass of thin, dry Martian air. Given a 490 set I{sup sp} of H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} propulsion systems exhausting into the 6 millibar Mars-surface atmosphere and the 5.0 km/s Martian gravity well, {approx}40 tons of water two-thirds converted into 5:1 O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} cryogenic fuel could support exploration and loft a crew-of-four and their 8-ton ascent vehicle into Earth-return trajectory. The remaining H{sub 2}O and excess O{sub 2} would suffice for half-open-cycle life support for a year's exploration-intensive stay on Mars. A Mars Expedition thus needs to land only explorers, dehydrated food, habitation gear and unfueled exploration/Earth-return equipment--and a water/oxygen/fuel plant exploiting Martian atmospheric water. All of the oxygen, water and propellants necessary for life-support, extensive exploration and Earth-return can be provided readily by the host planet. Crewed exploration of Mars launched from LEO with on1.V 2 Shuttle-loads of equipment and consumables--a commercial total cost-equivalent of {approx}$650 M--thereby becomes feasible. The most challenging current problem with respect to human expeditions to Mars is escape from Earth's deep, 11.2 km/s gravity well, and is largely an economic issue. Living on Mars, exploring it extensively and returning to Earth, each hitherto major technical issues, are actually much less difficult, thanks in no small part to the effective ''wetness'' of Mars. Similar considerations apply to other water-rich locations in the Solar system, e.g. Europa.

Hyde, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Nuckolls, J.; Whitehead, J.; Wood, L.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

Unlike PAHs from Exxon Valdez crude oil, PAHs from Gulf of Alaska coals are not readily bioavailable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, spatially and temporally spill-correlated biological effects consistent with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure were observed. Some works have proposed that confounding sources from local source rocks, prominently coals, are the provenance of the PAHs. Representative coal deposits along the southeast Alaskan coast (Kulthieth Formation) were sampled and fully characterized chemically and geologically. The coals have variable but high total organic carbon content, technically classifying as coals and coaly shale, and highly varying PAH contents. Even for coals with high PAH content (4000 ppm total PAHs), a PAH-sensitive bacterial biosensor demonstrates nondetectable bioavailability as quantified, based on naphthalene as a test calibrant. These results are consistent with studies indicating that materials such as coals strongly diminish the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds and support previous work suggesting that hydrocarbons associated with the regional background in northern Gulf of Alaska marine sediments are not appreciably bioavailable. 44 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Halambage Upul Deepthike; Robin Tecon; Gerry van Kooten; Jan Roelof van der Meer; Hauke Harms; Mona Wells; Jeffrey Short [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN (United States). Department of Chemistry

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

A Numerical Investigation of Several Factors Contributing to the Observed Variable Intensity of Deep Convection over South Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study employs a revised version of the Colorado State University three-dimensional numerical cloud scale model to investigate the observed behavior of deep convection over South Florida on 17 July 1973. A brief description of recent model ...

Gregory J. Tripoli; William R. Cotton

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Factors Controlling the Vertical Extent of Fair-Weather Shallow Cumulus Clouds over Land: Investigation of Diurnal-Cycle Observations Collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summertime observations for 13 yr at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site are used to study fair-weather shallow cumuli (ShCu). To roughly separate forced from active ShCu, days are categorized into “thin-” or “thick-” ...

Yunyan Zhang; Stephen A. Klein

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Readily Deinkable Toner - Energy Innovation Portal  

Description The technology also was shown to be more effective at deinking or removing print from the paper during the ... Simplified and lower energy recycling ...

12

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

Make Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and public perceptions and preferences, help improve our understanding of risk, vulnerability, resilience, and adaptive capacity. How does USGCRP make observations? USGCRP...

14

Observations - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 10, 1999 ... A broad range of observations were made, culled from the various sources mentioned. Those bearing directly on the participatory process are ...

15

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers is studied. Since the billing capacity is determined by dividing the real demand by the power factor (the minimum billing capacity is based on 80 percent of the summer peak billing capacity) and the billing capacity is used to determine the number of kilowatt-hours billed at each pricing tier, the power factor affects both the demand and the energy charge. There is almost no information available in the literature concerning recommended power factor corrections for this situation. The general advice commonly given in the past has been that power factor should be corrected to above 0.9 if it is below that value to begin with, but that does not take into account the facts of the situation studied here. Calculations relevant to a commercial consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 kW and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results are displayed in a series of graphs that enable annual cost savings and payback periods to be readily determined over a range of commonly encountered parameter values. It is found that it is often economically advantageous to correct a power factor to near unity.

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Dynamic valuation model For wind development in regard to land value, proximity to transmission lines, and capacity factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a wind farm involves many variables that can make or break the success of a potential wind farm project. Some variables such as wind data (capacity factor, wind rose, wind speed, etc.) are readily available in ...

Nikandrou, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Observations of ubiquitous compressive waves in the Sun's chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The details of the mechanism(s) responsible for the observed heating and dynamics of the solar atmosphere still remain a mystery. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are thought to play a vital role in this process. Although it has been shown that incompressible waves are ubiquitous in off-limb solar atmospheric observations their energy cannot be readily dissipated. We provide here, for the first time, on-disk observation and identification of concurrent MHD wave modes, both compressible and incompressible, in the solar chromosphere. The observed ubiquity and estimated energy flux associated with the detected MHD waves suggest the chromosphere is a vast reservoir of wave energy with the potential to meet chromospheric and coronal heating requirements. We are also able to propose an upper bound on the flux of the observed wave energy that is able to reach the corona based on observational constraints, which has important implications for the suggested mechanism(s) for quiescent coronal heating.

Morton, R J; Jess, D B; Kuridze, D; Ruderman, M S; Mathioudakis, M; Erdelyi, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

BOOK REVIEWS 399 sults readily accessible. I believe the book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, population dynamics, or nuclear reactor physics. At least since a pioneering arti­ cle by A two­volume work devoted to the basic theory of Lie groups and Lie al­ gebras. The present volume starts out by introducing the key concepts in Lie group and Lie algebra theory. The remaining three

Kolk, Johan A.C.

19

Atomic Collapse Observed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collapse State Observed Aided by Simulations, Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 |...

20

Relationships between Ice Water Content and Volume Extinction Coefficient from In Situ Observations for Temperatures from 0 C to ?86 C: Implications for Spaceborne Lidar Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An examination of two years of CALIPSO lidar observations and CloudSat cloud radar observations shows that ice clouds at temperatures below about ?45 C frequently fall below the CloudSat radar’s detection threshold, yet are readily detectable by ...

Andrew Heymsfield; Dave Winker; Melody Avery; Mark Vaughan; Glenn Diskin; Min Deng; Valentin Mitev

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Observational Tests of Modified Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structure than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics and the ISW effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the Gravitational ``constant'' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which breaks the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions).

Bhuvnesh Jain; Pengjie Zhang

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Conversion Factor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed... 1,110 1,106 1,105 1,106 1,109 Extraction Loss ......

23

Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as “Douglas Factors” and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

24

Radar Observations of a Major Industrial Fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 23 May 1996, a Montreal suburban paint factory containing several hundred thousand gallons of paints, solvents, and other chemicals burned to the ground in a spectacular fire. The smoke plume from the fire was readily detected by three radars ...

R. R. Rogers; W. O. J. Brown

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Protocols from perceptual observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a cognitive vision system capable of autonomously learning protocols from perceptual observations of dynamic scenes. The work is motivated by the aim of creating a synthetic agent that can observe a scene containing interactions between ... Keywords: Autonomous learning, Cognitive vision, Inductive logic programming, Spatio-temporal reasoning, Symbol grounding, Unsupervised clustering

Chris J. Needham; Paulo E. Santos; Derek R. Magee; Vincent Devin; David C. Hogg; Anthony G. Cohn

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Green Thunderstorms Observed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green thunderstorms have been observed from time to time in association with deep convection or severe weather events. Often the green coloration has been attributed to hail or to reflections of light from green foliage on the ground. Some ...

Frank W. Gallagher III; William H. Beasley; Craig F. Bohren

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Tropical observability and predictability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many studies have investigated tropical data assimilation in the context of global models or specifically for tropical cyclones, but relatively few have focused on the mesoscale predictability and observability of the ...

Whitcomb, Timothy Robert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Multifunctional Mesoscale Observing Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 120 scientists, engineers, administrators, and users met on 8–10 December 2003 in a workshop format to discuss the needs for enhanced three-dimensional mesoscale observing networks. Improved networks are seen as being critical to ...

Walter F. Dabberdt; Thomas W. Schlatter; Frederick H. Carr; Elbert W. Joe Friday; David Jorgensen; Steven Koch; Maria Pirone; F. Martin Ralph; Juanzhen Sun; Patrick Welsh; James W. Wilson; Xiaolei Zou

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR CHLORONIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have observed para-chloronium (H{sub 2}Cl{sup +}) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km s{sup -1} cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H{sup 35}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and para-H{sup 37}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 1{sub 11}-0{sub 00} transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for {approx}4%-12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed OPR of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} and {approx}1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, respectively, for chloronium in these two sources. We obtained upper limits on the para-H{sup 35}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} line strengths toward H{sub 2} Peak 1 in the Orion Molecular cloud and toward the massive young star AFGL 2591. The chloronium abundances inferred in this study are typically at least a factor {approx}10 larger than the predictions of steady-state theoretical models for the chemistry of interstellar molecules containing chlorine. Several explanations for this discrepancy were investigated, but none has proven satisfactory, and thus the large observed abundances of chloronium remain puzzling.

Neufeld, David A.; Indriolo, Nick [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Roueff, Evelyne; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, LUTH UMR 8102, 5 Pl. Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Snell, Ronald L. [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lis, Dariusz; Monje, Raquel; Phillips, Thomas G. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benz, Arnold O. [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Bruderer, Simon [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Black, John H.; Larsson, Bengt [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala (Sweden); De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC and UCP (France); Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gupta, Harshal [JPL, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Melnick, Gary J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nagy, Zsofia [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); and others

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Quantum Mechanics Without Observers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measurement problem and the role of observers have plagued quantum mechanics since its conception. Attempts to resolve these have introduced anthropomorphic or non-realist notions into physics. A shift of perspective based upon process theory and utilizing methods from combinatorial games, interpolation theory and complex systems theory results in a novel realist version of quantum mechanics incorporating quasi-local, nondeterministic hidden variables that are compatible with the no-hidden variable theorems and relativistic invariance, and reproduce the standard results of quantum mechanics to a high degree of accuracy without invoking observers.

W. H. Sulis

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

31

Network Observability Transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the modeling, monitoring, and control of complex networks, a fundamental problem concerns the comprehensive determination of the state of the system from limited measurements. Using power grids as example networks, we show that this problem leads to a new type of percolation transition, here termed a {\\it network observability transition}, which we solve analytically for the configuration model. We also demonstrate a dual role of the network's community structure, which both facilitates optimal measurement placement and renders the networks substantially more sensitive to `observability attacks'. Aside from their immediate implications for the development of smart grids, these results provide insights into decentralized biological, social, and technological networks.

Yang, Yang; Motter, Adilson E; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.258701

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Observations of Edge Turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edge Turbulence Edge Turbulence near the X-point of Alcator C-Mod APS-2007 (1) J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben*, B. LaBombard, I. Cziegler, O. Grulke + , D.P. Stotler* MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center *Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory + MPI for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Assoc., Greifswald, Germany American Physical Society - Div. of Plasma Physics Orlando, FL Nov. 12 - Nov. 16, 2007 APS-2007 (2) Background and Motivation for "Xpt-region" View Strong edge turbulence has been observed in nearly all magnetic confinement devices. Desire predictive capability Most previous measurements made near outboard midplane where the turbulence has the following main features: - generation is ballooning-like (absent at inboard midplane, etc.) - filaments/blobs moves radially outward with some poloidal motion

33

Study of lattice QCD form factors using the extended Gari-Kruempelmann model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the suitability of a modern vector meson dominance (VMD) model as a method for chiral extrapolation of nucleon electromagnetic form factor simulations in lattice QCD. It is found that the VMD fits to experimental data can be readily generalized to describe the lattice simulations. However, the converse is not true. That is, the VMD form is unsuitable as a method of extrapolation of lattice simulations at large quark mass to the physical regime.

Matevosyan, Hrayr H. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Thomas, Anthony W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Miller, Gerald A. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Box 351560, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS  

SciTech Connect

Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Strong planning under partial observability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rarely planning domains are fully observable. For this reason, the ability to deal with partial observability is one of the most important challenges in planning. In this paper, we tackle the problem of strong planning under partial observability in ... Keywords: Binary decision diagrams, Heuristic search in belief space, Planning in nondeterministic domains, Planning under partial observability, Symbolic model checking

Piergiorgio Bertoli; Alessandro Cimatti; Marco Roveri; Paolo Traverso

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Direct observation of pyrolysis behavior of carbonaceous solids in a hot steam-argon environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A unique flame-pyrolysis, direct-sampling mass spectrometer system has been applied to the observation of the primary and secondary pyrolysis of wood and its constituents. The system consists of a flat-flame burner which generates a hot column of steam-argon, into which samples to be pyrolyzed are introduced or suspended. A free-jet, molecular-beam, mass spectrometric sampling system is positioned relative to the pyrolyzing surface so that primary products can be observed as well as their secondary cracking in hot gases. Typical primary pyrolysis product slates from cellulose, lignin, hemicellulose, wood, oil shale and coal will be shown, as well as the secondary cracking of cellulose products to olefins. The effect of potassium ions and sample dimension on primary pyrolysis of cellulose will be shown to illustrate the kind of real-time pyrolysis behavior that can readily be observed with our techniques.

Milne, T.A.; Soltys, M.N.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Observation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the large mass of the implies an affinity to Higgs bosons. Within the SM, the Higgs boson is related to the mechanism by which the quarks, leptons and force-carrying gauge...

38

Monthly Temperature Observations for Uganda  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Surface Temperature Initiative is a worldwide effort to locate weather observations, digitize them for public access, and attach provenance to them. As part of that effort, this study sought documents of temperature observations ...

John R. Christy

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Marine Observations of Old Weather  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather observations are vital for climate change monitoring and prediction. For the world's oceans, there are many meteorological and oceanographic observations available back to the mid-twentieth century, but coverage is limited in earlier ...

Philip Brohan; Rob Allan; J. Eric Freeman; Anne M. Waple; Dennis Wheeler; Clive Wilkinson; Scott Woodruff

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ensemble Transformation and Adaptive Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suppose that the geographical and temporal resolution of the observational network could be changed on a daily basis. Of all the possible deployments of observational resources, which particular deployment would minimize expected forecast error? ...

Craig H. Bishop; Zoltan Toth

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Stratospheric Satellites for Earth Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, robust, yet inexpensive observational platforms and networks of platforms will make revolutionary Earth science observations possible in the next 30 years. One new platform concept that is needed is a long-duration stratospheric balloon ...

Alexey Pankine; Kerry Nock; Zhanqing Li; David Parsons; Michael Purucker; Warren Wiscombe; Elliot Weinstock

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

44

State observer for synchronous motors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

Lang, Jeffrey H. (Waltham, MA)

1994-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Spin Observables in Kaon Electroproduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab has proven to be a powerful tool for use in studying the electromagnetic production of hadronic systems containing a strange constituent quark. The electromagnetic probe only marginally disturbs the system being investigated, and is well understood. Its use as a means to probe the internal structure of hadronic systems has been well documented. Among the most studied of these hadronic systems, currently, is the nucleon. The unique opportunities afforded by the use of polarized, high-current, high-duty-factor electron beams provides an even more powerful probe of the electromagnetic structure of hadronic systems; the study of the spin dependence of the electromagnetic production and weak decay of the hyperon, specifically the {Lambda}-hyperon, becomes feasible. An experiment to study the electroproduction of the {Lambda} as a function of virtual photon momentum transfer, angle, and energy, using spin polarization observables in order to extract insights into its production and weak decay dynamics has already been approved at Jefferson Lab (E98-101; Spin Polarization in Kaon Electroproduction). The experiment aims to study the mechanism of polarization transfer in the reaction e + p {yields} e' + K + {Lambda}. The experiment requires only moderate momentum resolution and no specialized equipment other than that associated with the polarized beam. The data quality is expected to improve with higher electron beam energies, for higher Q{sup 2} measurements. Additionally, at higher energies the increased virtual photon flux allows the 4experiment to be run at lower currents (and therefore high beam polarization). A polarized electron beam and an unpolarized cryogenic hydrogen target are required. The study uses the electron arm spectrometer and the hadron arm spectrometer to detect the scattered electron and the electroproduced kaon before it decays in flight, respectively. Additionally, the hadron arm will be used to detect the proton from the hyperon decay. The hadron arm used as a hyperon tagger, in general terms, will detect the protons resulting from the weak decays of the hyperons in {Lambda} {yields} p + {pi}.

O.K. Baker

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents Return to online conversions. Next page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty ...

47

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

48

Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect

The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cornman's definition of observation terms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reconcile what is described in mentalistic terms with materialism. ... It is clearly important that the observation terms should not include terms which are ...

50

Moored Observations of Precipitation Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct observations of precipitation temperature were made from a surface buoy deployed for four months in the western Pacific warm pool. The observed rain droplet temperatures are equal to the wet-bulb temperature to within the measured wet-bulb ...

Steven P. Anderson; Alan Hinton; Robert A. Weller

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Jet acollinearity and quark form factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbative Quantum Chromodynamic corrections involving the emission of gluons which are both soft and collinear are discussed for both hadronic production of lepton pairs and e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. The result is an exponential, double logarithmic quark form factor. The effect of sub-leading corrections and the possible experimental observation of the form factor are discussed.

Stirling, W.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Doppler Radar Observations of Mammatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of mammatus-like cloud features associated with a convective rain shower were obtained using a vertically pointing 8-mm-wavelength Doppler radar. The radar's excellent sensitivity and resolution allowed even very weak, finescale ...

Brooks E. Martner

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Previous page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty notation eg, 123(45) | Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents. Top. ...

54

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

55

Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions.

U. Alvarez-Rodriguez; M. Sanz; L. Lamata; E. Solano

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

56

Earth Observation Business Network (EOBN), Vancouver, Canada, May 2002.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines some of the reasons that have contributed to this situation, and explores ways in which international co-operation in space observation can be improved, proposing both a short and a medium term agenda for collaboration. Our analysis is based on a framework that enables an assessment of international collaborative programs in earth observation, by considering the relative importance of the factors affecting a country's decision to engage in a co-operative program

Making International Collaboration; Gilberto Câmara; Director For Earth Observation

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Traffic observation and situation assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilization of camera systems for surveillance tasks (e. g. traffic monitoring) has become a standard procedure and has been in use for over 20 years. However, most of the cameras are operated locally and data analyzed manually. Locally means here a ... Keywords: cooperative distributed vision, multi-camera orientation, multi-camera system, multi-target tracking, situation, traffic observation

Ralf Reulke; Dominik Rueß; Kristian Manthey; Andreas Luber

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts with AGILE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AGILE satellite, in orbit since 2007, localized up to October 2009 about 1 Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) per month with the hard X-ray imager SuperAGILE (18 - 60 keV) (with a rate reduced by a factor 2-3 in spinning mode) and is detecting around 1 GRB per week with the non-imaging Mini-Calorimeter (MCAL, 0.35 - 100 MeV). Up to October 2011 the AGILE Gamma Ray Imaging Detector firmly detected four GRBs in the energy band between 20 MeV and few GeV. In this paper we review the status of the GRBs observation with AGILE and discuss the upper limits in the gamma-ray band of the non-detected events.

Longo, F; Del Monte, E; Marisaldi, M; Fuschino, F; Giuliani, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Gamma Ray Pulsars: Multiwavelength Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The seven or more pulsars seen by instruments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. For all the known gamma-ray pulsars, multiwavelength observations and theoretical models based on such observations offer the prospect of gaining a broad understanding of these rotating neutron stars. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2007, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

David J. Thompson

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

Spectra Observed Following Cargo Interrogation  

SciTech Connect

The authors present calculations of photon spectra observed following irradiation of bare HEU, HEU embedded in steel and wood cargos, and steel and wood alone. These spectra might be useful starting points for statistical detection efforts aimed at determining whether fissile material is present in a cargo. Detailed comparisons between calculations and experiments are presented and overall quite good (small {chi}{sup 2}) agreement is found. they do not present a complete solution to the problem of determining whether a given spectrum contains contributions from post-fission photons. However, it is shown that a brute-force fitting of observed spectra in terms of a few calculated ''basis'' spectra gives meaningful predictions about the presence of {sup 235}U in cargo. Though this may not be the most powerful method, it does give well defined confidence limits and seems to have strong predictive power.

Pruet, J; Prussin, S; Descalle, M; Hall, J

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Spectra Observed Following Cargo Interrogation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors present calculations of photon spectra observed following irradiation of bare HEU, HEU embedded in steel and wood cargos, and steel and wood alone. These spectra might be useful starting points for statistical detection efforts aimed at determining whether fissile material is present in a cargo. Detailed comparisons between calculations and experiments are presented and overall quite good (small {chi}{sup 2}) agreement is found. they do not present a complete solution to the problem of determining whether a given spectrum contains contributions from post-fission photons. However, it is shown that a brute-force fitting of observed spectra in terms of a few calculated ''basis'' spectra gives meaningful predictions about the presence of {sup 235}U in cargo. Though this may not be the most powerful method, it does give well defined confidence limits and seems to have strong predictive power.

Pruet, J; Prussin, S; Descalle, M; Hall, J

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

factor.mws - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... 0 "" {TEXT -1 61 "Be default \\+ factor factors over the field of rational numbers. ... {PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 36 "alias(beta=RootOf(x^5+x^3+x^2+x+1));" } ...

65

Observation of the Top Quark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The D collaboration reports on a search for the Standard Model top quark in pp collisions at p s = 1:8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50 pb \\Gamma1 . We have searched for t t production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels, with and without tagging of b-quark jets. We observed 17 events with an expected background of 3:8 \\Sigma 0:6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2 \\Theta 10 \\Gamma6 (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measure its mass to be 199 +19 \\Gamma21 (stat.) \\Sigma22 (syst.) GeV/c 2 and its production cross section to be 6:4 \\Sigma 2:2 pb. Typeset using REVT E X 3 In the Standard Model (SM), the top quark is the weak isospin partner of the b quark. The D collaboration published a lower limit on the mas...

Abachi Abbott Abolins

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Observation of the Top Quark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The DØ collaboration reports on a search for the Standard Model top quark in p¯p collisions at p s = 1:8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50 pb \\Gamma1 . We have searched for t ¯ t production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels, with and without tagging of b-quark jets. We observed 17 events with an expected background of 3:8 \\Sigma 0:6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2 \\Theta 10 \\Gamma6 (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measure its mass to be 199 +19 \\Gamma21 (stat.) \\Sigma22 (syst.) GeV/c 2 and its production cross section to be 6:4 \\Sigma 2:2 pb. Typeset using REVT E X In the Standard Model (SM), the top quark is the weak isospin partner of the b quark. The DØ collaboration published a lower limit on the m...

Abachi Abbott

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Observation of Geo-Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geo-neutrinos, electron anti-neutrinos produced in beta decays of naturally occurring radioactive isotopes in the Earth, are a unique direct probe of our planet's interior. We report the first observation at more than 3$\\sigma$ C.L. of geo-neutrinos, performed with the Borexino detector at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Anti-neutrinos are detected through the neutron inverse beta decay reaction. With a 252.6 ton-yr fiducial exposure after all selection cuts, we detected 9.9^{+4.1}_{-3.4}(^{+14.6}_{-8.2}) geo-neutrino events, with errors corresponding to a 68.3%(99.73%) C.L. From the $\\ln{\\cal{L}}$ profile, the statistical significance of the Borexino geo-neutrino observation corresponds to a 99.997% C.L. Our measurement of the geo-neutrinos rate is 3.9^{+1.6}_{-1.3}(^{+5.8}_{-3.2}) events/(100ton-yr). This measurement rejects the hypothesis of an active geo-reactor in the Earth's core with a power above 3 TW at 95% C.L. The observed prompt positron spectrum above 2.6 MeV is compatible with that expected from european nuclear reactors (mean base line of approximately 1000 km). Our measurement of reactor anti-neutrinos excludes the non-oscillation hypothesis at 99.60% C.L.

Borexino Collaboration

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

KINEMATIC ORIGIN OF CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVABLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, several new correlations between gamma-ray burst (GRB) observables have been discovered. Like previously well-established correlations, they challenge GRB models. Here, we show that in the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, the newly discovered correlations have the same simple kinematic origin as those discovered earlier. They all result from the strong dependence of the observed radiations on the Lorentz and Doppler factors of the jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) that produces the observed radiations by interaction with the medium through which it propagates.

Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon, E-mail: dado@phep3.technion.ac.il, E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.il [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Reported Significant Observation (RSO) studies. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Reported Significant Observation (RSO) study used in the field of safety is an information-gathering technique where employee-participants describe situations they have personally witnessed involving good and bad practices and safe and unsafe conditions. This information is useful in the risk assessment process because it focuses on hazards and thereby facilitates their elimination. However, RSO cannot be the only component in a risk assessment program. Used by the Air Force in their aviation psychology program and further developed by John C. Flanagan, RSO is more commonly known as the ``Critical Incident Technique.`` However, the words ``Critical`` and ``Incident`` had other connotations in nuclear safety, prompting early users within the Aerojet Nuclear Company to coin the more fitting title of ``Reported Significant Observations.`` The technique spread slowly in the safety field primarily because the majority of users were researchers interested in after-the-fact data, with application to everyday problems and behavioral factors. RSO was formally recognized as a significant hazard reduction tool during the development of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) program for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The Department of Energy (DOE) has, in turn, adopted MORT for its system safety program, and this has resulted in RSO being a modern and viable technique for DOE contractor safety programs.

Eicher, R.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

residential environment. Electrical connections that are easily pulled apart and single, exposed conductors that are readily  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, which sponsored code-writing activities, believed that rooftop, building-integrated, utility that additions to the code specifically addressed this technology. Making Solar Electricity Safer In the mid-1970

Johnson, Eric E.

71

Apps for Vehicles: What sort of vehicle data isn't readily available...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

updates the tachometer arm when it receives a new value. The cluster doesn't have to query for anything. Conversely, diagnostic messages use a requestresponse style. When you...

72

Definition: Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Observation Wells An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that...

73

Aerosol observing system platform integration and AAF instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

As part of the federal government’s 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the U.S. DOE Office of Science allocated funds for the capital upgrade of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility to improve and expand observational capabilities related to cloud and aerosol properties. The ARM Facility was established as a national user facility for the global scientific community to conduct a wide range of interdisciplinary science. Part of the ARRA-funded expansion of the ARM Facility includes four new Aerosol Observing Systems (AOS) to be designed, instrumented, and mentored by BNL. The enclosures will be customized SeaTainers. These new platforms ([AMF2]: ARM Mobile Facility-2; [TWP-D]: Tropical Western Pacific at Darwin; and [MAOS-A]/[MAOS-C]: Mobile Aerosol Observing System-Aerosol/-Chemistry) will provide a laboratory environment for fielding instruments to collect data on aerosol life cycle, microphysics, and optical/physical properties. The extensive instrument suite includes both established methods and initial deployments of new techniques to add breadth and depth to the AOS data sets. The platforms are designed: (1) to have all instruments pre-installed before deployment, allowing a higher measurement duty cycle; (2) with a standardized configuration improving the robustness of data inter-comparability; (3) to provide remote access capability for instrument mentors; and (4) to readily accommodate guest instrumentation. The first deployment of the AMF2 platform will be at the upcoming StormVEx campaign held at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, October 15, 2010–March 31, 2011 while the TWP-D AOS will be stationed at the ARM Darwin site. The maiden deployments of the MAOS-A and MAOS-C platforms will be during the Ganges Valley Experiment (GVAX) scheduled for April 2011–April 2012. In addition to the ground-based AOS platforms, thee major instrument builds for the AAF are also being undertaken (new trace gas package [NO, NOx, NOy, CO, O3, and SO2]; Scanning Mobility Particle Sampler [SMPS]; and Particle into Liquid Sampler [PILS]). The current status of the AOS platforms, instrument suites, instituted QA/QC activities, projected AOS VAPs, and inlet design, as well as still-unresolved issues, will be presented.

Springston, S.; Sedlacek, A.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Jet Observables Without Jet Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables---jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum---have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their "local" computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

Daniele Bertolini; Tucker Chan; Jesse Thaler

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

75

Observation of the Top Quark  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

Kim, S. B.

1995-08-00T23:59:59.000Z

76

Waves in the chromosphere: observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the literature on observational aspects of waves in the solar chromosphere in the first part of this contribution. High-frequency waves are invoked to build elaborate cool-star chromosphere heating theories but have not been detected decisively so far, neither as magnetic modes in network elements nor as acoustic modes in below-the-canopy internetwork regions. Three-minute upward-propagating acoustic shocks are thoroughly established through numerical simulation as the cause of intermittent bright internetwork grains, but their pistoning and their role in the low-chromosphere energy budget remain in debate. Three-minute wave interaction with magnetic canopies is a newer interest, presently progressing through numerical simulation. Three-minute umbral flashes and running penumbral waves seem a similar acoustic-shock phenomenon awaiting numerical simulation. The low-frequency network Doppler modulation remains enigmatic. In the second part, I address low-frequency ultraviolet brightness variations of t...

Rutten, R J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

Jefferson, A

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

78

Observation of the sling effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When cloud particles are small enough, they move with the turbulent air in the cloud. On the other hand, as particles become larger their inertia affects their motions, and they move differently than the air. These inertial dynamics impact cloud evolution and ultimately climate prediction, since clouds govern the earth's energy balances. Yet we lack a simple description of the dynamics. Falkovich et al. describes theoretically a new dynamical mechanism called the "sling effect" by which extreme events in the turbulent air cause idealized inertial cloud particles to break free from the airflow (Falkovich G, Fouxon A, Stepanov MG 2002 Nature 419, 151). The sling effect thereafter causes particle trajectories to cross each other within isolated pockets in the flow, which increases the chance of collisions that form larger particles. We combined experimental techniques that allow for precise control of a turbulent flow with three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles at unprecedented resolution. In this way, we could observe both the sling effect and crossing trajectories between real particles. We isolated the inertial sling dynamics from those caused by turbulent advection by conditionally averaging the data. We found the dynamics to be universal in terms of a local Stokes number that quantifies the local particle velocity gradients. We measured the probability density of this quantity, which shows that sharp gradients become more frequent as the global Stokes number increases. We observed that sharp compressive gradients in the airflow initiated the sling effect, and that thereafter gradients in the particle flow ran away and steepened in a way that produced singularities in the flow in finite time. During this process both the fluid motions and gravity became unimportant. The results underpin a framework for describing a crucial aspect of inertial particle dynamics.

Gregory P. Bewley; Ewe Wei Saw; Eberhard Bodenschatz

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Douglas Factors Douglas Factors The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as "Douglas Factors: (1) The nature and seriousness of the offense, and its relation to the employee's duties, position, and responsibilities, including whether the offense was intentional or technical or inadvertent, or was committed maliciously or for gain, or was frequently repeated; (2) the employee's job level and type of employment, including supervisory or fiduciary role,

80

Observation of GRBs with AGILE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since its early phases of operation, the AGILE satellite is observing Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) over an energy range potentially spanning six orders of magnitude. In the hard X-ray band the SuperAGILE imager provides localization of about one GRB/month plus the detection of 1-2 GRBs per month out of its field of view. The Mini-Calorimeter detects about one GRB/week in the 350keV - 100MeV energy range, plus several other transients at very short time scales. In fact, the on-board MCAL trigger logic, implemented for the first time on time windows as short as 300 microseconds, is particularly suitable for very short bursts detection. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID), sensitive in the 30MeV - 30GeV range, firmly detected three GRBs (GRB080514B, GRB090401B and GRB090510) plus some other candidates at a lower significance level. Moreover, all GRBs localized by other spacecrafts inside the GRID field of view are currently searched for possible detection, and upper limits are provided. In this paper we review the ...

Marisaldi, M; Costa, E; Cutini, S; Del Monte, E; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Giuliani, A; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mereghetti, S; Moretti, E; Pacciani, L; Rapisarda, M; Soffitta, P; Tavani, M; Trifoglio, M; Vercellone, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents, For your convenience, you may convert energies online below. Or display factors as: ...

82

Unsuspected Pulmonary Embolism in Observation Unit Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

department observation unit. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2001;ED) managed acute care unit on ED overcrowding and emergencyof a chest pain observation unit compared with routine care.

Limkakeng, Alexander T.; Glickman, Seth W; Cairns, Charles B; Chandra, Abhinav

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

84

ASPHERICAL SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUT AND THE OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2008D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock breakout is the earliest, readily observable emission from a core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion. Observing SN shock breakout may yield information about the nature of the SN shock prior to exiting the progenitor and, in turn, about the core-collapse SN mechanism itself. X-ray outburst 080109, later associated with SN 2008D, is a very well-observed example of shock breakout from a core-collapse SN. Despite excellent observational coverage and detailed modeling, fundamental information about the shock breakout, such as the radius of breakout and driver of the light curve timescale, is still uncertain. The models constructed for explaining the shock breakout emission from SN 2008D all assume spherical symmetry. We present a study of the observational characteristics of aspherical shock breakout from stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe surrounded by a wind. We conduct two-dimensional, jet-driven SN simulations from stripped-envelope progenitors and calculate the resulting shock breakout X-ray spectra and light curves. The X-ray spectra evolve significantly in time as the shocks expand outward and are not fit well by single-temperature and radius blackbodies. The timescale of the X-ray burst light curve of the shock breakout is related to the shock crossing time of the progenitor, and not to the much shorter light crossing time that sets the light curve timescale in spherical breakouts. This could explain the long shock breakout light curve timescale observed for XRO 080109/SN 2008D. We also comment on the distribution of intermediate-mass elements in asymmetric explosions.

Couch, Sean M.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Milosavljevic, Milos [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Pooley, David [Eureka Scientific, Inc., Austin, TX 78756 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Plane Parallel Albedo Biases from Satellite Observations. Part I: Dependence on Resolution and Other Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to cloud heterogeneity and the nonlinear dependence of albedo on cloud water content, the average albedo of a cloudy scene found by calculating the albedo of independent pixels within the scene tends to be different from the albedo calculated ...

Lazaros Oreopoulos; Roger Davies

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36 36 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253836 Varnish cache server factors Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago)

87

FGF growth factor analogs  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

88

Factors Causing Unexpected Variations in Ada Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benchmarks are often used to describe the performance of computer systems. This report considers factors that may cause Ada benchmarks to produce inaccurate results. Included are examples from the ongoing benchmarking efforts of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project using bare target computers with several Ada compilers. 1. Introduction One of the goals of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project is to assess the readiness of the Ada programming language and Ada tools for developing embedded systems. The benchmarking and instrumentation subgroup within the AEST Project is running various suites of Ada benchmarks to obtain data on the real-time performance of Ada on a number of different target systems. The purpose of this report is to categorize the factors which cause anomalous results to be produced by the benchmarks. Some of these factors have been observed, while others are more speculative in nature. All these factors should be understood if accurate, comparable,...

Neal Altman; Neal Altman

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Observational?Inductive Framework for Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new observational?inductive framework for science is emerging due to recent developments in sensors

Timothy E. Eastman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Environmental Dynamical Control of Tropical Cyclone Intensity—An Observational Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of two environmental dynamical factors, namely, the transitional speed and vertical wind shear, on tropical cyclone (TC) intensification, intensity, and lifetime peak intensity were analyzed based on observations in the western North ...

Zhihua Zeng; Yuqing Wang; Chun-Chieh Wu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Observational Analysis of Heavy Rainfall Mechanisms Associated with Severe Tropical Storm Bilis (2006) after Its Landfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This observational study attempts to determine factors responsible for the distribution of precipitation over large areas of southern China induced by Bilis, a western North Pacific Ocean severe tropical storm that made landfall on the ...

Shuanzhu Gao; Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang; Lance F. Bosart

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Impact of Omega Dropwindsonde Observations on Barotropic Hurricane Track Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scarcity of observations in the hurricane environment is one factor believed to be limiting the improvement in hurricane track forecast accuracy. Since 1982, the Hurricane Research Division (HRD) of the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and ...

James L. Franklin; Mark DeMaria

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

An Observational Study of Atmospheric Bore Formation from Colliding Density Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from east-central Florida during the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment are used to investigate the factors that influence atmospheric bore formation from colliding density currents. Ten cases involving ...

David E. Kingsmill; N. Andrew Crook

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Accuracy of Voluntary Observing Ships' Meteorological Observations-Results of the VSOP-NA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the Voluntary Observing Ships Special Observing Project for the North Atlantic (VSOP-NA), the layout, meteorological instrumentation, and observing practices of 45 voluntary observing ships (VOS) operating in the North Atlantic were ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor; Bruce S. Truscott; John S. Hopkins

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Form factors from lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

Dru Renner

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Form factors and standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. Form Factors and Standard Definitions. ... with ? in, eg, Ångstroms; the "anomalous" scattering factor f? (depending on x-ray energy E and the ...

97

A Generalized Adjoint Approach for Quantifying Reflector Assembly Discontinuity Factor Uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Sensitivity-based uncertainty analysis of assembly discontinuity factors (ADFs) can be readily performed using adjoint methods for infinite lattice models. However, there is currently no adjoint-based methodology to obtain uncertainties for ADFs along an interface between a fuel and reflector region. To accommodate leakage effects in a reflector region, a 1D approximation is usually made in order to obtain the homogeneous interface flux required to calculate the ADF. Within this 1D framework an adjoint-based method is proposed that is capable of efficiently calculating ADF uncertainties. In the proposed method the sandwich rule is utilized to relate the covariance of the input parameters of 1D diffusion theory in the reflector region to the covariance of the interface ADFs. The input parameters covariance matrix can be readily obtained using sampling-based codes such as XSUSA or adjoint-based codes such as TSUNAMI. The sensitivity matrix is constructed using a fixed-source adjoint approach for inputs characterizing the reflector region. An analytic approach is then used to determine the sensitivity of the ADFs to fuel parameters using the neutron balance equation. A stochastic approach is used to validate the proposed adjoint-based method.

Yankov, Artem [University of Michigan; Collins, Benjamin [University of Michigan; Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL; Downar, Thomas [University of Michigan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Special Emphasis Observances | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services » Diversity and Inclusion » Special Emphasis Observances Services » Diversity and Inclusion » Special Emphasis Observances Special Emphasis Observances The Energy Department celebrates special emphasis observances regularly, inviting guest speakers to highlight how the agency's mission benefits from diversity and inclusion. The Energy Department celebrates special emphasis observances regularly, inviting guest speakers to highlight how the agency's mission benefits from diversity and inclusion. The Department of Energy observes special days, weeks, and months as reflected in the below list of special program observances. Observances are held annually in compliance with Executive Order 11478, 29 CFR Part 1614.102(b)(4), joint Congressional Resolutions, Presidential Proclamations, and the Department's diversity and inclusion goals as

99

Near-Global Observations of Low Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes several near-global datasets of low cloud cover, including the the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) satellite observations, C. J. Hahn et al. surface-derived observations, and the National Centers for ...

Bryan C. Weare

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Observations of a Mesoscale Ducted Gravity Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports coordinated observations of a mesoscale gravity wave made during the FRONTS 84 field experiment conducted in southwestern France in the summer of 1984. The observations were unique in the sense that all relevant wave ...

F. M. Ralph; V. Venkateswaran; M. Crochet

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GNSS radio occultation constellation observing system experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing system experiments within the operational ECMWF data assimilation framework have been performed for summer 2008 when the largest recorded number of GNSS radio occultation observations from both operational and experimental satellites ...

Peter Bauer; Gábor Radnóti; Sean Healy; Carla Cardinali

102

Observations of Irminger Sea Anticyclonic Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale anticyclonic eddies in the Irminger Sea are observed using a mooring and a glider. Between 2002 and 2009, the mooring observed 53 anticyclones. Using a kinematic model, objective estimates of eddy length scales and velocity structure are ...

Xue Fan; Uwe Send; Pierre Testor; Johannes Karstensen; Pascale Lherminier

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

An Ocean Observing System for Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designs and implementation are proceeding for a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and a Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). The initial design for the ocean component of the GCOS, which is also the climate module of the GOOS, was completed ...

Worth D. Nowlin Jr.; Neville Smith; George Needler; Peter K. Taylor; Robert Weller; Ray Schmitt; Liliane Merlivat; Alain Vézina; Arthur Alexiou; Michael McPhaden; Massaaki Wakatsuchi

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The THORPEX Observation Impact Intercomparison Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment is being conducted to directly compare the impact of all assimilated observations on short-range forecast errors in different forecast systems using an adjoint-based technique. The technique allows detailed comparison of observation ...

Ronald Gelaro; Rolf H. Langland; Simon Pellerin; Ricardo Todling

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Statistical Design for Adaptive Weather Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suppose that one has the freedom to adapt the observational network by choosing the times and locations of observations. Which choices would yield the best analysis of the atmospheric state or the best subsequent forecast? Here, this problem of “...

L. Mark Berliner; Zhan-Qian Lu; Chris Snyder

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Observed Aerosol Radiative Forcings: Comparison for Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are from 1997, when the El Nio suppressed the rainfall in that region and biomass burning was widespread in the area. These observations are compared to those observed during...

107

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Ozkocak, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Exploration Activity Details Location...

108

Observations and Modeling of Photovoltaic Responses in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Ferroelectrics and Multiferroics. Presentation Title, Observations and Modeling ...

109

PQ Encyclopedia: Understanding Power Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ Encylopedia offers a thorough understanding of what power factor is, what factors affect it, and what to be aware of when attempting to improve it. In particular, efforts to remedy power factor can sometimes worsen harmonics.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optimal filling factor of nanorod lenses for subwavelength imaging  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the effect of the filling factor on the imaging performance of metallic nanorod lenses. We observe that thicker nanorods allow lower reflection in the canalization regime and we find optimal values of the filling factor to achieve a transfer function with the characteristics of a perfect lens in a wide range of spatial frequencies.

Kosulnikov, Sergey Yu.; Yankovskaya, Elizaveta A. [Department of Photonics and Optoinformatics, St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverkskiy pr., 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Maslovski, Stanislav I. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal); Belov, Pavel A. [Department of Photonics and Optoinformatics, St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverkskiy pr., 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Queen Mary College, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Kivshar, Yuri S. [Department of Photonics and Optoinformatics, St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverkskiy pr., 49, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Nonlinear Physics Centre, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national annual quantity-weighted average conversion factors for conventional, reformulated, and oxygenated motor gasolines (see Table A3). The factor ...

113

Blind and pointed Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and such observations reveal the variation in the scale factor as a function of redshift. The redshift is determined from supernovae emission/absorption lines from 1 + z = ?obs ?em = a(tobs) a(tem) , (1.24) where ?em is the wavelength of emitted light, ?obs... is the wavelength of observed light, a(tem) and a(tobs) are the scale factors at the redshift of the emitting object and the observer respectively. For a flat Universe luminosity distance, dL, is given by dL = c(1 + z) H0 ? z 0 dz ? ?M (1 + z)3 + ?? , (1...

Shimwell, Timothy William

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

114

Many Factors Affect MPG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy How You Drive Vehicle Maintenance Fuel Variations Vehicle Variations Engine Break-In Vehicles in traffic Quick acceleration and heavy braking can reduce fuel economy by up to 33 percent on the highway and 5 percent around town. New EPA tests account for faster acceleration rates, but vigorous driving can still lower MPG. Excessive idling decreases MPG. The EPA city test includes idling, but more idling will lower MPG. Driving at higher speeds increases aerodynamic drag (wind resistance), reducing fuel economy. The new EPA tests account for aerodynamic drag up to highway speeds of 80 mph, but some drivers exceed this speed. Cold weather and frequent short trips can reduce fuel economy, since your engine doesn't operate efficiently until it is warmed up. In colder

115

Human factoring administrative procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

On active region loops: Hinode/EIS observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronal loops are fundamental building blocks of the solar active regions and the corona. Therefore, a clear understanding of the physics of coronal loops will help us understand the physics of active region heating in particular and coronal heating in general. This requires a precise measurement of physical quantities such as electron densities and filling factors, temperatures, and flows in coronal loops. In this paper we have carried out an investigation of a spatially well resolved coronal loop using the EIS onboard Hinode to measure the above mentioned physical quantities. Based on this study we find that a nano-flare model could explain most of the observed characteristics of this loop.

Tripathi, D; Dwivedi, B N; Del Zanna, G; Young, P R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Computer-Related Ergonomic Safety Talking Points and Observation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Ergonomic Safety Related Ergonomic Safety Talking Points and Observation Criteria Supporting Managers and Supervisors in Meetings with Employees March 14, 2007 Background to Discussions * Scope of the Problem: - ~70% of recordable injuries this FY are from ergonomic causes - ~70% of ergonomic injuries involve computer work (remainder mainly involve laboratory and shop work) - Most significant cause of computer related ergo injuries is workload hazard control (help = work with manager) - Single most significant contributing factor is not requesting help when ergonomic issues surface (help = request ergonomic evaluation) Suggested Employee Discussion Topics - Computer Ergo (p1) * Meet with employees in their workspace so you can observe the ergonomic issues in their work. * Begin by telling the employee you are there to see

119

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Automated Surface Observing System Standby Options Power Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) General System Description * Self contained group of sensors and data gathering equipment that produces an automated weather observation * Weather observations support aviation, climate data, non government weather operations, public consumption, etc. * Initial deployment began in 1991 and continued through 1997 * Located at 884 sites nationwide, normally at airports * System has two distinct subsystems: Field installed equipment (DCP & Sensor Group) and an indoor processor (ACU) with peripherals * Separate facility power for DCP & Sensors and ACU 1 * measure and collect data * Located on the airport * back up group for 10 minutes * Currently pl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Aircraft S-HIS Observations during MPACE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aircraft S-HIS Observations during MPACE DeSlover, Daniel University of Wisconsin Holz, Robert University of Wisconsin, CIMMS Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison...

122

Observational Window Functions in Planet Transit Searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Window functions describe, as a function of orbital period, the probability that an existing planetary transit is detectable in one's data for a given observing strategy. We show the dependence of this probability upon several strategy and astrophysical parameters, such as length of observing run, observing cadence, length of night, and transit duration. The ability to detect a transit is directly related to the intrinsic noise of the observations. In our simulations of the window function, we explicitly address non-correlated (gaussian or white) noise and correlated (red) noise and discuss how these two different noise components affect window functions in different manners.

Kaspar von Braun; David R. Ciardi

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1...

124

Cooperative Weather Observations | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooperative Weather Observations Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities Agriculture...

125

Estimation of Daytime Net Radiation from Shortwave Radiation Measurements and Meteorological Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in surface net radiation Rn control the earth’s climate, the hydrological cycle, and plant photosynthesis. However, Rn is not readily available. This study develops a method to estimate surface daytime Rn from solar shortwave radiation ...

Kaicun Wang; Shunlin Liang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Observer and Particle Transformations and Newton's Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A frequently confused point in studies of symmetry violation is the distinction between observer and particle transformations. In this work, we consider a model in which a coefficient in the Standard-Model Extension leads to violations of rotation invariance in Newton's second law. The model highlights the distinction between observer and particle transformations.

T. H. Bertschinger; Natasha A. Flowers; Jay D. Tasson

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretariat Vegetation greenness profiles North America Vegetation Annual Greenness Profiles 100 120 140 160;© GEO Secretariat GEO 2009-11 Work Plan ­ Related Task DA-09-05: Global Carbon Observation and Analysis System Implement a global carbon observation and analysis system addressing the three components

128

Towards New Platform Technology for Sustained Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of offshore oil and gas companies may make for a larger market and may help reduce costs. Docking systems such as drifting and profiling floats already complement research, survey and voluntary ships. Floats are but one. Introduction Ocean observations rely on platforms and sensors. Programs of sustained observations naturally

Griffiths, Gwyn

129

Stress Intensification Factors and Flexibility Factors for Unreinforced Branch Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations, based on analyses and test data, for determining the stress intensification factors and flexibility factors for branch connections. The report contains results of an investigation into the flexibility and stress intensification factors of unreinforced fabricated tees (and other similar configurations). It provides flexibility equations for a more accurate evaluation of these configurations.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) will raise and lower a heavily instrumented tethered balloon system at regular intervals in the lower 2 kilometers of the atmosphere at Oliktok Point. Data obtained during the ALTOS campaign will provide a statistically significant set of observed in situ cloud properties for validating retrieval algorithms and help scientists reduce the uncertainty in the radiative forcing and heating rates on hourly time scales. The data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the state of the Arctic climate system. Collaborators Science Team: The Pennsylvania State University, Stratton

131

Factor Separation in Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple method is developed for computing the interactions among various factors influencing the atmospheric circulations. It is shown how numerical simulations can be utilized to obtain the pure contribution of any factor to any predicted field,...

