Sample records for readily observable factors

  1. Repository of not readily available documents for project W-320

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, J.C.

    1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a readily available source of the technical reports needed for the development of the safety documentation provided for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), designed to remove the radioactive and chemical sludge from tank 241-C-106, and transport that material to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 via a new, temporary, shielded, encased transfer line.

  2. Apps for Vehicles: What sort of vehicle data isn't readily available...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sort of vehicle data isn't readily available from the OpenXC platform and why might I want it? Home > Groups > Developer This question relates to energy hackathons and the OpenXC...

  3. On the need for simultaneity between X-ray and radio observations in Doppler factor estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liodakis, I; Pavlidou, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use archival X-ray and radio VLBA data to calculate inverse Compton Doppler factors for four high-power radio, $\\gamma$-loud Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars frequently monitored by the F-GAMMA project. We explore the effect of the non-simultaneity between X-ray and radio observations by calculating Doppler factors for simultaneous and non-simultaneous observations. By comparing the newly re-calculated values from this work and archival values with variability Doppler factors, we show that simultaneous/quasi-simultaneous X-ray and radio observations can provide a reliable estimate of the true Doppler factor in blazar jets. For the particular case of PKS0528+134 we find that a time-difference of up to 1 week provides inverse Compton Doppler factor estimates consistent with the variability Doppler factor of this source at the 19% percent level. In contrast, time differences of more than 30 days between radio and X-ray observations result to discrepancies from 100% to more than a factor of 4.

  4. Advances Towards Readily Deployable Antineutrino Detectors for Reactor Monitoring and Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, N S; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Lund, J; Reyna, D; Sadler, L; Svoboda, R

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our LLNL/SNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial PWR. With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. Recently, we have investigated several technology paths that could allow such devices to be more readily deployed in the field. In particular, we have developed and fielded two new detectors; a low cost, non- flammable water based design; and a robust solid-state design based upon plastic scintillator. Here we will describe the tradeoffs inherent in these designs, and present results from their field deployments.

  5. Development of pile foundation bias factors using observed behavior of platforms during Hurricane Andrew

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggarwal, R.K.; Litton, R.W.; Cornell, C.A.; Tang, W.H.; Chen, J.H.; Murff, J.D.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of more than 3,000 offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico was observed during the passage of Hurricane Andrew in August 1992. This event provided an opportunity to test the procedures used for platform analysis and design. A global bias was inferred for overall platform capacity and loads in the Andrew Joint Industry Project (JIP) Phase 1. It was predicted that the pile foundations of several platforms should have failed, but did not. These results indicated that the biases specific to foundation failure modes may be higher than those of jacket failure modes. The biases in predictions of foundation failure modes were therefore investigated further in this study. The work included capacity analysis and calibration of predictions with the observed behavior for 3 jacket platforms and 3 caissons using Bayesian updating. Bias factors for two foundation failure modes, lateral shear and overturning, were determined for each structure. Foundation capacity estimates using conventional methods were found to be conservatively biased overall.

  6. Estimates for Lorentz factors of gamma-ray bursts from early optical afterglow observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M. [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Daigne, Frédéric; Mochkovitch, Robert, E-mail: hascoet@astro.columbia.edu [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 Université Pierre et Marie Curie-CNRS, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The peak time of optical afterglow may be used as a proxy to constrain the Lorentz factor ? of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta. We revisit this method by including bursts with optical observations that started when the afterglow flux was already decaying; these bursts can provide useful lower limits on ?. Combining all analyzed bursts in our sample, we find that the previously reported correlation between ? and the burst luminosity L {sub ?} does not hold. However, the data clearly show a lower bound ?{sub min} that increases with L {sub ?}. We suggest an explanation for this feature: explosions with large jet luminosities and ? < ?{sub min} suffer strong adiabatic cooling before their radiation is released at the photosphere; they produce weak bursts, barely detectable with present instruments. To test this explanation, we examine the effect of adiabatic cooling on the GRB location in the L {sub ?} – ? plane using a Monte Carlo simulation of the GRB population. Our results predict detectable on-axis 'orphan' afterglows. We also derive upper limits on the density of the ambient medium that decelerates the explosion ejecta. We find that the density in many cases is smaller than expected for stellar winds from normal Wolf-Rayet progenitors. The burst progenitors may be peculiar massive stars with weaker winds, or there might exist a mechanism that reduces the stellar wind a few years before the explosion.

  7. SCIAMACHY MONITORING FACTORS: OBSERVATION AND END-TO-END CORRECTION OF INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    DEGRADATION Klaus Bramstedt1 , Stefan No¨el1 , Heinrich Bovensmann1 , John P. Burrows1 , Christophe Lerot2-factors. Key words: SCIAMACHY; m-factors; degradation; mon- itoring. 1. INTRODUCTION SCIAMACHY [1] is now seven's precursor Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), the performance of the instrument is degrading

  8. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation of aof

  9. Measuring Ambient Densities and Lorentz Factors of Gamma-Ray Bursts from GeV and Optical Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermi satellite discovered that cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are accompanied by long GeV flashes. In two GRBs, an optical counterpart of the GeV flash has been detected. Recent work suggests that the GeV+optical flash is emitted by the external blast wave from the explosion in a medium loaded with copious $e^\\pm$ pairs. The full light curve of the flash is predicted by a first-principle radiative transfer simulation and can be tested against observations. Here we examine a sample of 7 bursts with best GeV+optical data and test the model. We find that the observed light curves are in agreement with the theoretical predictions and allow us to measure three parameters for each burst: the Lorentz factor of the explosion, its isotropic kinetic energy, and the external density. With one possible exception of GRB 090510 (which is the only short burst in the sample) the ambient medium is consistent with a wind from a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. The wind density parameter $A=\\rho r^2$ varies in the sample around $1...

  10. Single-crystal sapphire resonator at millikelvin temperatures: Observation of thermal bistability in high-Q factor whispering gallery modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Tobar, Michael E.; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Duty, Timothy [School of Physics (M013), University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonance modes in single crystal sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit extremely high electrical and mechanical Q factors ({approx_equal}10{sup 9} at 4 K), which are important characteristics for electromechanical experiments at the quantum limit. We report the cool down of a bulk sapphire sample below superfluid liquid-helium temperature (1.6 K) to as low as 25 mK. The electromagnetic properties were characterized at microwave frequencies, and we report the observation of electromagnetically induced thermal bistability in whispering gallery modes due to the material T{sup 3} dependence on thermal conductivity and the ultralow dielectric loss tangent. We identify ''magic temperatures'' between 80 and 2100 mK, the lowest ever measured, at which the onset of bistability is suppressed and the frequency-temperature dependence is annulled. These phenomena at low temperatures make sapphire suitable for quantum metrology and ultrastable clock applications, including the possible realization of the quantum-limited sapphire clock.

  11. INT. J. CONTROL, 1989, VOL. 50, NO. 6, 25832597 Doubly coprime factorization, reduced-order observers, and dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    of the results in the factorization approach to multivariable control system analysis and synthesis. In work in the factorization approach to multivariable control system analysis and synthesis (Vidyasagar 1985). In an important by Nett d d, (1984), explicit state-space realizations of these factorization are derived using results

  12. Unlike PAHs from Exxon Valdez crude oil, PAHs from Gulf of Alaska coals are not readily bioavailable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halambage Upul Deepthike; Robin Tecon; Gerry van Kooten; Jan Roelof van der Meer; Hauke Harms; Mona Wells; Jeffrey Short [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN (United States). Department of Chemistry

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, spatially and temporally spill-correlated biological effects consistent with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure were observed. Some works have proposed that confounding sources from local source rocks, prominently coals, are the provenance of the PAHs. Representative coal deposits along the southeast Alaskan coast (Kulthieth Formation) were sampled and fully characterized chemically and geologically. The coals have variable but high total organic carbon content, technically classifying as coals and coaly shale, and highly varying PAH contents. Even for coals with high PAH content (4000 ppm total PAHs), a PAH-sensitive bacterial biosensor demonstrates nondetectable bioavailability as quantified, based on naphthalene as a test calibrant. These results are consistent with studies indicating that materials such as coals strongly diminish the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds and support previous work suggesting that hydrocarbons associated with the regional background in northern Gulf of Alaska marine sediments are not appreciably bioavailable. 44 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Observation of Discrete Oscillations in a Model-independent Plot of Cosmological Scale Factor vs. Lookback Time and a Scalar Field Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringermacher, H I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed damped longitudinal cosmological-scale oscillations in a unique model-independent plot of scale factor against lookback time for Type Ia supernovae data. We found several first-derivative relative maxima/minima spanning the range of reported transition-redshifts. These extrema comprise 2 full cycles with a period of approximately 0.15 Hubble times (H0=68 km/s/Mpc). This period corresponds to a fundamental frequency of approximately 7 cycles over the Hubble time. Transition-z values quoted in the literature generally fall near these minima and may explain the reported wide spread up to the predicted LCDM value of approximately z = 0.77. We also observe second and third harmonics of the fundamental. The scale factor data is analyzed several different ways including smoothing, Fourier transform and autocorrelation. We propose a cosmological scalar field harmonic oscillator model for the observation. On this time scale, for a quantum scalar field, the scalar field mass is extraordinarily small at...

  14. Readily Deinkable Toner - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaising funds forAdvancedAdvanced Materials

  15. DYNAMIC INTERACTION FACTORS FOR FLOATING PILE GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    DYNAMIC INTERACTION FACTORS FOR FLOATING PILE GROUPS By George Gazetas,1 Ke Fan,2 Amir Kaynia,3 at the head of each pile. These readily applicable graphs have been developed with a rigorous analytical- portional to depth) and three pile separation distances (3,5, and 10 pile-diamctcrs). A wide range of values

  16. Dynamic valuation model For wind development in regard to land value, proximity to transmission lines, and capacity factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikandrou, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a wind farm involves many variables that can make or break the success of a potential wind farm project. Some variables such as wind data (capacity factor, wind rose, wind speed, etc.) are readily available in ...

  17. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  18. Readily Available Data Help to Overcome Geothermal Deployment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Access to high-quality, geothermal-relevant data has been named as the single greatest need in the geothermal industry. The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is based on a DOE...

  19. Readily Available Data Help to Overcome Geothermal Deployment Barriers |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  20. Readily Available Data Help to Overcome Geothermal Deployment Barriers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide: PowerFrequency2014Department ofDr. James

  1. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  2. Prospect for UV observations from the Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safonova, Margarita; Mohan, Rekhesh; Sreejith, A G; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Arpit; Narayan, Rahul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space astronomy in the last 40 years has largely been done from spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) for which the technology is proven and delivery mechanisms are readily available. However, new opportunities are arising with the surge in commercial aerospace missions. We describe here one such possibility: deploying a small instrument on the Moon. This can be accomplished by flying onboard the Indian entry to the Google Lunar X PRIZE competition, Team Indus mission, which is expected to deliver a nearly 30 kgs of payloads to the Moon, with a rover as its primary payload. We propose to mount a wide-field far-UV (130--180 nm) imaging telescope as a payload on the Team Indus lander. Our baseline operation is a fixed zenith pointing but with the option of a mechanism to allow observations of different attitudes. Pointing towards intermediate ecliptic latitude (50 deg or above) ensures that the Sun is at least 40 deg off the line of sight at all times. In this position, the telescope can cover higher galactic lat...

  3. CAN REMOTE OBSERVING BE GOOD OBSERVING? REFLECTIONS ON PROCRUSTES AND ANTAEUS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    CAN REMOTE OBSERVING BE GOOD OBSERVING? REFLECTIONS ON PROCRUSTES AND ANTAEUS 1 Felix J. Lockman 2 National Radio Astronomy Observatory 520 Edgemont Rd. Charlottesville, Va. 22903 USA ABSTRACT Remote tales of Procrustes and Antaeus. This article considers some of the human factors involved in remote

  4. Power Factor Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

  5. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  6. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  7. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  8. Factors Contributing to Ideal Instructional Interactivity Michael Yacci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacci, Michael

    Factors Contributing to Ideal Instructional Interactivity Michael Yacci Paul Hyman Information are the factors that contribute to "ideal" instructional interactivity? In this study, subjects observed different and paralanguage. Introduction The purpose of this project was to determine factors that contribute to an "ideal

  9. Observational learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Katherine Louise

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . One group served as control subjects while the other group functioned as a treated group (observers). The observers were allowed to watch a correctly performed discrimination task prior to testing of a learning response using the same task.... Discrimination testing was conducted on all horses daily for 14 days with criterion set at seven out of eight responses correct with the last five consecutively correct. The maximum number of trials performed without reaching set criterion was limited...

  10. Spitzer observations of hydrogen deuteride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Neufeld; Joel D. Green; David J. Hollenbach; Paule Sonnentrucker; Gary J. Melnick; Edwin A. Bergin; Ronald L. Snell; William J. Forrest; Dan M. Watson; Michael J. Kaufman

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of interstellar hydrogen deuteride (HD) toward the supernova remnant IC443, and the tentative detection of HD toward the Herbig Haro objects HH54 and HH7 and the star forming region GGD37 (Cepheus A West). Our detections are based upon spectral line mapping observations of the R(3) and R(4) rotational lines of HD, at rest wavelengths of 28.502 and 23.034 micron respectively, obtained using the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The HD R(4)/R(3) line intensity ratio promises to be a valuable probe of the gas pressure in regions where it can be observed. The derived HD/H2 abundance ratios are 1.19(+0.35/-0.24)E-5, 1.80(+0.54/-0.32)E-5, and 1.41(+0.46/-0.33)E-5 respectively (68.3% confidence limits, based upon statistical errors alone) for IC443 (clump C), HH54, and HH7. If HD is the only significant reservoir of gas-phase deuterium in these sources, the inferred HD/H2 ratios are all consistent with a gas-phase elemental abundance [n(D)/n(H)](gas) ~ 7.5E-6, a factor 2 - 3 below the values obtained previously from observations of atomic deuterium in the local bubble and the Galactic halo. However, similarly low gas-phase deuterium abundances have been inferred previously for molecular gas clouds in the Orion region, and in atomic clouds along sight-lines within the Galactic disk to stars more distant than 500 pc from the Sun.

  11. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  12. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  13. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems

  14. Freak observers and the measure of the multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Vilenkin

    2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I suggest that the factor $p_j$ in the pocket-based measure of the multiverse, $P_j=p_j f_j$, should be interpreted as accounting for equilibrium de Sitter vacuum fluctuations, while the selection factor $f_j$ accounts for the number of observers that were formed due to non-equilibrium processes resulting from such fluctuations. I show that this formulation does not suffer from the problem of freak observers (also known as Boltzmann brains).

  15. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

  16. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

  17. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  18. RHESSI and SphinX Common Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrozek, Tomasz

    ) energy range: 3-8 keV (16 energy bands, E=0.3 keV) #12;Fluxes comparison SphinX DRM conversion factors possible. In 2009 we had three instruments that observed the Sun in similar energy band: SphinX, RHESSI, design & manufacture - energy range: 1.2 ­ 15 keV - time resolution: ~0.00001 s - sensitivity: 100x

  19. Can Remote Observing be Good Observing? Reflections on Procrustes and Antaeus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix J. Lockman

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote observing seeks to simulate the presence of the astronomer at the telescope. While this is useful, and necessary in some circumstances, simulation is not reality. The drive to abstract the astronomer from the instrument can have unpleasant consequences, some of which are prefigured in the ancient tales of Procrustes and Antaeus. This article, written in 1992 for a conference proceedings on remote observing, is reprinted here with only slight editorial changes and the addition of a short Afterword. I consider some of the human factors involved in remote observing, and suggest that our aim be to enhance rather than supplant the astronomer at the telescope.

  20. Observational Mishaps - a Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar von Braun; Kristin Chiboucas; Denise Hurley-Keller

    1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a World-Wide-Web-accessible database of astronomical images which suffer from a variety of observational problems, ranging from common occurences, such as dust grains on filters and/or the dewar window, to more exotic phenomena, such as loss of primary mirror support due to the deflation of the support airbags. Apart from its educational usefulness, the purpose of this database is to assist astronomers in diagnosing and treating errant images at the telescope, thus saving valuable telescope time. Every observational mishap contained in this on-line catalog is presented in the form of a GIF image, a brief explanation of the problem, and, when possible, a suggestion for improving the image quality.

  1. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  2. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  3. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new, existing, andObservations Projected

  4. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. Observing the Inflationary Reheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

  6. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  7. residential environment. Electrical connections that are easily pulled apart and single, exposed conductors that are readily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    connections. In those early years, although the majority of PV installations were off grid, the early PV code investigations. Many of the first "terrestrial" PV modules were for off- grid applications used by people-interactive systems. But code changes over these several decades have continued to address both off-grid and on

  8. Apps for Vehicles: What sort of vehicle data isn't readily available from

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon Capture andsoftware and hardware or do I havethe OpenXC

  9. Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

  10. Public Health FAT FACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    : THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

  11. Observing alternatives to inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Peter

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

  12. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  13. Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

  14. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  15. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  16. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHotSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingOTYa

  17. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found

  18. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and Oil ResearchPublictearing mode

  19. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and Oil ResearchPublictearing

  20. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  1. Rare $B$ decays using lattice QCD form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horgan, R R; Meinel, S; Wingate, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this write-up we review and update our recent lattice QCD calculation of $B \\to K^*$, $B_s \\to \\phi$, and $B_s \\to K^*$ form factors [arXiv:1310.3722]. These unquenched calculations, performed in the low-recoil kinematic regime, provide a significant improvement over the use of extrapolated light cone sum rule results. The fits presented here include further kinematic constraints and estimates of additional correlations between the different form factor shape parameters. We use these form factors along with Standard Model determinations of Wilson coefficients to give Standard Model predictions for several observables [arXiv:1310.3887]. The modest improvements to the form factor fits lead to improved determinations of $F_L$, the fraction of longitudinally polarized vector mesons, but have little effect on most other observables.

  2. Rare $B$ decays using lattice QCD form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. R. Horgan; Z. Liu; S. Meinel; M. Wingate

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this write-up we review and update our recent lattice QCD calculation of $B \\to K^*$, $B_s \\to \\phi$, and $B_s \\to K^*$ form factors [arXiv:1310.3722]. These unquenched calculations, performed in the low-recoil kinematic regime, provide a significant improvement over the use of extrapolated light cone sum rule results. The fits presented here include further kinematic constraints and estimates of additional correlations between the different form factor shape parameters. We use these form factors along with Standard Model determinations of Wilson coefficients to give Standard Model predictions for several observables [arXiv:1310.3887]. The modest improvements to the form factor fits lead to improved determinations of $F_L$, the fraction of longitudinally polarized vector mesons, but have little effect on most other observables.

  3. Fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palastro, J. P.; Ross, J. S.; Pollock, B.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering in unmagnetized plasmas valid to all orders in the normalized electron velocity, beta->=v->/c. The form factor is compared to a previously derived expression where the lowest order electron velocity, beta->, corrections are included [J. Sheffield, Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation (Academic Press, New York, 1975)]. The beta-> expansion approach is sufficient for electrostatic waves with small phase velocities such as ion-acoustic waves, but for electron-plasma waves the phase velocities can be near luminal. At high phase velocities, the electron motion acquires relativistic corrections including effective electron mass, relative motion of the electrons and electromagnetic wave, and polarization rotation. These relativistic corrections alter the scattered emission of thermal plasma waves, which manifest as changes in both the peak power and width of the observed Thomson-scattered spectra.

  4. 8, 88178846, 2008 Observed boundary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H. Marsham et and Enviroment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2 Institut f¨ur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universit@env.leeds.ac.uk) 8817 #12;ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H

  5. Giant g-factors of natural impurities in synthetic quartz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Farr, Warrick G.; Tobar, Michael E., E-mail: michael.tobar@uwa.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of g-factors of natural paramagnetic impurities in a pure synthetic quartz crystal at milli-Kelvin temperatures. Measurements are made by performing spectroscopy using multiple high-Q whispering gallery modes sustained in the crystal. Extreme sensitivity of the method at low temperatures allows the determination of natural residual impurities introduced during the crystal growth. We observe g-factors that significantly differ from integer multiples of the electron g-factor in vacuum, and with values of up to 7.6, which reveals much stronger coupling between impurities and the crystal lattice than in previous studies. Both substitutional and interstitial ions are proposed as candidates for the observed interactions.

  6. Dynamic structure factors of a dense mixture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supurna Sinha

    2005-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the dynamic structure factors of a dense binary liquid mixture. These describe dynamics on molecular length scales, where structural relaxation is important. We find that the presence of a few large particles in a dense fluid of small particles slows down the dynamics considerably. We also observe a deep narrowing of the spectrum for a disordered mixture composed of a nearly equal packing of the two species. In contrast, a few small particles diffuse easily in the background of a dense fluid of large particles. We expect our results to describe neutron scattering from a dense mixture.

  7. Building a completely positive factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 19, 2009 ... Abstract. Using a bordering approach, and building upon an already known factorization of a principal block, we establish sufficient conditions.

  8. Kalman Filtering with Intermittent Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Michael I.

    1 Kalman Filtering with Intermittent Observations Bruno Sinopoli, Luca Schenato, Massimo within sensor networks, we consider the prob- lem of performing Kalman filtering with intermittent be neglected. We address this problem starting from the discrete Kalman filtering formulation, and modelling

  9. Radio Observations of Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Reich

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae release an enormous amount of energy into the interstellar medium. Their remnants can observationally be traced up to several ten-thousand years. So far more than 230 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) have been identified in the radio range. Detailed studies of the different types of SNRs give insight into the interaction of the blast wave with the interstellar medium. Shock accelerated particles are observed, but also neutron stars left from the supernova explosion make their contribution. X-ray observations in conjunction with radio data constrain models of supernova evolution. A brief review of the origin and evolution of SNRs is given, which are compared with supernova statistics and observational limitations. In addition the morphology and characteristics of the different types of SNRs are described, including some recent results and illustrated by SNRs images mostly obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope.

  10. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  11. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolini, Daniele

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but ...

  12. Aerosol observing system platform integration and AAF instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springston, S.; Sedlacek, A.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the federal government’s 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the U.S. DOE Office of Science allocated funds for the capital upgrade of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility to improve and expand observational capabilities related to cloud and aerosol properties. The ARM Facility was established as a national user facility for the global scientific community to conduct a wide range of interdisciplinary science. Part of the ARRA-funded expansion of the ARM Facility includes four new Aerosol Observing Systems (AOS) to be designed, instrumented, and mentored by BNL. The enclosures will be customized SeaTainers. These new platforms ([AMF2]: ARM Mobile Facility-2; [TWP-D]: Tropical Western Pacific at Darwin; and [MAOS-A]/[MAOS-C]: Mobile Aerosol Observing System-Aerosol/-Chemistry) will provide a laboratory environment for fielding instruments to collect data on aerosol life cycle, microphysics, and optical/physical properties. The extensive instrument suite includes both established methods and initial deployments of new techniques to add breadth and depth to the AOS data sets. The platforms are designed: (1) to have all instruments pre-installed before deployment, allowing a higher measurement duty cycle; (2) with a standardized configuration improving the robustness of data inter-comparability; (3) to provide remote access capability for instrument mentors; and (4) to readily accommodate guest instrumentation. The first deployment of the AMF2 platform will be at the upcoming StormVEx campaign held at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, October 15, 2010–March 31, 2011 while the TWP-D AOS will be stationed at the ARM Darwin site. The maiden deployments of the MAOS-A and MAOS-C platforms will be during the Ganges Valley Experiment (GVAX) scheduled for April 2011–April 2012. In addition to the ground-based AOS platforms, thee major instrument builds for the AAF are also being undertaken (new trace gas package [NO, NOx, NOy, CO, O3, and SO2]; Scanning Mobility Particle Sampler [SMPS]; and Particle into Liquid Sampler [PILS]). The current status of the AOS platforms, instrument suites, instituted QA/QC activities, projected AOS VAPs, and inlet design, as well as still-unresolved issues, will be presented.

  13. Human factors engineering control-room-design review/audit report: Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Arizona Public Service Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, J.W.; Lappa, D.A.

    1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A human factors engineering design review of the Palo Verde control room simulator was performed at the site on September 15 through September 17, 1981. Observed human factors design discrepancies were given priority ratings. This report summarizes the team's observations of the control room design and layout and of the control room operators' interface with the control room environment. A list of the human factors strengths observed in the Palo Verde control room simulator is given.

  14. Factors Controlling Ionospheric Outflows as Observed at Intermediate Altitudes R. J. Strangeway,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strangeway, Robert J.

    Auroral Snapshot (FAST) Small Explorer during the September 24th ­ 25th, 1998, geomagnetic storm have been, measured by the density of precipitating electrons. At 4000 km altitude it is found that fi = 1.022x109 of magnetospheric physics is being addressed. When considering the ion ring current, for example, the solar wind

  15. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 240 0.222 0.549 0.054 37 7.3 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  16. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SS 433 JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Nowak, Michael [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hillwig, Todd [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael [NRAO, P.O. Box 2, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heinz, Sebastian, E-mail: hermanm@space.mit.edu, E-mail: crc@space.mit.edu, E-mail: nss@space.mit.edu, E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu, E-mail: todd.hillwig@valpo.edu, E-mail: amiodusz@nrao.edu, E-mail: mrupen@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: heinzs@astro.wisc.edu [Astronomy Department, 5408 Sterling Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the SS 433 jets using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer with contemporaneous optical and Very Long Baseline Array observations. The X-ray and optical emission line regions are found to be related but not coincident as the optical line emission persists for days while the X-ray emission lines fade in less than 5000 s. The line Doppler shifts from the optical and X-ray lines match well, indicating that they are less than 3 × 10{sup 14} cm apart. The jet Doppler shifts show aperiodic variations that could result from shocks in interactions with the local environment. These perturbations are consistent with a change in jet direction but not jet speed. The proper motions of the radio knots match the kinematic model only if the distance to SS 433 is 4.5 ± 0.2 kpc. Observations during eclipse show that the occulted emission is very hard, seen only above 2 keV and rising to comprise >50% of the flux at 8 keV. The soft X-ray emission lines from the jet are not blocked, constraining the jet length to ?> 2 × 10{sup 12} cm. The base jet density is in the range 10{sup 10-13} cm{sup –3}, in contrast to our previous estimate based on the Si XIII triplet, which is likely to have been affected by UV de-excitation. There is a clear overabundance of Ni by a factor of about 15 relative to the solar value, which may have resulted from an unusual supernova that formed the compact object.

  17. Beyond the Fundamentals of Special Relativity: Full Lorentz gamma factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sardin

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Special relativity calculates, by means of the Lorentz gamma factor, the proper time of all inertial systems from the observer proper time, which is taken as a time standard. So, any temporal inference relies in first instance on the observer own time. The question is thus: what fixes the observer proper time? This will be the crucial point debated here. This implies analyzing at the very first why the observer can be taken as a motionless reference in spite of being himself inertial. Is this just an approximation, and if so, up to what extent can it be applied? The framework of special relativity is compared to an amended form in which the fact of taking himself as a reference does not allow the observer to overlook its own kinetics. So, the issue stands on which of two formulations of the Lorentz gamma factor is the most accurate one: its standard expression or an amended one which takes into account the fact that the observer is himself inertial, while the former disregards it. When the observer speed is ignored, the two formulations become identical. Hence, the standard relativistic expression of gamma can be seen as an approximation applicable when the observer motion is null or low, such as it is the instance on Earth.

  18. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Abstract:...

  19. Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, K.

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

  20. Mechanism Based Anticancer Drugs that Degrade Sp Transcription Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chadalapaka, Gayathri

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    4 transcription factors. Similar results were observed for a structurally-related triterpenoid, methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me), which is currently in clinical trials for treatment of leukemia. Celastrol, a naturally...

  1. Climate Dynamics Observational, Theoretical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    1 23 Climate Dynamics Observational, Theoretical and Computational Research on the Climate System.6, and -22.5 Wm-2 , respectively, indicating a net cooling effect of clouds on the TOA radiation budget-2 , respectively, resulting in a larger net cooling effect of 2.9 Wm-2 in the model simu- lations

  2. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Vagins, Mark R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (? 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (? 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (?3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub ?2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.4} per century for a total Galactic SN rate of 4.6{sub ?2.7}{sup +7.4} per century is needed to account for the SNe observed over the last millennium, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of 3.6{sub ?3.0}{sup +8.3} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}.

  3. Risk factors for equine laminitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polzer, John Patrick

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    logistic regression to assess age, breed, sex, and seasonality as risk factors for equine laminitis. There were 70 acute cases, 183 chronic cases, and 779 controls. No statistical association was found between age, breed, sex, or seasonality...

  4. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tapajyoti

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for ...

  5. Factors Affecting Option Premium Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason; Smith, Jackie; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Waller, Mark L.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors Affecting Option Premium Values Jason Johnson, Jackie Smith, Kevin Dhuyvetter and Mark Waller* Put Options Hedging in the futures market with options is much like buying an insurance policy to protect commodity sellers against declining...

  6. Electrical and Production Load Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tapajyoti

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector...

  7. Integer factorization is in P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    owner

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    can be solved by a deterministic Turing machine in polynomial time(see e.g.. Cormen et al. (2009)). Theorem 5. Integer factorization is in FP. Algorithm 2 can be ...

  8. Automatic Test Factoring for Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saff, David

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Test factoring creates fast, focused unit tests from slow system-widetests; each new unit test exercises only a subset of the functionalityexercised by the system test. Augmenting a test suite with factoredunit tests ...

  9. Human Factors of Reporting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed.), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK. pp 715-750 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

  10. Radiant-interchange configuration factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddin, Thomas Edward

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an important role in any situation involving radiant interchange. The engineer desiring to compute the radiant heat transfer in a system is usually discouraged from performing more than a superficial estimation because of the excessive amount of time... Monitor System using the Fortran IV Compiler and the Macro Assembly Program. Listings of the programs appear in the appendices. CHAPTER II THE GEOMETRY OF THE BLACK BODY CONFIGURATION FACTOR 2. 1 Derivation of the Configuration Factor To evaluate...

  11. Nucleon axial form factors from two-flavour Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Junnarkar; S. Capitani; D. Djukanovic; G. von Hippel; J. Hua; B. Jäger; H. B. Meyer; T. D. Rae; H. Wittig

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results on the axial form factor $G_A(Q^2)$ and the induced pseudoscalar form factor $G_P(Q^2)$ of the nucleon. A systematic analysis of the excited-state contributions to form factors is performed on the CLS ensemble `N6' with $m_\\pi = 340 \\ \\text{MeV}$ and lattice spacing $a \\sim 0.05 \\ \\text{fm}$. The relevant three-point functions were computed with source-sink separations ranging from $t_s \\sim 0.6 \\ \\text{fm}$ to $t_s \\sim \\ 1.4 \\ \\text{fm}$. We observe that the form factors suffer from non-trivial excited-state contributions at the source-sink separations available to us. It is noted that naive plateau fits underestimate the excited-state contributions and that the method of summed operator insertions correctly accounts for these effects.

  12. A general moment NRIXS approach to the determination of equilibrium Fe isotopic fractionation factors: application to goethite and jarosite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauphas, N; Alp, E E; Golden, D C; Sio, C K; Tissot, F L H; Hu, M; Zhao, J; Gao, L; Morris, R V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the reduced partition function ratios for iron isotopes in goethite FeO(OH), potassium-jarosite KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6, and hydronium-jarosite (H3O)Fe3(SO4)2(OH)6, by Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering (NRIXS, also known as Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy -NRVS- or Nuclear Inelastic Scattering -NIS) at the Advanced Photon Source. These measurements were made on synthetic minerals enriched in 57Fe. A new method (i.e., the general moment approach) is presented to calculate {\\beta}-factors from the moments of the NRIXS spectrum S(E). The first term in the moment expansion controls iron isotopic fractionation at high temperature and corresponds to the mean force constant of the iron bonds, a quantity that is readily measured and often reported in NRIXS studies.

  13. CX Lyrae 2008 Observing Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blazhko effect in CX Lyr has been reported for the first time by Le Borgne et al. (2007). The authors have pointed out that the Blazhko period was not evaluated accurately due to dataset scarcity. The possible period values announced were 128 or 227 days. A newly conducted four-month observing campaign in 2008 (fifty-nine observation nights) has provided fourteen times of maximum. From a period analysis of measured times of maximum, a Blazhko period of 62 +/- 2 days can be suggested. However, the present dataset is still not densely sampled enough to exclude that the measured period is still a modulation of the real Blazhko period. Indeed the shape of the (O-C) curve does not repeat itself exactly during the campaign duration.

  14. Observations of the Icy Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

  15. Observation of an Antimatter Hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons - composed of an antiproton, antineutron, and antilambda hyperon - produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 {+-} 17 antihypertritons ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and 157 {+-} 30 hypertritons ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H). The measured yields of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and {sup 3}He ({sup 3}{ovr He}) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear/particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  16. Odds of observing the multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlen, A. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Eternal inflation predicts that our observable universe lies within a bubble (or pocket universe) embedded in a volume of inflating space. The interior of the bubble undergoes inflation and standard cosmology, while the bubble walls expand outward and collide with other neighboring bubbles. The collisions provide either an opportunity to make a direct observation of the multiverse or, if they produce unacceptable anisotropy, a threat to inflationary theory. The probability of an observer in our bubble detecting the effects of collisions has an absolute upper bound set by the odds of being in the part of our bubble that lies in the forward light cone of a collision; in the case of collisions with bubbles of identical vacua, this bound is given by the bubble nucleation rate times (H{sub O}/H{sub I}){sup 2}, where H{sub O} is the Hubble scale outside the bubbles and H{sub I} is the scale of the second round of inflation that occurs inside our bubble. Similar results were obtained by Freigovel et al. using a different method for the case of collisions with bubbles of much larger cosmological constant; here, it is shown to hold in the case of collisions with identical bubbles as well.

  17. Odds of observing the multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Dahlen

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Eternal inflation predicts our observable universe lies within a bubble (or pocket universe) embedded in a volume of inflating space. The interior of the bubble undergoes inflation and standard cosmology, while the bubble walls expand outward and collide with other neighboring bubbles. The collisions provide either an opportunity to make a direct observation of the multiverse or, if they produce unacceptable anisotropy, a threat to inflationary theory. The probability of an observer in our bubble detecting the effects of collisions has an absolute upper bound set by the odds of being in the part of our bubble that lies in the forward light-cone of a collision; in the case of collisions with bubbles of identical vacua, this bound given by the bubble nucleation rate times ($H_{\\rm{O}}/H_{\\rm{I}})^2$, where $H_{\\rm{O}}$ is the Hubble scale outside the bubbles and $H_{\\rm{I}}$ is the scale of the second round of inflation that occurs inside our bubble. Similar results were obtained by Freigovel \\emph{et al.} using a different method for the case of collisions with bubbles of much larger cosmological constant; here it is shown to hold in the case of collisions with identical bubbles as well. A significant error in a previous draft was corrected in order to arrive at this result.

  18. Spectral dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor in quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zubov, F. I., E-mail: fedyazu@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Maximov, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Livshits, D. A. [Innolume GmbH (Germany); Payusov, A. S.; Nadtochiy, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Savelyev, A. V.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Gordeev, N. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral analysis of amplified spontaneous emission is used to determine the linewidth enhancement factor (?-factor) in lasers based on InAs/InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) in a wide spectral range near the ground-state optical transition energy. The effect of the pump current and number of QDs on the spectral dependences of the ?-factor is examined. The temperature dependence of the spectra of the ?-factor is experimentally determined for the first time for lasers with InAs/InGaAs QDs. An explanation is suggested for the observed anomalous decrease in the ?-factor with increasing temperature.

  19. Evaluating CERES angular distribution models for snow using surface reflectance observations from the East Antarctic Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    techniques. Data products produced by the CERES team include the observed broadband solar, window long- wave data processing algorithms, used to convert the observed upwelling radiance to an estimate of the upwelling hemispheric flux. We model top-of-atmosphere anisotropic reflectance factors using an atmospheric

  20. Magnetars: the physics behind observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turolla, Roberto; Watts, Anna

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetars are the strongest magnets in the present universe and the combination of extreme magnetic field, gravity and density makes them unique laboratories to probe current physical theories (from quantum electrodynamics to general relativity) in the strong field limit. Magnetars are observed as peculiar, burst--active X-ray pulsars, the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs); the latter emitted also three "giant flares," extremely powerful events during which luminosities can reach up to 10^47 erg/s for about one second. The last five years have witnessed an explosion in magnetar research which has led, among other things, to the discovery of transient, or "outbursting," and "low-field" magnetars. Substantial progress has been made also on the theoretical side. Quite detailed models for explaining the magnetars' persistent X-ray emission, the properties of the bursts, the flux evolution in transient sources have been developed and confronted with observations. New insight on neu...

  1. Conformal Relativity: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pervushin; V. Zinchuk; A. Zorin

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical and observational arguments are listed in favor of a new principle of relativity of units of measurements as the basis of a conformal-invariant unification of General Relativity and Standard Model by replacement of all masses with a scalar (dilaton) field. The relative units mean conformal observables: the coordinate distance, conformal time, running masses, and constant temperature. They reveal to us a motion of a universe along its hypersurface in the field space of events like a motion of a relativistic particle in the Minkowski space, where the postulate of the vacuum as a state with minimal energy leads to arrow of the geometric time. In relative units, the unified theory describes the Cold Universe Scenario, where the role of the conformal dark energy is played by a free minimal coupling scalar field in agreement with the most recent distance-redshift data from type Ia supernovae. In this Scenario, the evolution of the Universe begins with the effect of intensive creation of primordial W-Z-bosons explaining the value of CMBR temperature, baryon asymmetry, tremendous deficit of the luminosity masses in the COMA-type superclusters and large-scale structure of the Universe.

  2. Spitzer observations of hydrogen deuteride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, D A; Hollenbach, D J; Sonnentrucker, P; Melnick, G J; Bergin, E A; Snell, R L; Forrest, W J; Watson, D M; Kaufman, M J; Neufeld, David A.; Green, Joel D.; Hollenbach, David J.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Melnick, Gary J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Snell, Ronald L.; Forrest, William J.; Watson, Dan M.; Kaufman, and Michael J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of interstellar hydrogen deuteride (HD) toward the supernova remnant IC443, and the tentative detection of HD toward the Herbig Haro objects HH54 and HH7 and the star forming region GGD37 (Cepheus A West). Our detections are based upon spectral line mapping observations of the R(3) and R(4) rotational lines of HD, at rest wavelengths of 28.502 and 23.034 micron respectively, obtained using the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The HD R(4)/R(3) line intensity ratio promises to be a valuable probe of the gas pressure in regions where it can be observed. The derived HD/H2 abundance ratios are 1.19(+0.35/-0.24)E-5, 1.80(+0.54/-0.32)E-5, and 1.41(+0.46/-0.33)E-5 respectively (68.3% confidence limits, based upon statistical errors alone) for IC443 (clump C), HH54, and HH7. If HD is the only significant reservoir of gas-phase deuterium in these sources, the inferred HD/H2 ratios are all consistent with a gas-phase elemental abundance [n(D)/n(H)](gas) ~ 7.5E-6, a facto...

  3. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  4. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  5. Optimization Online - Integer Factorization is in P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuly Shipilevsky

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 31, 2012 ... Integer Factorization is in P. Yuly Shipilevsky (yulysh2000 ***at*** yahoo.ca). Abstract: A polynomial-time algorithm for integer factorization, ...

  6. THE PROPAGATION OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELING. II. THE CHALLENGE OF COMPARING GALAXY EVOLUTION MODELS TO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conroy, Charlie; Gunn, James E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); White, Martin [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models for the formation and evolution of galaxies readily predict physical properties such as star formation rates, metal-enrichment histories, and, increasingly, gas and dust content of synthetic galaxies. Such predictions are frequently compared to the spectral energy distributions of observed galaxies via the stellar population synthesis (SPS) technique. Substantial uncertainties in SPS exist, and yet their relevance to the task of comparing galaxy evolution models to observations has received little attention. In the present work, we begin to address this issue by investigating the importance of uncertainties in stellar evolution, the initial stellar mass function (IMF), and dust and interstellar medium (ISM) properties on the translation from models to observations. We demonstrate that these uncertainties translate into substantial uncertainties in the ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared colors of synthetic galaxies. Aspects that carry significant uncertainties include the logarithmic slope of the IMF above 1 M{sub sun}, dust attenuation law, molecular cloud disruption timescale, clumpiness of the ISM, fraction of unobscured starlight, and treatment of advanced stages of stellar evolution including blue stragglers, the horizontal branch, and the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch. The interpretation of the resulting uncertainties in the derived colors is highly non-trivial because many of the uncertainties are likely systematic, and possibly correlated with the physical properties of galaxies. We therefore urge caution when comparing models to observations.