U. Stein; P. Alpert

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Globally Gridded Satellite Observations for Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them that no central archive ...

Kenneth R. Knapp; Steve Ansari; Caroline L. Bain; Mark A. Bourassa; Michael J. Dickinson; Chris Funk; Chip N. Helms; Christopher C. Hennon; Christopher D. Holmes; George J. Huffman; James P. Kossin; Hai-Tien Lee; Alexander Loew; Gudrun Magnusdottir

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Observing Surf-Zone Dispersion with Drifters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surf-zone dispersion is studied using drifter observations collected within about 200 m of the shoreline (at depths of less than about 5 m) on a beach with approximately alongshore uniform bathymetry and waves. There were about 70 individual ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen; R. T. Guza; W. E. Schmidt

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Surface Observations in the Hurricane Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composite analyses of marine surface observations from 37 hurricanes between 1975 and 1998 show that the difference between the sea surface temperature and the surface air temperature significantly increases just outside the hurricane inner core. ...

Joseph J. Cione; Peter G. Black; Samuel H. Houston

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Observations and Mechanisms of GATE Waterspouts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GATE data base for days 261 and 186 is used for a combined observational and numerical investigation of interacting cumulus processes that may be important in the generation of waterspouts. The results suggest that the existence of cumulus-...

Joanne Simpson; Bruce R. Morton; Michael C. McCumber; Richard S. Penc

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print Spin and charge are inseparable traits of an electron, but in one-dimensional solids, a 40-year-old theory predicts their separation into "collective" modes-as independent excitation quanta called spinons and holons. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) should provide the most direct evidence of this spin-charge separation, as the single quasiparticle peak splits into a spinon-holon two-peak structure. However, despite extensive ARPES experiments, the unambiguous observation of the two-peak structure has remained elusive. Working at the ALS, a team of researchers from Korea, Japan, and the U.S. has now observed electron spin-charge separation in a one-dimensional solid. These results hold implications for future developments in several key areas of advanced technology, including high-temperature superconductors, nanowires, and spintronics.

137

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print Spin and charge are inseparable traits of an electron, but in one-dimensional solids, a 40-year-old theory predicts their separation into "collective" modes-as independent excitation quanta called spinons and holons. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) should provide the most direct evidence of this spin-charge separation, as the single quasiparticle peak splits into a spinon-holon two-peak structure. However, despite extensive ARPES experiments, the unambiguous observation of the two-peak structure has remained elusive. Working at the ALS, a team of researchers from Korea, Japan, and the U.S. has now observed electron spin-charge separation in a one-dimensional solid. These results hold implications for future developments in several key areas of advanced technology, including high-temperature superconductors, nanowires, and spintronics.

138

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print Spin and charge are inseparable traits of an electron, but in one-dimensional solids, a 40-year-old theory predicts their separation into "collective" modes-as independent excitation quanta called spinons and holons. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) should provide the most direct evidence of this spin-charge separation, as the single quasiparticle peak splits into a spinon-holon two-peak structure. However, despite extensive ARPES experiments, the unambiguous observation of the two-peak structure has remained elusive. Working at the ALS, a team of researchers from Korea, Japan, and the U.S. has now observed electron spin-charge separation in a one-dimensional solid. These results hold implications for future developments in several key areas of advanced technology, including high-temperature superconductors, nanowires, and spintronics.

139

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

140

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - CERN: Experiments Observe...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERN: Experiments Observe Particle Consistent with Long-sought Higgs Boson July 5, 2012 from CERN At a seminar held at CERN as a curtain raiser to the year's major particle physics...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Principal Component Analysis of Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to wind profiler observations to study the vertical profile of the wind field and its temporal evolution. The rationale for decomposing time–height wind profiler data using PCA is twofold. The ...

Christopher R. Williams

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Mobile Mesonet for Finescale Meteorological Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile weather observing system (mobile mesonet) was designed to augment existing meteorological networks in the study of severe local storms and other mesoscale weather phenomena in conjunction with the Verification of the Origins of Rotation ...

Jerry M. Straka; Erik N. Rasmussen; Sherman E. Fredrickson

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Observations of the Diurnal Tide from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a climatology of mesospheric and lower-thermospheric diurnal tidal winds obtained with the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). The observations reveal that although tidal ...

Paul B. Hays; D. L. Wu; The HRDI Science Team

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) International Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) International Workshop, sponsored by NOAA Office of Global Programs and NASA Land Surface Hydrology Program, was held on 27 February 1 March 2001 at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Rick Lawford

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Observations of the Evolution of Orogenic Blocking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of low-level flow upstream of the Continental Divide (Rocky Mountains) and the Wasatch Range from being unable to surmount the mountain range, to becoming unblocked and blocked again is studied observationally. During two months in ...

Georg J. Mayr; Thomas B. McKee

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Multisensor Observation of an Atmospheric Undular Bore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed and unique multisensor observation of an undular bore is presented. The data include those from rawinsonde, satellite, two Doppler radars, and a tall instrumented tower. Noteworthy are Doppler radar images that resolve the wave's ...

Pravas R. Mahapatra; Richard J. Doviak; Dusan S. Zrni?

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Freezing Rain: An Observational and Theoretical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a Doppler radar, an instrumented aircraft, and several rawinsonde observations during freezing rain and ice pellet events have been analyzed for this study. From these data, 34 soundings were obtained that characterized the vertical ...

Ryan J. Zerr

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Surface Temperature Observations from AVHRR in FIFE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the surface radiometric temperature by the AVHRR sensor on board the NOAA-9 satellite during the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment conducted in central Kansas during 1987 are ...

T. J. Schmugge; G. M. Schmidt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Observations of Breaking Surface Wave Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breaking surface waves were observed during the Surface Wave Process Program with a novel acoustical instrument that makes use of underwater ambient sound to track individual breaking events. The spatial and temporal statistics of braking waves ...

Li Ding; David M. Farmer

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Estimation of Convective Rainfall from Lightning Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a technique to use lightning observations for estimating convective rainfall. A framework for rainfall estimation is developed in which key elements are 1) the rainfall–lightning ratio, that is, the ...

Alberto Tapia; James A. Smith; Michael Dixon

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Filtering Turbulent Sparsely Observed Geophysical Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Filtering sparsely turbulent signals from nature is a central problem of contemporary data assimilation. Here, sparsely observed turbulent signals from nature are generated by solutions of two-layer quasigeostrophic models with turbulent cascades ...

John Harlim; Andrew J. Majda

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Scatterometer Observations at High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite scatterometer winds are commonly validated by comparing them to buoy observations and/or numerical model surface wind analyses. However, the empirical scatterometer algorithm (geophysical model function) has been calibrated against a ...

Lixin Zeng; Robert A. Brown

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Duke University Helicopter Observation Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To establish a helicopter observation platform (HOP), Duke University has purchased a Bell 206 “Jet Ranger” helicopter, which has been equipped with a three-dimensional, high-frequency positioning and attitude-recording system, a data acquisition ...

Roni Avissar; Heidi E. Holder; Nathan Abehserra; M. Adam Bolch; Patrick Canning; Jose Magalhaes; Robert L. Walko; K. Novick; G. Katul; Katya Prince; Naoki Matayoshi; Kristina M. Johnson

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

two-peak structure has remained elusive. Working at the ALS, a team of researchers from Korea, Japan, and the U.S. has now observed electron spin-charge separation in a...

155

Communications in the observation limited regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the design of communications systems when the principal cost is observing the channel, as opposed to transmit energy per bit or spectral efficiency. This is motivated by energy constrained communications devices ...

Bhardwaj, Manish, 1976-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Autocorrelation of Hourly Wind Speed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The autocorrelation of hourly wind speed observations is estimated for seven stations on the west coast of Canada at selected lags ranging from one hour to two months. The estimated autocorrelation function is fitted by a model that includes a ...

Arthur C. Brett; Stanton E. Tuller

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Targeted Observations with an Airborne Wind Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the possibilities and limitations of airborne Doppler lidar for adaptive observations over the Atlantic Ocean. For the first time, a scanning 2-?m Doppler lidar was applied for targeted measurements during the Atlantic “...

M. Weissmann; R. Busen; A. Dörnbrack; S. Rahm; O. Reitebuch

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Have Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes Observed Dark Matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two ground-based experiments have recently independently detected TeV $\\gamma$-rays from the direction of the Galactic center. The observations made by the VERITAS and CANGAROO collaborations are unexpected, although not impossible to interpret in terms of astrophysical sources. Here we examine in detail whether the observed $\\gamma$-rays may arise from the more exotic alternative of annihilations of dark matter particles clustered in the center of the Galaxy.

Dan Hooper; Ignacio de la Calle Perez; Joseph Silk; Francesc Ferrer; Subir Sarkar

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

159

Experimental observation of a complex periodic window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of a special periodic window in the two-dimensional parameter space of an experimental Chua's circuit is reported. One of the main reasons that makes such a window special is that the observation of one implies that other similar periodic windows must exist for other parameter values. However, such a window has never been experimentally observed, since its size in parameter space decreases exponentially with the period of the periodic attractor. This property imposes clear limitations for its experimental detection.

D. M. Maranhão; M. S. Baptista; J. C. Sartorelli; I. L. Caldas

2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

Assessment of the Impact of Observations on Analyses Derived from Observing System Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing system experiments (OSEs) are commonly used to quantify the impact of different observation types on forecasts produced by a specific numerical weather prediction system. Recently, methods based on degree of freedom for signal (DFS) have ...

Cristina Lupu; Pierre Gauthier; Stéphane Laroche

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS  

SciTech Connect

The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Anthrax Lethal Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037. Anthrax Toxin is a major virulence factor in the infectious disease, Anthrax1. This toxin is produced by Bacillus anthracis, which is an encapsulated, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium. Inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form, is contracted through breathing spores. Once spores germinate within cells of the immune system called macrophages2, bacterial cells are released into the bloodstream. There they proliferate rapidly and secrete Anthrax Toxin, ultimately leading to septic shock and death. Although antibiotics may be used to kill the bacteria, the level of toxin has often become so high in the bloodstream that removing the bacteria alone is not sufficient to prevent death. Therefore, the design of anti-toxins offers the prospect of treatment in the advanced stages of infection. Together with collaborators from the NIH and Harvard Medical School, we are involved in the atomic resolution study of the Anthrax Toxin components and their complexes, including small molecules with therapeutic potential. Data collection at SSRL and other synchrotron radiation sources has been key to the advances made in this research so far and is expected to play a continuing role in the future.

164

Non-Rayleigh Scattering Effect in Rain Observations by an X- and Ka-band Dual-Wavelength Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of non-Rayleigh scattering appearing in a rain observation experiment using a dual-wavelength rain radar, is investigated. The non-Rayleigh scattering effect causes a small difference between the effective radar reflectivity factor and ...

Kenji Nakamura; Hideyuki Inomata

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

166

BNL | Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) The Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) is a platform and instrument suite for Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) to conduct in situ measurements of aerosols and their precursors. MAOS is part of the ARM Climate Research Facility. Physically MAOS is contained in two 20' SeaTainers custom adapted to provide a sheltered laboratory environment for operators and instruments even under harsh conditions. The two structures are designated MAOS-A and MAOS-C for Aerosol and Chemistry respectively. Although independent, with separate data systems, inlets and power distribution, the two structures are normally a single operating unit. The two enclosures comprising MAOS are designed for rapid deployment. All components (except for the Radar Wind Profiler) are transported internally

167

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

168

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

169

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

170

Observing AAPI Heritage Month | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Observing AAPI Heritage Month Observing AAPI Heritage Month Observing AAPI Heritage Month May 1, 2012 - 4:42pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director What are the key facts? President Obama has also appointed a historic number of highly qualified Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to senior positions in his Administration Throughout May,the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders will be sharing the many ways in which the Obama Administration has helped the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Editor's Note: This blog originally appeared on the White House Blog, and is authored by Chris Lu, Assistant to the President and Cabinet Secretary. He is also the Co-Chair of the White House Initiative on Asian

171

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

172

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

ANITA collaboration; P. W. Gorham; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; D. Z. Besson; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

SciTech Connect

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

Gorham, P.W.

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

174

Workshop on observations of recent comets (1990)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential interpretations are presented for observations of four comets: Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o), Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko (1989r), Aarseth-Brewington (1989a1), and Austin (1989o1). The relationship of minor species with each other and possible parents as well as with dust are being pursued in a number of investigations. Of particular interest are the abundance ratios of CH{sub 4} to CO and NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2}. The need for closer collaboration betwen observing teams and modelers is examined. The need for dust size distribution as a function of cometocentric distance to be analyzed in closer collaboration between observers and modelers is discussed.

Huebner, W.F.; Wehinger, P.A.; Rahe, J.; Konno, I.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Pollution Markets with Imperfectly Observed Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Another example with similar monitoring requirements is the Southern California RECLAIM program that implemented separated markets for nitrogen oxide (NOx) and SO2 emissions from power plants, refineries and other large stationary sources. This program did... to the allocation of permits, an emission standard specific to buses. It may also be optimal to use 28 I thank one of the referees for pointing out this case and its relevance for the Los Angeles’ RECLAIM market. 26 different utilization factors (eq) for each group...

Montero, Juan-Pablo

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

PRECISION POINTING OF IBEX-Lo OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Post-launch boresight of the IBEX-Lo instrument on board the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is determined based on IBEX-Lo Star Sensor observations. Accurate information on the boresight of the neutral gas camera is essential for precise determination of interstellar gas flow parameters. Utilizing spin-phase information from the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS), positions of stars observed by the Star Sensor during two years of IBEX measurements were analyzed and compared with positions obtained from a star catalog. No statistically significant differences were observed beyond those expected from the pre-launch uncertainty in the Star Sensor mounting. Based on the star observations and their positions in the spacecraft reference system, pointing of the IBEX satellite spin axis was determined and compared with the pointing obtained from the ACS. Again, no statistically significant deviations were observed. We conclude that no systematic correction for boresight geometry is needed in the analysis of IBEX-Lo observations to determine neutral interstellar gas flow properties. A stack-up of uncertainties in attitude knowledge shows that the instantaneous IBEX-Lo pointing is determined to within {approx}0.{sup 0}1 in both spin angle and elevation using either the Star Sensor or the ACS. Further, the Star Sensor can be used to independently determine the spacecraft spin axis. Thus, Star Sensor data can be used reliably to correct the spin phase when the Star Tracker (used by the ACS) is disabled by bright objects in its field of view. The Star Sensor can also determine the spin axis during most orbits and thus provides redundancy for the Star Tracker.

Hlond, M.; Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 18A Bartycka, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Heirtzler, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; Neill, M. E. O'; Clark, G. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall, 8 College Road, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Crew, G. B. [Haystack Observatory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Fuselier, S. [Lockheed Martin, Space Physics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); McComas, D. J., E-mail: mhlond@cbk.waw.pl, E-mail: eberhard.moebius@unh.edu, E-mail: gbc@haystack.mit.edu, E-mail: stephen.a.fuselier@linco.com, E-mail: DMcComas@swri.edu, E-mail: DMcComas@swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Towards a dynamical theory of observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a model of classical and quantum observation based on contextuality and dynamically evolving apparatus. Power sets of classical bits model the four classical states of elementary detectors, viz. the two normal yes/no signal states, the faulty or decommissioned state and the non-existence state. Operators over power set registers are used to describe various physical scenarios such as the construction and decommissioning of physical devices in otherwise empty laboratories, the dynamics of signal states over those detectors, the extraction of information from those states, and multiple observers. We apply our quantum formalism to the Elitzur-Vaidman bomb-tester experiment and the Hardy paradox experiment.

George Jaroszkiewicz

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

178

Arithmetic, mutually unbiased bases and complementary observables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complementary observables in quantum mechanics may be viewed as Frobenius structures in a dagger monoidal category, such as the category of finite dimensional Hilbert spaces over the complex numbers. On the other hand, their properties crucially depend on the discrete Fourier transform and its associated quantum torus, requiring only the finite fields that underlie mutually unbiased bases. In axiomatic topos theory, the complex numbers are difficult to describe and should not be invoked unnecessarily. This paper surveys some fundamentals of quantum arithmetic using finite field complementary observables, with a view considering more general axiom systems.

Sheppeard, M. D. [Oxford University Computing Laboratory, Wolfson Building, Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3QD (United Kingdom)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Overtone Mobility Spectrometry: Part 1. Experimental Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

introduce a new approach for isolating ions having specific mobilities (or collision cross sections). IonsARTICLES Overtone Mobility Spectrometry: Part 1. Experimental Observations Ruwan T. Kurulugama, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA A new method that allows a linear drift tube to be operated

Clemmer, David E.

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181

TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SECTION B: HOUSING TYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SECTION C: HOME HEATING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 SECTION D: AIR CONDITIONING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 SECTION E: WATER HEATING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 SECTION F: LIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 SECTION G: APPLIANCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Refrigerators and Freezers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

182

Observational Constraints on Open Inflation Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss observational constraints on models of open inflation. Current data from large-scale structure and the cosmic microwave background prefer models with blue spectra and/or Omega_0 >= 0.3--0.5. Models with minimal anisotropy at large angles are strongly preferred.

Martin White; Joe Silk

1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

Theory of cooling neutron stars versus observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review current state of neutron star cooling theory and discuss the prospects to constrain the equation of state, neutrino emission and superfluid properties of neutron star cores by comparing the cooling theory with observations of thermal radiation from isolated neutron stars.

Yakovlev, D G; Kaminker, A D; Potekhin, A Yu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Lidar Observations of Ship Spray Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Monterey Area Ship Track experiment, which was designed to study ship-generated cloud tracks, ship-based measurements were made by a gyroscopically stabilized scanning lidar system. This paper focuses on the spray plume observed by ...

William P. Hooper; Jeffrey E. James

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hadley Cell Widening: Model Simulations versus Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations show that the Hadley cell has widened by about 2°–5° since 1979. This widening and the concomitant poleward displacement of the subtropical dry zones may be accompanied by large-scale drying near 30°N and 30°S. Such drying poses a ...

Celeste M. Johanson; Qiang Fu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Negative Energy Seen By Accelerated Observers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sampled negative energy density seen by inertial observers, in arbitrary quantum states is limited by quantum inequalities, which take the form of an inverse relation between the magnitude and duration of the negative energy. The quantum inequalities severely limit the utilization of negative energy to produce gross macroscopic effects, such as violations of the second law of thermodynamics. The restrictions on the sampled energy density along the worldlines of accelerated observers are much weaker than for inertial observers. Here we will illustrate this with several explicit examples. We consider the worldline of a particle undergoing sinusoidal motion in space in the presence of a single mode squeezed vacuum state of the electromagnetic field. We show that it is possible for the integrated energy density along such a worldline to become arbitrarily negative at a constant average rate. Thus the averaged weak energy condition is violated in these examples.This can be the case even when the particle moves at non-relativistic speeds. We use the Raychaudhuri equation to show that there can be net defocussing of a congruence of these accelerated worldlines. This defocussing is an operational signature of the negative integrated energy density. These results in no way invalidate nor undermine either the validity or utility of the quantum inequalities for inertial observers. In particular, they do not change previous constraints on the production of macroscopic effects with negative energy, e.g., the maintenance of traversable wormholes.

L. H. Ford; Thomas A. Roman

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fermi Observations of Gamma?ray Bursts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gamma?ray emission mechanism of Gamma?ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma?ray Space Telescope successfully detected high?energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high?energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications

Masanori Ohno; The Fermi?LAT collaborations; The GBM collaborations

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Bell-type inequalities for arbitrary observables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a Bell-type inequality for observables with arbitrary spectra. For the case of continuous variable systems we propose a possible experimental violation of this inequality, by using squeezed light and homodyne detection together with methods of quantum-state reconstruction. It is shown that the violation is also possible for realistic detection efficiencies.

E. Shchukin W. Vogel

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Typhoon Observed with the MU Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the passage of Typhoon 8719 a 60-h continuous observation was made of the troposphere and the lower stratosphere with the MU (middle and upper atmosphere) radar. Height profiles of the wind velocity vector were measured every 2.5 min with ...

Toru Sato; Naoki Ao; Mamoru Yamamoto; Shoichiro Fukao; Toshitaka Tsuda; Susumu Kato

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Observing SQL queries in their natural habitat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe Habitat, a declarative observational debugger for SQL. Habitat facilitates true language-level (not: plan-level) debugging of, probably flawed, SQL queries that yield unexpected results. Users mark SQL subexpressions ... Keywords: Declarative debugging, SQL, query languages, relational databases

Torsten Grust; Jan Rittinger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Comparing Two Approaches for Assessing Observation Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Langland and Baker introduced an approach to assess the impact of observations on the forecasts. In that approach, a state-space aspect of the forecast is defined and a procedure is derived ultimately relating changes in the aspect with changes in ...

Ricardo Todling

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

DOW Radar Observations of Wind Farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of the wind industry in recent years has motivated investigation into wind farm interference with the operation of the nationwide Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) network. Observations of a wind farm were taken with a Doppler ...

Mallie Toth; Erin Jones; Dustin Pittman; David Solomon

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

GOES Observation of a Rapidly Melting Snowband  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GOES observation of rapid dissipation of a 5–10 cm (2–4 inches) depth snowband over the central and upper Mississippi River valley on 15 April 1980 is presented. Differences in the local weather between the stations with and without melting snow ...

Carlyle H. Wash; Delain A. Edman; John Zapotocny

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

An Observational Study of the Dryline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents analyses of data collected in the vicinity of a cloud-free dryline that occurred in western Oklahoma on 24 May 1989. Observations reveal sharp contrasts across the quasi-stationary, north-south dryline during midafternoon. Of ...

Conrad L. Ziegler; Carl E. Hane

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Observations of underdense plasma lens focusing of relativistic electron beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focusing of a 15 MeV, 19 nC electron bunch by an underdense plasma lens operated just beyond the threshold of the underdense condition has been demonstrated in experiments at the Fermilab NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL). The strong 1.9 cm focal-length plasma-lens focused both transverse directions simultaneously and reduced the minimum area of the beam spot by a factor of 23. Analysis of the beam-envelope evolution observed near the beam waist shows that the spherical aberrations of this underdense lens are lower than those of an overdense plasma lens, as predicted by theory. Correlations between the beam charge and the properties of the beam focus corroborate this conclusion.

Thompson, M.C.; /UCLA /LLNL, Livermore; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; /UCLA; Fliller, R.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Piot, P.; Santucci, J.; /Fermilab; Li, J.; Tikhoplav, R.; /Rochester U.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Observations of Ferroelastic Switching by Raman Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have become an important part of turbine technology by providing thermal protection to the underlying metallic components. These coatings are typically made from a zirconia-based ceramics which have a low thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficients similar to those of the superalloys. Early failure in these coatings is most often due to foreign object damage and erosion resulting in delamination and spallation. To protect against these types of failure, new materials with increased toughness are needed. There are two main toughening mechanisms in ceramics: transformation toughening, which is limited to low temperature applications and ferroelastic toughening which is accessible at all temperatures. Ferroelastic toughening occurs when the c-axis of the tetragonal grain undergoes reorientation under the application of an external stress. In this study, ferroelastic toughening is examined by Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that by using polarized confocal Raman spectroscopy one can not only observed the ferroelastic process, but also measure the parameters that control the increase in toughness observed. Ferroelastic toughening was observed in two ways in the 18mol% ceria stabilized zirconia (18CSZ) samples studied here. Samples were either exposed to indentation damage or uniaxial loading. In both of these cases maps of the ceramic surface were taken using Raman spectroscopy following loading and the relative intensities of the tetragonal peaks were analyzed. The resulting intensity profiles were used to monitor the reorientation of domains corresponding to ferroelastic toughening. Changes in domain orientation were observed that corresponded to the reorientation of domains along cracks as well as on a larger scale along those cracks. Domain reorientation was also observed under uniaxial loading and the stresses required for domain formation and movement were measured.

Bolon, Amy Marie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Design Factors That Influence Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Corrosion factors that can influence design considerations...Inhibitors Inspection Planned maintenance Source: Ref 25...

198

Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis W. F. Feltz, D. D. Turner, R. O. Knuteson, and R. G. Dedecker Space Science and Engineering Center Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has funded the development of the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI). This has led to a hardened, autonomous system that measures downwelling infrared (IR) radiance at high-spectral resolution. Seven AERI systems have been deployed around the world as part of the ARM Program. The initial goal of these instruments was to characterize the clear-sky IR emission from the atmosphere,

199

Variations in task and the ideal observer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In most previous studies involving the ideal observer, the task considered has been that of simple detection where it is assumed that there is complete a priori knowledge of the background and of the possible object's shape, amplitude, and position. It is shown that redefining the detection task to include the possibility of an unknown, slowly varying background reduces the importance of the low-frequency components in the image for the ideal observer. More complicated tasks than object detection are also considered, such as determination of an object's position and width and the resolution of two objects. These higher-order tasks further enhance the importance of the high-frequency information content of the image.