  7. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  8. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

  9. INTEGRAL observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldoni, P; Laurent, P; Cassé, M; Paul, J; Sarazin, C L

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cluster of galaxies are the largest concentrations of visible mass in the Universe and therefore a fundamental topic of cosmology and astrophysics. Recent radio, EUV, and X-ray observations suggest that clusters contain large populations of diffuse nonthermal relativistic and/or superthermal particles. These particles may be produced by acceleration in cluster merger shocks, AGNs, and/or supernovae in cluster galaxies. Models for the nonthermal populations in clusters indicate that they should produce substantial hard X-ray and $\\gamma$ luminosities. The possible role of nonthermal particles in the dynamics of clusters is one of the greatest uncertainties in their use as cosmological probes. INTEGRAL offers, for the first time, the possibility of simultaneous medium resolution imaging (~ 12 arcmin) and high resolution spectroscopy (DeltaE/E ~ 2 keV @ 1.3 MeV) with exceptional sensitivity in the hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray band. The spatial resolution will allow discrete sources, such as AGNs, to be separated fr...

  10. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  11. 12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 1 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 2 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 3 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10

  12. Programming Infinite Objects by Observations Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    ), and observe its result (behavior). Application is the defining principle of functions [Granstr¨om

  13. Programming Infinite Objects by Observations Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    (experiment), and observe its result (behavior). Application is the defining principle of functions [Granstr¨om

  14. An analysis of factors contributing to train-involved crashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooner, Scott Allen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzed for the contributing factors. The contributing factors were classified into four categories: railroad factors, environmental factors, roadway factors, and driver/passenger factors. The accident data was analyzed using one and two-way classification...

  15. Human Factors for Situation Assessment in Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttromson, Ross T.; Schur, Anne; Greitzer, Frank L.; Paget, Mia L.

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary Despite advances in technology, power system operators must assimilate overwhelming amounts of data to keep the grid operating. Analyses of recent blackouts have clearly demonstrated the need to enhance the operator’s situation awareness (SA). The long-term objective of this research is to integrate valuable technologies into the grid operator environment that support decision making under normal and abnormal operating conditions and remove non-technical barriers to enable the optimum use of these technologies by individuals working alone and as a team. More specifically, the research aims to identify methods and principles to increase SA of grid operators in the context of system conditions that are representative or common across many operating entities and develop operationally relevant experimental methods for studying technologies and operational practices which contribute to SA. With increasing complexity and interconnectivity of the grid, the scope and complexity of situation awareness have grown. New paradigms are needed to guide research and tool development aimed to enhance and improve operations. In reviewing related research, operating practices, systems, and tools, the present study established a taxonomy that provides a perspective on research and development surrounding power grid situation awareness and clarifies the field of human factors/SA for grid operations. Information sources that we used to identify critical factors underlying SA included interviews with experienced operational personnel, available historical summaries and transcripts of abnormal conditions and outages (e.g., the August 14, 2003 blackout), scientific literature, and operational policies/procedures and other documentation. Our analysis of August 2003 blackout transcripts and interviews adopted a different perspective than previous analyses of this material, and we complemented this analysis with additional interviews. Based on our analysis and a broad literature review, we advocate a new perspective on SA in terms of sensemaking, also called situated or ecological decision making, where the focus of the investigation is to understand why the decision maker(s) experienced the situation the way they did, or why what they saw made sense to them at the time. This perspective is distinct from the traditional branch of human factors research in the field which focuses more on ergonomics and the transactional relationship between the human operator and the systems. Consistent with our findings from the literature review, we recognized an over-arching need to focus SA research on issues surrounding the concept of shared knowledge; e.g., awareness of what is happening in adjacent areas as well as one’s own area of responsibility. Major findings were: a) Inadequate communication/information sharing is pervasive, b) Information is available, but not used. Many tools and mechanisms exist for operators to build awareness of the physical grid system, yet the transcripts reveal that they still need to call and exchange information with operators of neighboring areas to improve or validate their SA. The specific types of information that they request are quite predictable and, in most cases, cover information that could be available to both operators and reliability coordinators through readily available displays or other data sources, c) Shared Knowledge is Required on Operations/Actions as Well as Physical Status. In an ideal, technologically and organizationally perfect world, every control room and every reliability coordinator may have access to complete data across all regional control areas and yet, there would still be reason for the operators to call each other to gain and improve their SA of power grid operations, and d) Situation Awareness as sensemaking and shared knowledge.

  16. Nonlinear relationships between individual IEQ factors and overall workspace satisfaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungsoo; de Dear, Richard

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in dissatisfaction. So for Bonus Factors, the absolute valuemarketing literature), (2) Bonus Factors (synonyms include “for occupants’ satisfaction. Bonus Factors: Bonus Factors go

  17. The Origins of the SPAR-H Method's Performance Shaping Factor Multipliers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Harold S. Blackman

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method has proved to be a reliable, easy-to-use method for human reliability analysis. Calculation of human error probability (HEP) rates is especially straightforward, starting with pre-defined nominal error rates for cognitive vs. action oriented tasks, and incorporating performance shaping factor (PSF) multipliers upon those nominal error rates. SPAR-H uses eight PSFs with multipliers typically corresponding to nominal, degraded, and severely degraded human performance for individual PSFs. Additionally, some PSFs feature multipliers to reflect enhanced performance. Although SPAR-H enjoys widespread use among industry and regulators, current source documents on SPAR-H such as NUREG/CR-6883 do not provide a clear account of the origin of these multipliers. The present paper redresses this shortcoming and documents the historic development of the SPAR-H PSF multipliers, from the initial use of nominal error rates, to the selection of the eight PSFs, to the mapping of multipliers to available data sources such as a Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP). Where error rates were not readily derived from THERP and other sources, expert judgment was used to extrapolate appropriate values. In documenting key background information on the multipliers, this paper provides a much needed cross-reference for human reliability practitioners and researchers of SPAR-H to validate analyses and research findings.

  18. Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

  19. Ornithological Observations 1 GUIDELINES TO AUTHORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    Ornithological Observations 1 GUIDELINES TO AUTHORS Ornithological Observations is a semi flush left (no tabs or indents) and paragraphs must be separated by a line space. Authors are requested

  20. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  1. Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations Vijay K. Garg \\Lambda Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Texas for observing and controlling a distributed computation and its applications to distributed debugging

  2. Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations Vijay K. Garg Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Texas for observing and controlling a distributed computation and its applications to distributed debugging

  3. 12 Years of Stellar Activity Observations in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauas, Pablo J D; Diaz, R; Vieytes, M; Petrucci, R; Jofre, E; Abrevaya, X; Luoni, M L; Valenzuela, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an observational program we started in 1999, to systematically obtain mid-resolution spectra of late-type stars, to study in particular chromospheric activity. In particular, we found cyclic activity in four dM stars, including Prox-Cen. We directly derived the conversion factor that translates the known S index to flux in the Ca II cores, and extend its calibration to a wider spectral range. We investigated the relation between the activity measurements in the calcium and hydrogen lines, and found that the usual correlation observed is the product of the dependence of each flux on stellar color, and it is not always preserved when simultaneous observations of a particular star are considered. We also used our observations to model the chromospheres of stars of different spectral types and activity levels, and found that the integrated chromospheric radiative losses, normalized to the surface luminosity, show a unique trend for G and K dwarfs when plotted against the S index.

  4. Rhodium Mossbauer Superradiance of Observable Gravitational Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

    2007-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the experimental observations of three case studies on the long-lived rhodium Mossbauer Effect. Extraordinary observations reported in this work manifest the open-up of photonic band gap in analogy to the superconducting gap. Observable gravitational effect is manifested by the superradiance of different sample orientations corresponding to the earth gravity. These observations are of potential importance for detecting gravitational waves and development of the two-photon gamma laser.

  5. JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;1 Disasters Health Energy Climate Water 1 Japanese Main Activities of Earth Observation Weather MTSAT (JMA) Eco Earth Observation Targets (JFY) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

  6. Belief space planning assuming maximum likelihood observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Perez, Tomas

    observations are modelled as Gaussian noise. Given this model of the dynamics, two planning and control methods-locating the sensors with the contacts this way complicates planning and control because it forces the system to trade of the partially observable control problem, often modeled as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP

  7. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

  8. Guidelines for Power Factor Improvement Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, G. W.

    Power factor is an indication of electrical system efficiency. Low power factor, or low system efficiency, may be due to one or more causes, including lightly loaded transformers, oversized electric motors, and harmonic-generating non-linear loads...

  9. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  10. Factors for Bioenergy Market Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

    1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

  11. Infrared Scales and Factorization in QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneesh V. Manohar

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective field theory methods are used to study factorization of the deep inelastic scattering cross-section. The cross-section is shown to factor in QCD, even though it does not factor in perturbation theory for some choices of the infrared regulator. Messenger modes are not required in soft-collinear effective theory for deep inelastic scattering as x -> 1.

  12. Prime Factorization in the Duality Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan-Ying Wang; Bin Shang; Chuan Wang; Gui Lu Long

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We give algorithms to factorize large integers in the duality computer. We provide three duality algorithms for factorization based on a naive factorization method, the Shor algorithm in quantum computing, and the Fermat's method in classical computing. All these algorithms are polynomial in the input size.

  13. Journal influence factors6 Massimo Franceschet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franceschet, Massimo

    Journal influence factors6 Massimo Franceschet Department of Mathematics and Computer Science of journal influence, namely 2- year impact factor, 5-year impact factor, eigenfactor and article influence. These indicators have been recently added by Thomson Reuters to the Journal Citation Reports, in both science

  14. QUANTIFYING OBSERVATIONAL PROJECTION EFFECTS USING MOLECULAR CLOUD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaumont, Christopher N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Offner, Stella S.R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Shetty, Rahul; Glover, Simon C. O. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goodman, Alyssa A., E-mail: beaumont@ifa.hawaii.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical properties of molecular clouds are often measured using spectral-line observations, which provide the only probes of the clouds' velocity structure. It is hard, though, to assess whether and to what extent intensity features in position-position-velocity (PPV) space correspond to 'real' density structures in position-position-position (PPP) space. In this paper, we create synthetic molecular cloud spectral-line maps of simulated molecular clouds, and present a new technique for measuring the reality of individual PPV structures. Using a dendrogram algorithm, we identify hierarchical structures in both PPP and PPV space. Our procedure projects density structures identified in PPP space into corresponding intensity structures in PPV space and then measures the geometric overlap of the projected structures with structures identified from the synthetic observation. The fractional overlap between a PPP and PPV structure quantifies how well the synthetic observation recovers information about the three-dimensional structure. Applying this machinery to a set of synthetic observations of CO isotopes, we measure how well spectral-line measurements recover mass, size, velocity dispersion, and virial parameter for a simulated star-forming region. By disabling various steps of our analysis, we investigate how much opacity, chemistry, and gravity affect measurements of physical properties extracted from PPV cubes. For the simulations used here, which offer a decent, but not perfect, match to the properties of a star-forming region like Perseus, our results suggest that superposition induces a ?40% uncertainty in masses, sizes, and velocity dispersions derived from {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0). As would be expected, superposition and confusion is worst in regions where the filling factor of emitting material is large. The virial parameter is most affected by superposition, such that estimates of the virial parameter derived from PPV and PPP information typically disagree by a factor of ?2. This uncertainty makes it particularly difficult to judge whether gravitational or kinetic energy dominate a given region, since the majority of virial parameter measurements fall within a factor of two of the equipartition level ? ? 2.

  15. Natural geometric representation for electron local observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minogin, V.G., E-mail: minogin@isan.troitsk.ru

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: •Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. •Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. •Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

  16. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON RED AND BLUE HELIUM BURNING SEQUENCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001-Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the optical luminosity, colors, and ratios of the blue and red helium burning (HeB) stellar populations from archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of nineteen starburst dwarf galaxies and compare them with theoretical isochrones from Padova stellar evolution models across metallicities from Z = 0.001 to 0.009. We find that the observational data and the theoretical isochrones for both blue and red HeB populations overlap in optical luminosities and colors and the observed and predicted blue to red HeB ratios agree for stars older than 50 Myr over the time bins studied. These findings confirm the usefulness of applying isochrones to interpret observations of HeB populations. However, there are significant differences, especially for the red HeB population. Specifically, we find (1) offsets in color between the observations and theoretical isochrones of order 0.15 mag (0.5 mag) for the blue (red) HeB populations brighter than M{sub V} {approx} -4 mag, which cannot be solely due to differential extinction; (2) blue HeB stars fainter than M{sub V} {approx} -3 mag are bluer than predicted; (3) the slope of the red HeB sequence is shallower than predicted by a factor of {approx}3; and (4) the models overpredict the ratio of the most luminous blue to red HeB stars corresponding to ages {approx}< 50 Myr. Additionally, we find that for the more metal-rich galaxies in our sample (Z {approx}> 0.5 Z{sub sun}), the red HeB stars overlap with the red giant branch stars in the color-magnitude diagrams, thus reducing their usefulness as indicators of star formation for ages {approx}> 100 Myr.

  17. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

  18. Construction of Quantum Field Theories with Factorizing S-Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandalf Lechner

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to the construction of interacting quantum field theories on two-dimensional Minkowski space is discussed. In this program, models are obtained from a prescribed factorizing S-matrix in two steps. At first, quantum fields which are localized in infinitely extended, wedge-shaped regions of Minkowski space are constructed explicitly. In the second step, local observables are analyzed with operator-algebraic techniques, in particular by using the modular nuclearity condition of Buchholz, d'Antoni and Longo. Besides a model-independent result regarding the Reeh-Schlieder property of the vacuum in this framework, an infinite class of quantum field theoretic models with non-trivial interaction is constructed. This construction completes a program initiated by Schroer in a large family of theories, a particular example being the Sinh-Gordon model. The crucial problem of establishing the existence of local observables in these models is solved by verifying the modular nuclearity condition, which here amounts to a condition on analytic properties of form factors of observables localized in wedge regions. It is shown that the constructed models solve the inverse scattering problem for the considered class of S-matrices. Moreover, a proof of asymptotic completeness is obtained by explicitly computing total sets of scattering states. The structure of these collision states is found to be in agreement with the heuristic formulae underlying the Zamolodchikov-Faddeev algebra.

  19. Factor Analysis for Skewed Data and Skew-Normal Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaucher, Beverly Jane

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 2.7.1 The Factor Analysis Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 v 2.8 Model Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 2.8.1 The Akaike Information Criterion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 2.8.2 The Bayesian... Information Criterion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.9 Factor Scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.10 Non-uniqueness of Factor Loadings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.10.1 The Rotation of Factor Loadings...

  20. Global inventory of nitrogen oxide emissions constrained by space-based observations of NO2 columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Global inventory of nitrogen oxide emissions constrained by space-based observations of NO2 columns NO + NO2), and combine these with a priori information from a bottom- up emission inventory (with error and a factor of 2 over remote regions. We derive a top-down NOx emission inventory from the GOME data by using

  1. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  2. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  3. Observational Window Functions in Planet Transit Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar von Braun; David R. Ciardi

    2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Window functions describe, as a function of orbital period, the probability that an existing planetary transit is detectable in one's data for a given observing strategy. We show the dependence of this probability upon several strategy and astrophysical parameters, such as length of observing run, observing cadence, length of night, and transit duration. The ability to detect a transit is directly related to the intrinsic noise of the observations. In our simulations of the window function, we explicitly address non-correlated (gaussian or white) noise and correlated (red) noise and discuss how these two different noise components affect window functions in different manners.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Marginal Ice Zone Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment mission Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers &...

  5. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

  6. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1...

  7. CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

  8. A general perspective on time observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Roberts

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose a general geometric framework in which to discuss the existence of time observables. This frameworks allows one to describe a local sense in which time observables always exist, and a global sense in which they can sometimes exist subject to a restriction on the vector fields that they generate. Pauli's prohibition on quantum time observables is derived as a corollary to this result. I will then discuss how time observables can be regained in modest extensions of quantum theory beyond its standard formulation.

  9. Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

  10. CAN REMOTE OBSERVING BE GOOD OBSERVING? REFLECTIONS ON PROCRUSTES AND ANTAEUS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockman, Jay

    CAN REMOTE OBSERVING BE GOOD OBSERVING? REFLECTIONS ON PROCRUSTES AND ANTAEUS 1 Felix J. Lockman National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, WV 24944 USA ABSTRACT Remote observing seeks to simulate, written in 1992 for a conference proceedings on remote observing, is reprinted here with only slight

  11. Detection and Plant Monitoring Programs: Lessons from an Intensive Survey of Asclepias meadii with Five Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Helen M.; Reed, Aaron W.; Kettle, W. Dean; Slade, Norman A.; Bodbyl-Roels, Sarah Ann; Collins, Cathy Diane; Salisbury,Vaughn

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    information about probabilities of detection and what factors cause plants to be missed. This information can guide development of monitoring programs. Citation: Alexander HM, Reed AW, Kettle WD, Slade NA, Bodbyl Roels SA, et al. (2012) Detection and Plant... of observers. This value was calculated as: 1{ 1{pAð Þ 1{pBð Þ 1{pCð Þ 1{pDð Þ 1{pEð Þ½ #2; ð1Þ where pA, pB, pC, pD, and pE refer to observer-specific detection probabilities. We calculated a common variance using the delta method [34]. Each observer...

  12. Observing Conditions and Mid-IR Data Quality Rachel Masona, Andre Wonga, b, Tom Geballea, Kevin Volka, Tom Haywardc, Matt Dillmana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    . These data can be used to illustrate the effect of factors such as water vapour column, airmass, cloud cover these effects is important for the efficiency of mid-IR queue observing, the ability of classical observers imaging observations, and which can safely be neglected. Keywords: infrared radiation, infrared

  13. Direct Observation of Polymer Sheathing in Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Observation of Polymer Sheathing in Carbon Nanotube-Polycarbonate Composites W. Ding, A (MWCNT)-polycarbonate composites are presented. This sheathing was observed in images of the composite properties, increases in electrical conductivity3 and improved thermal properties4 are obtained with small

  14. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  15. Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Barreiro; J. W. R. Tabosa; H. Failache; A. Lezama

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle/EIT coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

  16. ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORTPERIOD COMETS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demoulin, Pascal

    1 ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORT­PERIOD COMETS \\Lambda J. Crovisier 1 , T. Encrenaz 1 , E 4 , E. van Dishoeck 5 , R. Knacke 6 , T.Y. Brooke 7 1 Observatoire de Paris, Meudon, France 2 ISO are found in a short­period comet. The ISO observations of the Jupiter­family comet P/Hartley 2, presum

  17. Towards observable signatures of other bubble universes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.; Shomer, Assaf [SCIPP, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the possibility of observable effects arising from collisions between vacuum bubbles in a universe undergoing false-vacuum eternal inflation. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we find that under certain assumptions most positions inside a bubble should have access to a large number of collision events. We calculate the expected number and angular size distribution of such collisions on an observer's 'sky', finding that for typical observers the distribution is anisotropic and includes many bubbles, each of which will affect the majority of the observer's sky. After a qualitative discussion of the physics involved in collisions between arbitrary bubbles, we evaluate the implications of our results, and outline possible detectable effects. In an optimistic sense, then, the present paper constitutes a first step in an assessment of the possible effects of other bubble universes on the cosmic microwave background and other observables.

  18. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  19. Human factors methods in DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, C.T.; Banks, W.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Waters, R.J. (Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of developing a series of guidelines for the use of human factors standards, procedures, and methods to be used in nuclear facilities. This paper discusses the philosophy and process being used to develop a DOE human factors methods handbook to be used during the design cycle. The following sections will discuss: (1) basic justification for the project; (2) human factors design objectives and goals; and (3) role of human factors engineering (HFE) in the design cycle.

  20. Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

  1. Vitiligo: A good prognostic factor in melanoma?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunha, Daniela; Pacheco, Fernando Assis; Cardoso, Jorge

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with intermediate to thick melanomas (>1 mm) with the use ofgood prognostic factor in melanoma? Daniela Cunha, Fernandoimmunologic therapy for melanoma is generally regarded as a

  2. Optimization Online - Building a completely positive factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Immanuel Bomze

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 21, 2009 ... Abstract: Using a bordering approach, and building upon an already known factorization of a principal block, we establish sufficient conditions ...