Hanson, K.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Direct Observation of Oxygen Superstructures in Manganites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the observation of superstructures associated with the oxygen 2p states in two prototypical manganites using x-ray diffraction at the oxygen K edge. In the stripe order system Bi{sub 0.31}Ca{sub 0.69}MnO{sub 3}, hole-doped O states are orbitally ordered, at the same propagation vector as the Mn orbital ordering, but no oxygen charge stripes are found at this periodicity. In La{sub 7/8}Sr{sub 1/8}MnO{sub 3}, we observe a 2p charge ordering described by alternating hole-poor and hole-rich MnO planes that is consistent with some of the recent predictions.

Grenier, S.; Tonnerre, J. M. [Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Thomas, K. J.; Hill, J. P. [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Staub, U.; Bodenthin, Y.; Garcia-Fernandez, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Sherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Scagnoli, V. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Kiryukhin, V.; Cheong, S-W.; Kim, B. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Direct observation of time reversal violation  

SciTech Connect

A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

Bernabeu, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Valencia, and IFIC, Joint Centre Univ. Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Observables in Strongly Coupled Anisotropic Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review certain anisotropic gauge/gravity dualities, focusing more on a theory with space dependent axion term. Then we discuss and also present some new results for several observables: the static potential and force, the imaginary part of the static potential, the quark dipole in the plasma wind, the drag force and diffusion time, the jet quenching of heavy and light quarks, the energy loss of rotating quarks, the photon production and finally the violation of the holographic viscosity over entropy bound. The corresponding weakly coupled results are also discussed. Finally we investigate the bounds of the parameters of the current strongly coupled anisotropic theories attempting to match them with the observed quark-gluon plasma and report the problems appear.

Dimitrios Giataganas

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

LNG Observer: Second Qatargas train goes onstream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The January-February, 1997 issue of the LNG Observer is presented. The following topics are discussed: second Qatargas train goes onstream; financing for the eighth Indonesian liquefaction train; Koreans take stakes in Oman LNG; US imports and exports of LNG in 1996; A 60% increase in proved reserves on the North West Shelf; proposals for Indian LNG terminal CEDIGAZ forecasts world LNG trade by 2010; growth for North African gas production and exports; and new forecast sees strong growth for Asian gas.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Avery, K.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nonclassical transport processes in geologic media: Review of field and laboratory observations and basic physical concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of the problem of solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous media. We first review field and laboratory observations that demonstrate nonclassical flow and transport behavior. The main physical principles causing anomalous transport regimes in fractured rock media are identified. The basic factors and physical concepts needed to describe anomalous transport in saturated and unsaturated fractured rock are discussed in detail.

Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Pruess, K.; Semenov, V.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hail Growth Mechanisms in a Colorado Storm. Part I: Dual-Wavelength Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive comparisons of dual-wavelength (10 and 3 cm) radar data with observations at the ground and penetration aircraft (T-28) measurements of hail in a Colorado storm show that positive hail signals (10 cm reflectivity factor exceeds that at ...

A. R. Jameson; A. J. Heymsfield

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Quantum mechanics problems in observer's mathematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work considers the ontology, guiding equation, Schrodinger's equation, relation to the Born Rule, the conditional wave function of a subsystem in a setting of arithmetic, algebra and topology provided by Observer's Mathematics (see www.mathrelativity.com). Observer's Mathematics creates new arithmetic, algebra, geometry, topology, analysis and logic which do not contain the concept of continuum, but locally coincide with the standard fields. Certain results and communications pertaining to solutions of these problems are provided. In particular, we prove the following theorems: Theorem I (Two-slit interference). Let {Psi}{sub 1} be a wave from slit 1, {Psi}{sub 2} - from slit 2, and {Psi} = {Psi}{sub 1}+{Psi}{sub 2}. Then the probability of {Psi} being a wave equals to 0.5. Theorem II (k-bodies solution). For W{sub n} from m-observer point of view with m>log{sub 10}((2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2n}-1){sup 2k}+1), the probability of standard expression of Hamiltonian variation is less than 1 and depends on n,m,k.

Khots, Boris; Khots, Dmitriy [Compressor Controls Corp, Des Moines, Iowa (United States); iMath Consulting LLC, Omaha, Nebraska (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Apparatus for observing a hostile environment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is provided for observing a hostile environment, comprising a housing and a camera capable of insertion within the housing. The housing is a double wall assembly with an inner and outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. A housing for an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided, comprising a transparent, double wall assembly. The double wall assembly has an inner wall and an outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The double wall assembly has an opening and a void area in communication with the opening. The void area of the housing is adapted to accommodate the optical system within said void area. An apparatus for protecting an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided comprising a housing; a tube positioned within the housing; and a base for supporting the housing and the tube. The housing comprises a double wall assembly having an inner wall and an outerwall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The tube is adapted to house the optical system therein.

Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Boylston, Micah L. (Williston, SC); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Sexton, William C. (Aiken, SC); Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Observation-based test set generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When circuits are manufactured, there are unavoidable defects that occur in a small but significant portion of the products. Input test patterns that can detect these defects are uniquely generated for each circuit in advance of their production. Current test set generation relies primarily on the "stuck-at" model, which both excites and observes every site of the circuit. However, a test set with good stuck-at fault coverage will not necessarily find all the defects in a circuit. Other models, such as bridging surrogates and transition surrogates, can also be considered when evaluating the quality of a test set. My research explores the role that observation alone plays in generating a set of valuable tests. I compare the performance of test patterns generated with traditional detection methods and ones made only considering the observation of each site. I also compare the lengths of each test set, with the goal of finding shorter and more effective tests that achieve an acceptable defective part level for a circuit.

Cobb, Jeffrey Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Observation of the submillimeter cosmic background spectrum  

SciTech Connect

An experimental measurement of the spectrum of the submillimeter cosmic background radiation is described. The experiment consists of measuring the night sky emission at an altitude of 39 km, correcting for the atmospheric molecular line emission, and placing limits on the contamination from sources of continuum radiation such as the apparatus itself and the earth. The observations were made on 24 July 1974 using a fully calibrated liquid-helium-cooled balloon- borne spectrophotometer. Important features of the apparatus include a cooled antenna, a polarizing interferometer, and a germanium bolometric detector. The characterization of the spectrophotometer includes the large angle response and emission of the antenna. The calibration of the instrument and corrections to the observed sky spectrum are based on measurements made during the flight. A simple model of the molecular line emission is used to determine the atmospheric contribution. The resulting spectrum covers the frequency range from 4 to 17 cm$sup -1$ and establishes that the cosmic background radiation follows the high frequency quantum cutoff for a 3K blackbody. A blackbody temperature of 2.99/sub -.$sub 14$/$sup +$.$sup 07$/K is deduced from our data. The present status of the cosmic background observations, which span more than three decades in frequency, is analyzed and it is concluded that they are all consistent with a blackbody temperature of 2.90 +- .04K (+- 1 SIGMA). This firmly supports the Big Bang cosmological model of the universe. (auth)

Woody, D.P.

1975-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ultra High-Energy Cosmic Ray Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The year 2007 has furnished us with outstanding results about the origin of the most energetic cosmic rays: a flux suppression as expected from the GZK-effect has been observed in the data of the HiRes and Auger experiments and correlations between the positions of nearby AGN and the arrival directions of trans-GZK events have been observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory. The latter finding marks the beginning of ultra high-energy cosmic ray astronomy and is considered a major breakthrough starting to shed first light onto the sources of the most extreme particles in nature. This report summarizes those observations and includes other major advances of the field, mostly presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference held in Merida, Mexico, in July 2007. With increasing statistics becoming available from current and even terminated experiments, systematic differences amongst different experiments and techniques can be studied in detail which is hoped to improve our understanding of experimental tec...

Kampert, Karl-Heinz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

XMM-Newton timing mode observations of Mrk 421  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a detailed temporal analysis of the bright BL Lac object Mrk 421 using the three available long timing mode observations by the EPIC PN camera. This detector mode is characterized by its long life time and is largely free of photon pile-up problems. The source was found in different intensity and variability states differing by up to more than a factor of three in count rate. A time resolved cross correlation analysis between the soft and hard energy bands revealed that the characteristics of the correlated emission, with lags of both signs, change on time scales of a few thousand seconds. Individual spectra, resolved on time scales of a few hundread seconds, can be quite well fitted by a broken power law. We find significant spectral variations on time scales as short as 500-1000 sec. Both the hard and the soft band spectral indices show a non-linear correlation with the source flux. A comparison of the observed light curves with numerical results from relativistic hydrodynamic computer simulations of the currently favored shock-in-jet models indicates that any determination of the jet's physical parameters from `simple' emission models must be regarded with caution: at any time we are seeing the emission from several emission regions distinct in space and time, which are connected by the complex hydrodynamic evolution of the non-uniform jet.

W. Brinkmann; I. E. Papadakis; C. Raeth; P. Mimica; F. Haberl

2005-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Comments on Form Factor Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved model independent upper bounds on the weak transition form factors are derived using inclusive sum rules. Comparison of the new bounds with the old ones is made for the form factors h_{A_1} and h_V in B -> D* decays.

Chiang, C W

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Remarks on Form Factor Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved model independent upper bounds on the weak transition form factors are derived using inclusive sum rules. Comparison of the new bounds with the old ones is made for the form factors h_{A_1} and h_V in B -> D* decays.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electromagnetic form factors of hadrons  

SciTech Connect

A vector meson dominance model of the electromagnetic form factors of hadrons is developed which is based on the use of unstable particle propagators. Least-square fits are made to the proton, neutron, pion and kaon form factor data in both the space and time-like regions. A good fit to the low-energy nucleon form factor data is obtained using only rho, $omega$, and phi dominance, and leads to a determination of the vector meson resonance parameters in good agreement with experiment. The nucleon-vector meson coupling constants obey simple sum rules indicating that there exists no hard core contribution to the form factors within theoretical uncertainties. The prediction for the electromagnetic radii of the proton is in reasonable agreement with recent experiments. The pion and kaon charge form factors as deduced from the nucleon form factors assuming vector meson universality are compared to the data. The pion form factor agrees with the data in both the space and time-like regions. The pion charge radius is in agreement with the recent Dubna result, but the isovector P-wave pion-pion phase shift calculated from the theory disagrees with experiment. A possible contribution to the form factors from a heavy rho meson is also evaluated. (auth)

Zidell, V.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Community Discovery via Metagraph Factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work aims at discovering community structure in rich media social networks through analysis of time-varying, multirelational data. Community structure represents the latent social context of user actions. It has important applications such as search ... Keywords: MetaFac, community discovery, dynamic social network analysis, metagraph factorization, nonnegative tensor factorization, relational hypergraph

Yu-Ru Lin; Jimeng Sun; Hari Sundaram; Aisling Kelliher; Paul Castro; Ravi Konuru

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Indoor Air Quality Observations in Public Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations of indoor air qmlity or indoor environment problems were accomplished in seven different Texas schools. The schools were located in hot and humid climates. Comfort and mildew were the most frequent complaints. In all cases, the air-conditioning system maintenance and operation was a primary factor in the problem cause and solution. The significance of problems investigated cculd have been minimized had the symptoms been addressed when they were reported the first time. Preventive maintenance and better housekeeping of air-conditioning systems in Texas schools will improve the indoor environment. Schools are encouraged to be more aggressive in preventive maintenance and plan for indoor air quality and energy efficiency in school air-conditioning retrofits.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Observations and Simulations of Fibrils and Mottles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent advent of the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), advanced image processing techniques, as well as numerical simulations that provide a more realistic view of the chromosphere, a comprehensive understanding of chromospheric jets such as spicules, mottles and fibrils is now within reach. In this paper, we briefly summarize results from a recent analysis of dynamic fibrils, short-lived jet-like features that dominate the chromosphere (as imaged in H-alpha) above and about active region plage. Using extremely high-resolution observations obtained at the SST, and advanced numerical 2D radiative MHD simulations, we show that fibrils are most likely formed by chromospheric shock waves that occur when convective flows and global oscillations leak into the chromosphere along the field lines of magnetic flux concentrations. In addition, we present some preliminary observations of quiet Sun jets or mottles. We find that the mechanism that produces fibrils in active regions is most likely also at work in quiet Sun regions, although it is modified by the weaker magnetic field and the presence of more mixed-polarity. A comparison with numerical simulations suggests that the weaker magnetic field in quiet Sun allows for significantly stronger (than in active regions) transverse motions that are superposed on the field-aligned, shock-driven motions. This leads to a more dynamic, and much more complex environment than in active region plage. In addition, our observations of the mixed polarity environment in quiet Sun regions suggest that other mechanisms, such as reconnection, may well play a significant role in the formation of some quiet Sun jets.

Bart De Pontieu; Viggo H. Hansteen; Luc Rouppe van der Voort; Michiel van Noort; Mats Carlsson

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

220

Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations of Atmospheric Water for Climate Research J. B. Snider, D. A. Hazen, A. J. Francavilla, W. B. Madsen, and M. D. Jacobson National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Surface-based microwave and infrared radiometers have been employed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) in climate research since 1987. The ability of these systems to operate continuously and unattended for extended periods of time has provided significant new information on atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid. These data are being employed to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation feedback mechanisms, an understanding

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Flip-flop phenomenon: observations and theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many active stars the spots concentrate on two permanent active longitudes which are 180 degrees apart. In some of these stars the dominant part of the spot activity changes the longitude every few years. This so-called flip-flop phenomenon has up to now been reported in 11 stars, both single and binary alike, and including also the Sun. To explain this phenomenon, a non-axisymmetric dynamo mode, giving rise to two permanent active longitudes at opposite stellar hemispheres, is needed together with an oscillating axisymmetric magnetic field. Here we discuss the observed characteristics of the flip-flop phenomenon and present a dynamo solution to explain them.

D. Elstner; H. Korhonen

2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

AGN fueling the observational point of view  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations at multiple wavelengths are reviewed to search for evidence for fueling mechanisms in galaxies, both for nuclear starbursts and AGN activity. Although it is undisputed that dynamical perturbations such as bars or tidal interactions accumulate gas in the central regions and sometimes trigger nuclear starbursts, the evidence remains scarce that these are necessary to fuel AGNs. Interpretations in terms of time-scales, feed-back, and black hole evolution are discussed. It is suggested that the AGN phase corresponds to the early-type phases of galaxies.

Combes, F

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents Conversion factors for energy equivalents are derived from the following relations: ...

224

Factors of characteristic words: Location and decompositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let @a be an irrational number with 0Keywords: Characteristic word, Decomposition, Location, Overlap factor, Return words, Separate factor

Wai-Fong Chuan; Hui-Ling Ho

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039  

SciTech Connect

The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Grenoble Observ. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U.; /more authors..

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

Brief paper: Near optimal interval observers bundle for uncertain bioreactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we design an interval observer for the estimation of unmeasured variables of uncertain bioreactors. The observer is based on a bounded error observer, as proposed in [Lemesle, V., & Gouze, J.-L. (2005). Hybrid bounded error observers for ... Keywords: Bounded error observers, Interval observers, Uncertain systems, Wastewater treatment

Marcelo Moisan; Olivier Bernard; Jean-Luc Gouzé

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Enhancement of ARM Surface Meteorological Observations during the Fall 1996 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes in situ moisture sensor comparisons that were performed in conjunction with the first Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period (IOP) conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) ...

Scott J. Richardson; Michael E. Splitt; Barry M. Lesht

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Optical Properties of Equatorial Cirrus from Observations in the ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of equatorial cirrus were studied during a three-week period of the ARM Pilot Radiation and Observation Experiment at Kavieng, Papua New Guinea, in January and February 1993. The experiment consisted of vertical lidar (532 ...

C. M. R. Platt; S. A. Young; P. J. Manson; G. R. Patterson; S. C. Marsden; R. T. Austin; J. H. Churnside

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Report: Human Capital Discussion and Observations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Capital Discussion, Human Capital Discussion, Observations, and Recommendations August 24, 2006 Submitted by: Mr. A. James Barnes and Mr. Dennis Ferrigno Background: During the March 23-24, 2006 EMAB Public Meeting, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1), James Rispoli, asked the EMAB members to pursue a review of EM Human Capital issues. Although the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) is also conducting a review of this topic - the results of which will be available in October 2007 - Mr. Rispoli instructed EMAB to identify areas that need improvement and make recommendations to begin bettering the program now. EMAB focused specifically on the areas of: Morale/Workplace Census Planning/Accountability Training/Certification

230

Prospects for Observations of Microquasars with GLAST  

SciTech Connect

The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a next generation high energy gamma-ray observatory due for launch in Fall 2007. The primary instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which will measure gamma-ray flux and spectra from 20 MeV to > 300 GeV and is a successor to the highly successful EGRET experiment on CGRO. The LAT will have better angular resolution, greater effective area, wider field of view and broader energy coverage than any previous experiment in this energy range. This poster will present performance estimates with particular emphasis on how these apply to studies of microquasars. The LAT's scanning mode will provide unprecedented uniformity of sky coverage and permit measurements of light curves for any source. We will show results from recent detailed simulations that illustrate the potential of the LAT to observe microquasar variability and spectra, including source sensitivity and ability to detect orbital modulation.

Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

Science Results Enabled by SDSS Astrometric Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss several results made possible by accurate SDSS astrometric measurements in a large sky area, with emphasis on asteroids and stellar proper motions obtained by comparing POSS and SDSS. SDSS has observed over 200,000 moving objects in five photometric bands, corresponding to about two orders of magnitude increase over previous multi--color surveys. These data were used to extend the measurement of asteroid size distribution to a smaller size limit, to demonstrate that asteroid dynamical families, defined as clusters in orbital parameter space, also strongly segregate in color space, and to discover a correlation between asteroid age and colors. A preliminary analysis of SDSS-POSS proper motions for about 1 million M dwarf stars demonstrates that, in the 0.1-1 kpc distance range, the rotational velocity and its dispersion for disk stars increase with the distance from the Galactic plane.

Z. Ivezic; N. Bond; M. Juric; J. A. Munn; R. H. Lupton; J. R. Pier; G. S. Hennessy; G. R. Knapp; J. E. Gunn; C. M. Rockosi; T. Quinn

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

Chandra Observations of WZ Sge in Superoutburst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present seven separate Chandra observations of the 2001 superoutburst of WZ Sge. The high-energy outburst was dominated by intense EUV emission lines, which we interpret as boundary layer emission scattered into our line of sight in an accretion disc wind. The direct boundary layer emission was hidden from view, presumably by the accretion disc. The outburst orbital hump (OOH) was detected in the EUV, but the common superhump was not, indicating a geometric mechanism in the former and a dissipative mechanism in the latter. X-rays detected during outburst were not consistent with boundary layer emission and we argue that there must be a second source of X-rays in dwarf novae in outburst.

Peter J. Wheatley; Christopher W. Mauche

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

234

Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hänsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

235

COMPTEL Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION The origin of cosmic g-ray bursts is as mysterious today as it was when they were discovered more than 25 years ago. Despite a wealth of new observational data obtained with the BATSE instrument on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, many of the fundamental questions remain unanswered. For instance, although BATSE has provided a tremendous statistical advantage (allowing the most accurate measurement of the spatial isotropy and inhomogeneity of burst sources ), its limited angular resolution and spectral range have given us an incomplete picture of the small-scale angular source distribution and high energy emission properties. 2,3 Furthermore, the limited angular resolution has also made it difficult to search for burst counterparts at other wavelengths. The COMPTEL instrument on board Compton measures the locations and spectra (0.75-30 MeV) of several strong g-ray bursts per year which occur within the ~1 sr fieldof -view of the main ("telescope") instrument.

Kippen Ryan Connors; R. M. Kippen; B J. Ryan; B A. Connors; B M. Mcconnell; V. Schönfelder; C J. Greiner; C M. Varendorff; W. Collmar; C W. Hermsen; D L. Kuiper; D C. Winkler; L. O. Hanlon E; K. S. O’flaherty E

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Fermat factorization method revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the well known Fermat factorization method, we call the Fermat factorization equation the equation solved by it: P(x, y) = (x + 2R) 2 ? y 2 ? 4N = 0; where N = p q> 0 is a RSA modulus with primes p and q supposed of equal length. This equation is a bivariate integer polynomial equation and we propose to solve it directly using Coppersmith’s methods for bivariate integer polynomials. As we use them as a black box, our proofs will be brief. We show a first result: we can factor N in a polynomial time if |p ? q | < N 5/18. Using the fact that the Newton polygon of P(x, y) is in fact a lower triangle we show a better result: we can indeed factor N in a polynomial time if |p ? q | < N 1/3. We conclude with proposals for future works. 1

Robert Erra; Christophe Grenier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool  

A new software tool enables the easy and quick selection of applicable regulatory guidelines as a starting point for human factors engineering (HFE) analyses.  Once selected, each guideline can be viewed on screen.  The software tracks and reports the ...

238

Automatic Test Factoring for Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

Saff, David

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

Uniformly accelerated observer in a thermal bath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the quantum field aspects in flat spacetime for an uniformly accelerated observer moving in a thermal bath. In particular, we obtain an exact closed expression of the reduced density matrix for an uniformly accelerated observer with acceleration $a = 2\\pi T$ when the state of the quantum field is a thermal bath at temperature $T^\\prime$. We find that the density matrix has a simple form with an effective partition function $Z$ being a product, $Z = Z_T Z_{T^\\prime}$, of two thermal partition functions corresponding to temperatures $T$ and $T^\\prime$ and hence is not thermal, even when $T = T^\\prime$. We show that, even though the partition function has a product structure, the two thermal baths are, in fact, interacting systems; although in the high frequency limit $\\omega_k \\gg T$ and $\\omega_k \\gg T^\\prime$, the interactions are found to become sub-dominant. We further demonstrate that the resulting spectrum of the Rindler particles can be interpreted in terms of spontaneous and stimulated emission due to the background thermal bath. The density matrix is also found to be symmetric in the acceleration temperature $T$ and the thermal bath temperature $T^\\prime$ indicating that thermodynamic experiments alone cannot distinguish between the thermal effects due to $T$ and those due to $T^\\prime$. The entanglement entropy associated with the reduced density matrix (with the background contribution of the Davies-Unruh bath removed) is shown to satisfy, in the $\\omega_k \\gg T^\\prime$ limit, a first law of thermodynamics relation of the form $T \\delta S = \\delta E$ where $\\delta E$ is the difference in the energies corresponding to the reduced density matrix and the background Davies-Unruh bath. The implications are discussed.

Sanved Kolekar

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Exploration At Geothermal Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic Exploration At Geothermal Wells Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Super Low Frequency (SLF) electromagnetic exploration was performed by using a nature source SLF electromagnetic detector at two geothermal wells in Peking University. The data of the SLF electromagnetic exploration at well JR-119 and JR-168 were obtained with the observation of continued five days and four times per day at well JR-119 and of one day at well JR-168. Based on these data, the influencing factors of the SI-F electromagnetic exploration were analyzed, which included the relationship

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Separability and ground state factorization in quantum spin systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the existence and the properties of fully separable (fully factorized) ground states in quantum spin systems. Exploiting techniques of quantum information and entanglement theory we extend a recently introduced method and construct a general, self-contained theory of ground state factorization in frustration-free quantum spin models defined on lattices in any spatial dimension and for interactions of arbitrary range. We show that, quite generally, non exactly solvable models in external field admit exact, fully factorized ground state solutions. Unentangled ground states occur at finite values of the Hamiltonian parameters satisfying well defined balancing conditions between external fields and interaction strengths. These conditions are analytically determined together with the type of magnetic orderings compatible with factorization and the corresponding values of the fundamental observables such as energy and magnetization. The method is applied to a series of examples of increasing complexi...

Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Bounding the Greybody Factors for Non-rotating Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiclassical black holes emit radiation called Hawking radiation. Such radiation, as seen by an asymptotic observer far outside the black hole, differs from original radiation near the horizon of the black hole by a redshift factor and the so-called "greybody factor". In this paper, we concentrate on the greybody factor-various bounds for the greybody factors of non-rotating black holes are obtained, concentrating on charged Reissner-Nordstrom and Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter black holes. These bounds can be derived by using a 2x2 transfer matrix formalism. It is found that the charges of black holes act as efficient barriers. Furthermore, adding extra dimensions to spacetime can shield Hawking radiation. Finally, the cosmological constant can increase the emission rate of Hawking radiation.

Tritos Ngampitipan; Petarpa Boonserm

2012-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

X-ray computed-tomography observations of water flow through anisotropic methane hydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect

We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to image and quantify the effect of a heterogeneous sand grain-size distribution on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate, as well as the effect on water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand. A 28 cm long sand column was packed with several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with sands of different grain-size distributions. During the hydrate formation, water redistribution occurred. Observations of water flow through the hydrate-bearing sands showed that water was imbibed more readily into the fine sand, and that higher hydrate saturation increased water imbibition in the coarse sand due to increased capillary strength. Hydrate dissociation induced by depressurization resulted in different flow patterns with the different grain sizes and hydrate saturations, but the relationships between dissociation rates and the grain sizes could not be identified using the CT images. The formation, presence, and dissociation of hydrate in the pore space dramatically impact water saturation and flow in the system.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

OBSERVATION OF DIPOLAR FERROMAGNETISM BY TEM TECHNIQUES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetostatic interactions play a central role in determining the magnetic response of an array of patterned magnetic elements or magnetized nanoparticles of given shape. The Fourier space approach recently introduced for the analytical computation of the demagnetizing tensor, field and energy for particles of arbitrary shape [1], has been recently extended to cover interactions between elements [2]. The main achievement has been the definition of a generalized dipole-dipole interaction for cylindrical objects, which takes into account the influence of shape anisotropy without resorting to,any kind of approximations [3]. Once the interaction energy is available, it becomes possible to evaluate the minimum energy state of the system for a given set of external parameters (such as applied field, aspect ratio, distance between elements). It turns out that, below a critical combination of aspect ratios and distances, the system undergoes a phase transition, changing abruptly from a closure domain state, with zero net magnetization, to a dipolar ferromagnetic state with a net magnetization which depends on the interaction strength between the elements. In order to observe this phenomenon by TEM, it is necessary to estimate the feasibility of the experiment by a series of simulations. Figure 1 shows the electron optical phase shifts for the system of three weakly (a-c) and strongly (d) interacting disks. The elements have a radius of 50 nm, a thickness of 5 nm (aspect ratio 1/20), and are uniformly magnetized at 2 T. By comparing Fig.1 (c) and (d), it can be seen that the fingerprint of the transition is the presence of fringing fields around the elements, revealed by the cosine fringes which resemble a dipole-like field in (d). When the system is in the closure-domain state, as in (a-c), no fringing field can be observed on a large scale. Figure 2 shows a set of Fresnel images, calculated for the same configurations as in Fig.1. As the Fresnel technique is scarcely sensitive to fringing fields, their effect is not evident in the images. However, by following the bright and dark contrast features in each image, a change in magnetization can be deduced, also when the electrostatic phase shift proportional to the thickness is taken into account. An alternative, more indirect, opportunity to observe the transition is granted by hysteresis loops. Figure 3 shows calculated hysteresis curves for non-interacting (a), weakly interacting (b) and strongly interacting (c) disks. The applied field is in-plane, along one of the triangular symmetry axis (0{sup o}, 60{sup o} or 120{sup o}). The transition is revealed by a remnant magnetization in zero field (c), contrary to the behavior of the weak interaction (b). Dipolar ferromagnetism can, therefore, be successfully investigated by TEM, where at least three different techniques, phase retrieval, phase contrast, and in-situ hysteresis experiments, are available for detecting the phase transition [4].

BELEGGIA, M.ZHU,Y.TANDON,S.ET AL.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Title The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Thatcher, Tracy L., Melissa M. Lunden, Richard G. Sextro, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 1 Pagination 846-851 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation

246

Direct observation of a magnetic Bose glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bose glass is a novel state of matter that emerges in systems of interacting bosons in the presence of quenched disorder. At sufficiently low temperatures, disorder-free bosons are subject to so-called Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). BEC can involve atoms in liquid 4He, laser-cooled ions in magnetic traps,2 Cooper pairs in superconductors, or magnons in magnetic systems. Due to peculiarities of Bose statistics, particles lose their individuality and occupy a unique quantum-mechanical state. The wave function of this condensate establishes long-range quantum phase coherence across a macroscopic sample. This, in turn, spawns unique quantum phenomena such as superfluity,5 Josephson effect6 and vortex matter. For repulsive bosons, quenched disorder disrupts the condensate and interferes with phase coherence. The result is a peculiar glassy state with only short-range phase correlations. While some experimental evidence of this was found in ultracold atoms,9 novel high-temperature superconductors,10 and quantum magnets,11, 12 none of the studies were direct. The key characteristic, namely the wave function of the condensate disrupted by disorder on the microscopic scale, remained inaccessible. Hereby we report a direct neutron diffraction observation of short range correlations of the BEC order parameter in a magnetic Bose glass. This phase is realized in the quantum spin ladder compound IPA-Cu(Cl0.96Br0.04)3, where disorder is induced by random chemical substitution.

Hong, Tao [ORNL; Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Manaka, H. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima JAPAN; Regnault, L.-P. [CEA, Grenoble, France

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Observation of Single Top Quark Production  

SciTech Connect

The author reports on the observation of electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 Tev using 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy, two, three or four jets, with one or two of them identified as originating from the fragmentation of a b quark, the measured cross section for the process p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X is 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb (for a top quark mass of 170 GeV). the probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10{sup -7}, corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance. Using the same dataset, the measured cross sections for the t- and the s-channel processes when determined simultaneously with no assumption on their relative production rate are 3.14{sub -0.80}{sup +0.94} pb and 1.05 {+-} 0.81 pb respectively, consistent with standard model expectations. The measured t-channel cross section has a significance of 4.8 standard deviations, representing the first evidence for the production of an individual single top process to be detected.

Gerber, Cecilia E.; /Illinois U., Chicago

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Preliminary Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies on the Variational Assimilation Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations M. Janisková, J.-F. Mahfouf, and J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Shinfield Park, Reading Berskshire, United Kingdom Abstract A linearized cloud scheme and a radiation scheme including cloud effects have been developed at European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to assimilate cloud properties in the framework of the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) assimilation system. To investigate the potential of those schemes to modify the model temperature, humidity and cloud profiles and produce a better match to the observed radiation fluxes, one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) assimilation experiments have been carried out using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

249

VLBI phase-reference observations of the gravitational lens JVAS B0218+357  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of phase-referenced VLBA+Effelsberg observations at five frequencies of the double-image gravitational lens JVAS B0218+357, made to establish the precise registration of the A and B lensed image positions. The motivation behind these observations is to investigate the anomalous variation of the image flux density ratio (A/B) with frequency - this ratio changes by almost a factor of two over a frequency range from 1.65 GHz to 15.35 GHz. We investigate whether frequency dependent image positions, combined with a magnification gradient across the image field, could give rise to the anomaly. Our observations confirm the variation of image flux ratio with frequency. The results from our phase-reference astrometry, taken together with the lens mass model of Wucknitz et al. (2004), show that shifts of the image peaks and centroids are too small to account for the observed frequency-dependent ratio.

Rupal Mittal; Richard Porcas; Olaf Wucknitz; Andy Biggs; Ian Browne

2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

X-ray Observations of Galaxies: The Importance of Deep High-Resolution Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray observations of galaxies have grown from a curiosity into a full-fledged field of astronomy. These observations provide unique information on black holes, binary stars, and the hot phase of the ISM, which can be used to constrain the chemical evolution of the Universe, and the joint evolution of galaxies and massive black holes. These exciting results are due in large part to the high-resolution capability of {\\it Chandra}. To follow on {\\it Chandra} and push forward this science past the present capabilities, our community must build a high-resolution (sub-arcsecond) large-area (several square meters) X-ray telescope.

G. Fabbiano

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

Analysis of the carbon dioxide concentration in the lowest atmospheric layers and the factors affecting China based on satellite observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide CO2 is the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas contributing to global climate change. SCIAMACHY on board ENVISAT launched in 2002 is the first satellite instrument to monitor the changes in CO2 concentration ...

Yanfang Hou; Shixin Wang; Yi Zhou; Fuli Yan; Jinfeng Zhu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Determination of Water Level and Tides Using Interferometric Observations of GPS Signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonintrusive remote sensing method to measure water level is examined. It relies on the fact that water is a good reflector of radio frequency energy, thus, on a satellite-to-ground path when the satellite is near the horizon, a readily ...

Kenneth D. Anderson

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

CMB Observational Techniques and Recent Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) consists of photons that were last created about 2 months after the Big Bang, and last scattered about 380,000 years after the Big Bang. The spectrum of the CMB is very close to a blackbody at 2.725 K and upper limits on any deviations of the CMB from a blackbody place strong constraints on energy transfer between the CMB and matter at all redshifts less than 2,000,000. The CMB is very nearly isotropic, but a dipole anisotropy of +/-3.346(17) mK shows that the Solar System barycenter is moving at 368+/-2 km/sec relative to the observable Universe. The dipole corresponds to a spherical harmonic index l=1. The higher indices l geq 2 indicate intrinsic inhomogeneities in the Universe that existed at the time of last scattering. While the photons have traveled freely only since the time of last scattering, the inhomogeneities traced by the CMB photons have been in place since the inflationary epoch only 10^{-35} sec after the Big Bang. These intrinsic anisotropies are much smaller in amplitude than the dipole anisotropy, with Delta T leq 100 microK. Electron scattering of the anisotropic radiation field produces an anisotropic linear polarization in the CMB with amplitudes less than 5 microK. Detailed studies of the angular power spectrum of the temperature and linear polarization anisotropies have yielded precise values for many cosmological parameters. This paper will discuss the techniques necessary to measure signals that are 100 million times smaller than the emission from the instrument and briefly describe results from experiments up to WMAP.

E. L. Wright

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Simple Estimator of the Shape Factor of the Two-Parameter Weibull Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is given to estimate the shape factor (K) of the Weibull distribution directly from wind observations, without iteration, plotting, or sorting of data. The estimate is of comparable accuracy as that given by the maximum-likelihood ...

Rolan D. Christofferson; Dale A. Gillette

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Photohadronic Origin of the TeV-PeV Neutrinos Observed in IceCube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform an unbiased search of the origin of the recently observed 28 events above ~30 TeV in the IceCube neutrino observatory, assuming that these are (apart from the atmospheric background) of astrophysical origin produced by photohadronic interactions. Instead of relying on the normalization of the neutrino flux, we demonstrate that spectral shape and flavor composition can be used to constrain or identify the source class. In order to quantify our observations, we use a model where the target photons are produced by the synchrotron emission of co-accelerated electrons, and we include magnetic field effects on the secondary muons, pions, and kaons. We find that the lack of observed events with energies much larger than PeV points towards sources with strong magnetic fields, which do not exhibit a direct correlation between highest cosmic ray and neutrino energies. While the simplest AGN models with efficient proton acceleration plausibly describe the current data at about the 3sigma confidence level, we show that IceCube can rule out that the observed neutrinos stem from the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays with a factor of ten increased statistics at more than 5sigma if the current observations are confirmed. A possible caveat are sources with strong magnetic fields and high Lorentz factors, such as magnetic energy dominated GRBs.

Walter Winter

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

Observing and modeling Earths energy flows  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews, from the authors perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within {+-}2 W m{sup -2}. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute importantly to this adjustment and thus contribute both to uncertainty in estimates of radiative forcing and to uncertainty in the response. Models are indispensable to calculation of the adjustment of the system to a compositional change but are known to be flawed in their representation of clouds. Advances in tracking Earth's energy flows and compositional changes on daily through decadal timescales are shown to provide both a critical and constructive framework for advancing model development and evaluation.

Stevens B.; Schwartz S.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Correction of Marine Air Temperature Observations for Solar Radiation Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of incoming solar radiation on merchant ships' observations of air temperature was assessed as part of the Voluntary Observing Ships' Special Observing Project for the North Atlantic (VSOP-NA), The ships' reports were compared with ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Raoul J. Tiddy; Peter K. Taylor

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Optimum Sampling Designs for a Glider–Mooring Observing Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean observing systems (OOSs) constituted by moorings and gliders are becoming relevant in oceanographic and climate studies. In these observing networks, the temporal variability is captured by mooring observations, while the spatial variability ...

A. Alvarez; B. Mourre

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Simulated and Observed Preindustrial to Modern Vegetation and Climate Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising levels of carbon dioxide since the preindustrial era have likely contributed to an observed warming of the global surface, and observations show global greening and an expansion of boreal forests. This study reproduces observed climate and ...

Michael Notaro; Zhengyu Liu; Robert Gallimore; Stephen J. Vavrus; John E. Kutzbach; I. Colin Prentice; Robert L. Jacob

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Common Risk Factors in Currency Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identify a “slope” factor in exchange rates. High interest rate currencies load more on this slope factor than low interest rate currencies. This factor accounts for most of the cross-sectional variation in average ...

Roussano, Nikolai

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261

Bayesian mixtures of common factor analyzers: Model, variational inference, and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a representative approach, named mixtures of common factor analyzers (MCFA), was proposed for clustering high-dimensional observed data. Existing model-parameter estimation methods for this approach is based on the maximum likelihood criterion ... Keywords: Bayesian mixtures of common factor analyzers, Clustering, Dimension reduction, Variational inference

Xin Wei, Chunguang Li

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase,...

263

Position and momentum observables on R and on R^3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize all position and momentum observables on R and on R^3. We study some of their operational properties and discuss their covariant joint observables.

C. Carmeli; T. Heinonen; A. Toigo

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California Title Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in...

265

Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by...

266

Observation Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP)...

267

Primeless factoring-based cryptography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factoring-based public-key cryptosystems have an overall complexity which is dominated by the key-production algorithm, which requires the generation of prime numbers. This is most inconvenient in settings where the key-generation is not an one-off process, ...

Sonia Bogos, Ioana Boureanu, Serge Vaudenay

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Factorization of a 512-bit RSA modulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the factorization of the 512-bit number RSA-155 by the Number Field Sieve factoring method (NFS) and discusses the implications for RSA.

Stefania Cavallar; Bruce Dodson; Arjen K. Lenstra; Walter Lioen; Peter L. Montgomery; Brian Murphy; Herman Te Riele; Karen Aardal; Jeff Gilchrist; Gérard Guillerm; Paul Leyland; Joël Marchand; François Morain; Alec Muffett; Chris Putnam; Craig Putnam; Paul Zimmermann

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Oak Ridge Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN More Documents & Publications Major Risk Factors to the Integrated...

270

November 2010CAPACITY FACTOR RISK AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior to the end of its anticipated useful life. We then fit the parameters of the model to the IAEA’s PRIS dataset of historical capacity factors on reactors across the globe. The estimated capacity factor risk is greatest in the first year of operation. It then quickly declines over the next couple of years, after which it is approximately constant. Whether risk is constant or increasing in later years depends significantly on the probability of a premature permanent shutdown of the reactor. Because these should be very rare events, the probability is difficult to estimate reliably from the small historical sample of observations. Our base case is parameterized with a conservatively low probability of a premature permanent shutdown which yields the approximately constant variance. Our model, combined with the global historical dataset, also yields relatively low estimates for the expected level of the capacity factor through the life of the plant. Our base case estimate is approximately 74%. Focusing on alternative subsets of the data raises the estimated mean capacity factor marginally, but not significantly, unless the sample chosen is restricted to selected countries over select years. This emphasizes the need for judgment in exploiting the historical data to project future probabilities.

Yangbo Du; John E. Parsons; Yangbo Du; John E. Parsons

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Determination of influence factors and accident rates for the Armored Tractor/Safe Secure Trailer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating environments, such as road type, road location, and time of day, play an important role in the observed accident rates of heavy trucks used in general commerce. These same factors influence the accident rate of the Armored Tractor/Safe Secure Trailer (AT/SST) used by the Department of Energy to transport hazardous cargos within the continental United States. This report discusses the development of accident rate influence factors. These factors, based on heavy trucks used in general commerce, are used to modify the observed overall AT/SST accident rate to account for the different operating environments.

Phillips, J.S.; Clauss, D.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blower, D.F. [Univ. of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Center for National Truck Statistics

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An XMM-Newton Observation of Abell 2597  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a 120 ks XMM-Newton observation of the galaxy cluster Abell 2597. Results from both the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) are presented. From EPIC we obtain radial profiles of temperature, density and abundance, and use these to derive cooling time and entropy. We illustrate corrections to these profiles for projection and point spread function (PSF) effects. At the spatial resolution available to XMM-Newton, the temperature declines by around a factor of two in the central 150 kpc or so in radius, and the abundance increases from about one-fifth to over one-half solar. The cooling time is less than 10 Gyr inside a radius of 130 kpc. EPIC fits to the central region are consistent with a cooling flow of around 100 solar masses per year. Broad-band fits to the RGS spectra extracted from the central 2 arcmin are also consistent with a cooling flow of the same magnitude; with a preferred low-temperature cut-off of essentially zero. The data appear to suggest (albeit at low significance levels below formal detection limits) the presence of the important thermometer lines from Fe XVII at 15, 17 Angstrom rest wavelength, characteristic of gas at temperatures ~ 0.3 keV. The measured flux in each line is converted to a mass deposition estimate by comparison with a classical cooling flow model, and once again values at the level of 100 solar masses per year are obtained. These mass deposition rates, whilst lower than those of previous generations of X-ray observatories, are consistent with those obtained from UV data for this object. This raises the possibility of a classical cooling flow, at the level of around 100 solar masses per year, cooling from 4 keV by more than two orders of magnitude in temperature.

R. Glenn Morris; A. C. Fabian

2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Optimization of the transmission of observable expectation values and observable statistics in continuous-variable teleportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the statistics of observables in continuous-variable (CV) quantum teleportation in the formalism of the characteristic function. We derive expressions for average values of output-state observables, in particular, cumulants which are additive in terms of the input state and the resource of teleportation. Working with a general class of teleportation resources, the squeezed-bell-like states, which may be optimized in a free parameter for better teleportation performance, we discuss the relation between resources optimal for fidelity and those optimal for different observable averages. We obtain the values of the free parameter of the squeezed-bell-like states which optimize the central momenta and cumulants up to fourth order. For the cumulants the distortion between in and out states due to teleportation depends only on the resource. We obtain optimal parameters {Delta}{sub (2)}{sup opt} and {Delta}{sub (4)}{sup opt} for the second- and fourth-order cumulants, which do not depend on the squeezing of the resource. The second-order central momenta, which are equal to the second-order cumulants, and the photon number average are also optimized by the resource with {Delta}{sub (2)}{sup opt}. We show that the optimal fidelity resource, which has been found previously to depend on the characteristics of input, approaches for high squeezing to the resource that optimizes the second-order momenta. A similar behavior is obtained for the resource that optimizes the photon statistics, which is treated here using the sum of the squared differences in photon probabilities of input versus output states as the distortion measure. This is interpreted naturally to mean that the distortions associated with second-order momenta dominate the behavior of the output state for large squeezing of the resource. Optimal fidelity resources and optimal photon statistics resources are compared, and it is shown that for mixtures of Fock states both resources are equivalent.

Albano Farias, L.; Stephany, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Seccion de Fenomenos Opticos, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado Postal 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

FTCP Human Factors Engineering Supplemental Competencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Factors Engineering Functional Area Qualification Competencies Examples for DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel

275

The Origins of the SPAR-H Method's Performance Shaping Factor Multipliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method has proved to be a reliable, easy-to-use method for human reliability analysis. Calculation of human error probability (HEP) rates is especially straightforward, starting with pre-defined nominal error rates for cognitive vs. action oriented tasks, and incorporating performance shaping factor (PSF) multipliers upon those nominal error rates. SPAR-H uses eight PSFs with multipliers typically corresponding to nominal, degraded, and severely degraded human performance for individual PSFs. Additionally, some PSFs feature multipliers to reflect enhanced performance. Although SPAR-H enjoys widespread use among industry and regulators, current source documents on SPAR-H such as NUREG/CR-6883 do not provide a clear account of the origin of these multipliers. The present paper redresses this shortcoming and documents the historic development of the SPAR-H PSF multipliers, from the initial use of nominal error rates, to the selection of the eight PSFs, to the mapping of multipliers to available data sources such as a Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP). Where error rates were not readily derived from THERP and other sources, expert judgment was used to extrapolate appropriate values. In documenting key background information on the multipliers, this paper provides a much needed cross-reference for human reliability practitioners and researchers of SPAR-H to validate analyses and research findings.

Ronald L. Boring; Harold S. Blackman

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Inter- and Intra-Observer Variability in Prostate Definition With Tissue Harmonic and Brightness Mode Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. Results: A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p =}35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. Conclusions: H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates.

Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur, E-mail: Gurpreet.Sandhu2@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Meyer, Tyler [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Pavamani, Simon [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India); Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Direct Observation of Microstructure Evolution in Li-Ion Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic Properties of Ni3Al Foils for Methane Steam Reforming · Characterization of the Crystallographic Textures and Mechanical Anisotropy Factors in Two ...

278

Molecular quantum mechanical observers, symmetry, and string theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper \\cite{Dance0601} tentatively suggested a physical picture that might underlie string theories. The string parameters $\\tau $ and $\\sigma_i $ were interpreted as spacetime dimensions which a simple quantum mechanical observer can observe, while symmetries of the relevant observer states could limit the observability of other dimensions. An atomic observer was the focus of the discussion. The present paper extends the discussion of\\cite{Dance0601} to molecular observers, including the nature of some common molecular bonds and their symmetries.

M. Dance

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

Separability and ground state factorization in quantum spin systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the existence and the properties of fully separable (fully factorized) ground states in quantum spin systems. Exploiting techniques of quantum information and entanglement theory we extend a recently introduced method and construct a general, self-contained theory of ground state factorization in frustration free quantum spin models defined on lattices in any spatial dimension and for interactions of arbitrary range. We show that, quite generally, non exactly solvable translationally invariant models in presence of an external uniform magnetic field can admit exact, fully factorized ground state solutions. Unentangled ground states occur at finite values of the Hamiltonian parameters satisfying well defined balancing conditions between the applied field and the interaction strengths. These conditions are analytically determined together with the type of magnetic orderings compatible with factorization and the corresponding values of the fundamental observables such as energy and magnetization. The method is applied to a series of examples of increasing complexity, including translationally-invariant models with short, long, and infinite ranges of interaction, as well as systems with spatial anisotropies, in low and higher dimensions. We also illustrate how the general method, besides yielding a large series of novel exact results for complex models in any dimension, recovers, as particular cases, the results previously achieved on simple models in low dimensions exploiting direct methods based on factorized mean-field ansatz.

S. M. Giampaolo; G. Adesso; F. Illuminati

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

280

Electrical and Production Load Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector. The operating hours of small and medium sized manufacturing facilities are analyzed to identify the most common operating hour or shift work patterns. About 75% of manufacturing facilities fall into expected operating hour patterns with operating hours near 40, 80, 120 and 168 hours/week. Two types of load factors, electrical and production are computed for each shift classification within major industry categories in the U.S. The load factor based on monthly billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand, the load factor based on production hours (PLF) shows an inverse trend, varying from about 1.4 for one shift operation to 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. When used as a diagnostic tool, if the PLF exceeds unity, then unnecessary energy consumption may be taking place. For plants operating at 40 hours per week, the ELF value was found to greater than the theoretical maximum, while the PLF value was greater than one, suggesting that these facilities may have significant energy usage outside production hours. The data for the PLF however, is more scattered for plants operating less than 80 hours per week, indicating that grouping PLF data based on operating hours may not be a reasonable approach to benchmarking energy use in industries. This analysis uses annual electricity consumption and demand along with operating hour data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database. The annual values are used because more desirable monthly data are not available. Monthly data are preferred as they capture the load profile of the facility more accurately. The data there come from Industrial Assessment Centers which employ university engineering students, faculty and staff to perform energy assessments for small to medium-sized manufacturing plants. The nation-wide IAC program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Sen, Tapajyoti

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Toward Objective, Standardized Intensity Estimates from Surface Wind Speed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme wind climatology and event-specific intensity assessments rely heavily on surface wind field observations. The most widely used platforms sited at airports are the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) and its predecessor, the ...

Forrest J. Masters; Peter J. Vickery; Phuong Bacon; Edward N. Rappaport

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Idealized Adaptive Observation Strategies for Improving Numerical Weather Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptive sampling uses information about individual atmospheric situations to identify regions where additional observations are likely to improve weather forecasts of interest. The observation network could be adapted for a wide range of ...

Rebecca E. Morss; Kerry A. Emanuel; Chris Snyder

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Causal Bounds and Observable Constraints for Non-deterministic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conditional independence relations involving latent variables do not necessarily imply observable independences. They may imply inequality constraints on observable parameters and causal bounds, which can be used for falsification and identification. ...