  3. ISO observations of spirals: modelling the FIR emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Bianchi; Paul B. Alton; Jonathan I. Davies

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISO observations at 200 micron have modified our view of the dust component in spiral galaxies. For a sample of seven resolved spirals we have retrieved a mean temperature of 20K, about 10K lower than previous estimates based on IRAS data at shorter wavelengths. Because of the steep dependence of far-infrared emission on the dust temperature, the dust masses inferred from ISO fluxes are a factor of 10 higher than those derived from IRAS data only, leading to gas-to-dust ratios close to the value observed in the Galaxy. The scale-length of the 200 micron emission is larger than for the IRAS 100 micron emission, with colder dust at larger distances from the galactic centre, as expected if the interstellar radiation field is the main source of dust heating. The 200 micron scale-length is also larger than the optical, for all the galaxies in the sample. This suggests that the dust distribution is more extended than that of the stars.A model of the dust heating is needed to derive the parameters of the dust distribution from the FIR emission. Therefore, we have adapted an existing radiative transfer code to deal with dust emission. Simulated maps of the temperature distribution within the dust disk and of the dust emission at any wavelength can be produced. The stellar spectral energy distribution is derived from observations in the ultraviolet, optical and near infrared. The parameters of the dust distribution (scale-lengths and optical depth) are chosen to reproduce the observed characteristics of the FIR emission, i.e. the shape of the spectrum, the flux and the spatial distribution. We describe the application of the model to one of the galaxies in the sample, NGC 6946.

  4. Time changes in gradient and observed winds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ronald Dale

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD DALE CARLSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillm=n of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1972 Major Subject...: Meteorology TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD D. CARLSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co , ee) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT Time Changes in Gradient and Observed Winds. (May 1972) Ronald Dale...

  5. Photon impact factor in the NLO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian [JLAB

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photon impact factor for the BFKL pomeron is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximation using the operator expansion in Wilson lines. The result is represented as a NLO k{sub T}-factorization formula for the structure functions of small-x deep inelastic scattering.

  6. Aviation Human Factors Division Institute of Aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AHFD Aviation Human Factors Division Institute of Aviation University of Illinois at Urbana Systems Monitoring and Control Gavin R. Essenberg, Douglas A. Wiegmann, Aviation Human Factors Division experiments with more difficult path selection tasks might reveal if there are advantages for motion. Overall

  7. Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Bjorn

    Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

  8. Initial Helioseismic Observations by Hinode/SOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Sekii; Alexander G. Kosovichev; Junwei Zhao; Saku Tsuneta; Hiromoto Shibahashi; Thomas E. Berger; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Yukio Katsukawa; Bruce W. Lites; Shin'ichi Nagata; Toshifumi Shimizu; Richard A. Shine; Yoshinori Suematsu; Theodore D. Tarbell; Alan M. Title

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from initial helioseismic observations by Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode are reported. It has been demonstrated that intensity oscillation data from Broadband Filter Imager can be used for various helioseismic analyses. The k-omega power spectra, as well as corresponding time-distance cross-correlation function that promises high-resolution time-distance analysis below 6-Mm travelling distance, were obtained for G-band and CaII-H data. Subsurface supergranular patterns have been observed from our first time-distance analysis. The results show that the solar oscillation spectrum is extended to much higher frequencies and wavenumbers, and the time-distance diagram is extended to much shorter travel distances and times than they were observed before, thus revealing great potential for high-resolution helioseismic observations from Hinode.

  9. Near-Infrared Observations April 9, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    idea: correct wavefront distortions using a deformable secondary mirror · can achieve better correction;Energy Generation · what are we seeing when we observe solar system objects in the NIR? · reflected

  10. OBSERVATIONS OF TWO TRANSIENT LUMINOUS EVENT-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    OBSERVATIONS OF TWO TRANSIENT LUMINOUS EVENT- PRODUCING MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS Timothy LangC by positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning can lead to transient luminous events (TLEs; Williams 1998; Lyons

  11. NASA Launches New Earth Observation Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Goddard View The Weekly ­ 2 NASA Launches New Earth Observation Satellite ­ 3 3-D printing Creates Complex free online access to the information. This revolution has al- lowed scientists to detect changes over

  12. Spectrum of Controlling and Observing Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Gang; Barzel, Baruch; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing and controlling complex networks are of paramount interest for understanding complex physical, biological and technological systems. Recent studies have made important advances in identifying sensor or driver nodes, through which we can observe or control a complex system. Yet, the observation uncertainty induced by measurement noise and the energy cost required for control continue to be significant challenges in practical applications. Here we show that the control energy cost and the observation uncertainty vary widely in different directions of the state space. In particular, we find that if all nodes are directly driven, control is energetically feasible, as the maximum energy cost increases sublinearly with the system size. If, however, we aim to control a system by driving only a single node, control in some directions is energetically prohibitive, increasing exponentially with the system size. For the cases in between, the maximum energy decays exponentially if we increase the number of driv...

  13. INTEGRAL observations of HER X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; K. P. Postnov; N. I. Shakura; S. A. Potanin; C. Ferrigno; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    First results of observations of the low mass X-ray binary Her X-1/HZ Her performed by the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005 are presented. A significant part of one 35 day main-on state was covered. The cyclotron line in the X-ray spectrum is well observed and its position and shape, as well as its variability with time and phase of the 1.24 s pulsation are explored. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy bands are studied throughout the observation. The pulse period is found to vary on short time scales revealing a dynamical spin-up/spin-down behavior. Results of simultaneous optical observations of HZ Her are also discussed.

  14. Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

  15. Infrasonic observations of the Northridge, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutschlecner, J.P.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrasonic waves from the Northridge, California, earthquake of 17 January 1994 were observed at the St. George, Utah, infrasound array of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The distance to the epicenter was 543 kilometers. The signal shows a complex character with many peaks and a long duration. An interpretation is given in terms of several modes of signal propagation and generation including a seismic-acoustic secondary source mechanism. A number of signals from aftershocks are also observed.

  16. Mass Parameterizations and Predictions of Isotopic Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Souza; P. Danielewicz; S. Das Gupta; R. Donangelo; W. A. Friedman; W. G. Lynch; W. P. Tan; M. B. Tsang

    2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the accuracy of mass models for extrapolating to very asymmetric nuclei and the impact of such extrapolations on the predictions of isotopic observables in multifragmentation. We obtain improved mass predictions by incorporating measured masses and extrapolating to unmeasured masses with a mass formula that includes surface symmetry and Coulomb terms. We find that using accurate masses has a significant impact on the predicted isotopic observables.

  17. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  18. Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 70, No. 3, 2007, Pages 661666 Factors Related to Food Worker Hand Hygiene Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand Hygiene Practices LAURA R. GREEN,1* VINCENT RADKE,2 RYAN MASON,3 LISA BUSHNELL,4 DAVID W. REIMANN To identify factors related to food worker hand hygiene practices, we collected (i) observational data on food worker (n = 321) hand hygiene practices (hand washing and glove use) and (ii) observational and interview

  19. A Reliability and Validity Study of the Protective Factors Survey to Assess Protective Factors in Families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Counts, Jacqueline Marie

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    and caregivers. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted with a sample of 1,078 participants, who completed a parent education program in Nevada. Results provide psychometric data that support a valid and reliable four-factor solution, consisting of family...

  20. On the filling factor of emitting material in the upper atmosphere of Epsilon Eri (K2 V)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Sim; C. Jordan

    2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission measure distribution in the upper transition region and corona of Epsilon Eri is derived from observed emission line fluxes. Theoretical emission measure distributions are calculated assuming that the radiation losses are balanced by the net conductive flux. We discuss how the area factor of the emitting regions as a function of temperature can be derived from a comparison between these emission measure distributions. It is found that the filling factor varies from ~0.2 in the mid transition region to ~1.0 in the inner corona. The sensitivity of these results to the adopted ion fractions, the iron abundance and other parameters is discussed. The area factors found are qualitatively similar to the observed structure of the solar atmosphere, and can be used to constrain two-component models of the chromosphere. Given further observations, the method could be applied to investigate the trends in filling factors with indicators of stellar activity.

  1. EGRET observations of bursts at MeV energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catelli, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); NASA/GSFC Code 661, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Dingus, B. L. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Schneid, E. J. [Northrop Grumman Co., MS A01-26, Bethpage, New York 11714 (United States)

    1998-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results from the analysis of 16 bright bursts that have been observed by the EGRET NaI calorimeter, or TASC. Seven bursts have been imaged in the EGRET spark chamber above 30 MeV, but in most cases the TASC data gives the highest energy spectra available for these bursts. The TASC can obtain spectral and rate information for bursts well outside the field of view of the EGRET spark chambers, and is sensitive in the energy range from 1 to 200 MeV. The spectra for these bursts are mostly consistent with a simple power law with spectral index in the range from 1.7 to 3.7, with several of the brighter bursts showing emission past 100 MeV. No high energy cutoff has been observed. These high energy photons offer important clues to the physical processes involved at the origin of burst emission. For bursts at cosmological distances extremely high bulk Lorentz factors are implied by the presence of MeV and GeV photons which have not been attenuated by pair production with the lower energy photons from the source.

  2. Background Bayes Factor Simulation Study BF And PPP Using Bayes Factors for Model Selection in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Background Bayes Factor Simulation Study BF And PPP Using Bayes Factors for Model Selection in High Study BF And PPP Model Comparison in Astrophysics Nested models (line detection in spectral analysis" to formally compare or select a model. #12;Background Bayes Factor Simulation Study BF And PPP Spectral

  3. X-ray computed-tomography observations of water flow through anisotropic methane hydrate-bearing sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to image and quantify the effect of a heterogeneous sand grain-size distribution on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate, as well as the effect on water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand. A 28 cm long sand column was packed with several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with sands of different grain-size distributions. During the hydrate formation, water redistribution occurred. Observations of water flow through the hydrate-bearing sands showed that water was imbibed more readily into the fine sand, and that higher hydrate saturation increased water imbibition in the coarse sand due to increased capillary strength. Hydrate dissociation induced by depressurization resulted in different flow patterns with the different grain sizes and hydrate saturations, but the relationships between dissociation rates and the grain sizes could not be identified using the CT images. The formation, presence, and dissociation of hydrate in the pore space dramatically impact water saturation and flow in the system.

  4. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  5. A Current-Sensorless Digital Controller for Active Power Factor Correction Control Based on Kalman Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Jonathan W.

    A Current-Sensorless Digital Controller for Active Power Factor Correction Control Based on Kalman, by replacing the sensor with a Kalman filter, which is essentially a stochastic observer. Experimental results-power techniques are undesirable and the current sensor is too expensive. A Kalman filter [7] can be used

  6. Numerical study of the thermoelectric power factor in ultra-thin Si nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Numerical study of the thermoelectric power factor in ultra-thin Si nanowires Neophytos Neophytou thermoelectric (TE) performance because of a drastic reduction in their thermal conductivity, l. This has been observed for a variety of materials, even for traditionally poor thermoelectrics such as silicon. Other

  7. $B_{c}$ ${\\to}$ $BP$, $BV$ decays with the QCD factorization approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junfeng Sun; Na Wang; Qin Chang; Yueling Yang

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the nonleptonic $B_{c}$ ${\\to}$ $BP$, $BV$ decay with the QCD factorization approach. It is found that the Cabibbo favored processes of $B_{c}$ ${\\to}$ $B_{s}{\\pi}$, $B_{s}{\\rho}$, $B_{u}\\bar{K}$ are the promising decay channels with branching ratio larger than 1\\%, which should be observed earlier by the LHCb Collaboration.

  8. The Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and local information needs and decisions related to water-quality management and policy (httpThe Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well Vulnerability to Contamination: Understanding Observed Water Quality and Anticipating Future Water Quality National Water-Quality

  9. TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk mutations are observed in about 40e70% of lung cancer tissues, and the hot spot codon mu- tations factors that influence TP53 gene mutation in lung cancer patients residing areas with high lung cancer

  10. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  11. The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

  12. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  13. Assessment of International Work on Organizational Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Ian

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the concept of organizational factors and includes a consensus definition. It summarizes existing methods for assessing organizations from a safety culture perspective, for analyzing past incidents at plants to assess the role of safety culture, and for using such incident analysis to provide a database supporting organizational factors models. It describes existing methods that potentially could be extended to quantify organizational factors in a Probabilistic Safety Analysis. It concludes that no method is clearly superior for this purpose and recommends the organization of a workshop to clarify important issues prior to selecting a method.

  14. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  15. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANITA collaboration; P. W. Gorham; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; D. Z. Besson; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  16. Workshop on observations of recent comets (1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, W.F.; Wehinger, P.A.; Rahe, J.; Konno, I.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential interpretations are presented for observations of four comets: Brorsen-Metcalf (1989o), Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko (1989r), Aarseth-Brewington (1989a1), and Austin (1989o1). The relationship of minor species with each other and possible parents as well as with dust are being pursued in a number of investigations. Of particular interest are the abundance ratios of CH{sub 4} to CO and NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2}. The need for closer collaboration betwen observing teams and modelers is examined. The need for dust size distribution as a function of cometocentric distance to be analyzed in closer collaboration between observers and modelers is discussed.

  17. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; Duvernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Goodhue, A; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Hoover, S; Israel, M H; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B; Miki, C; Miocinovic, P; Nam, J; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R; Palladino, K J; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Saltzberg, D; Secke, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wu, F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  18. Rhodium Mossbauer Superradiance of Observable Gravitational Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yao

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the direct observations of the entangled superradiance from rhodium nuclei oriented along the long edge of the polycrystalline sample. The long-lived rhodium Mossbauer effect is sensitive to the earth gravity, which opens up novel approaches of detecting the gravitational waves. Superradiance and exciton diffusion are enhanced by liquid-nitrogen cooling. Gravitational effect attributed to multipolar nuclear transition of the atto-eV natural linewidth is manifested by emissions from different sample orientations corresponding to the earth gravity. The long-range gamma coupling across grain boundaries despite the temperature variation inside sample is manifested by the observed dependence on macroscopic sample size.

  19. Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  20. Observation of superdeformation in sup 191 Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.F.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Chasman, R.R.; Ahmad, I.; Khoo, T.L.; Wolfs, F.L.H. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (US)); Ye, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (US)); Beard, K.B. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (US)); Garg, U. (University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556); Drigert, M.W. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415); and others

    1989-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observation of superdeformation in the mass region {ital A}{congruent}190 is reported. A rotational band of twelve transitions with an average energy spacing of 37 keV, an average moment of inertia {ital scrF}{sup (2)} of 110 {h bar}{sup 2} MeV{sup {minus}1}, and an average quadrupole moment of 18{plus minus}3 {ital e} b has been observed in {sup 191}Hg; this band persists at low rotational frequency. These results are in excellent agreement with a calculation that predicts an ellipsoidal axis ratio of 1.65:1 for the superdeformed shape in this nucleus.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

  2. Decision making process and factors routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yichen, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research studies the decision-making process and the factors that affect truck routing. The data collection involved intercept interviews with truck drivers at three rest area and truck stops along major highways in ...

  3. Crop Management Factors: What is Important?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastens, Terry L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Nivens, Heather; Klinefelter, Danny A.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Crop Management Factors: What is Important? Terry L. Kastens, Kevin C. Dhuyvetter, Heather Nivens and Danny Klinefelter* Defining Good Farm Management Economically, a well-managed farm is one that consistently makes greater prof- its than similarly...

  4. GPDs, form factors and Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kroll

    2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic theoretical ideas of the handbag factorization and its application to wide-angle scattering reactions are reviewed. With regard to the present experimental program carried out at JLab, wide-angle Compton scattering is discussed in some detail.

  5. Factors affecting mother-child play

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Jennifer Colleen

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , factors that affect parents' ability to play with their children have not been widely addressed in the literature. As Webster-Stratton (1990) points out, little effort has been made to understand "the factors that influence parents' perceptions... support of competent parenting" (p. 215). Although there is not sufficient evidence to date to support this claim, it is clear that marital satisfaction and marital conflict should not be overlooked when researching parenting (e. g. , Brody, Pellegrini...

  6. Pion form factor with chirally improved fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Capitani; Christof Gattringer; C. B. Lang

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for Monte Carlo calculations of the electromagnetic vector and scalar form factors of the pion in a quenched simulation. We work at a lattice spacing of 0.15 fm and use two lattice volumes up to a spatial size of 2.4 fm. The pion form factors in the space-like region are determined for pion masses down to 340 MeV.

  7. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  8. Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, Joseph Y.

    Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier Dept. Computer Science University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia Canada, V6T 1W5 cebly@cs.ubc.ca Nir Friedman ¡£¢ Computer Research in belief revision has been dominated by work that lies firmly within the classic AGM paradigm

  9. Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;7/30/2006 IGARSS_2006 Integrated Systems for Agriculture 2 Convergence of Evidence, All Gov't Policy Makers Reference Model: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service PECAD:Production Estimates

  10. OH Maser Observations of Planetary Nebulae Precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. M. Deacon; J. M. Chapman; A. J. Green

    2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present OH maser observations at 1612, 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz for 86 post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars selected from a survey of 1612 MHz maser sources in the Galactic Plane. The observations were taken with the Parkes Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array between 2002 September and 2003 August. Post-AGB stars are the precursors to planetary nebulae, the diverse morphological range of which is unexplained. The maser observations were taken to investigate the onset and incidence of wind asymmetries during the post-AGB phase. We re-detected all 86 sources at 1612 MHz while 27 sources were detected at 1665 and 45 at 1667 MHz. One source was re-detected at 1720 MHz. We present a classification scheme for the maser profiles and show that 25% of sources in our sample are likely to have asymmetric or bipolar outflows. From a comparison of the maser and far-infrared properties we find that there is a likely trend in the shape of the maser profiles with some sources evolving from double-peaked to irregular to fully bipolar profiles. A subset of higher-mass sources stand out as having almost no mainline emission and mostly double-peaked profiles. At least 25% of sources in the sample are variable at one or more of the frequencies observed. We also confirm a previously-noted 1667 MHz overshoot phenomenon.

  11. SEU induced errors observed in microprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asenek, V.; Underwood, C.; Oldfield, M. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Surrey Space Centre] [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Surrey Space Centre; Velazco, R.; Rezgui, S.; Cheynet, P. [TIMA Lab., Grenoble (France)] [TIMA Lab., Grenoble (France); Ecoffet, R. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)] [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors present software tools for predicting the rate and nature of observable SEU induced errors in microprocessor systems. These tools are built around a commercial microprocessor simulator and are used to analyze real satellite application systems. Results obtained from simulating the nature of SEU induced errors are shown to correlate with ground-based radiation test data.

  12. INVENTORY MANAGEMENT WITH PARTIALLY OBSERVED NONSTATIONARY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Mike

    INVENTORY MANAGEMENT WITH PARTIALLY OBSERVED NONSTATIONARY DEMAND ERHAN BAYRAKTAR AND MICHAEL LUDKOVSKI Abstract. We consider a continuous-time model for inventory management with Markov mod- ulated non inventory level. We then solve this equivalent formulation and directly characterize an optimal inventory

  13. 8) Stratospheric equatorial variability a) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Francois

    speed. Phase lines inclined eastward when altitude increases indicating upward propation Signal field) Westward phase propagation but eastward group propagation Phase lines inclined westward Signal;5 Satellites wind observations (UARS, Swinbak et Ortland 1997) The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (low stratosphere

  14. Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    that energetic electron fluxes peak at sites of compressed density within islands, which imposes a new constraintLETTERS Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands L.-J. CHEN1 *, A. BHATTACHARJEE1, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA 2 National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2

  15. Finding slowly decaying observables Gary Froyland \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyland, Gary

    Finding slowly decaying observables Gary Froyland \\Lambda Department of Mathematical Engineering initial transient behaviour to disappear. We present a rigorous numerical method for (i) estimating distribution on M ; that is, if you plot the orbit on a computer, you see the same distribution of dots. We

  16. Uncertain Probabilistic Roadmaps with Observations Richard Dearden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    Uncertain Probabilistic Roadmaps with Observations Richard Dearden School of Computer Science Science University of Birmingham Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK mlk@cs.bham.ac.uk Abstract Probabilistic roadmaps. Introduction Probabilistic Roadmaps (PRM) are a popular technique for path planning in high dimensional spaces

  17. Energy flow observables in hadronic collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hautmann

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present recent QCD calculations of energy flow distributions associated with the production of jets at wide rapidity separations in high-energy hadron collisions, and discuss the role of these observables to analyze contributions from parton showering and from multiple parton collisions.