Roland R. Ramsahai

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Springtime Photochemical Air Pollution in Osaka: Field Observation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High concentrations of nitrogen dioxide are frequently observed in the Osaka area in the spring. To clarify the mechanism of springtime air pollution formation, a series of three-dimensional field observations was conducted in April 1993 covering ...

Shinji Wakamatsu; Itsushi Uno; Toshimasa Ohara

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Observation Quality Control with a Robust Ensemble Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current ensemble-based Kalman filter (EnKF) algorithms are not robust to gross observation errors caused by technical or human errors during the data collection process. In this paper, we consider two types of gross observational errors, additive ...

Soojin Roh; Marc G. Genton; Mikyoung Jun; Istvan Szunyogh; Ibrahim Hoteit

286

Toward a Mesoscale Observation Network in Southeast Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current weather observation network in Southeast Asia is unable to support the accurate monitoring and prediction of the region's predominantly convective weather. Establishing a multisensor mesoscale observation network comprising automated ...

Tieh-Yong Koh; Chee-Kiat Teo

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluating NCEP Eta Model–Derived Data against Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data derived at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction via four-dimensional data assimilation using the Eta Model were evaluated against surface observations from two observational arrays, one located in the semihumid, continental ...

Ismail Yucel; W. James Shuttleworth; James Washburne; Fei Chen

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

On the Computation of Gradients from Observations over Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical scheme is developed to compute the gradients of observations taken over complex terrain. The method is applied to an artificial example to demonstrate the scheme. An application is made to surface pressure observations between ...

Fred J. Kopp; Paul L. Smith; Harold D. Orville

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Observation Quality Control with a Robust Ensemble Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current ensemble-based Kalman filter (EnKF) algorithms are not robust to gross observation errors caused by technical or human errors during the data collection process. In this paper, the authors consider two types of gross observational errors, ...

Soojin Roh; Marc G. Genton; Mikyoung Jun; Istvan Szunyogh; Ibrahim Hoteit

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Anthropogenic Warming of the Oceans: Observations and Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations show the oceans have warmed over the past 40 yr, with appreciable regional variation and more warming at the surface than at depth. Comparing the observations with results from two coupled ocean–atmosphere climate models [the ...

David W. Pierce; Tim P. Barnett; Krishna M. AchutaRao; Peter J. Gleckler; Jonathan M. Gregory; Warren M. Washington

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Impacts of Mesonet Observations on Meteorological Surface Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the heterogeneous equipment, maintenance and reporting practices, and siting of surface observing stations, subjective decisions that depend on the application tend to be made to use some observations and to avoid others. This research ...

Daniel P. Tyndall; John D. Horel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Observing the Galápagos–EUC Interaction: Insights and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although sustained observations yield a description of the mean equatorial current system from the western Pacific to the eastern terminus of the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) array, a comprehensive observational dataset suitable for describing ...

Kristopher B. Karnauskas; Raghu Murtugudde; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dispersion relation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves using Cluster observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-point wave observations on Cluster spacecraft are used to infer the dispersion relation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. In this study we use a phase differencing method and observations from STAFF and ...

Pakhotin, I. P.

294

Observed and Simulated Energy Cycles in the Frequency Domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of spectral energetics in the frequency domain has been applied to several observed datasets and those simulated by a GFDL general circulation model. There exists good agreement on the directions of energy flows between the observed ...

Jian Sheng; Yoshikazu Hayashi

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Quality Control of Pre-1948 Cooperative Observer Network Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent comprehensive effort to digitize U.S. daily temperature and precipitation data observed prior to 1948 has resulted in a major enhancement in the computer database of the records of the National Weather Service’s cooperative observer ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel; David R. Easterling; Kenneth Hubbard; Kelly Redmond; Karen Andsager; Michael C. Kruk; Michael L. Spinar

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Stepwise Onset of Monsoon Weather Observed in the Nepal Himalaya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mountain weather changes in the Nepal Himalaya were intensively examined during the 2003 monsoon onset using in situ datasets, observed by multiple automatic weather stations (AWS) distributed across the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (...

K. Ueno; K. Toyotsu; L. Bertolani; G. Tartari

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

AMBROSia: An Autonomous Model-Based Reactive Observing System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing systems facilitate scientific studies by instrumenting the real world and collecting corresponding measurements, with the aim of detecting and tracking phenomena of interest. Our AMBROSia project focuses on a class of observing systems which ...

David Caron; Abhimanyu Das; Amit Dhariwal; Leana Golubchik; Ramesh Govindan; David Kempe; Carl Oberg; Abhishek Sharma; Beth Stauffer; Gaurav Sukhatme; Bin Zhang

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Measurement Methods Affect the Observed Global Dimming and Brightening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface incident solar radiation G determines our climate and environment, and has been widely observed with a single pyranometer since the late 1950s. Such observations have suggested a widespread decrease between the 1950s and 1980s (global ...

Kaicun Wang; Robert E. Dickinson; Qian Ma; John A. Augustine; Martin Wild

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated in situ Indian Ocean observing system (IndOOS) is simulated using a high-resolution ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with daily mean forcing, including an estimate of subdaily oceanic variability derived from observations. The ...

Gabriel A. Vecchi; Matthew J. Harrison

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Observations of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Tidal Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational evidence for the existence of quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in tidal currents is derived from the auto- and cross-correlation spectra of vertically separated current meters. The observed quasi- two-dimensional turbulence seems to ...

C. Veth; J. T. F. Zimmerman

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Explicitly Accounting for Observation Error in Categorical Verification of Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given an accurate representation of errors in observations it is possible to remove the effect of those errors from categorical verification scores. The errors in the observations are treated as additive white noise that is statistically ...

Neill E. Bowler

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Role of Operational Constraints in Selecting Supplementary Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptive observation strategies in numerical weather prediction aim to improve forecasts by exploiting additional observations at locations that are themselves optimized with respect to the current state of the atmosphere. The role played by an ...

James A. Hansen; Leonard A. Smith

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Observations of the Distribution of Ice in Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the type and distribution 0°C isotherm in three Atlantic hurricanes are presented. Supercooled drops, graupel, columns and aggregated snowflakes were observed. The supercooled drops were found only in convective updrafts stronger ...

R. A. Black; J. Hallett

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Discontinuities due to Joining Precipitation Station Observations in Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a climatological station is relocated or is closing, it is often possible to join the climate observations of a nearby site to create a longer time series. However, joining climate observations can sometimes introduce artificial ...

Lucie A. Vincent; Eva Mekis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A simple methodology for observing fracture process of nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple methodology for observing mechanical properties of nanocomposite Part 1: interfacial properties in an Epoxy Clay Nanocomposites. ...

306

Type 1a Supernovae Observations are Consistent with a Static Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The finding that the widths of type 1a supernovae light curves increase with redshift appears to provide strong evidence for an expanding universe. This paper argues that the observations are consistent with a static cosmology where redshift is produced by a tired-light mechanism. For type 1a supernovae there is a strong correlation between peak luminosity and the width of the light curve, the Phillips relation. In an expanding universe this relation is used to combine the absolute magnitude with the stretch factor to obtain a corrected apparent peak magnitude. In a model for a static universe where width rather than stretch factor is used there is different apparent peak magnitude. Since the analysis program explicitly uses the stretch factor rather than width in its use of the Phillips relation its application in a static universe produces a systematic bias in the peak magnitudes. In addition, the stretch selection that is valid for an expanding universe produces another small bias in the data that must be included in a static universe. The aim of this paper is to show that, using the Phillips relation, and allowing for these biases, the data are consistent with a static model. In a static model the density distribution of type 1a supernovae is independent of redshift. This prediction agrees with the observations.

David F. Crawford

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Coastal Underwater Field Observer with Remote IP Access  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal Underwater Field Observer with Remote IP Access Joe Wilinski, Aaron Ganick, Alexander with continuous use of batteries. Costal Underwater Field Observer 9/16/09 #12;Boston University Slideshow Title? Wide angle Zoom Costal Underwater Field Observer #12;Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here

Goldberg, Bennett

308

Effects of Secular Changes in Frequency of Observations and Observational Errors on Monthly Mean MSLP Summary Statistics Derived from ICOADS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo technique has been employed to assess how sextile mean sea level pressure (MSLP) statistics derived from ship observations can be affected by changes in the frequency of observations. The results show that when the number of ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Observing Strategy and Observation Targeting for Tropical Cyclones Using Ensemble-Based Sensitivity Analysis and Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation system for the Weather Research and Forecasting Model is used with ensemble-based sensitivity analysis to explore observing strategies and observation targeting for tropical cyclones. The case selected ...

Baoguo Xie; Fuqing Zhang; Qinghong Zhang; Jonathan Poterjoy; Yonghui Weng

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Assimilation of Satellite Infrared Radiances and Doppler Radar Observations during a Cool Season Observing System Simulation Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observing system simulation experiment is used to examine the impact of assimilating water vapor–sensitive satellite infrared brightness temperatures and Doppler radar reflectivity and radial velocity observations on the analysis accuracy of a ...

Thomas A. Jones; Jason A. Otkin; David J. Stensrud; Kent Knopfmeier

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

PROPAGATING SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN CORONAL LOOPS OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations of 5 minute quasi-periodic oscillations detected in a transition-region line (He II) and five coronal lines (Fe X, Fe XII, Fe XIII, Fe XIV, and Fe XV) at the footpoint of a coronal loop. The oscillations exist throughout the whole observation, characterized by a series of wave packets with nearly constant period, typically persisting for 4-6 cycles with a lifetime of 20-30 minutes. There is an approximate in-phase relation between Doppler shift and intensity oscillations. This provides evidence for slow magnetoacoustic waves propagating upward from the transition region into the corona. We find that the oscillations detected in the five coronal lines are highly correlated, and the amplitude decreases with increasing temperature. The amplitude of Doppler shift oscillations decrease by a factor of about 3, while that of relative intensity decreases by a factor of about 4 from Fe X to Fe XV. These oscillations may be caused by the leakage of the photospheric p-modes through the chromosphere and transition region into the corona, which has been suggested as the source for intensity oscillations previously observed by Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The temperature dependence of the oscillation amplitudes can be explained by damping of the waves traveling along the loop with multithread structure near the footpoint. Thus, this property may have potential value for coronal seismology in diagnostic of temperature structure in a coronal loop.

Wang, T. J.; Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, J. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)], E-mail: wangtj@helio.gsfc.nasa.gov

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY ASTROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE CASSINI SPACECRAFT AT SATURN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planetary ephemeris is an essential tool for interplanetary spacecraft navigation, studies of solar system dynamics (including, for example, barycenter corrections for pulsar timing ephemerides), the prediction of occultations, and tests of general relativity. We are carrying out a series of astrometric very long baseline interferometry observations of the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). These observations provide positions for the center of mass of Saturn in the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) with accuracies {approx}0.3 mas (1.5 nrad) or about 2 km at the average distance of Saturn. This paper reports results from eight observing epochs between 2006 October and 2009 April. These data are combined with two VLBA observations by other investigators in 2004 and a Cassini-based gravitational deflection measurement by Fomalont et al. in 2009 to constrain a new ephemeris (DE 422). The DE 422 post-fit residuals for Saturn with respect to the VLBA data are generally 0.2 mas, but additional observations are needed to improve the positions of all of our phase reference sources to this level. Over time we expect to be able to improve the accuracy of all three coordinates in the Saturn ephemeris (latitude, longitude, and range) by a factor of at least three. This will represent a significant improvement not just in the Saturn ephemeris but also in the link between the inner and outer solar system ephemerides and in the link to the inertial ICRF.

Jones, Dayton L.; Folkner, William M.; Lanyi, Gabor; Border, James; Jacobson, Robert A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Fomalont, Ed [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Dhawan, Vivek; Romney, Jon, E-mail: dayton.jones@jpl.nasa.gov [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

FULLY RESOLVED QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE OBSERVED WITH THE SUNRISE/IMAX INSTRUMENT  

SciTech Connect

Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Schmidt, W.; Berkefeld, T. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de AstronomIa y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: lagg@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Factors for Bioenergy Market Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

315

Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

Du, Yangbo

316

Emission Factors from Brazilian Deforestation Fires Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of emission factors from 19 deforestation fires in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil. LBA-ECO TG-10 Fire Emission Factors in Mato Grosso, Para, and Amazonas, Brazil: 2004...

317

Expected Power-Utility Maximization Under Incomplete Information and with Cox-Process Observations  

SciTech Connect

We consider the problem of maximization of expected terminal power utility (risk sensitive criterion). The underlying market model is a regime-switching diffusion model where the regime is determined by an unobservable factor process forming a finite state Markov process. The main novelty is due to the fact that prices are observed and the portfolio is rebalanced only at random times corresponding to a Cox process where the intensity is driven by the unobserved Markovian factor process as well. This leads to a more realistic modeling for many practical situations, like in markets with liquidity restrictions; on the other hand it considerably complicates the problem to the point that traditional methodologies cannot be directly applied. The approach presented here is specific to the power-utility. For log-utilities a different approach is presented in Fujimoto et al. (Preprint, 2012).

Fujimoto, Kazufumi, E-mail: m_fuji@kvj.biglobe.ne.jp [Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., Corporate Risk Management Division (Japan)] [Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., Corporate Risk Management Division (Japan); Nagai, Hideo, E-mail: nagai@sigmath.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, Division of Mathematical Science for Social Systems, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan)] [Osaka University, Division of Mathematical Science for Social Systems, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan); Runggaldier, Wolfgang J., E-mail: runggal@math.unipd.it [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicata (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Definition: Distribution Factor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Also Known As Transfer Distribution Factor Related Terms Interchange Transaction, transmission lines, facility, Interchange, transmission line, flowgate, smart grid...

319

Updating an LU Factorization with Pivoting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how to compute an LU factorization of a matrix when the factors of a leading principle submatrix are already known. The approach incorporates pivoting akin to partial pivoting, a strategy we call incremental pivoting. An implementation ... Keywords: LU factorization, linear systems, pivoting, updating

Enrique S. Quintana-Ortí; Robert A. Van De Geijn

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Prime Factorization in the Duality Computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give algorithms to factorize large integers in the duality computer. We provide three duality algorithms for factorization based on a naive factorization method, the Shor algorithm in quantum computing, and the Fermat's method in classical computing. All these algorithms are polynomial in the input size.

Wan-Ying Wang; Bin Shang; Chuan Wang; Gui Lu Long

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nonnegative matrix factorization with quadratic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) solves the following problem: find such nonnegative matrices A@?R"+^I^x^J and X@?R"+^J^x^K that Y@?AX, given only Y@?R^I^x^K and the assigned index J (K@?I>=J). Basically, the factorization is achieved by alternating ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Nonnegative matrix factorization, Quadratic programming

Rafal Zdunek; Andrzej Cichocki

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Variational learning for rectified factor analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear factor models with non-negativity constraints have received a great deal of interest in a number of problem domains. In existing approaches, positivity has often been associated with sparsity. In this paper we argue that sparsity of the factors ... Keywords: Positive factor analysis, Source separation, Variational Bayes

Markus Harva; Ata Kabán

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles Title Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Klepeis, Neil E., Michael G. Apte, Lara A. Gundel, Richard G. Sextro, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Aerosol Science & Technology Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 780-790 Date Published October 2003 Abstract Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides -- in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors -- estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange rate 20m^3 chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained by integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes

324

COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)  

SciTech Connect

We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kerber, Florian [European Southern Observatory, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

BeppoSAX Observations of the TeV Blazar Mkn 421  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The blazar Mkn 421 has been observed, as part of the AO1 Core Program, five times from 2 to 7 May 1997. In the LECS+MECS energy band the spectrum shows convex curvature, well represented by a broken power--law. Flux variability (more than a factor 2) has been detected over the entire 0.1--10 keV range, accompanying which the spectrum steepens with the decrease in intensity. Mkn 421 has also been detected with the PDS instrument. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the PDS spectrum lies significantly above the extrapolation from the MECS, suggesting a contribution from a flatter high energy component.

G. Fossati; L. Chiappetti; on behalf of the "Steep Blazars" collaboration

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

326

Observations of Strong Surface Radar Ducts over the Persian Gulf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ducting of microwave radiation is a common phenomenon over the oceans. The height and strength of the duct are controlling factors for radar propagation and must be determined accurately to assess propagation ranges. A surface evaporation duct ...

Ian M. Brooks; Andreas K. Goroch; David P. Rogers

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

How Are You Observing Energy Awareness Month? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Are You Observing Energy Awareness Month? Are You Observing Energy Awareness Month? How Are You Observing Energy Awareness Month? October 7, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis October is Energy Awareness Month, and we think a great way to celebrate would be to make an improvement that gets you a tax credit. But there are plenty of other ways you could observe Energy Awareness Month help spread the word about saving energy. So tell us: How are you observing Energy Awareness Month? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Will You Observe Energy Awareness Month? What Are You Doing to Fight Climate Change? How Do You Stay Cool and Comfortable in Hot Weather?

328

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) SUMMARY The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of long-term ecological infrastructure. DOE has evaluated and adopted the NSF EA to cover the NEON Project research activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and has issued a finding of no significant impact. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2013 EA-1964: FInding of No Significant Impact National Ecological Observation Network May 29, 2013 EA-1964: Final Environmental Assessment National Ecological Observation Network

329

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) 964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) SUMMARY The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of long-term ecological infrastructure. DOE has evaluated and adopted the NSF EA to cover the NEON Project research activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and has issued a finding of no significant impact. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2013 EA-1964: FInding of No Significant Impact National Ecological Observation Network May 29, 2013 EA-1964: Final Environmental Assessment National Ecological Observation Network

330

Observation of GRBs by the MAGIC Telescope, Status and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observation of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the Very High Energy (VHE) domain will provide important information on the physical conditions in GRB outflows. The MAGIC telescope is the best suited Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) for these observations. Thanks to its fast repositioning time and low energy threshold, MAGIC is able to start quickly the follow-up observation, triggered by an alert from the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN), and observe the prompt emission and early afterglow phase from GRBs. In the last two years of operation several GRB follow-up observations were performed by MAGIC, however, until now without successful detection of VHE gamma rays above threshold energies >100 GeV. In this paper we revise the expectations for the GRB observations with MAGIC, based on the experience from the last years of operation.

D. Bastieri; N. Galante; M. Garczarczyk; M. Gaug; F. Longo; S. Mizobuchi; V. Scapin

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

Factors Affecting the Distribution and Spillover of Precipitation in the Southern Alps of New Zealand—A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain gauge, radar, and atmospheric observations during a prolonged northwesterly storm in November 1994 have been used to study factors influencing the distribution of precipitation across the Southern Alps. Despite the persistent northwesterly ...

Mark R. Sinclair; David S. Wratt; Roddy D. Henderson; Warren R. Gray

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Correlations of experimental isotope shifts with spectroscopic and mass observables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental differential observables relating to mean square charge radii, spectroscopic, and mass observables of even-even nuclei are presented for different regions in the nuclear chart. They exhibit remarkable correlations, not heretofore recognized, that provide a new perspective on structural evolution, especially in exotic nuclei. This can also be a guide for future measurements of charge radii, spectroscopic observables, and masses, as well as for future theoretical approaches.

Cakirli, R. B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Istanbul, Istanbul (Turkey); Casten, R. F. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Calculation of fission observables through event-by-event simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increased interest in more exclusive fission observables has demanded more detailed models. We present here a new computational model, FREYA, that aims to meet this need by producing large samples of complete fission events from which any observable of interest can then be extracted consistently, including arbitrary correlations. The various model assumptions are described and the potential utility of the model is illustrated by means of several novel correlation observables.

J. Randrup; R. Vogt

2009-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutral cluster Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Neutral cluster Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) 2014.01.01 - 2014.10.31 Lead Scientist : John Backman Description The goal of the Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer measure and mechanistically understand the factors affecting the particle number size distribution of the atmospheric particle population over a tropical rain forest (especially the effects of anthropogenic pollution as a perturbation to natural state). The instrument will complement particle number size

335

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRI-PTR-ToFMS SRI-PTR-ToFMS Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SRI-PTR-ToFMS 2014.01.01 - 2014.10.31 Lead Scientist : Alex Guenther Description One of the major uncertainties in climate model simulations is the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and a better understanding of the factors controlling aerosol distributions and life cycle is urgently needed. Aerosols contribute directly to the Earth's radiation balance by scattering or absorbing light as a function of their physical properties and indirectly through particle-cloud interactions that lead to cloud

336

Infrared and Sub-millimetre Observing Conditions on the Antarctic Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Antarctic plateau provides the best terrestrial sites for infrared and sub-millimetre astronomy. In this paper we examine the relative importance of temperature, aerosol content and precipitable water vapour to determine which parameters have the greatest influence on atmospheric transmission and sky brightness. We use the atmospheric modelling program, MODTRAN, to model the observed sky spectrum at the South Pole from the near-IR to the sub-millimetre. We find that temperature and aerosol content determine the quality of nearIR observing conditions, aerosol content is the determining factor in the mid-IR up to 20m, while at longer wavelengths, including the sub-millimetre, it is the water vapour content that matters. Finding a location where aerosol levels are minimised is a key constraint in determining the optimum site on the Antarctic plateau for an infrared observatory. Keywords: Site testing, atmospheric effects, infrared: general. 1 Introduction It is now well es...

Marton G. Hidas; Michael G. Burton; Matthew A. Chamberlain; John W.V. Storey

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Interpretation of screen factor measurements  

SciTech Connect

Screen viscometer measurements give different information about polymer molecular weight and molecular weight distribution than intrinsic viscosity or relative viscosity measurements. This study shows that conventional screen viscometers measure elongation flow properties of solutions, and that for flexible polymers such as polyacrylamides, a sharp transition in conformation from a coiled to a stretched state is observed, which occurs at a Deborah number of 0.5. Conventional screen viscometers operate just above this critical Deborah number. Evidence for this transition in polymer conformation comes from measurements on a modified screen viscometer, from extensive work by Durst and Interhal on the sudden pressure jumps during flow of polyacrylamide solutions through porous media, and from polymer kinetic theory modeling of molecular deformation in flow. ll references.

Lim, T.; Uhl, J.T.; Prud'Homme, R.K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Tropical anvil cirrus evolution from observations and numerical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cirrus evolution from observations and numerical simulations Deng, Min University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Modeling The tropical anvil cirrus formation...

339

Observation Wells At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

340

Observation Wells At East Brawley Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Observation Wells At East Brawley Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Observing Climate with Satellites Are We on Thin Ice?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing Climate with Satellites Are We on Thin Ice? A glacial-melt stream on the top of the Greenland ice sheet in late summer. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

AAO support observations for the Hubble Deep Field Sout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present proposed ground-based support observations at the AAO for the forthcoming Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) campaign.

B. J. Boyle

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Battery Electric Vehicle Driving and Charging Behavior Observed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Electric Vehicle Driving and Charging Behavior Observed Early in The EV Project The EV Project John Smart, Idaho National Laboratory Stephen Schey, ECOtality North America...

344

SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

FISCHER,W.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Manhattan Project: A 70th Anniversary Observance | OSTI,...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTI has been making government R&D results open and transparent since 1947 The Manhattan Project: A 70th Anniversary Observance atomic energy molecule showing a nucleus...

346

An Observable Silene/Silylene Rearrangement in a Cationic Iridium ...  

An Observable Silene/Silylene Rearrangement in a Cationic Iridium Complex Steven R. Klei, T. Don Tilley,* and Robert G. Bergman* Department of Chemistry and Center ...

347

Experimental Observation of Energy Modulation in Electron Beams...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OBSERVATION OF ENERGY MODULATION IN ELECTRON BEAMS PASSING THROUGH TERAHERTZ DIELECTRIC WAKEFIELD STRUCTURES* S. Antipov , C. Jing, P. Schoessow, and A. Kanareykin, Euclid...

348

Observation of Lithium Ions at Atomic Resolution Using an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Observation of Lithium Ions at Atomic Resolution Using an ... at atomic resolution in several important electrode materials for Li-ion batteries.

349

Untrained Forward Observer (UFO) translator for call for fire .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many observers need indirect fire but are not proficient in Call for Fire, the procedure used to request indirect fire. To alleviate this, we propose… (more)

King, Regan R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

An Observation System Using Both Optical Stitching and Video Geo ...  

home \\ technologies \\ optical stitching and video geo registration. Technologies: Ready-to-Sign Licenses: Software: Patents: An Observation System Using Both Optical ...