  18. Observation-based test set generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Jeffrey Lee

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . Current test set generation relies primarily on the "stuck-at" model, which both excites and observes every site of the circuit. However, a test set with good stuck-at fault coverage will not necessarily find all the defects in a circuit. Other models...

  19. 7, 79077932, 2007 ACE-FTS observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , D. Hauglustaine5 , C. D. Boone6 , and P. F. Bernath6,7 1 Spectroscopie de l'atmosph`ere, Chimie Center, Mail Stop 401A, Hampton, VA 23681-2199, USA 4 Earth Observation Science, Space Research Centre Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)/Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace, CEA-CNRS, F

  20. Atmospheric Noise in Single Dish Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    the errors in a wideband total power measurement. Noise con­ tributions come from thermal noise consider total power measurements with a single dish radiometer. The measured total power, p[K] = g \\Theta for extended sources. For wideband total power observations, the maximum integration time ¸ 0.1 s in order

  1. An Observational Look at Rotating Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiita, Paul J.

    . The Doppler Effect induces a shift at each end of the star's spectrum as one limb recedes, while the other radial velocities and the resulting shifts in wavelength from the various parts of the star (Kaler 1989 be calculated, or perhaps even the angular velocity" (Abney 1877). The component of the radial velocity observed

  2. Observations and simulations improve space weather models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Observations and simulations improve space weather models June 25, 2014 Los Alamos with fast-moving particles and a space weather system that varies in response to incoming energy computer simulations of the space weather that can affect vital technology, communication and navigation

  3. Relativistic particle: Dirac observables and Feynman propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freidel, Laurent; Girelli, Florian; Livine, Etera R. [Perimeter Institute, 31 Caroline St North, Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); SISSA, Via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 46 Allee d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the algebra of Dirac observables of the relativistic particle in four space-time dimensions. We show that the position observables become noncommutative and the commutation relations lead to a structure very similar to the noncommutative geometry of deformed special relativity (DSR). In this framework, it appears natural to consider the 4D relativistic particle as a five-dimensional massless particle. We study its quantization in terms of wave functions on the 5D light cone. We introduce the corresponding five-dimensional action principle and analyze how it reproduces the physics of the 4D relativistic particle. The formalism is naturally subject to divergences (due to the 5D representation), and we show that DSR arises as a natural regularization: the 5D light cone is regularized as the de Sitter space. We interpret the fifth coordinate as the particle's proper time while the fifth moment can be understood as the mass. Finally, we show how to formulate the Feynman propagator and the Feynman amplitudes of quantum field theory in this context in terms of Dirac observables. This provides new insights for the construction of observables and scattering amplitudes in DSR.

  4. Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper) Andrew J. Whalen*t, Sean N. Brennan Engineering, + Engineering Science and Mechanics, Neurosurgery, and Physics, Penn State University, University) neuronal networks as a function of 1) the connection topology and sym metry, 2) the measured nodes, and 3

  5. Power Counting to Better Jet Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Larkoski; Ian Moult; Duff Neill

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimized jet substructure observables for identifying boosted topologies will play an essential role in maximizing the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider. Ideally, the design of discriminating variables would be informed by analytic calculations in perturbative QCD. Unfortunately, explicit calculations are often not feasible due to the complexity of the observables used for discrimination, and so many validation studies rely heavily, and solely, on Monte Carlo. In this paper we show how methods based on the parametric power counting of the dynamics of QCD, familiar from effective theory analyses, can be used to design, understand, and make robust predictions for the behavior of jet substructure variables. As a concrete example, we apply power counting for discriminating boosted Z bosons from massive QCD jets using observables formed from the n-point energy correlation functions. We show that power counting alone gives a definite prediction for the observable that optimally separates the background-rich from the signal-rich regions of phase space. Power counting can also be used to understand effects of phase space cuts and the effect of contamination from pile-up, which we discuss. As these arguments rely only on the parametric scaling of QCD, the predictions from power counting must be reproduced by any Monte Carlo, which we verify using Pythia8 and Herwig++. We also use the example of quark versus gluon discrimination to demonstrate the limits of the power counting technique.

  6. INTEGRAL observations of Her X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; K. Postnov; N. Shakura; A. Santangelo; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We investigate the X-ray spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray pulsar Her X-1 observed with the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005. Methods: The data analyzed in this work cover a substantial part of one main-on state of the source. The short-time scale pulse period development is measured. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy ranges and time intervals are constructed. Pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved broad band X-ray spectra are studied. Spectral changes during X-ray dips are explored. Results: The X-ray pulse profiles are found to change significantly during the period of observations. For the first time a strong spinup is measured within one 35 d cycle. Spectral characteristics observed during the X-ray dips are consistent with their interpretaion as due to partial covering as has been reported by several authors. The fundamental cyclotron absorption line is firmly observed in both pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved X-ray spectra. The energy, width, and the depth of the line are found to vary significantly with pulse phase.

  7. On the impact of power corrections in the prediction of B->K*mu+mu- observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sébastien Descotes-Genon; Lars Hofer; Joaquim Matias; Javier Virto

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent LHCb angular analysis of the exclusive decay B->K^*mu+mu- has indicated significant deviations from the Standard Model expectations. Accurate predictions can be achieved at large K*-meson recoil for an optimised set of observables designed to have no sensitivity to hadronic input in the heavy-quark limit at leading order in alpha_s. However, hadronic uncertainties reappear through non-perturbative Lambda_QCD/m_b power corrections, which must be assessed precisely. In the framework of QCD factorisation we present a systematic method to include factorisable power corrections and point out that their impact on angular observables depends on the scheme chosen to define the soft form factors. Associated uncertainties are found to be under control, contrary to earlier claims in the literature. We also discuss the impact of possible non-factorisable power corrections, including an estimate of charm-loop effects. We provide results for angular observables at large recoil for two different sets of inputs for the form factors, spelling out the different sources of theoretical uncertainties. Finally, we comment on a recent proposal to explain the anomaly in B->K*mu+mu- observables through charm-resonance effects, and we propose strategies to test this proposal identifying observables and kinematic regions where either the charm-loop model can be disentangled from New Physics effects or the two options leave different imprints.

  8. ISO observations of four active galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Dennefeld; Thomas Boller; Dimitra Rigopoulou; Henrik Spoon

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ISO PHOT-S spectra of four galaxies known or suspected to host a central AGN, selected from the initial Iras/Rosat sample of Boller et al. (1992). Two of them had no obvious Seyfert features in their previous optical spectra: IRAS 14201+2956, and IRAS 21582+1018. The latter was bright enough to also allow SWS observations around selected neon lines, to establish its excitation. While both PHOT-S spectra are characteristic of starburst-dominated galaxies, the neon line ratios in IRAS 21582+1018 indicate the presence of a hard excitation source. New, high-resolution, optical spectra show only a weak, broad component around Halpha, classifying now these two objects as Sey 1.9 galaxies. The two other galaxies observed are the NLS1 galaxies Mrk 359 and Mrk 1388. Their ISO spectra however do not reveal the typical, strong PAH features found in the starburst galaxies and are more like those of standard Seyferts. These results show therefore that, although IR observations were expected to be able to always reveal the presence of an active nucleus by piercing through the central obscuration, the result may be ambiguous: the broad band IR energy distribution can still be dominated by starburts located in a circumnuclear region, and the AGN appear only in specific observations (high-excitation lines in the IR, or optical spectra with better quality than classification spectra). The obscuration needs however to be patchy rather than complete, to explain the detection of the high-excitation lines or broad Balmer wings. Only high-energy observations can then establish the strength of the central AGN and the amount of extinction with certainty.

  9. Odd orders in Shor's factoring algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Lawson

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Shor's factoring algorithm (SFA) finds the prime factors of a number, $N=p_1 p_2$, exponentially faster than the best known classical algorithm. Responsible for the speed-up is a subroutine called the quantum order finding algorithm (QOFA) which calculates the order -- the smallest integer, $r$, satisfying $a^r \\mod N =1$, where $a$ is a randomly chosen integer coprime to $N$ (meaning their greatest common divisor is one, $\\gcd(a, N) =1$). Given $r$, and with probability not less than $1/2$, the factors are given by $p_1 = \\gcd (a^{\\frac{r}{2}} - 1, N)$ and $p_2 = \\gcd (a^{\\frac{r}{2}} + 1, N)$. For odd $r$ it is assumed the factors cannot be found (since $a^{\\frac{r}{2}}$ is not generally integer) and the QOFA is relaunched with a different value of $a$. But a recent paper [E. Martin-Lopez: Nat Photon {\\bf 6}, 773 (2012)] noted that the factors can sometimes be found from odd orders if the coprime is square. This raises the question of improving SFA's success probability by considering odd orders. We show that an improvement is possible, though it is small. We present two techniques for retrieving the order from apparently useless runs of the QOFA: not discarding odd orders; and looking out for new order finding relations in the case of failure. In terms of efficiency, using our techniques is equivalent to avoiding square coprimes and disregarding odd orders, which is simpler in practice. Even still, our techniques may be useful in the near future, while demonstrations are restricted to factoring small numbers. The most convincing demonstrations of the QOFA are those that return a non-power-of-two order, making odd orders that lead to the factors attractive to experimentalists.

  10. WTERT-India Observations from India's Crisis Ranjith Annepu Observations from India's Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the city could not find a new landfill site. Author Ranjith Annepu, WTERT ­ India Date February 04, 2013WTERT- India Observations from India's Crisis Ranjith Annepu Observations from India's Crisis Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) ­ India, 89-B, NEERI Mumbai Zonal Lab, Worli

  11. Observation of Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan State U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report first observation of the electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 2.3 fb{sup ?1} of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon and missing transverse energy, together with jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10{sup ?7}, corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance for the observation.

  12. Electron Cloud observation in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumolo, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Baudrenghien, P; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P; Claudet, S; De Maria, R; Esteban-Muller, J; Favier, M; Hansen, C; Höfle, W; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lanza, G; Li, K S B; Maury Cuna, G H I; Métral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E N; Steinhagen, R J; Tavian, L J; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zimmermann, F; Iriso, U; Dominguez, O; Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Zannini, C; Bhat, C M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of LHC with bunch trains at different spacings has revealed the formation of an electron cloud inside the machine. The main observations of electron cloud build up are the pressure rise measured at the vacuum gauges in the warm regions, as well as the increase of the beam screen temperature in the cold regions due to an additional heat load. The effects of the electron cloud were also visible as instability and emittance growth affecting the last bunches of longer trains, which could be improved running with higher chromaticity or larger transverse emittances. A summary of the 2010 and 2011 observations and measurements and a comparison with models will be presented. The efficiency of scrubbing to improve the machine running performance will be briefly discussed.

  13. Observable Proxies For 26 Al Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Patrick A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ellinger, Carola I [ASU; Arnett, William D [UNIV ARIZONA

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the cospatial production of elements in supernova explosions to find observationally detectable proxies for enhancement of {sup 26}Al in supernova ejecta and stellar systems. Using four progenitors we explore a range of 1D explosions at different energies and an asymmetric 3D explosion. We find that the most reliable indicator of the presence of {sup 26}Al in unmixed ejecta is a very low S/Si ratio ({approx} 0.05). Production of N in O/S/Si-rich regions is also indicative. The biologically important element P is produced at its highest abundance in the same regions. Proxies should be detectable in supernova ejecta with high spatial resolution multi wavelength observations, but the small absolute abundance of material injected into a proto-planetary disk makes detection unlikely in existing or forming stellar/planetary systems.

  14. Observational constraints on braneworld chaotic inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew R Liddle; Anthony J Smith

    2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine observational constraints on chaotic inflation models in the Randall-Sundrum Type II braneworld. If inflation takes place in the high-energy regime, the perturbations produced by the quadratic potential are further from scale-invariance than in the standard cosmology, in the quartic case more or less unchanged, while for potentials of greater exponent the trend is reversed. We test these predictions against a data compilation including the WMAP measurements of microwave anisotropies and the 2dF galaxy power spectrum. While in the standard cosmology the quartic potential is at the border of what the data allow and all higher powers excluded, we find that in the high-energy regime of braneworld inflation even the quadratic case is under strong observational pressure. We also investigate the intermediate regime where the brane tension is comparable to the inflationary energy scale, where the deviations from scale-invariance prove to be greater.

  15. Constraining the Braneworld with Gravitational Wave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, Sean T. [Gravitational Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, l, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining l via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain l at the {approx}1 {mu}m level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of l{<=}5 {mu}m.

  16. SALT observations of southern post-novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomov, T; Mikolajewski, M; Ilkiewicz, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on recent optical observations of the stellar and the nebular remnants of 22 southern post-novae. In this study, for each of our targets, we obtained and analysed long-slit spectra in the spectral range 3500-6600 A and in H$\\alpha$+NII narrow-band images. The changes in the emission lines' equivalent widths with the time since the outburst agree with earlier published results of other authors. We estimated an average value $\\alpha$=2.37 for the exponent of the power law fitted to the post-novae continua. Our observations clearly show the two-component structure of the V842 Cen expanding nebulae, owing to the different velocities of the ejected matter. We discovered an expanding shell around V382 Vel with an outer diameter of about 12 arcsec.

  17. First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P [Fermilab; Andreopoulos, C [Rutherford; Auty, D J [Sussex U.; Ayres, D S [Argonne; Backhouse, C [Oxford U.; Barr, G [Oxford U.; Bishai, M [Brookhaven; Blake, A [Cambridge U.; Bock, G J [Fermilab; Boehnlein, D J [/Fermilab; Bogert, D [Fermilab; Harvard U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ??? production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ??? events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3?. The best fit to oscillation yields |?m?2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 ??) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) ± 0.01(syst.). The MINOS ?? and ??? measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

  18. Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) mostly uses conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute, 30-minute, and 1440-minute (daily) averages of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity (RH), barometric pressure, and precipitation at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research site. The SMOSs are not calibrated as systems. The sensors and the data logger (which includes the analog-to-digital converter, or A/D) are calibrated separately. All systems are installed using components that have a current calibration. SMOSs have not been installed at extended facilities located within about 10 km of existing surface meteorological stations, such as those of the Oklahoma Mesonet. The Surface Meteorological Observation Systems are used to create climatology for each particular location, and to verify the output of numerical weather forecast and other model output. They are also used to “ground-truth” other remote sensing equipment.

  19. LNG Observer: Second Qatargas train goes onstream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The January-February, 1997 issue of the LNG Observer is presented. The following topics are discussed: second Qatargas train goes onstream; financing for the eighth Indonesian liquefaction train; Koreans take stakes in Oman LNG; US imports and exports of LNG in 1996; A 60% increase in proved reserves on the North West Shelf; proposals for Indian LNG terminal CEDIGAZ forecasts world LNG trade by 2010; growth for North African gas production and exports; and new forecast sees strong growth for Asian gas.

  20. Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office PressPostdoctoraldecadal observations719 Posters117

  1. Correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging when lesion location is uncertain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Zhang, Yi; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey [Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Toledano, Alicia Y. [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, 10606 Wheatley Street, Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)] [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, 10606 Wheatley Street, Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging for the task of lesion detection and localization when the lesion location is uncertain.Methods: Two cylindrical rods (3-mm and 5-mm diameters) were placed in a 35 × 26 cm torso-shaped water phantom to simulate lesions with ?15 HU contrast at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times on a 128-slice CT scanner at each of four dose levels (CTDIvol = 5.7, 11.4, 17.1, and 22.8 mGy). Regions of interest (ROIs) around each lesion were extracted to generate images with signal-present, with each ROI containing 128 × 128 pixels. Corresponding ROIs of signal-absent images were generated from images without lesion mimicking rods. The location of the lesion (rod) in each ROI was randomly distributed by moving the ROIs around each lesion. Human observer studies were performed by having three trained observers identify the presence or absence of lesions, indicating the lesion location in each image and scoring confidence for the detection task on a 6-point scale. The same image data were analyzed using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) with Gabor channels. Internal noise was added to the decision variables for the model observer study. Area under the curve (AUC) of ROC and localization ROC (LROC) curves were calculated using a nonparametric approach. The Spearman's rank order correlation between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance was calculated for the AUC of both ROC and LROC curves for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions.Results: In both ROC and LROC analyses, AUC values for the model observer agreed well with the average values across the three human observers. The Spearman's rank order correlation values for both ROC and LROC analyses for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions were all 1.0, indicating perfect rank ordering agreement of the figures of merit (AUC) between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance.Conclusions: In CT imaging of different sizes of low-contrast lesions (?15 HU), the performance of CHO with Gabor channels was highly correlated with human observer performance for the detection and localization tasks with uncertain lesion location in CT imaging at four clinically relevant dose levels. This suggests the ability of Gabor CHO model observers to meaningfully assess CT image quality for the purpose of optimizing scan protocols and radiation dose levels in detection and localization tasks for low-contrast lesions.

  2. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  3. Apparatus for observing a hostile environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Boylston, Micah L. (Williston, SC); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Sexton, William C. (Aiken, SC); Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for observing a hostile environment, comprising a housing and a camera capable of insertion within the housing. The housing is a double wall assembly with an inner and outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. A housing for an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided, comprising a transparent, double wall assembly. The double wall assembly has an inner wall and an outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The double wall assembly has an opening and a void area in communication with the opening. The void area of the housing is adapted to accommodate the optical system within said void area. An apparatus for protecting an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided comprising a housing; a tube positioned within the housing; and a base for supporting the housing and the tube. The housing comprises a double wall assembly having an inner wall and an outerwall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The tube is adapted to house the optical system therein.

  4. Predicting the cosmological constant with the scale-factor cutoff measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Simone, Andrea; Guth, Alan H. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Salem, Michael P.; Vilenkin, Alexander [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that anthropic selection from a landscape with a flat prior distribution of cosmological constant {lambda} gives a reasonable fit to observation. However, a realistic model of the multiverse has a physical volume that diverges with time, and the predicted distribution of {lambda} depends on how the spacetime volume is regulated. A very promising method of regulation uses a scale-factor cutoff, which avoids a number of serious problems that arise in other approaches. In particular, the scale-factor cutoff avoids the 'youngness problem' (high probability of living in a much younger universe) and the 'Q and G catastrophes' (high probability for the primordial density contrast Q and gravitational constant G to have extremely large or small values). We apply the scale-factor cutoff measure to the probability distribution of {lambda}, considering both positive and negative values. The results are in good agreement with observation. In particular, the scale-factor cutoff strongly suppresses the probability for values of {lambda} that are more than about 10 times the observed value. We also discuss qualitatively the prediction for the density parameter {omega}, indicating that with this measure there is a possibility of detectable negative curvature.

  5. Accelerated Gibbs Sampling for Infinite Sparse Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrzejewski, D M

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian Buffet Process (IBP) gives a probabilistic model of sparse binary matrices with an unbounded number of columns. This construct can be used, for example, to model a fixed numer of observed data points (rows) associated with an unknown number of latent features (columns). Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are often used for IBP inference, and in this technical note, we provide a detailed review of the derivations of collapsed and accelerated Gibbs samplers for the linear-Gaussian infinite latent feature model. We also discuss and explain update equations for hyperparameter resampling in a 'full Bayesian' treatment and present a novel slice sampler capable of extending the accelerated Gibbs sampler to the case of infinite sparse factor analysis by allowing the use of real-valued latent features.

  6. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syukurilla, L., E-mail: tmart@fisika.ui.ac.id; Mart, T., E-mail: tmart@fisika.ui.ac.id [Department Fisika, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, 164242 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the K?N vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  7. The Solar Wind Charge-Exchange Production Factor for Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuntz, K D; Collier, M R; Connor, H K; Cravens, T E; Koutroumpa, D; Porter, F S; Robertson, I P; Sibeck, D G; Snowden, S L; Thomas, N E; Wash, B M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production factor, or broad band averaged cross-section, for solar wind charge-exchange with hydrogen producing emission in the ROSAT 1/4 keV (R12) band is $3.8\\pm0.2\\times10^{-20}$ count degree$^{-2}$ cm$^4$. This value is derived from a comparison of the Long-Term (background) Enhancements in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with magnetohysdrodynamic simulations of the magnetosheath. This value is 1.8 to 4.5 times higher than values derived from limited atomic data, suggesting that those values may be missing a large number of faint lines. This production factor is important for deriving the exact amount of 1/4 keV band flux that is due to the Local Hot Bubble, for planning future observations in the 1/4 keV band, and for evaluating proposals for remote sensing of the magnetosheath. The same method cannot be applied to the 3/4 keV band as that band, being composed primarily of the oxygen lines, is far more sensitive to the detailed abundances and ionization balance in the solar wind. We also show, incidentally,...

  8. Invariant Form of BK-factorization and its Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kartashova; O. Rudenko

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Invariant form of BK-factorization is presented, it is used for factorization of the LPDOs equivalent under gauge transformation and for construction of approximate factorization simplifying numerical simulsations with corresponding LPDEs of higher order

  9. Towards Controlling the Acceptance Factors for a Collaborative Platform in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Towards Controlling the Acceptance Factors for a Collaborative Platform in Engineering Design factor which are supposed to influence future users of a collaborative KM platform (Dimocode). At the end management systems (KMS) deployment. Keywords: acceptance factors, collaborative, platforms, engineering

  10. Magnetic changes observed in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, R.L.; Hurford, G.J.; Jones, H.P.; Kane, S.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of a fairly large impulsive flare (1B/M4, starting 17:22 UT, 1980 April 10). Observations of the microwave/hard X-ray burst show the time development of the impulsive energy release. Chromospheric (H..cap alpha..) and photospheric (Fe I lambda5324) filtergrams and photospheric (Fe I lambda8688) magnetograms, intensitygrams, and velocitygrams show magnetic strucutre, flare emission, mass motion, and magnetic changes. From these observations, we conclude: 1. The flare was triggered by a small emerging magnetic bipole. 2. The peak impulsive energy release occurred in the explosive eruption of a filament from over the magnetic inversion line. Hence: a) The filament eruption was the magnetic transient in the heart of the primary energy release in the chromosphere and corona. b) The primary energy release did not occur in approximately stationary magnetic loops, but on field lines undergoing violet motion and drastic changes in direction. 3. In the photospheric magnetograph lines. Fe I lambda5324 and Fe I lambda8688, the impulsive peak of the flare produced emission in a unipolar area of a sunspot. In synchrony with the emission, the polarity of this area transiently reversed in the lambda8688 magnetigrams; apparently, this was an artifact of the line emission. 4. Within a few minutes after the explosive filament eruption. a) A permanent decrease in magnetic flux accompanied the truncation of an umbra. b) A permanent increase in magnetic flux accompanied the severance of the penumbral bridge to a satellite sunspot. Apparently, thee genuine photospheric magnetic changes were consequences of strong flare-wrought magnetic changes in the chromospher and corona.

  11. From Saudi Arabia to Venezuela: Energy Resources, Market Factors & ConflictsEnergy Resources, Market Factors & Conflicts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    (Brazil, Russia, India and China) will end U.S. supremacy in the dollar based oil market? Lastly, weFrom Saudi Arabia to Venezuela: Energy Resources, Market Factors & ConflictsEnergy Resources, Market Factors & Conflicts Dr. Tom O'Donnell Friday, 12:00 ­ 2:48 PM Room 125, Mendenhall Laboratory

  12. Photon impact factor and k{sub T} factorization in the next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Balitsky

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photon impact factor for the BFKL pomeron is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximation using the operator expansion in Wilson lines. The result is represented as a NLO k{sub T}-factorization formula for the structure functions of small-x deep inelastic scattering.

  13. Quantitative Finance To apear Efficient Factor GARCH Models and Factor-DCC Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jegelka, Stefanie

    Quantitative Finance To apear Efficient Factor GARCH Models and Factor-DCC Models Kun Zhang KZHANG of Hong Kong Hong Kong Abstract We reveal that in the estimation of univariate GARCH or multivariate generalized or- thogonal GARCH (GO-GARCH) models, maximizing the likelihood is equivalent to making

  14. Organizational Culture andOrganizational Culture and Human Factors in HealthcareHuman Factors in Healthcare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organizational Culture andOrganizational Culture and Human Factors in HealthcareHuman Factors;TEAMWORK!TEAMWORK! #12;OverviewOverview ·· Organizational culture and adaptationOrganizational cultureKey Objectives ·· Compare error response in differentCompare error response in different organizational

  15. Observation of ?cJ decays to ??¯¯¯????

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; et al

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decays of the ?cJ states (J=0, 1, 2) to ??¯¯¯????, including processes with intermediate ?(1385), are studied through the E1 transition ?'???cJ using 106×10? ?' events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII. This is the first observation of ?cJ decays to the final state ??¯¯¯????. The branching ratio of the intermediate process ?cJ??(1385)±?¯¯¯(1385)? is also measured for the first time, and the results agree with the theoretical predictions based on the color-octet effect.

  16. Gamma-Ray Burst observations with Fermi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Omodei, Nicola; Vianello, Giacomo; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After seven years of science operation, the Fermi mission has brought great advances in the study of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). Over 1600 GRBs have been detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and more than 100 of these are also detected by the Large Area Telescope above 30 MeV. We will give an overview of these observations, presenting the common properties in the GRB temporal and spectral behavior at high energies. We will also highlight the unique characteristics of some individual bursts. The main physical implications of these results will be discussed, along with open questions regarding GRB modeling in their prompt and temporally-extended emission phases.

  17. GLAST observation of high-redshift GRBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34100, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34100, Trieste (Italy); Calura, Francesco [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Matteucci, Francesca [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Omodei, Nicola [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Edificio C - Polo Fibonacci, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127, Pisa (Italy)

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SNIb/c) rates with the observed long-duration Gamma-Ray-Burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift, by assuming different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological types. Due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict a large number of GRBs beyond z > 7. Moreover, based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this burst population is presented.

  18. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Michael Lemonick

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus?the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  19. Time changes in gradient and observed winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ronald Dale

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - cal purposes, represents the changes in the components of the gradient wind speed, as calculated from Eqs. (9) and (10). Equations (9) and (10) were solved by the use of finite dif- ference methods. Due to the long incremental time steps, 3 to 12... hours, the changes in the components of the gradient wind speed obtained numerically from Eqs. (9) and (10) may differ slightly from the changes observed due to the numerical techniques employed. How- ever, the patterns obtained by the two methods...

  20. Direct Observation of Paramagnons in Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doubble, R. [University of Bristol, UK; Hayden, S M. [University of Bristol, UK; Dai, Pengcheng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Frost, C. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an inelastic neutron scattering study of the spin fluctuations in the nearly ferromagnetic element palladium. Dispersive over-damped collective magnetic excitations or 'paramagnons' are observed up to 128 meV. We analyze our results in terms of a Moriya-Lonzarich-type spin-fluctuation model and estimate the contribution of the spin fluctuations to the low-temperature heat capacity. In spite of the paramagnon excitations being relatively strong, their relaxation rates are large. This leads to a small contribution to the low-temperature electronic specific heat.

  1. AGN fueling: the observational point of view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations at multiple wavelengths are reviewed to search for evidence for fueling mechanisms in galaxies, both for nuclear starbursts and AGN activity. Although it is undisputed that dynamical perturbations such as bars or tidal interactions accumulate gas in the central regions and sometimes trigger nuclear starbursts, the evidence remains scarce that these are necessary to fuel AGNs. Interpretations in terms of time-scales, feed-back, and black hole evolution are discussed. It is suggested that the AGN phase corresponds to the early-type phases of galaxies.

  2. Observing AAPI Heritage Month | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization FundingObserving

  3. Observations and simulations improve space weather models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access to scienceScientificObservation of a

  4. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancing OpportunitiesDirectNuclearFirst Observation of

  5. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancing OpportunitiesDirectNuclearFirst Observation

  6. Category:Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo Back toFL" TheTheseObservation

  7. Observations and simulations improve space weather models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation of

  8. Form factors in finite volume I: form factor bootstrap and truncated conformal space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pozsgay; G. Takacs

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the volume dependence of matrix elements of local fields to all orders in inverse powers of the volume (i.e. only neglecting contributions that decay exponentially with volume). Using the scaling Lee-Yang model and the Ising model in a magnetic field as testing ground, we compare them to matrix elements extracted in finite volume using truncated conformal space approach to exact form factors obtained using the bootstrap method. We obtain solid confirmation for the form factor bootstrap, which is different from all previously available tests in that it is a non-perturbative and direct comparison of exact form factors to multi-particle matrix elements of local operators, computed from the Hamiltonian formulation of the quantum field theory. We also demonstrate that combining form factor bootstrap and truncated conformal space is an effective method for evaluating finite volume form factors in integrable field theories over the whole range in volume.

  9. affecting critical factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    social responsibility implementation: an emphasis on values 5 Factors affecting wild turkey distribution and numbers Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: FACTORS AFFECTING...

  10. Measured and Modeled Humidification Factors of Fresh Smoke Particles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measured and Modeled Humidification Factors of Fresh Smoke Particles From Biomass Burning: Role of Inorganic Constituents. Measured and Modeled Humidification Factors of Fresh...

  11. annihilation factor analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 Correlated Bayesian Factor Analysis CiteSeer Summary: Factor analysis is a method in multivariate statistical analysis that can help scientists determine which variables to...

  12. Technology and Organizational Factors in the Notebook Industry Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, William; Cheng, Zhang; Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical and Organizational Solutions to Supply Chain18 III. Organizational Factors and the Notebook Industry4: Technology and Organizational Factors in the Notebook

  13. Current advances in using neurotrophic factors to treat neurodegenerative disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissmiller, April M; Wu, Chengbiao

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neurotrophic factors to treat neurodegenerative disorders.neurotrophic factors to treat neurodegenerative disordersCNS diseases are difficult to treat due to the Page 3 of 9

  14. Structure Functions, Form Factors, and Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Wilcox; B. Andersen-Pugh

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results towards the calculation of the pion electric form factor and structure function on a $16^3\\times 24$ lattice using charge overlap. By sacrificing Fourier transform information in two directions, it is seen that the longitudinal four point function can be extracted with reasonable error bars at low momentum.

  15. Federal Aviation Administration Human Factors Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    Federal Aviation Administration Human Factors Team Report on: The Interfaces Between Flightcrews Générale de l'Aviation Civile (France), Douglas Aircraft Company, Federal Aviation Administration, European was produced by a team of highly qualified individuals from the FAA and the European Joint Aviation Authorities

  16. Factored Language Models for Statistical Machine Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehn, Philipp

    Factored Language Models for Statistical Machine Translation Amittai E. Axelrod TH E U N I V E R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.4.3 Log-Linear, Phrase-Based Translation Models . . . . . . . . . 11 3 Statistical Language S ITY OF E D I N B U R G H Master of Science by Research Institute for Communicating and Collaborative

  17. Factors Influencing Succession: Lessons from Large, Infrequent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    intense disturbances of large and small extent. Key words: disturbance frequency; disturbance intensityFactors Influencing Succession: Lessons from Large, Infrequent Natural Disturbances Monica G ABSTRACT Disturbance events vary in intensity, size, and fre- quency, but few opportunities exist to study

  18. Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Bjorn

    Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

  19. ASSESSING CAUSAL FACTORS IN INDIVIDUAL ROAD ACCIDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ASSESSING CAUSAL FACTORS IN INDIVIDUAL ROAD ACCIDENTS: COLLECTIVE RESPONSIBILITY IN FREEWAY REAR accident report: Happened on I-94 in downtown Minneapolis Happened during the afternoon peak period Vehicle" is a "condition or event" such that "had the condition or event been prevented...the accident would not occur

  20. VERITAS Observations of the Galactic Center Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to its extraordinarily high concentration of known relativistic particle accelerators such as pulsar wind nebula, supernova remnants, dense molecular cloud regions, and the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*); the center of the Milky Way galaxy has long been an ideal target for high energy (HE, 0.1-100 GeV) and very high energy ( VHE, 50 GeV-50 TeV) gamma-ray emission. Indeed, detections of Sgr A* and other nearby regions of gamma-ray emission have been reported by EGRET and Fermi-LAT in the HE band, as well as CANGAROO, Whipple, HESS, VERITAS, and MAGIC in the VHE band. Here we report on the results of extended observations of the region with VERITAS between 2010-2014. Due to the visibility of the source for VERITAS in the Northern Hemisphere, these observations provide the most sensitive probe of gamma-ray emission above 2 TeV in one of the most complicated and interesting regions of our home galaxy.

  1. METHYL CYANIDE OBSERVATIONS TOWARD MASSIVE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kurtz, S. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Bieging, J. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Araya, E. D. [Physics Department, Western Illinois University, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL 61455 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a survey in the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition toward a sample of massive proto-stellar candidates. The observations were carried out with the 10 m Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, AZ. We detected this molecular line in 9 out of 21 observed sources. In six cases this is the first detection of this transition. We also obtained full beam sampled cross-scans for five sources which show that the lower K-components can be extended on the arcminute angular scale. The higher K-components, however, are always found to be compact with respect to our 36'' beam. A Boltzmann population diagram analysis of the central spectra indicates CH{sub 3}CN column densities of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, and rotational temperatures above 50 K, which confirms these sources as hot molecular cores. Independent fits to line velocity and width for the individual K-components resulted in the detection of an increasing blueshift with increasing line excitation for four sources. Comparison with mid-infrared (mid-IR) images from the SPITZER GLIMPSE/IRAC archive for six sources show that the CH{sub 3}CN emission is generally coincident with a bright mid-IR source. Our data clearly show that the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition is a good probe of the hot molecular gas near massive protostars, and provide the basis for future interferometric studies.

  2. Photometric defocus observations of transiting extrasolar planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinse, Tobias C; Yoon, Jo-Na; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Yong-Gi; Kim, Chun-Hwey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out photometric follow-up observations of bright transiting extrasolar planets using the CbNUOJ 0.6m telescope. We have tested the possibility of obtaining high photometric precision by applying the telescope defocus technique allowing the use of several hundred seconds in exposure time for a single measurement. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of obtaining a root-mean-square scatter of order sub-millimagnitude over several hours for a V $\\sim$ 10 host star typical for transiting planets detected from ground-based survey facilities. We compare our results with transit observations with the telescope operated in in-focus mode. High photometric precision is obtained due to the collection of a larger amount of photons resulting in a higher signal compared to other random and systematic noise sources. Accurate telescope tracking is likely to further contribute to lowering systematic noise by probing the same pixels on the CCD. Furthermore, a longer exposure time helps reducing the eff...

  3. Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Grenoble Observ. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  4. Observing the Multiverse with Cosmic Wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Kleban; Thomas S. Levi; Kris Sigurdson

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current theories of the origin of the Universe, including string theory, predict the existence of a multiverse containing many bubble universes. These bubble universes will generically collide, and collisions with ours produce cosmic wakes that enter our Hubble volume, appear as unusually symmetric disks in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and disturb large scale structure (LSS). There is preliminary observational evidence consistent with one or more of these disturbances on our sky. However, other sources can produce similar features in the CMB temperature map and so additional signals are needed to verify their extra-universal origin. Here we find, for the first time, the detailed three-dimensional shape and CMB temperature and polarization signals of the cosmic wake of a bubble collision in the early universe consistent with current observations. The predicted polarization pattern has distinctive features that when correlated with the corresponding temperature pattern are a unique and striking signal of a bubble collision. These features represent the first verifiable prediction of the multiverse paradigm and might be detected by current experiments such as Planck and future CMB polarization missions. A detection of a bubble collision would confirm the existence of the Multiverse, provide compelling evidence for the string theory landscape, and sharpen our picture of the Universe and its origins.

  5. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

  6. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiCicco-Bloom, E.; Black, I.B. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain.

  7. Dense LU Factorization on Multicore Supercomputer Nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Miller, Phil [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Venkataraman, Ramprasad [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Arya, Anshu [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Jones, Terry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kale, Laxmikant V [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense LU factorization is a prominent benchmark used to rank the performance of supercomputers. Many implementations, including the reference code HPL, use block-cyclic distributions of matrix blocks onto a two-dimensional process grid. The process grid dimensions drive a trade-off between communication and computation and are architecture- and implementation-sensitive. We show how the critical panel factorization steps can be made less communication-bound by overlapping asynchronous collectives for pivot identification and exchange with the computation of rank-k updates. By shifting this trade-off, a modified block-cyclic distribution can beneficially exploit more available parallelism on the critical path, and reduce panel factorization's memory hierarchy contention on now-ubiquitous multi-core architectures. The missed parallelism in traditional block-cyclic distributions arises because active panel factorization, triangular solves, and subsequent broadcasts are spread over single process columns or rows (respectively) of the process grid. Increasing one dimension of the process grid decreases the number of distinct processes in the other dimension. To increase parallelism in both dimensions, periodic 'rotation' is applied to the process grid to recover the row-parallelism lost by a tall process grid. During active panel factorization, rank-1 updates stream through memory with minimal reuse. In a column-major process grid, the performance of this access pattern degrades as too many streaming processors contend for access to memory. A block-cyclic mapping in the more popular row-major order does not encounter this problem, but consequently sacrifices node and network locality in the critical pivoting steps. We introduce 'striding' to vary between the two extremes of row- and column-major process grids. As a test-bed for further mapping experiments, we describe a dense LU implementation that allows a block distribution to be defined as a general function of block to processor. Other mappings can be tested with only small, local changes to the code.

  8. Nucleon and $?$ elastic and transition form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Segovia; Ian C. Cloet; Craig D. Roberts; Sebastian M. Schmidt

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute nucleon and Delta elastic and transition form factors, and compare predictions made using a framework built upon a Faddeev equation kernel and interaction vertices that possess QCD-like momentum dependence with results obtained using a vector-vector contact-interaction. The comparison emphasises that experiment is sensitive to the momentum dependence of the running couplings and masses in the strong interaction sector of the Standard Model and highlights that the key to describing hadron properties is a veracious expression of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in the bound-state problem. Amongst the results we describe, the following are of particular interest: $G_E^p(Q^2)/G_M^p(Q^2)$ possesses a zero at $Q^2=9.5GeV^2$; any change in the interaction which shifts a zero in the proton ratio to larger $Q^2$ relocates a zero in $G_E^n(Q^2)/G_M^n(Q^2)$ to smaller $Q^2$; and there is likely a value of momentum transfer above which $G_E^n>G_E^p$. Regarding the $\\Delta(1232)$-baryon, we find that, inter alia: the electric monopole form factor exhibits a zero; the electric quadrupole form factor is negative, large in magnitude, and sensitive to the nature and strength of correlations in the $\\Delta(1232)$ Faddeev amplitude; and the magnetic octupole form factor is negative so long as rest-frame P- and D-wave correlations are included. In connection with the N-to-Delta transition, the momentum-dependence of the magnetic transition form factor, $G_M^\\ast$, matches that of $G_M^n$ once the momentum transfer is high enough to pierce the meson-cloud; and the electric quadrupole ratio is a keen measure of diquark and orbital angular momentum correlations.

  9. D-Factor: A Quantitative Model of Application Slow-Down in Multi-Resource Shared Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL] [ORNL; Huh, Jae-Seok [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scheduling multiple jobs onto a platform enhances system utilization by sharing resources. The benefits from higher resource utilization include reduced cost to construct, operate, and maintain a system, which often include energy consumption. Maximizing these benefits comes at a price - resource contention among jobs increases job completion time. In this paper, we analyze slow-downs of jobs due to contention for multiple resources in a system; referred to as dilation factor. We observe that multiple-resource contention creates non-linear dilation factors of jobs. From this observation, we establish a general quantitative model for dilation factors of jobs in multi-resource systems. A job is characterized by a vector-valued loading statistics and dilation factors of a job set are given by a quadratic function of their loading vectors. We demonstrate how to systematically characterize a job, maintain the data structure to calculate the dilation factor (loading matrix), and calculate the dilation factor of each job. We validate the accuracy of the model with multiple processes running on a native Linux server, virtualized servers, and with multiple MapReduce workloads co-scheduled in a cluster. Evaluation with measured data shows that the D-factor model has an error margin of less than 16%. We also show that the model can be integrated with an existing on-line scheduler to minimize the makespan of workloads.

  10. Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

  11. Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hänsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

  12. Guidelines for axion identification in astrophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zioutas; Y. Semertzidis; Th. Papaevangelou

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of various celestial phenomena have remained mysterious for conventional astrophysics. Therefore, alternative solutions should be considered, taking into account the involvement of unstable dark-matter particle candidates, such as the celebrated axions or other as yet unforeseen axion-like particles. Their spontaneous and induced decay by the ubiquitous solar magnetic fields can be at the origin of persisting enigmatic X-ray emission, giving rise to a steady and a transient/local solar activity, respectively. The (coherent) conversion of photons into axion(-like) particles in intrinsic magnetic fields may modify the solar axion spectrum. The reversed process can be behind transient (solar) luminosity deficits in the visible. Then, the Sun might be also a strong source of ~eV-axions. Thus, enigmatic observations might be the as yet missing direct signature for axion(-like) particles in earth-bound detectors.