351

Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Comparison of TWP-ICE Observational Data with Cloud-Resolving Model Results  

SciTech Connect

Observations made during the TWP-ICE campaign are used to drive and evaluate thirteen cloud-resolving model simulations with periodic lateral boundary conditions. The simulations employ 2D and 3D dynamics, one- and two-moment microphysics, several variations on large-scale forcing, and the use of observationally derived aerosol properties to prognose droplet numbers. When domain means are averaged over a 6-day active monsoon period, all simulations reproduce observed surface precipitation rate but not its structural distribution. Simulated fractional areas covered by convective and stratiform rain are uncorrelated with one another, and are both variably overpredicted by up to a factor of {approx}2. Stratiform area fractions are strongly anticorrelated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) but are negligibly correlated with ice water path (IWP), indicating that ice spatial distribution controls OLR more than mean IWP. Overpredictions of OLR tend to be accompanied by underpredictions of reflected shortwave radiation (RSR). When there are two simulations differing only in microphysics scheme or large-scale forcing, the one with smaller stratiform area tends to exhibit greater OLR and lesser RSR by similar amounts. After {approx}10 days, simulations reach a suppressed monsoon period with a wide range of mean precipitable water vapor, attributable in part to varying overprediction of cloud-modulated radiative flux divergence compared with observationally derived values. Differences across the simulation ensemble arise from multiple sources, including dynamics, microphysics, and radiation treatments. Close agreement of spatial and temporal averages with observations may not be expected, but the wide spreads of predicted stratiform fraction and anticorrelated OLR indicate a need for more rigorous observation-based evaluation of the underlying micro- and macrophysical properties of convective and stratiform structures.

Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Hill, A.; Jones, T. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Liu, G.; Minnis, Patrick; Morrison, H.; Nguyen, L.; Park, S.; Petch, Jon C.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Schumacher, Courtney; Shipway, Ben; Varble, A. C.; Wu, Xiaoqing; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Minghua

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

353

ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF TWO FLARE LOOPS OBSERVED BY AIA AND EIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze and model an M1.0 flare observed by SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS to investigate how flare loops are heated and evolve subsequently. The flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. The UV 1600 A emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Such behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit and the subsequent response in overlying coronal loops that evolve through different temperatures. Using the method we recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treating them as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, reasonably agree with observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend and their magnitudes are comparable by within a factor of two. Furthermore, we also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different loops with different heating functions as inferred from their footpoint UV emission, combined with their different lengths as measured from imaging observations, give rise to different coronal plasma evolution patterns captured both in the model and in observations.

Li, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Qiu, J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Mechanism Based Anticancer Drugs that Degrade Sp Transcription Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curcumin is the active component of tumeric, and this polyphenolic compound has been extensively investigated as an anticancer drug that modulates multiple pathways and genes. We demonstrated that curcumin inhibited 253JB-V and KU7 bladder cancer cell growth, and this was accompanied by induction of apoptosis and decreased expression of the proapoptotic protein survivin and the angiogenic proteins vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1). Since expression of survivin, VEGF and VEGFR1 are dependent on specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors, we also investigated the effects of curcumin on downregulation of Sp protein expression as an underlying mechanism for the apoptotic and antiangiogenic activity of this compound. Curcumin decreases expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in blader cancer cells indicating that the cancer chemotherapeutic activity of curcumin is due, in part, to decreased expression of Sp transcription factors and Sp-dependent genes. Betulinic acid (BA) and curcumin are phytochemical anticancer agents, and we hypothesized that both compounds decrease EGFR expression in bladder cancer through downregulation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors. BA and curcumin decreased expression of EGFR, Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-dependent proteins in 253JB-V and KU7 cells; EGFR was also decreased in cells transfected with a cocktail (iSp) containing small inhibitory RNAs for Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 showing that EGFR is an Sp-regulated gene. Methyl 2-cyano-3,11-dioxo-18?-olean-1,12- dien-30-oate (CDODA-Me) is a synthetic triterpenoid derived from glycyrrhetinic acid which inhibits proliferation of KU7 and 253JB-V bladder cancer cells. CDODA-Me also decreased expression of specificity protein-1 (Sp1), Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. Similar results were observed for a structurally-related triterpenoid, methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me), which is currently in clinical trials for treatment of leukemia. Celastrol, a naturally occurring triterpenoid acid from an ivy-like vine exhibits anticancer activity against bladder cancer cells. Celastrol decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and decreased expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and several Sp-dependent genes like Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). In vivo studies using KU7 cells as xenografts showed that celastrol represents novel class of anticancer drugs that acts, in part, through targeting downregulation of Sp transcription factors.

Chadalapaka, Gayathri

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

OCEANOGRAPHIC OBSERVATIONS IN BRISTOL BAY AND THE BERING SEA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

381 OCEANOGRAPHIC OBSERVATIONS IN BRISTOL BAY AND THE BERING SEA 1939-41, USCGT Redwing L. o OCEANOGRAPHIC OBSERVATSONS IN BRBSTOL BAY AND THE BERING SEA 1939-41 (USCGT Redwing) by Felix Favorite, John W OBSERVATIONS IN BRISTOL BAY AND THE BERING SEA 1939-41 (USCGT Redwing) by Felix Favorite, John W. Schantz

356

Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias climatological surface wind speed probability density functions (PDFs) estimated from observations and use them to evaluate, for the first time, contemporaneous wind PDFs predicted by a GCM. The ob- servations include NASA

Zender, Charles

357

Cirriform Rotor Cloud Observed on a Canadian Arctic Ice Cap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thin rotor cloud was observed on the lee side of Penny Ice Cap in the Canadian Arctic on 21 April 1996. The cloud consisted of thin cirriform layers, so that its motion was clearly observed. By means of time-lapse camera photography, the ...

Hisashi Ozawa; Kumiko Goto-Azuma; Koyuru Iwanami; Roy M. Koerner

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Radiation Fog: A Comparison of Model Simulation with Detailed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional model designed to study the formation, growth, and dissipation of radiation fog is described. The model is compared with detailed observations made at the 200-m tower at Cabauw in the Netherlands. This study we use observations ...

Peter G. Duynkerke

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Quality-Control Routine for Hourly Wind Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of hourly wind speed and direction observations from 41 northeastern U.S. first-order weather stations is evaluated with regard to the recognition of individual observations that are either obviously in error or of suspect quality. An ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Asymptotically efficient parameter estimation using quantized output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies identification of systems in which only quantized output observations are available. An identification algorithm for system gains is introduced that employs empirical measures from multiple sensor thresholds and optimizes their convex ... Keywords: Cramér-Rao bound, Efficient estimator, Quantized observation, System identification

Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Recursive controllability and observability tests for large dynamic systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controllability and observability criteria for a linear stationary system are used to design recursive tests for slackening the computing system requirements for verification of the controllability and observability of large systems. Practical examples ... Keywords: 02.30.Yy+64.70.+p

E. Yu. Zybin; M. Sh. Misrikhanov; V. N. Ryabchenko

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations govCampaignsWater Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations 2002.04.01 - 2002.06.30 Lead Scientist : Marvin Wesely For data sets, see below. Description The U.S. DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) is a 3-year feasibility investigation focused on accurately evaluating the water cycle components and using stable isotopes as an effective tool in doing so. The study area is primarily the Whitewater subbasin in the Walnut River Watershed in southeastern Kansas. Two intensive observations periods are planned, this first one in April to June 2002 and a second currently scheduled for December 2002 to February 2003. Observations will be made of precipitation

363

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 4 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Observation_Wells_At_Mccoy_Geothermal_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402599" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services

364

Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars Haynes, John Colorado State University Stephens, Graeme Colorado State University Category: Cloud Properties The results of an analysis of tropical cloud systems observed from a variety of vertically pointing radar systems are described. In particular, observations taken during five years of operation of the ARM millimeter wavelength radar system (MMCR) at Manus Island in the Tropical West Pacific region are characterized into cloud classes according to the radar reflectivity structures of these cloud systems, associated rainfall, and surface radiative properties. These observations of cloud properties are composited with respect to various phases of the Madden Julian Oscillation, which is a dominant mode of variability at Manus Island. A method of better

365

Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from GOES-WEST Inoue, Toshiro MRI/JMA Category: Field Campaigns Low-level cloud formed off the west coast of continents plays an important role in general circulation and climate. Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) was conducted at the ARM mobile site deployed at Pt Reyes, California during April to September. Here, we studied the relationship between meteorological parameters observed by GPS sonde and cloud properties observed from GOES-WEST during the MASRAD intensive operational period. Cloud properties are retrieved from VISST (Visible Infrared Solar-infrared Split window Technique). The vertical profile of stability, relative humidity (RH) and wind speed observed by GPS sonde are

366

VOYAGER 2 OBSERVES A LARGE DENSITY INCREASE IN THE HELIOSHEATH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voyager 2 (V2) entered the heliosheath in 2007 August at roughly the same time solar minimum conditions were reaching the outer heliosphere. Soon after crossing the termination shock the solar wind density at Voyager decreased by a factor of two and the temperature decreased by a factor of three. At the beginning of 2011 the plasma density in the heliosheath began to increase and in mid-2012 it was up by more than a factor of two. The temperature rose by about 50% and the speed remained constant, although the flow direction continues to turn tailward. These changes may signal the end of solar minimum conditions at V2 in the heliosheath, although we do not understand why the speed did not decrease. The increased dynamic pressure has lead to an outward movement of the termination shock from its very compressed state at solar minimum.

Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wang, C., E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: cw@spaceweather.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Assimilation of Standard and Targeted Observations within the Unstable Subspace of the Observation–Analysis–Forecast Cycle System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper it is shown that the flow-dependent instabilities that develop within an observation–analysis–forecast (OAF) cycle and that are responsible for the background error can be exploited in a very simple way to assimilate observations. ...

Anna Trevisan; Francesco Uboldi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Appendix A Conversion Factors for Standard Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy, work, heat(a) joule J ... a utility-specific factor that has incorporated actual fuel mix ... Arizona Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Utah Wyoming

369

politics factors into climate bill, too  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

06/2 - POLITICS FACTORS INTO CLIMATE BILL, TOO. In A 987-page bill, six committees with jurisdiction, a mammoth oil spill to consider, no bipartisan support, ...

370

Health Information Technology (IT), Human Factor Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on a research program aimed at developing human factors guidelines for ... technical guidelines will help support safe, effective, error-free EHR use ...

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Factors associated with participation restriction in community ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 26, 2007 ... restriction, after adjusting for age and gender in a logistic regression analysis. Health and disability factors most strongly and independently ...

373

Mini-Conference on Factorization Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, The University of Iowa, Iowa City. Non-Atomic Unique Factorization. 3:00-3:45 PM Franz Halter-Koch, Karl

Coykendall, James

374

OpenEI - electricity emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4650 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

375

OpenEI - hourly emission factors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4640 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

376

Factors that Predict Quality Classroom Technology Use.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite technological advancements intended to enhance teaching and learning in the 21st century, numerous teacher and school factors continue to impede quality classroom technology use.… (more)

Hastings, Tricia A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nucleon Form Factor Measurements and Interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The data base for the form factors of the nucleon obtained from elastic ep scattering is discussed, as well as some recent developments in their calculation.

Charles F. Perdrisat

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

378

Photometric observations from theoretical flip-flop models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some active stars show a so-called flip-flop phenomenon in which the main spot activity periodically switches between two active longitudes that are 180 degrees apart. In this paper we study the flip-flop phenomenon by converting results from dynamo calculations into long-term synthetic photometric observations, which are then compared to the real stellar observations. We show that similar activity patterns as obtained from flip-flop dynamo calculations, can also be seen in the observations. The long-term light-curve behaviour seen in the synthesised data can be used for finding new stars exhibiting the flip-flop phenomenon.

H. Korhonen; D. Elstner

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

379

OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR DARK MATTER INTERACTING THROUGH A YUKAWA POTENTIAL  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations in galaxies and clusters indicate that dark matter density profiles exhibit core-like structures which contradict the numerical simulation results of collisionless cold dark matter (CDM). On the other hand, it has been shown that CDM particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the cores in dwarf galaxies. In this Letter, I use the Yukawa potential interacting dark matter model to derive two simple scaling relations on the galactic and cluster scales, respectively, which give excellent agreements with observations. Also, in our model, the masses of the force carrier and dark matter particle can be constrained by the observational data.

Chan, M. H., E-mail: mhchan@phy.cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

De-caf-einated : life without chromatin assembly factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTORS THAT ACTSaccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin- assembly factors thatSaccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin-assembly factors that act

Kats, Ellen Simona

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Representation Error of Oceanic Observations for Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple approach to the estimation of representation error (RE) of sea level (?), temperature (T), and salinity (S) observations for ocean data assimilation is described. It is assumed that the main source of RE is due to unresolved processes ...

Peter R. Oke; Pavel Sakov

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The 1 August 1981 MOPE Storm: Observations and Modeling Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations made by the T-28 armored research aircraft, radar, and other data sources were used to study an eastern Moutana hailstorm that developed on 1 August 1981 during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment season. The storm ...

Rooney S. Kubesh; Dennis J. Musil; Richard D. Farley; Harold D. Orville

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Relating Cirrus Cloud Properties to Observed Fluxes: A Critical Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy needed in cirrus cloud scattering and microphysical properties is quantified such that the radiative effect on climate can he determined. Our ability to compute and observe these properties to within needed accuracies is assessed, ...

A. M. Vogelmann; T. P. Ackerman

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Automatic Cloud Tracking Applied to GOES and METEOSAT Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements to the SRI automatic cloud-tracking system are described that enable it to operate on multilayer clouds associated with severe storms. The improved method has been tested using rapid-scan observations of Hurricane Eloise obtained by ...

Roy M. Endlich; Daniel E. Wolf

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A 94-GHz Doppler Radar for Cloud Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Doppler radar operating at 3.2 mm wavelength was designed and assembled primarily for observation of clouds and precipitation. Phase detection of the radar signals which is required for Doppler operation is implemented through the use of a ...

Roger Lhermitte

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Observed Vegetation–Climate Feedbacks in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed vegetation feedbacks on temperature and precipitation are assessed across the United States using satellite-based fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) and monthly climate data for the period of 1982–2000. This study ...

M. Notaro; Z. Liu; J. W. Williams

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Combined Satellite- and Surface-Based Observations of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for combining satellite and surface-based cloud observations into a self-consistent three-dimensional field is presented. This method derives the probabilities of the cloud states, which are most consistent with all of the ...

Bryan C. Weare

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Green Ocean Amazon: Year-to-Year Differences (GOAMAZON 2015) 2015.01.01, Martin, AMF Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon Aerial Campaign 2014.02.15,...

389

Early Canadian Weather Observers and the “Year Without a Summer”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unusual spring and summer weather of the year 1816 in central Canada is discussed using Canadian newspaper accounts together with manuscript records from early amateur weather observers. Many of the spectacular meteorological events of this ...

Kevin Hamilton

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Lidar Observation of Elevated Pollution Layers over Los Angeles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elevated pollution layers are observed over Los Angeles with an aircraft equipped with a downward-looking lidar. For the first time, detailed ancillary upper-air kinematic and thermodynamic data were collected simultaneously to aid in the ...

Roger M. Wakimoto; James L. McElroy

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

ARM - Field Campaign - Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) Campaign Links RACORO Website Related Campaigns Surface Radiation Comparison Transfer Measurements for RACORO 2009.01.20, Long, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/racoro/ Lead Scientist : Andrew Vogelmann For data sets, see below. Description The ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) supported the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, led by principal investigator Andrew Vogelmann. During this long-term campaign, the AAF conducted routine flights at the ACRF Southern

392

How Will You Observe Energy Awareness Month? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Observe Energy Awareness Month? Observe Energy Awareness Month? How Will You Observe Energy Awareness Month? October 1, 2009 - 7:00am Addthis October is Energy Awareness Month! This year's theme, "A Sustainable Energy Future; Putting All the Pieces Together," encourages you to see yourself as a piece of a larger puzzle-fitting into the big picture, shaping our energy future, and moving our nation toward energy independence. Learn more about Energy Awareness Month and how you can download or order materials to help spread the word. How will you observe Energy Awareness Month? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments.

393

The Effect of Clouds on Air Showers Observation from Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues relating to extensive air showers observation by a space-borne fluorescence detector and the effects of clouds on the observations are investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulations assume the presence of clouds with varying altitudes and optical depths. Simulated events are reconstructed assuming a cloud-free atmosphere. While it is anticipated that auxiliary instruments, such as LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging), will be employed to measure the atmospheric conditions during actual observation, it is still possible that these instruments may fail to recognize the presence of a cloud in a particular shower observation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the reconstructed shower parameters in such cases. Reconstruction results are shown for both monocular and stereo detectors and for the two limiting cases of optically thin, and optically thick clouds.

T. Abu-Zayyad; C. C. H. Jui; E. C. Loh

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

Soil Moisture Modeling Based on Multiyear Observations in the Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two simple soil moisture models useful for drought monitoring and climate change studies were proposed, based on 4-yr ground observations of root-zone soil moisture in Sahelian Niger. One is a water balance model that calculates soil moisture ...

Y. Yamaguchi; M. Shinoda

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

An Observational and Prognostic Numerical Investigation of Complex Terrain Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain Program conducted a field experiment at the interface of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains in the winter of 1991. Extensive meteorological observations were taken in northeastern Colorado near ...

Gregory S. Poulos; James E. Bossert

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Dendritic Patterns in Tropical Cumulus: An Observational Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observational analysis of the structure and synoptic setting of tropical dendritic cumulus formations was undertaken using 30 months of global data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the National Aeronautics and ...

Stephen D. Nicholls; George S. Young

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Convective Impact on Temperatures Observed near the Tropical Tropopause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed temperature trends and interannual variations near the tropical tropopause suggest that temperatures up to the cold point are controlled by the troposphere, but some models indicate otherwise. Here, previous investigations of thermal ...

Steven C. Sherwood; Takeshi Horinouchi; Heidi A. Zeleznik

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Observations of Liquid Water in Orographic Clouds over Elk Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relatively simple orographic clouds forming in winter over Elk Mountain, Wyoming provided useful opportunities for field studies of cloud formation and of ice crystal development. In this paper, the observations of cloud droplet populations ...

Marcia K. Politovich; Gabor Vali

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Arctic Precipitation and Evaporation: Model Results and Observational Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational estimates of precipitation and evaporation over the Arctic Ocean and its terrestrial watersheds are compared with corresponding values from the climate model simulations of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir Kattsov; Diane Portis; Valentin Meleshko

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Theory and observations of controls on lightning flash size spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous analyses of VHF Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) observations relative to the location of deep convective updrafts have noted a systematic pattern in flash characteristics. In and near strong updrafts, flashes tend to be smaller and more ...

Eric C. Bruning; Donald R. MacGorman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Local Air–Sea Relationship in Observations and Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study compares the local simultaneous correlation between rainfall–evaporation and sea surface temperature (SST)–SST tendency among observations, coupled general circulation model (CGCM) simulations, and stand-alone atmospheric ...

Renguang Wu; Ben P. Kirtman; Kathy Pegion

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Comprehensive Automated Quality Assurance of Daily Surface Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a comprehensive set of fully automated quality assurance (QA) procedures for observations of daily surface temperature, precipitation, snowfall, and snow depth. The QA procedures are being applied operationally to the Global ...

Imke Durre; Matthew J. Menne; Byron E. Gleason; Tamara G. Houston; Russell S. Vose

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thermohaline Stratification of the Indonesian Seas: Model and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indonesian Throughflow, weaving through complex topography, drawing water from near the division of the North Pacific and South Pacific water mass fields, represents a severe challenge to modeling efforts. Thermohaline observations within the ...

Arnold L. Gordon; Julie L. McClean

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Helicopter Observations of the Sea Breeze over a Coastal Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamical observations by a helicopter have been conducted to study the internal structure of the sea breeze blowing inland from Tosa Bay during three periods (September 1993, November 1994 and 1995). Inland-intrusion distances of the ...

Osamu Chiba; Fumiaki Kobayashi; Gen’ichi Naito; Koji Sassa

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Multi-Spacecraft Observations: Stream Interactions and Associated Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the longitude, ? Sun the solar rotation angular speed, r thewithin one solar rotation when the Sun is very active, thefrom the Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun (

Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Galvin, A. B.; MacNeice, P. J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Tropical Cyclone Motion. A Comparison of Theory and Observation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analytic predictions of tropical cyclone motion by Holland are shown to be in very good agreement with observations in the Australian southwest Pacific region. These results indicate that a combined linear asymmetric advection and divergence ...

Greg J. Holland

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

An Assessment of Wave Observations from Ships in Southern Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of wind waves and swell from ship reports are investigated. Comparisons are made between estimates of wave parameters made from ships in southern oceans by calculating correlations as a function of ship separation, and analyzing the ...

A. K. Laing

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

TRMM Radar Observations of Shallow Precipitation over the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from the precipitation radar aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite provide the first opportunity to map vertical structure properties of rain over the entire Tropics and subtropics. Storm height histograms reveal a ...

David A. Short; Kenji Nakamura

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Estimation of TAMDAR Observational Error and Assimilation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) observations are becoming a major data source for numerical weather prediction (NWP) because of the advantages of their high spatiotemporal resolution and humidity measurements. In this ...

Feng Gao; Xiaoyan Zhang; Neil A. Jacobs; Xiang-Yu Huang; Xin Zhang; Peter P. Childs

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hydraulic Physical Modeling and Observations of a Severe Gap Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong gap winds in Howe Sound, British Columbia, are simulated using a small-scale physical model. Model results are presented and compared with observations recorded in Howe Sound during a severe gap wind event in December 1992. Hydraulic ...

Timothy D. Finnigan; Jason A. Vine; Peter L. Jackson; Susan E. Allen; Gregory A. Lawrence; Douw G. Steyn

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing as Determined from Nimbus-7 Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collocated and coincident cloud and outgoing longwave radiation observations taken by experiments on board the Nimbus-7 satellite have been used to infer the daytime longwave cloud-radiative forcing. Through the specification of a time-series of ...

Philip E. Ardanuy; Larry L. Stowe; Arnold Gruber; Mitchell Weiss; Craig S. Long

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Antarctic Meteorological Observations on the GTS during the FROST Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment is made of the availability of Antarctic synoptic observations on the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Telecommunication System (GTS) during the trial periods (5–9 July 1993 and 1–15 February 1994) and winter and ...

Steven Colwell; John Turner

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Observing-Systems Simulation Experiments: Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the history of observing-systems simulation experiments (OSSEs) is presented together with a description of current methodology, its capabilities and limitations, and considerations for the design of future experiments. These ...

Charles P. Arnold Jr.; Clifford H. Dey

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cloud Model-Based Simulation of Spaceborne Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of observations from potential spaceborne radars are made based on storm structure generated from the three-dimensional (3D) Goddard cumulus ensemble model simulation of an intense overland convective system. Five frequencies of 3, 10,...

H-Y. M. Yeh; N. Prasad; R. Meneghini; W-K. Tao; J. A. Jones; R. F. Adler

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Observed Diurnal Cycle Climatology of Planetary Boundary Layer Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observational climatology of the planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) diurnal cycle, specific to surface characteristics, is derived from 58 286 fine-resolution soundings collected in 14 major field campaigns around the world. An objective ...

Shuyan Liu; Xin-Zhong Liang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cirrus Infrared Parameters and Shortwave Reflectance Relations from Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of experimental observations and analysis of cirrus from high-altitude aircraft remote sensing is presented. The vertical distribution of cirrus optical and infrared cross-section parameters and the relative effective emittance and ...

James D. Spinhirne; William D. Hart; Dennis L. Hlavka

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Observations from Space and Thermal Convection: A Historical Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An abbreviated historical account of the evolution of the satellite meteorology program is presented. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the satellite and its space platform for observing and studying atmospheric convection. Particular ...

Ernest M. Agee

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

On Determinations of Maximum Hailstone Sizes from Hallpad Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports of hailstones larger than those indicated by hailpad observations being found on the ground around the hailpad sites raise questions about the validity of maximum-size determinations. Data from the Grossversuch IV hailpad network ...

Paul L. Smith; Albert Waldvogel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radiation Energy Budget Studies Using Collocated AVHRR and ERBE Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the energy balance at the top of the atmosphere are specified as a function of atmospheric and surface properties using observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVURR) and the Earth Radiation budget Experiment (...

Steven A. Ackerman; Toshiro Inoue

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Experimental Observations of Internal Vortex Structures in Steady Baroclinic Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic structures of steady baroclinic waves observed in a differentially heated rotating-fluid annulus are well known to be composed of high and low pressure vortices, upper (eastward) and lower (westward) jet streams meandering through the ...

T. Tajima; T. Nakamura; T. Sakata

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Observations of Near-Inertial Waves in a Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-inertial with horizontal scales O(10 km) dominate profiles of velocity finestructure collected in the North Pacific Subtropical Front during January 1980. Considerable spatial variability is observed. Two features in particular contain most ...