  13. Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novosyadlyj, B; Shtanov, Yu; Zhuk, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

  14. Head Observation Organizer (HObO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Predmore

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Head Observation Organizer, HObO, is a computer program that stores and manages measured ground-water levels. HObO was developed to help ground-water modelers compile, manage, and document water-level data needed to calibrate ground-water models. Well-construction and water-level data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Database (NWIS) easily can be imported into HObO from the NWIS web site (NWISWeb). The water-level data can be flagged to determine which data will be included in the calibration data set. The utility program HObO_NWISWeb was developed to simplify the down loading of well and water-level data from NWISWeb. An ArcGIS NWISWeb Extension was developed to retrieve site information from NWISWeb. A tutorial is presented showing the basic elements of HObO.

  15. Quintom Cosmology: Theoretical implications and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Mohammad R. Setare; Jun-Qing Xia

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the paradigm of quintom cosmology. This scenario is motivated by the observational indications that the equation of state of dark energy across the cosmological constant boundary is mildly favored, although the data are still far from being conclusive. As a theoretical setup we introduce a no-go theorem existing in quintom cosmology, and based on it we discuss the conditions for the equation of state of dark energy realizing the quintom scenario. The simplest quintom model can be achieved by introducing two scalar fields with one being quintessence and the other phantom. Based on the double-field quintom model we perform a detailed analysis of dark energy perturbations and we discuss their effects on current observations. This type of scenarios usually suffer from a manifest problem due to the existence of a ghost degree of freedom, and thus we review various alternative realizations of the quintom paradigm. The developments in particle physics and string theory provide potential clues indicating that a quintom scenario may be obtained from scalar systems with higher derivative terms, as well as from non-scalar systems. Additionally, we construct a quintom realization in the framework of braneworld cosmology, where the cosmic acceleration and the phantom divide crossing result from the combined effects of the field evolution on the brane and the competition between four and five dimensional gravity. Finally, we study the outsets and fates of a universe in quintom cosmology. In a scenario with null energy condition violation one may obtain a bouncing solution at early times and therefore avoid the Big Bang singularity. Furthermore, if this occurs periodically, we obtain a realization of an oscillating universe. Lastly, we comment on several open issues in quintom cosmology and their connection to future investigations.

  16. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF HOTSPOTS IN RADIO LOBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, Michael W.; Murphy, David W.; Livingston, John H.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jones, Dayton L.; Meier, David L.; Lawrence, Charles R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out a systematic search with Spitzer Warm Mission and archival data for infrared emission from the hotspots in radio lobes that have been described by Hardcastle et al. These hotspots have been detected with both radio and X-ray observations, but an observation at an intermediate frequency in the infrared can be critical to distinguish between competing models for particle acceleration and radiation processes in these objects. Between the archival and warm mission data, we report detections of 18 hotspots; the archival data generally include detections at all four IRAC bands, the Warm Mission data only at 3.6 {mu}m. Using a theoretical formalism adopted from Godfrey et al., we fit both archival and warm mission spectral energy distributions (SEDs)-including radio, X-ray, and optical data from Hardcastle as well as the Spitzer data-with a synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the X-rays are produced by Compton scattering of the radio frequency photons by the energetic electrons which radiate them. With one exception, an SSC model requires that the magnetic field be less or much less than the equipartition value which minimizes total energy and has comparable amounts of energy in the magnetic field and in the energetic particles. This conclusion agrees with those of comparable recent studies of hotspots, and with the analysis presented by Hardcastle et al. We also show that the infrared data rule out the simplest synchrotron-only models for the SEDs. We briefly discuss the implications of these results and of alternate interpretations of the data.

  17. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These mitochondrial abnormalities in the unstable clones contributes to oxidative stress.

  18. Beyond position weight matrices: nucleotide correlations in transcription factor binding sites and their description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolini, Marc; Hakim, Vincent

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs), in which each DNA base pair independently contributes to the transcription factor (TF) binding, despite mounting evidence of interdependence between base pairs positions. The recent availability of genome-wide data on TF-bound DNA regions offers the possibility to revisit this question in detail for TF binding {\\em in vivo}. Here, we use available fly and mouse ChIPseq data, and show that the independent model generally does not reproduce the observed statistics of TFBS, generalizing previous observations. We further show that TFBS description and predictability can be systematically improved by taking into account pairwise correlations in the TFBS via the principle of maximum entropy. The resulting pairwise interaction model is formally equivalent to the disordered ...

  19. Gate induced g-factor control and dimensional transition for donors in multi-valley semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajib Rahman; Seung H. Park; Timothy B. Boykin; Gerhard Klimeck; Sven Rogge; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of the g-factors of semiconductor donors on applied electric and magnetic fields is of immense importance in spin based quantum computation and in semiconductor spintronics. The donor g-factor Stark shift is sensitive to the orientation of the electric and magnetic fields and strongly influenced by the band-structure and spin-orbit interactions of the host. Using a multimillion atom tight-binding framework the spin-orbit Stark parameters are computed for donors in multi-valley semiconductors, silicon and germanium. Comparison with limited experimental data shows good agreement for a donor in silicon. Results for gate induced transition from 3D to 2D wave function confinement show that the corresponding g-factor shift in Si is experimentally observable.

  20. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by...

  1. Net Zero Waste - Tools and Technical Support ...and other observations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Net Zero Waste - Tools and Technical Support ...and other observations Net Zero Waste - Tools and Technical Support ...and other observations Presentation at Waste-to-Energy using...

  2. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Abstract: The...

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SKIP Pre-campaign Measurements Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON...

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014)...

  5. No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene. No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice...

  6. If physics is an information science, what is an observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretations of quantum theory have traditionally assumed a "Galilean" observer, a bare "point of view" implemented physically by a quantum system. This paper investigates the consequences of replacing such an informationally-impoverished observer with an observer that satisfies the requirements of classical automata theory, i.e. an observer that encodes sufficient prior information to identify the system being observed and recognize its acceptable states. It shows that with reasonable assumptions about the physical dynamics of information channels, the observations recorded by such an observer will display the typical characteristics predicted by quantum theory, without requiring any specific assumptions about the observer's physical implementation.

  7. Transcription factor-based biosensors for detecting dicarboxylic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Jeffrey; Keasling, Jay

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and compositions for detecting dicarboxylic acids using a transcription factor biosensor.

  8. Nucleon Axial Form Factor from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, K F; Draper, T; Wu, J M; Wilcox, W

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for the isovector axial form factors of the proton from a lattice QCD calculation are presented for both point-split and local currents. They are obtained on a quenched $16^{3} \\times 24$ lattice at $\\beta= 6.0$ with Wilson fermions for a range of quark masses from strange to charm. We determine the finite lattice renormalization for both the local and point-split currents of heavy quarks. Results extrapolated to the chiral limit show that the $q^2$ dependence of the axial form factor agrees reasonably well with experiment. The axial coupling constant $g_A$ calculated for the local and the point-split currents is about 6\\% and 12\\% smaller than the experimental value respectively.

  9. Fermionic greybody factors in dilaton black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahed Abedi; Hessamaddin Arfaei

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the question of emission of fermions in the process of dilaton black hole evolution and its characters for different dilaton coupling constants $\\alpha$ is studied. The main quantity of interest, the greybody factors are calculated both numerically and in analytical approximation. The dependence of rates of evaporation and behaviour on the dilaton coupling constant is analyzed. Having calculated the greybody factors we are able to address the question of the final fate of the dilaton black hole. For that we also need to make dynamical treatment of the solution by considering the backreaction which will show a crucial effect on the final result. We find a transition line in $(Q/M, \\alpha)$ plane that separates the two regimes for the fate of the black hole, decay regime and extremal regime. In the decay regime the black hole completely evaporates, while in the extremal regime the black hole approaches the extremal limit by radiation and becomes stable.

  10. Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Process Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, J. A.

    HUMAN FACTORS ASPECTS OF ADVANCED PRO?CESS CONTROL John A. Shaw Combustion Engineering Taylor Instrument Division Rochester, New York ABSTRACT Energy conservation practices, such as heat recovery and integration, require that many... chemical and related processes use advanced control systems. Many of the more advanced process control strategies and algorithms can cause operator confusion, leading to incorrect operator actions and negating the advantages of the advanced control...

  11. $?$ and $?'$ transition form factors from Padé approximants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sanchez-Puertas; Pere Masjuan

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ a systematic and model-independent method to extract, from space- and time-like data, the $\\eta$ and $\\eta'$ transition form factors (TFFs) obtaining the most precise determination for their low-energy parameters and discuss the $\\Gamma_{\\eta\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma}$ impact on them. Using TFF data alone, we also extract the $\\eta-\\eta'$ mixing parameters, which are compatible to those obtained from more sophisticated and input-demanding procedures.

  12. Measurement of the ??*?? and ??*??' transition form factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Botov, A. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the reactions e?e??e?e??(') in the single-tag mode and measure the ??*??(') transition form factors in the momentum-transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV². The analysis is based on 469 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e?e? center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  13. Scalable tensor factorizations with missing data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morup, Morten (Technical University of Denmark); Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim (Turkish National Research Institute of Electronics and Cryptology); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of missing data is ubiquitous in domains such as biomedical signal processing, network traffic analysis, bibliometrics, social network analysis, chemometrics, computer vision, and communication networks|all domains in which data collection is subject to occasional errors. Moreover, these data sets can be quite large and have more than two axes of variation, e.g., sender, receiver, time. Many applications in those domains aim to capture the underlying latent structure of the data; in other words, they need to factorize data sets with missing entries. If we cannot address the problem of missing data, many important data sets will be discarded or improperly analyzed. Therefore, we need a robust and scalable approach for factorizing multi-way arrays (i.e., tensors) in the presence of missing data. We focus on one of the most well-known tensor factorizations, CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP), and formulate the CP model as a weighted least squares problem that models only the known entries. We develop an algorithm called CP-WOPT (CP Weighted OPTimization) using a first-order optimization approach to solve the weighted least squares problem. Based on extensive numerical experiments, our algorithm is shown to successfully factor tensors with noise and up to 70% missing data. Moreover, our approach is significantly faster than the leading alternative and scales to larger problems. To show the real-world usefulness of CP-WOPT, we illustrate its applicability on a novel EEG (electroencephalogram) application where missing data is frequently encountered due to disconnections of electrodes.

  14. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Puckett

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon characterize the effect of its internal structure on its response to an electromagnetic probe as studied in elastic electronnucleon scattering. These form factors are functions of the squared four-momentum transfer Q2 between the electron and the proton. The two main classes of observables of this reaction are the scattering cross section and polarization asymmetries, both of which are sensitive to the form factors in different ways. When considering large f momentum transfers, double-polarization observables offer superior sensitivity to the electric form factor. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton at high momentum transfer using the recoil polarization technique. A polarized electron beam was scattered from a liquid hydrogen target, transferring polarization to the recoiling protons. These protons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer which was used to reconstruct their kinematics, including their scattering angles and momenta, and the position of the interaction vertex. A proton polarimeter measured the polarization of the recoiling protons by measuring the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of protons scattered in CH2 analyzers. The scattered electron was detected in a large acceptance electromagnetic calorimeter in order to suppress inelastic backgrounds. The measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the scattered proton is directly proportional to the ratio of form factors GpE=GpM. The measurements reported in this thesis took place at Q2 =5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV2, and represent the most accurate measurements of GpE in this Q2 region to date.

  15. Heavy to light baryon transition form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, X. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil] [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil; [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Huang, T. [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China)] [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China); [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Li, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Stech found form factor relations for heavy to light transitions based on two simple dynamical assumptions for a spectator particle. In this paper we generalize his approach to the case of baryons and find that for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} ({ital Q}={ital b} or {ital c}) only one independent form factor remains in the limit {ital m}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{infinity}. Furthermore, combining with the model of Guo and Kroll we determine both of the two form factors for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} in the heavy quark limit. The results are applied to {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} which is not clarified both theoretically and experimentally. It is found that the branching ratio of {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} is of order 10{sup {minus}5}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Scalable tensor factorizations with incomplete data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morup, Morten (Technical University of Denmark); Dunlavy, Daniel M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Acar, Evrim (Information Technologies Institute, Turkey); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of incomplete data - i.e., data with missing or unknown values - in multi-way arrays is ubiquitous in biomedical signal processing, network traffic analysis, bibliometrics, social network analysis, chemometrics, computer vision, communication networks, etc. We consider the problem of how to factorize data sets with missing values with the goal of capturing the underlying latent structure of the data and possibly reconstructing missing values (i.e., tensor completion). We focus on one of the most well-known tensor factorizations that captures multi-linear structure, CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP). In the presence of missing data, CP can be formulated as a weighted least squares problem that models only the known entries. We develop an algorithm called CP-WOPT (CP Weighted OPTimization) that uses a first-order optimization approach to solve the weighted least squares problem. Based on extensive numerical experiments, our algorithm is shown to successfully factorize tensors with noise and up to 99% missing data. A unique aspect of our approach is that it scales to sparse large-scale data, e.g., 1000 x 1000 x 1000 with five million known entries (0.5% dense). We further demonstrate the usefulness of CP-WOPT on two real-world applications: a novel EEG (electroencephalogram) application where missing data is frequently encountered due to disconnections of electrodes and the problem of modeling computer network traffic where data may be absent due to the expense of the data collection process.

  17. Human factors engineers as change agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, B.P.; Harbour, G.L.; Caccamise, D.J.; Francis, L.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes a case study and the lessons learned when a Human Factors Engineering (HFE) Department was enlisted as technical experts but gradually assumed a much larger role as change agents in transforming outdated job practices into streamlined processes that promoted a safety culture. At Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons processing plant in Colorado, a workforce of over 7000 people support or directly operate a myriad of processes that range from laboratory analysis to typical foundry activities, greatly complicated by the presence of fissile, radioactive materials. Safe handling of these materials was governed by detailed discussions contained in Nuclear Material Safety limits (NMSLs). In spite of this rather extensive documentation, operators were committing an unacceptable number of safety infractions. Analysis revealed NMSLs were difficult to comprehend and not practical for use in operational settings. New job performance aids, called Criticality Safety Operating Limits (CSOLs) were developed to solve these problems. However, the solution involved more than applying good human factors principles to this job-aid. Following the classic Lewin Force Field Model of Change, safety infractions made change imperative; the forces operating against it were tradition, and perceived irrelevance of new expertise. Historically, Criticality Engineering dictated safety limits to Operations. In the course of Human Factoring'' the CSOLs, the HFE, through an iterative process, became the team integrator of this development process. Using Quality concepts such as buy-in, empowerment, and ownership, HFE was able to instantiate and receive enthusiastic acceptance of their products.

  18. X-ray Observations of Galaxies: The Importance of Deep High-Resolution Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray observations of galaxies have grown from a curiosity into a full-fledged field of astronomy. These observations provide unique information on black holes, binary stars, and the hot phase of the ISM, which can be used to constrain the chemical evolution of the Universe, and the joint evolution of galaxies and massive black holes. These exciting results are due in large part to the high-resolution capability of {\\it Chandra}. To follow on {\\it Chandra} and push forward this science past the present capabilities, our community must build a high-resolution (sub-arcsecond) large-area (several square meters) X-ray telescope.

  19. Effects of friction factor and slip factor on the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Ketankumar Kantilal

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in dredging operations, chemical plants, power plants, and for handling coal slurries. For higher discharge pressure requirements, centrifugal slurry pumps are operated in series with up to six stages, 800 horsepower on each stage, and discharge pressures...EFFECTS OF FRICTION FACTOR AND SLIP FACTOR ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A CENTRIFUGAL SLURRY PUMP A Thesis by KETANKUMAR KANTILAL SHETH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  20. 3.5. EFFICIENCY FACTORS 63 3.5 Efficiency factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    3.5. EFFICIENCY FACTORS 63 3.5 Efficiency factors For comparison we consider a complete) and the variance of the estimator of x is (x L-x)2 CBD, which is equal to r-1x x2 CBD. Definition The efficiency to a complete-block design with variance 2 CBD and the same replication is x x rx L-x 2 CBD 2 and the efficiency

  1. Fragmenting protostellar disks: properties and observational signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorobyov, Eduard; Dunham, Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we study the gravitational fragmentation of an unstable protostellar disc formed during the collapse of a pre-stellar core with a mass of 1.2 M_sun. The forming fragments span a mass range from about a Jupiter mass to very-low-mass protostars and are located at distances from a few tens to a thousand AU, with a dearth of objects at < 100 AU. We explore the possibility of observational detection of the fragments in discs viewed through the outflow cavity at a distance of 250 pc. We demonstrate that one hour of integration time with the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) is sufficient to detect the fragments with masses as low as 1.5 M_Jup at orbital distances up to 800 AU from the protostar. The ALMA resolution sets the limit on the minimum orbital distance of detectable fragments. For the adopted resolution of our simulated ALMA images of 0.1", the fragments can be detected at distances down to 50 AU. At smaller distances, the fragments usually me...

  2. Nonperturbative QCD corrections to electroweak observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonperturbative QCD corrections are important to many low-energy electroweak observables, for example the muon magnetic moment. However, hadronic corrections also play a significant role at much higher energies due to their impact on the running of standard model parameters, such as the electromagnetic coupling. Currently, these hadronic contributions are accounted for by a combination of experimental measurements and phenomenological modeling but ideally should be calculated from first principles. Recent developments indicate that many of the most important hadronic corrections may be feasibly calculated using lattice QCD methods. To illustrate this, we will examine the lattice computation of the leading-order QCD corrections to the muon magnetic moment, paying particular attention to a recently developed method but also reviewing the results from other calculations. We will then continue with several examples that demonstrate the potential impact of the new approach: the leading-order corrections to the electron and tau magnetic moments, the running of the electromagnetic coupling, and a class of the next-to-leading-order corrections for the muon magnetic moment. Along the way, we will mention applications to the Adler function, the determination of the strong coupling constant and QCD corrections to muonic-hydrogen.

  3. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  4. Oscillations in Beta UMi - Observations with SMEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. J. Tarrant; W. J. Chaplin; Y. Elsworth; S. A. Spreckley; I. R. Stevens

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: From observations of the K4III star Beta UMi we attempt to determine whether oscillations or any other form of variability is present. Methods: A high-quality photometric time series of approximately 1000 days in length obtained from the SMEI instrument on the Coriolis satellite is analysed. Various statistical tests were performed to determine the significance of features seen in the power density spectrum of the light curve. Results: Two oscillations with frequencies 2.44 and 2.92 microhertz have been identified. We interpret these oscillations as consecutive overtones of an acoustic spectrum, implying a large frequency spacing of 0.48 microhertz. Using derived asteroseismic parameters in combination with known astrophysical parameters, we estimate the mass of Beta UMi to be 1.3 +/- 0.3 solar masses. Peaks of the oscillations in the power density spectrum show width, implying that modes are stochastically excited and damped by convection. The mode lifetime is estimated at 18 +/- 9 days.

  5. MAGIC observation of the GRB080430 afterglow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksi?, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Balestra, S; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Britzger, D; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E de Cea; Reyes, R De los; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Godinovic, N; Goebel, F; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hsu, C C; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Strah, N; Struebig, J C; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J; de Ugarte-Postigo, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: Gamma-ray bursts are cosmological sources emitting radiation from the gamma-rays to the radio band. Substantial observational efforts have been devoted to the study of gamma-ray bursts during the prompt phase, i.e. the initial burst of high-energy radiation, and during the long-lasting afterglows. In spite of many successes in interpreting these phenomena, there are still several open key questions about the fundamental emission processes, their energetics and the environment. Aim: Independently of specific gamma-ray burst theoretical recipes, spectra in the GeV/TeV range are predicted to be remarkably simple, being satisfactorily modeled with power-laws, and therefore offer a very valuable tool to probe the extragalactic background light distribution. Furthermore, the simple detection of a component at very-high energies, i.e. at $\\sim 100$\\,GeV, would solve the ambiguity about the importance of various possible emission processes, which provide barely distinguishable scenarios at lower energies. Me...