Eric Kunze; Thomas B. Sanford

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

An Observational Study of Stratocumulus Entrainment and Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The marine stratocumulus regime is studied using observational data from the Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS) experiment. Such regions are climatically important because of their influence on the earth–atmosphere energy ...

S. R. Kawa; R. Pearson Jr.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Observations of the Internal Tide in Monterey Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from two shipboard experiments in 1994, designed to observe the semidiurnal internal tide in Monterey Canyon, reveal semidiurnal currents of about 20 cm s?1, which is an order of magnitude larger than the estimated barotropic tidal currents. ...

Emil T. Petruncio; Leslie K. Rosenfeld; Jeffrey D. Paduan

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Kinematics of the Secondary Eyewall Observed in Hurricane Rita (2005)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne Doppler radar data collected from the concentric eyewalls of Hurricane Rita (2005) provide detailed three-dimensional kinematic observations of the secondary eyewall feature. The secondary eyewall radar echo shows a ring of heavy ...

Anthony C. Didlake Jr.; Robert A. Houze Jr.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Observation and Measurement of Solidification Phenomena at High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT) that can be used to study .... and the cell-tip stability observed in Fe-83C was in good agreement with the theory ...

426

A Method for Combining Passive Microwave and Infrared Rainfall Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive microwave observations of rainfall offer the ability to obtain very accurate instantaneous estimates of rainfall. Because passive microwave instruments are confined to polar-orbiting satellites, however, such estimates must interpolate ...

Christian Kummerow; Louis Giglio

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-CRUZ OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AT EXTREME ENERGIES ADedication xix Acknowledgments xx 1 Gamma-Ray Bursts 1.1

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ocean Response to a Hurricane. Part I: Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the ocean to hurricanes was investigated using aircraft-deployable expendable current profilers (AXCP). The goals were to observe and separate the surface wave and surface mixed layer (SML) velocities under the storms and to map ...

Thomas B. Sanford; Peter G. Black; James R. Haustein; James W. Feeney; George Z. Forristall; James F. Price

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

An Observationally Generated A Priori Database for Microwave Rainfall Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of active and passive microwave sensors on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite have been used to construct observationally constrained databases of precipitation profiles for use in passive microwave ...

Christian D. Kummerow; Sarah Ringerud; Jody Crook; David Randel; Wesley Berg

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Observations of Thermohaline Convection adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations were made of ocean microstructure and horizontal currents adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf in the southeastern Weddell Sea. Periods of in situ supercooled water extending as deep as 65 m were associated with ice nucleation and frazil ...

Ilker Fer; Keith Makinson; Keith W. Nicholls

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Extracting the Dominant SST Modes Impacting North America's Observed Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal impacts of the dominant sea surface temperature (SST) modes to North American climate are assessed comprehensively in observations using the multivariate generalized equilibrium feedback assessment (GEFA) method. The GEFA method is ...

Fuyao Wang; Zhengyu Liu; Michael Notaro

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Aircraft Observations of Ice Crystal Evolution in an Altostratus Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from a Lagrangian spiral descent within altostratus cloud associated with a cold front were used to study the evolution of ice particle spectra by following populations of ice crystals as they fell through the cloud. The flight track ...

Paul R. Field

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Late Pleistocene Ice Age Scenarios Based on Observational Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice age scenarios for the last glacial-interglacial cycle, based on observations of Boyle and Keigwin concerning the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation and of Barnola et al. concerning atmospheric C02 variations derived from the Vostok ice ...

G. DeBlonde; W. R. Peltier

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Observations of Polarity Reversal in Shoaling Nonlinear Internal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations off the New Jersey coast document the shoaling of three groups of nonlinear internal waves of depression over 35 km across the shelf. Each wave group experienced changing background conditions along its shoreward transit. Despite ...

E. L. Shroyer; J. N. Moum; J. D. Nash

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Property:GBIG/ObservationEndDate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ObservationEndDate Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:GBIGObservationEndDate&oldid5093...

436

Information-Disturbance Theorem for Mutually Unbiased Observables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a novel version of information-disturbance theorems for mutually unbiased observables. We show that the information gain by Eve inevitably makes the outcomes by Bob in the conjugate basis not only erroneous but random.

Takayuki Miyadera; Hideki Imai

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Combined System for Observations of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Thin Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A balloonborne sonde and a polarization lidar have been developed to make combined observations of thin tropospheric and stratospheric clouds. In their first application these instruments have been used in a campaign organized to study Antarctic ...

A. Adriani; G. P. Gobbi; M. Viterbini; S. Ugazio

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Observations of Boundary Mixing over the Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of mixing over the continental slope using a towed body reveal a great lateral extent (several kilometers) of continuously turbulent fluid within a few hundred meters of the boundary at depth 1600 m. The largest turbulent dissipation ...

J. N. Moum; D. R. Caldwell; J. D. Nash; G. D. Gunderson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Climatological Observations and Predicted Sublimation Rates at Lake Hoare, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1985, an automated meteorological station was established at Lake Hoare in the dry valley region of Antarctica. Here, we report on the first year-round observations available for any site in Taylor Valley. This dataset augments the ...

Gary D. Clow; Christopher P. McKay; George M. Simmons Jr.; Robert A. Wharton Jr.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Equatorial Atlantic Velocity and Temperature Observations: February–November 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper ocean velocity and temperature measurements were obtained in the central equatorial Atlantic using surface moored current meters from February to November 1981. Distinct seasonal variations were observed in the zonal momentum and ...

R. H. Weisberg

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Elevation-Dependent Trends in Precipitation Observed during NAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar data from the 2004 North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) enhanced observing period were used to investigate diurnal trends and vertical structure of precipitating features relative to local terrain. Two-dimensional composites of ...

Angela K. Rowe; Steven A. Rutledge; Timothy J. Lang; Paul E. Ciesielski; Stephen M. Saleeby

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Analysis of Land Skin Temperature Using AVHRR Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using satellite remote sensing techniques to take quantitative observations of the climate system will advance our knowledge and ability to model the climate system and its changes. Polar-orbiting satellite records of global land surface skin ...

Menglin Jin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

First Observations of Microbaroms with Single Absolute Barometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first observations of microbaroms with single absolute barometers are presented and discussed. Microbaroms are pulses of atmospheric infrasound emitted by ocean surface waves. They can propagate over thousands of kilometers through the ...

Ganesh K. Subramanian; Andreas Muschinski

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Overland Precipitation Estimation from TRMM Passive Microwave Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Procedures for passive microwave precipitation estimation over land are investigated based on a large database of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations. The procedures include components for rain area delineation, convective/...

Mircea Grecu; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Structure and Life Cycle of Microburst Outflows Observed in Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense, small-scale divergent outflows known as microbursts are held responsible for a number of aircraft accidents. This paper describes the morphology of microburst outflows observed in Colorado. Outflows are categorized into morphological ...

Mark R. Hjelmfelt

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Thermodynamic Properties of Mesoscale Convective Systems Observed during BAMEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dropsonde observations from the Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex Experiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatiotemporal variability of temperature, moisture, and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion-type sounding ...

James Correia Jr.; Raymond W. Arritt

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

ARM - Field Campaign - The ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsThe ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment (PROBE) Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : The...

448

Integrating spacecraft and aircraft in Earth Observation System architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) is the essential data gathering network that enables the advancement of Earth science. In recent years, efforts have been made to understand the major GEOS architectural tradeoffs. ...

Suarez, Brandon H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Empirical Localization of Observation Impact in Ensemble Kalman Filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localization is a method for reducing the impact of sampling errors in ensemble Kalman filters. Here, the regression coefficient, or gain, relating ensemble increments for observed quantity y to increments for state variable x is multiplied by a ...

Jeffrey Anderson; Lili Lei

450

Current Icing Potential: Algorithm Description and Comparison with Aircraft Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The “current icing potential” (CIP) algorithm combines satellite, radar, surface, lightning, and pilot-report observations with model output to create a detailed three-dimensional hourly diagnosis of the potential for the existence of icing and ...

Ben C. Bernstein; Frank McDonough; Marcia K. Politovich; Barbara G. Brown; Thomas P. Ratvasky; Dean R. Miller; Cory A. Wolff; Gary Cunning

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Mantle Echoes Associated with Deep Convection: Observations and Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finescale radar observations of intense thermals/starting plumes, during the early stages of precipitation formation, were collected by an airborne Doppler radar on two separate days. The radar data were recorded as the aircraft flew underneath ...

Roger M. Wakimoto; Hanne V. Murphey; Robert G. Fovell; Wen-Chau Lee

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Observations of Vertical Wind Shear Heterogeneity in Convective Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-Doppler wind syntheses from mobile radar observations obtained during the International H2O Project document some of the spatial variability of vertical wind profiles in convective boundary layers. Much of the variability of popular ...

Paul Markowski; Yvette Richardson

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Press Pass - Press Release - DZero ZZ diboson observation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ZZ diboson make its discovery an essential prelude to finding or excluding the Higgs boson at the Tevatron. The observation of the ZZ, announced at a Fermilab seminar on July...

454

The Mysteries of Mammatus Clouds: Observations and Formation Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mammatus clouds are an intriguing enigma of atmospheric fluid dynamics and cloud physics. Most commonly observed on the underside of cumulonimbus anvils, mammatus also occur on the underside of cirrus, cirrocumulus, altocumulus, altostratus, and ...

David M. Schultz; Katharine M. Kanak; Jerry M. Straka; Robert J. Trapp; Brent A. Gordon; Dusan S. Zrni?; George H. Bryan; Adam J. Durant; Timothy J. Garrett; Petra M. Klein; Douglas K. Lilly

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Personal Computers, Weather Observations, and the National Climatic Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The personal computer (PC) has become an important part of meteorological observing, telecommunications, forecasting, research, and data-management systems. The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is the nation's quality-control and archival ...

Richard Heim Jr.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Observations of Ship Tracks from Ship-Based Platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ship-based measurements in June 1994 provided information about ship-track clouds and associated atmospheric environment observed from below cloud levels that provide a perspective different from satellite and aircraft measurements. Surface ...

W. Porch; R. Borys; P. Durkee; R. Gasparovic; W. Hooper; E. Hindman; K. Nielsen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Global Annual Temperature Anomalies from Land and Ocean Observations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature Anomalies from Land and Ocean Observations, 1880-2012 image data Data Graphics Graphics Reference Hansen, J.E., R. Ruedy, M. Sato, and K. Lo. 2013. NASA GISS...

458

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), thought to be produced by the core-collapse of massive stars or merging compact objects, are the most luminous events observed since the… (more)

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Comparison of Adaptive Observing Guidance for Atlantic Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne adaptive observations have been collected for more than two decades in the neighborhood of tropical cyclones, to attempt to improve short-range forecasts of cyclone track. However, only simple subjective strategies for adaptive ...

S. J. Majumdar; S. D. Aberson; C. H. Bishop; R. Buizza; M. S. Peng; C. A. Reynolds

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Interpretation of Adaptive Observing Guidance for Atlantic Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptive observing guidance products for Atlantic tropical cyclones are compared using composite techniques that allow one to quantitatively examine differences in the spatial structures of the guidance maps and relate these differences to the ...

C. A. Reynolds; M. S. Peng; S. J. Majumdar; S. D. Aberson; C. H. Bishop; R. Buizza

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

On the Deterministic Observation Impact Guidance: A Geometrical Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimal use of the atmospheric data in numerical weather prediction requires an objective assessment of the value added by observations to improve the analyses and forecasts of a specific data assimilation system (DAS). This research brings ...

Dacian N. Daescu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Droplet activation properties of organic aerosols observed at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA Fan Mei, 1,7 Patrick L. Hayes, 2,3 Amber Ortega, 2,3 Jonathan W. Taylor, 4 James D. Allan,...

463

Microsoft PowerPoint - GNEP PARTNERS CANDIDATE PARTNERS AND OBSERVERS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publications GNEP Partners and Observers Microsoft PowerPoint - 5.3 Item 01 Top Kill Operation Status 09 June 1400.pptx Microsoft PowerPoint - Book and Journal Formsv2wButton.ppt...

464

A New Frontal Instability: Theory and ERICA Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A short-wave instability theory is applied to secondary waves on a narrow cold-front rainband observed during the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA). The basic mean state is approximated by the parabolic, ...

Nathan Paldor; Ching-Hwang Liu; Michael Ghil; Roger M. Wakimoto

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Lidar Observations of Banded Convection during BLX83  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lidar observations of clear-air convection during the 1983 Boundary Layer Experiment (BLX83) reveal the presence of elongated, parallel regions of updrafts marked by enhanced aerosol backscattering. These linear (banded) aerosol structures were ...

R. A. Ferrare; J. L. Schols; E. W. Eloranta; R. Coulter

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Tracer Transport by the Diabatic Circulation Deduced from Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean meridional circulations for the months of November through May 1979 are deduced from the net radiative heating rates obtained from detailed calculations based on satellite observations of temperature and radiatively important trace species. ...

S. Solomon; J. T. Kiehl; R. R. Garcia; W. Grose

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Secondary Cyclogenesis—Comparison of Observations and Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study of a small-scale polar front cyclone observed during the Canadian Atlantic Storms Program (CASP) is presented. The cyclone forms along an essentially two-dimensional front, which is in approximate thermal wind balance. This ...

R. Paul Ford; G. W. Kent Moore

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Ooishi's Observation: Viewed in the Context of Jet Stream Discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although aircraft encounters with strong westerly winds during World War II provided the stimulus for postwar research on the jet stream, Wasaburo Ooishi observed these winds in the 1920s. Ooishi's work is reviewed in the context of earlier work ...

John M. Lewis

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Microsoft PowerPoint - GNEP PARTNERS CANDIDATE PARTNERS AND OBSERVERS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Euratom Attending Candidate Partner and Observer Countries 1. Argentina 2. Belgium 3. Brazil 4. Canada 5. Czech 6. Egypt 7. Finland 8. Germany 9. Italy 10. Mexico 11. Morocco 12....

470

Regional Variability in Tropical Convection: Observations from TRMM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation of the vertical profile of precipitation over the global Tropics is a key objective of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) because this information is central to obtaining vertical profiles of latent heating. This study ...

Walter A. Petersen; Steven A. Rutledge

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Finescale Radar Observations of Tornado and Mesocyclone Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of vortex configurations observed at finescale with Doppler On Wheels (DOW) radars in and near the hook echoes of supercell thunderstorms are described. These include marginal/weak tornadoes, often with no documented condensation funnels,...

Joshua Wurman; Karen Kosiba

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Observations of a Cloud Are Triggered by Thunderstorm Outflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents aircraft, radar, satellite and rawinsonde observations which describe a cloud am formed by moist downdraft outflow from a cumulonimbus cluster in northwest Kansas. Aircraft cross sections are presented of four variables at 160 ...

David A. Matthews

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Monthly Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Conventional Meteorological Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean satellite measurements of surface heating rate, surface temperature, and normalized difference vegetation index were collected for seven locations in Kansas. These were combined with monthly average surface observations and used in a ...

J. D. Tarpley

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Arm Program's Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of water vapor intensive observation periods (WVIOPs) were conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma between 1996 and 2000. The goals of these WVIOPs are to characterize the accuracy of the operational ...

H. E. Revercomb; D. D. Turner; D. C. Tobin; R. O. Knuteson; W. F. Feltz; J. Barnard; J. Bösenberg; S. Clough; D. Cook; R. Ferrare; J. Goldsmith; S. Gutman; R. Halthore; B. Lesht; J. Liljegren; H. Linné; J. Michalsky; V. Morris; W. Porch; S. Richardson; B. Schmid; M. Splitt; T. Van Hove; E. Westwater; D. Whiteman

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Capturing the content of physics: systems, observables, and experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a content markup language for physics realized by extending the OMDoc format by an infrastructure for the principal concepts of physics: observables, physical systems, and experiments. The formalization of the description ...

Eberhard R. Hilf; Michael Kohlhase; Heinrich Stamerjohanns

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A Study of Hail Growth Utilizing Observed Storm Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hail growth is studied in the Westplains, Colorado, storm for which a variety of observations were collected. Measurements from a triple-Doppler radar network and a penetrating aircraft are used to synthesize fields of liquid water content and ...

G. Brant Foote

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Optical Observations of Lightning from a High-Altitude Airplane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning has been observed from above cloud top by using satellites, balloons, rockets, and high-altitude airplanes, each of which provides a unique perspective and holds the potential for gaining new understanding of lightning phenomena. During ...

H. J. Christian; S. J. Goodman

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Crisis in Cosmology : Observational Constraints on Omega and H_0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thanks to new technology of observations and fresh inputs from particle physics, cosmology has advanced on both observational and theoretical fronts. It is therefore opportune that we take stock of the cosmological situation today and examine the observational and theoretical constraints as they are now. The bottom line in this review is that despite the availability of the cosmological constant as an extra parameter for flat Friedmann models, the allowed parameter space for such models is very small. The observations that we consider here include the ages of globular clusters, measurement of Hubble's constant, abundance of rich clusters of galaxies, fraction of mass contributed by baryons in rich clusters and abundance of high redshift objects.

J. S. Bagla; T. Padmanabhan; J. V. Narlikar

1995-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

479

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Print It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gaps and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new...

480

Hydrometeor Retrieval Accuracy Using Microwave Window and Sounding Channel Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval errors of cloud and precipitation hydrometeor contents from spaceborne observations are estimated at microwave frequencies in atmospheric windows between 18 and 150 GHz and in oxygen absorption complexes near 50–60 and 118 GHz. The ...

Peter Bauer; Emmanuel Moreau; Sabatino Di Michele

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "readily observable factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated implications in the midlatitude satellite passes lower than 50 degrees geomagnetic latitude. At higher latitudes, auroral: Satellite induction. Index Terms: 1515 Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism: Geomagnetic induction; 3914 Mineral

Constable, Steve

482

Realizing the Potential of Vehicle-Based Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential availability of millions of surface observations from passenger vehicles and fleets represents a potentially significant opportunity for the weather community. The success of this opportunity rests with the weather community's technical ...

William P. Mahoney III; James M. O'Sullivan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Observable signatures of general relativistic dynamics in compact binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of general relativity (GR) in astrophysical systems are often difficult to calculate, but they can have important consequences for observables. This thesis considers the impact of previously-ignored GR effects ...

Lang, Ryan N. (Ryan Nathan)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Constraining Microwave Brightness Temperatures by Radar Brightband Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multichannel microwave sensors make it possible to construct physically based rainfall retrieval algorithms. In these schemes, errors arising from the inaccuracy of the physical modeling of the cloud system under observation have to be accounted ...

A. Battaglia; C. Kummerow; Dong-Bin Shin; C. Williams

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Simulating the Delaware Bay Buoyant Outflow: Comparison with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal buoyant outflows from rivers and estuaries previously have been studied with field research, laboratory experiments, and numerical models. There is a dire need to evaluate model performance in light of coastal current observations. This ...

Michael M. Whitney; Richard W. Garvine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Theory and Observations of Controls on Lightning Flash Size Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous analyses of very high frequency (VHF) Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) observations relative to the location of deep convective updrafts have noted a systematic pattern in flash characteristics. In and near strong updrafts, flashes tend to ...

Eric C. Bruning; Donald R. MacGorman

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Continuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computation. Distributed estimation problems arise, for instance, in sensor networks, electric power grids data, and rely upon distributed mechanisms to merge local computations, such as intermediate dataContinuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication Florian D¨orfler, Fabio

Bullo, Francesco

488

Some Observations of Snowfall and Meteorological Conditions in Arctic Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of snow crystals were made in mid-winter at Inuvik, N.W.T., Canada, in order to study the snow crystal of cold temperature type. The following results were obtained:

Choji Magono; Katsuhiro Kikuchi

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Observations of Supercooled Raindrops in New Mexico Summertime Cumuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations made in 1987 with the NCAR King Air aircraft and in 1993 with the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology dual-polarization radar have revealed the presence of supercooled raindrops in some New Mexico summertime cumulus clouds. ...

Alan M. Blyth; Rasmus E. Benestad; Paul R. Krehbiel; John Latham

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

Li, Qing, 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Airborne Doppler Lidar Observations of Convective Phenomena in Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 30 June 1981, the wind fields around a variety of convective clouds, ranging from large thunderstorm complexes to isolated cumulus congestus, were observed in Oklahoma using an airborne Doppler lidar operated by the National Aeronautics and ...

Eugene W. McCaul Jr.; Howard B. Bluestein; Richard J. Doviak

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Comparing Model-produced Convective Cloudiness with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Convective cloudiness generated by a cumulus parameterization scheme of a large-scale numerical weather prediction model was compared with analyses of clouds observed by geosynchronous satellites. The comparisons were performed over an equatorial ...

D. C. Norquist; C. Yang

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Observations of the Leeuwin Current off Western Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipboard observations made in May 1982 showed a definite poleward surface flow (the Leeuwin Current) over the West Australian shelf from 22°S to 28°S. The surface current was relatively fresh, warm, low in dissolved oxygen concentration, and ...

Rory O. R. Y. Thompson

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

GPS–Cellular Drifter Technology for Coastal Ocean Observing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A drifter for observing small spatial and temporal scales of motion in the coastal zone is presented. The drifter uses GPS to determine its position, and the Mobitex terrestrial cellular communications system to transmit the position data in near–...

J. Carter Ohlmann; Peter F. White; Andrew L. Sybrandy; P. Peter Niiler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cloud Top Liquid Water from Lidar Observations of Marine Stratocumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maine stratus clouds were simultaneously observed by nadir Nd:YAG lidar measurements and in situ cloud physics measurements. A procedure was applied to derive the two-dimensional vertical cross section of the liquid water from within the cloud ...

J. D. Spinhirne; R. Boers; W. D. Hart

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Extremely long hard bursts observed by Konus-Wind  

SciTech Connect

We report the observations of the prompt emission of the extremely long hard burst, GRB 060814B, discovered by Konus-Wind and localized by the IPN. The observations reveal a smooth, hard, {approx}40-min long pulse followed by weaker emission seen several hours after the burst onset. We also present the Konus-Wind data on similar burst, GRB 971208, localized by BATSE/IPN. And finally we discuss the different possible origins of these unusual events.

Pal'shin, V.; Aptekar, R.; Frederiks, D.; Golenetskii, S.; Il'inskii, V.; Mazets, E.; Oleynik, P.; Ulanov, M. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Yamaoka, K. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1, Fuchinobe, Sagamihara 229-8558 (Japan); Ohno, M. [Department of Physical Sciences, School of Science, Hiroshima University 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Sakamoto, T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D.; Lirvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Institute for Space Research, Profsojuznaja 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Shinohara, C. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] (and others)

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

497

Events and observables in generally invariant spacetime theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the problem of observables in generally invariant spacetime theories such as Einstein's general relativity. Using the refined notion of an event as a ``point-coincidence'' between scalar fields that completely characterise a spacetime model, we propose a generalisation of the relational local observables that does not require the existence of four everywhere invertible scalar fields. The collection of all point-coincidences forms in generic situations a four-dimensional manifold, that is naturally identified with the physical spacetime.

Hans Westman; Sebastiano Sonego

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

498

DK And: Reclassification as EW Binary from CCD Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the reclassification of DK And, formerly classified as a RRc type star, as EW binary. 1599 CCD unfiltered and filtered (V and R band) observations between 1999 and 2005 show, that the star is actually an eclipsing binary star with a period of P = 0.4892224 +/- 0.0000002 [d] with epoch E0 = 2451435.4353 +/- 0.0010 (if all historic data were taken into account). From our new observations 12 timings of minimum light are given.

F. -J. Hambsch; D. Husar

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

499

Initial Observations of Sunspot Oscillations Excited by Solar Flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of a large solar flare of December 13, 2006, using Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode spacecraft revealed high-frequency oscillations excited by the flare in the sunspot chromosphere. These oscillations are observed in the region of strong magnetic field of the sunspot umbra, and may provide a new diagnostic tool for probing the structure of sunspots and understanding physical processes in solar flares.

Kosovichev, A G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Optimal observation time window for forecasting the next earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report that the accuracy of predicting the occurrence time of the next earthquake is significantly enhanced by observing the latest rate of earthquake occurrences. The observation period that minimizes the temporal uncertainty of the next occurrence is on the order of 10 hours. This result is independent of the threshold magnitude and is consistent across different geographic areas. This time scale is much shorter than the months or years that have previously been considered characteristic of seismic activities.

Omi, Takahiro; Shinomoto, Shigeru [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kanter, Ido [Minerva Center and Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, 52900 (Israel)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z