  6. Observational constraints on Visser's cosmological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves, M. E. S.; Araujo, J. C. N. de; Miranda, O. D.; Wuensche, C. A. [INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais - Divisao de Astrofisica, Av.dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12227-010 SP (Brazil); Carvalho, F. C. [INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais - Divisao de Astrofisica, Av.dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12227-010 SP (Brazil); UERN - Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Mossoro, 59610-210, RN (Brazil); Santos, E. M. [UFRJ - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 21945-970, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theories of gravity for which gravitons can be treated as massive particles have presently been studied as realistic modifications of general relativity, and can be tested with cosmological observations. In this work, we study the ability of a recently proposed theory with massive gravitons, the so-called Visser theory, to explain the measurements of luminosity distance from the Union2 compilation, the most recent Type-Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) data set, adopting the current ratio of the total density of nonrelativistic matter to the critical density ({Omega}{sub m}) as a free parameter. We also combine the SNe Ia data with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. We find that, for the allowed interval of values for {Omega}{sub m}, a model based on Visser's theory can produce an accelerated expansion period without any dark energy component, but the combined analysis (SNe Ia+BAO+CMB) shows that the model is disfavored when compared with the {Lambda}CDM model.

  7. Observation of Bloch oscillations in molecular rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Floß; Andrei Kamalov; Ilya Sh. Averbukh; Philip H. Bucksbaum

    2015-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The periodically kicked quantum rotor is known for non-classical effects such as quantum localisation in angular momentum space or quantum resonances in rotational excitation. These phenomena have been studied in diverse systems mimicking the kicked rotor, such as cold atoms in optical lattices, or coupled photonic structures. Recently, it was predicted that several solid state quantum localisation phenomena - Anderson localisation, Bloch oscillations, and Tamm-Shockley surface states - may manifest themselves in the rotational dynamics of laser-kicked molecules. Here, we report the first observation of rotational Bloch oscillations in a gas of nitrogen molecules kicked by a periodic train of femtosecond laser pulses. A controllable detuning from the quantum resonance creates an effective accelerating potential in angular momentum space, inducing Bloch-like oscillations of the rotational excitation. These oscillations are measured via the temporal modulation of the refractive index of the gas. Our results introduce room-temperature laser-kicked molecules as a new laboratory for studies of localisation phenomena in quantum transport.

  8. Non-observable nature of the nuclear shell structure. Meaning, illustrations and consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Duguet; H. Hergert; J. D. Holt; V. Somà

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of single-nucleon shells constitutes a basic pillar of our understanding of nuclear structure. Effective single-particle energies (ESPEs) introduced by French and Baranger represent the most appropriate tool to relate many-body observables to a single-nucleon shell structure. As briefly discussed in [T. Duguet, G. Hagen, Phys. Rev. C {\\bf 85}, 034330 (2012)], the dependence of ESPEs on one-nucleon transfer probability matrices makes them purely theoretical quantities that "run" with the non-observable resolution scale $\\lambda$ employed in the calculation. Given that ESPEs provide a way to interpret the many-body problem in terms of simpler theoretical ingredients, the goal is to specify the terms, i.e. the exact sense and conditions, in which this interpretation can be conducted meaningfully. State-of-the-art multi-reference in-medium similarity renormalization group and self-consistent Gorkov Green's function many-body calculations are employed to corroborate the formal analysis. This is done by comparing the behavior of several observables and of non-observable ESPEs (and spectroscopic factors) under (quasi) unitary similarity renormalization group transformations of the Hamiltonian parameterized by the resolution scale $\\lambda$. The non-observable nature of the nuclear shell structure, i.e. the fact that it constitutes an intrinsically theoretical object with no counterpart in the empirical world, must be recognized and assimilated. Eventually, practitioners can refer to nuclear shells and spectroscopic factors in their analyses of nuclear phenomena if, and only if, they use consistent structure and reaction theoretical schemes based on a fixed resolution scale they have agreed on prior to performing their analysis and comparisons.

  9. Collider shot setup for Run 2 observations and suggestions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annala, J.; Joshel, B.

    1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This note is intended to provoke discussion on Collider Run II shot setup. We hope this is a start of activities that will converge on a functional description of what is needed for shot setups in Collider Run II. We will draw on observations of the present shot setup to raise questions and make suggestions for the next Collider run. It is assumed that the reader has some familiarity with the Collider operational issues. Shot setup is defined to be the time between the end of a store and the time the Main Control Room declares colliding beams. This is the time between Tevatron clock events SCE and SCB. This definition does not consider the time experiments use to turn on their detectors. This analysis was suggested by David Finley. The operational scenarios for Run II will require higher levels of reliability and speed for shot setup. See Appendix I and II. For example, we estimate that a loss of 3 pb{sup {minus}1}/week (with 8 hour stores) will occur if shot setups take 90 minutes instead of 30 minutes. In other words: If you do 12 shots for one week and accept an added delay of one minute in each shot, you will loose more than 60 nb{sup {minus}1} for that week alone (based on a normal shot setup of 30 minutes). These demands should lead us to be much more pedantic about all the factors that affect shot setups. Shot setup will be viewed as a distinct process that is composed of several inter- dependent `components`: procedures, hardware, controls, and sociology. These components don`t directly align with the different Accelerator Division departments, but are topical groupings of the needed accelerator functions. Defining these components, and categorizing our suggestions within them, are part of the goal of this document. Of course, some suggestions span several of these components.

  10. Many-Body Interactions of Neutrinos with Nuclei - Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Lalakulich; K. Gallmeister; U. Mosel

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The total inclusive cross sections obtained for quasielastic (QE) scattering in the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) are significantly larger than those calculated by all models based on the impulse approximation and using the world average value for the axial mass of $M_A \\approx 1 \\GeV$. This discrepancy has led to various, quite different explanations in terms of increased axial masses, changes in the functional form of the axial form factor, increased vector strength in nuclei, and initial two-particle interactions. This is disconcerting since the neutrino energy reconstruction depends on the reaction mechanism. Purpose: We investigate whether exclusive observables, such as nucleon knock-out, can be used to distinguish between the various proposed reaction mechanisms. We determine the influence of 2p-2h excitations on the energy reconstruction. Method: We use the Giessen Boltzmann--Uehling--Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) model to predict numbers and spectra of knock-out nucleons. The model is extended by incorporating a simple, but realistic treatment of initial 2p-2h excitations. Results: We show numbers and spectra of knock-out nucleons and show their sensitivity to the presence of 2p-2h initial excitations. We also discuss the influence of 2p-2h excitations on the neutrino energy reconstruction. Conclusions: 2p-2h excitations do lead to an increase in the number $n$ of knock-out nucleons for $n \\ge 2$ while only the $n=1$ knock-out remains a clean signal of true QE scattering. The spectra of knock-out nucleons do also change, but their qualitative shape remains as before. In the energy reconstruction 2p-2h interactions lead to a downward shift of the reconstructed energy; this effect of 2p-2h excitations disappears at higher energies because the 2p-2h influence is spread out over a wider energy range.

  11. Reduced Order Dead-Beat Observers for a Bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karafyllis, Iasson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the strong observability property and the reduced-order dead-beat observer design problem for a continuous bioreactor. New relationships between coexistence and strong observability, and checkable sufficient conditions for strong observability, are established for a chemostat with two competing microbial species. Furthermore, the dynamic output feedback stabilization problem is solved for the case of one species.

  12. Observability Criteria and Estimator Design for Stochastic Linear Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    . Alessandri and Coletta [5] proposed a Luenberger observer design methodology for deterministic linear hybrid

  13. FULLY RESOLVED QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE OBSERVED WITH THE SUNRISE/IMAX INSTRUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Schmidt, W.; Berkefeld, T. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de AstronomIa y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: lagg@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

  14. Observable Equivalence between General Relativity and Shape Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Koslowski

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this conceptual paper we construct a local version of Shape Dynamics that is equivalent to General Relativity in the sense that the algebras of Dirac observables weakly coincide. This allows us to identify Shape Dynamics observables with General Relativity observables, whose observables can now be interpreted as particular representative functions of observables of a conformal theory at fixed York time. An application of the observable equivalence of General Relativity and Shape Dynamics is to define the quantization of General Relativity through quantizing Shape Dynamics and using observable equivalence. We investigate this proposal explicitly for gravity in 2+1 dimensions.

  15. A Method for Weak Lensing Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Kaiser; Gordon Squires; Tom Broadhurst

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop and test a method for measuring the gravitational lensing induced distortion of faint background galaxies. We first describe how we locate the galaxies and measure a 2-component `polarisation' or ellipticity statistic $e_\\alpha$ whose expectation value should be proportional to the gravitational shear $\\gamma_\\alpha$. We then show that an anisotropic instrumental psf perturbs the polarisation by $\\delta e_\\alpha = P^s_{\\alpha\\beta} p_\\beta$, where $p_\\alpha$ is a measure of the psf anisotropy and $P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}$ is the `linearised smear polarisability tensor'. By estimating $P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}$ for each object we can determine $p_\\alpha$ from the foreground stars and apply a correction $-P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}p_\\beta$ to the galaxies. We test this procedure using deep high-resolution images from HST which are smeared with an anisotropic psf and then have noise added to simulate ground-based observations. We find that the procedure works very well. A similar analysis yields a linear shear polarisability tensor $P^\\gamma_{\\alpha\\beta}$ which describes the response to a gravitational shear. This calibrates the polarisation-shear relation, but only for galaxies which are well resolved. To empirically calibrate the effect of seeing on the smaller galaxies we artificially stretch HST images to simulate lensing and then degrade them as before. These experiments provide a rigorous and exacting test of the method under realistic conditions. They show that it is possible to remove the effect of instrumental psf anisotropy, and that the method provides an efficient and quantitative measurement of the gravitational shear.

  16. The terminal bulk Lorentz factor of relativistic electron-positron jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Renaud; G. Henri

    1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present numerical simulation of bulk Lorentz factor of relativistic electron-positron jet driven by Compton rocket effect from accretion disc radiation. The plasma is assumed to have a power-law distribution $n_{e}(\\gamma) \\propto \\gamma^{-s}$ whith $1 terminal bulk Lorentz factor in the case of supermassive black holes relevant to AGN and stellar black holes relevant to galactic microquasars. In the latter case, Klein-Nishina cross section effect are more important, and induce terminal bulk Lorentz factor smaller than in the former case. Our result are in good agreement with bulk Lorentz factors observed in galactic sources (GRS1915+105, GROJ1655-40) and extragalactic ones. Differences in scattered radiation and acceleration mechanism efficiency in AGN environment can be responsible for the variety of relativistic motion in those objects. We also take into account the influence of the size of the accretion disc; if the external radius is small enough, the bulk Lorentz factor can be as high as 60.

  17. Collective Electronic Excitations in Multilayer Systems Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a well established and readily available method in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    -standing single-layer graphene for increasing in- plane momentum transfer q along two different crystallographic-calibration) · analysis of E-x maps for graphene edge (adapt calibration method) · tools: Python 3. E-q mapping preparation), measuring different layered systems · Graphene / MoS2 / Graphene (beam-sensitive, combination

  18. Maintain all SAA weekly inspection forms in your laboratory. Forms must be readily available for review. Satellite Accumulation Area -Weekly Inspection Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the corresponding date of the SAA inspection. A. Good Condition - Containers in good condition, properly labeled containment. No Corrective Action Required. B. Missing Labels - Containers not labeled in compliance with SAA storage requirements. Satellite Accumulation Area ­ Waste Storage Requirements Label Requirements: · Waste

  19. Adding the Morrill Act Logo to Your EMail Signature (PCs) 1. Place the logo image on your desktop or somewhere you can readily access it.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Adding the Morrill Act Logo to Your EMail Signature (PCs) 1. Place the logo image on your desktop with the sun over it. Click on this to locate the logo on your computer. 6. Choose the logo and click. Adding the Morrill Act Logo to Your EMail Signature (Macs) 1. Place the logo image on your desktop

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    population. This relation between respiratory diseases and environmental factors about air pollution can help to building an epidemiological hypothesis for this region. So, it...

  1. Prime number generation and factor elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vineet Kumar

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

  2. Lorentz Coherence and the Proton Form Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dipole cutoff behavior for the proton form factor has been and still is one of the major issues in high-energy physics. It is shown that this dipole behavior comes from the coherence between the Lorentz contraction of the proton size and the decreasing wavelength of the incoming photon signal. The contraction rates are the same for both cases. This form of coherence is studied also in the momentum-energy space. The coherence effect in this space can be explained in terms of two overlapping wave functions.

  3. Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values Mass 1 kg = 1000 g = 0.001 metric ton = 2.921 inHg at 0 C Energy 1 J = 1 N·m = 107 ergs = 107 dyne·cm = 2.778×10-7 kW·h 1 J = 0.23901 cal = 0·R 10.73 psia·ft3 lbmol·R 62.36 liter·torr mol·K 0.7302 ft3·atm lbmol·R Temperature Conversions: T

  4. Lorentz Coherence and the Proton Form Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young S. Kim

    2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The dipole cutoff behavior for the proton form factor has been and still is one of the major issues in high-energy physics. It is shown that this dipole behavior comes from the coherence between the Lorentz contraction of the proton size and the decreasing wavelength of the incoming photon signal. The contraction rates are the same for both cases. This form of coherence is studied also in the momentum-energy space. The coherence effect in this space can be explained in terms of two overlapping wave functions.

  5. Factors for design of dips for roadways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCasland, William Richard

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    limit is sub]ect to mot1on which may cause considerable discomfort to be experienced by the oocupants. If a dip is particularly critical, the vehicle may even incur damages. The most important consideration, however, 1s the fact that the driver may... lose control of the vehicle momentarily and be involved in a traffic accident. These three factors indicate the need for all dips in roadways to be nrop- erly designed, whether they are to be temporary or oermanent. The use of dips as speed checks...

  6. Factors for design of dips for roadways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCasland, William Richard

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    limit is sub]ect to mot1on which may cause considerable discomfort to be experienced by the oocupants. If a dip is particularly critical, the vehicle may even incur damages. The most important consideration, however, 1s the fact that the driver may... lose control of the vehicle momentarily and be involved in a traffic accident. These three factors indicate the need for all dips in roadways to be nrop- erly designed, whether they are to be temporary or oermanent. The use of dips as speed checks...

  7. Factors Affecting Auction Market Operating Costs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wootan, Charley V.; McNeely, John G.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors Affecting Auction Market Operating Costs Texas Summary and Conclusions T THE TIME THE DATA for this study were collected A there were 178 livestock auctions operating in Texas; 140 were included in this analysis. They ranyed in size... from just over 5,000 animal units per year to alinost 350,000. It has been sl~own that opera- - tional efficiency, measured in terms of average cost per unit marketed, increases directly with firm size and that efficiency gains were most marked...

  8. Factor CO2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman AerospaceEfficiency Incentives andFVE BS sroFaconFactor

  9. EcoFactor Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport, Maine:EauEcoFactor Inc Jump to:

  10. Observing and modeling Earths energy flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens B.; Schwartz S.

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews, from the authors perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within {+-}2 W m{sup -2}. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute importantly to this adjustment and thus contribute both to uncertainty in estimates of radiative forcing and to uncertainty in the response. Models are indispensable to calculation of the adjustment of the system to a compositional change but are known to be flawed in their representation of clouds. Advances in tracking Earth's energy flows and compositional changes on daily through decadal timescales are shown to provide both a critical and constructive framework for advancing model development and evaluation.

  11. Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k{sub Q} factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k{sub Q} factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Results: Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k{sub Q} factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k{sub Q} factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k{sub Q} factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

  12. Human factors engineering program review model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  13. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voutier, Eric J.-M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  14. Secular Changes in Solar Magnetic Flux Amplification Factor and Prediction of Space Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E. Girish; G. Gopkumar

    2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We could infer a secular decreasing trend in the poloidal to toroidal solar magnetic flux amplification factor ( Af) using geomagnetic observations ( classic and IHV corrected aa indices) during the sunspot cycles 9-23. A similar decreasing trend is also observed for the solar equatorial rotation (W) which imply possibly a decrease in the efficiency of the solar dynamo during the above period. We could show correlated changes of Af and extreme space weather activity variations near earth since the middle of the 19th century. Indirect solar observations ( solar proton fluence estimates) suggests that the distinct enhancements in extreme space weather activity , Af and W found during sunspot cycles 10 to 15 is probably largest of that kind during the past 400 years. We find that the sunspot activity can reach an upper limit (Rweather conditions is most probable to occur during this cycle. Key words: Flux amplification,solar dynamo, space weather, predictions,cycle 24

  15. A Comparison of Polarization Observables in Electron Scattering from the Proton and Deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. D. Milbrath; J. I. McIntyre; C. S. Armstrong; D. H. Barkhuff; W. Bertozzi; D. Dale; G. Dodson; K. A. Dow; M. B. Epstein; M. Farkhondeh; J. M. Finn; S. Gilad; M. K. Jones; K. Joo; J. J. Kelly; S. Kowalski; R. W. Lourie; R. Madey; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; C. Mertz; J. Mitchell; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; L. Qin; P. M. Rutt; A. J. Sarty; D. Tieger; C. Tschalaer; W. Turchinetz; P. E. Ulmer; S. P. Van Verst; G. A. Warren; L. B. Weinstein; R. J. Woo

    1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Recoil proton polarization observables were measured for both the p($\\vec {\\rm e}$,e$^\\prime\\vec{\\rm p}\\,$) and d($\\vec {\\rm e}$,e$^\\prime\\vec{\\rm p}\\,)$n reactions at two values of Q$^2$ using a newly commissioned proton Focal Plane Polarimeter at the M.I.T.-Bates Linear Accelerator Center. The hydrogen and deuterium spin-dependent observables $D_{\\ell\\ell}$ and $D_{{\\ell}t}$, the induced polarization $P_n$ and the form factor ratio $G^p_E/G^p_M$ were measured under identical kinematics. The deuterium and hydrogen results are in good agreement with each other and with the plane-wave impulse approximation (PWIA).

  16. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulated mechanisms of glucosamine incorporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, M.A.; Pledger, W.J. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) treatment of density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells results in increased ({sup 3}H)glucosamine (GlcN) incorporation into cellular material. The enhanced GlcN incorporation is not due to a preferential increase in proteoglycan synthesis as measured by ({sup 35}S)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} incorporation. Approximately 50% of the GlcN incorporated in PDGF or platelet-poor plasma (PPP)-treated cultures enters N-linked glycoproteins. Addition of dolichol-phosphate (dolichol-P), a required intermediate in N-linked glycosylation, did not alter ({sup 3}H)GlcN incorporation in PDGF-treated cells but did increase incorporation in PPP-treated cultures to a level comparable to that observed for PDGF-treated cultures. PDGF-treated cultures contained twofold greater quantities of ({sup 3}H)GlcN dolichol intermediates and lipid-free glycoprotein. Over a 12-h time course 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) activity was similar in cultures treated with PDGF or PPP. Results of these studies reveal that enhanced protein glycosylation in response to PDGF treatment is not the result of a direct effect on HMG CoA reductase.

  17. Factors that influence follow-up after an abnormal mammogram 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copeland, Valerie Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this study was to explore women’s experiences with follow-up after an abnormal mammogram, and factors that influence follow-up. Factors, including health status, found in the cancer screening and treatment ...

  18. analyzing sociodemographic factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 He(e; e 0 n)scattering J, Arizona, USA k Dept. of Physics, University of Zagreb, Croatia Abstract The charge form factor factor, FinalStateInteraction PACS: 21.45.+v,...

  19. affect postprandial factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may influence the decision Cheng, Yvonne 2011-01-01 3 Factors affecting wild turkey distribution and numbers Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: FACTORS AFFECTING...

  20. Factors Inhibiting Personal Growth When Teaching Academically Diverse Classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenz, B. Keith; Melvin, Jeff; Kissam, Brenda; Bulgren, Janis; Roth, Janet

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study seeks to identify the factors that inhibit personal growth in teaching as teachers work to meet the needs of all students in academically diverse groups of learners. To identify these factors, researchers worked ...

  1. Dispersion modeling for prediction of emission factors for cattle feedyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parnell, Sarah Elizabeth

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of state air pollution regulatory agencies will require accurate EPA AP-42 emission factors. A protocol was developed so that accurate emission factors can be determined using both source sampling data and dispersion modeling. In this study, an emission...

  2. EVALUATING NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY: PERFORMANCE MEASURES AND INFLUENTIAL FACTORS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development, industrial structure, energy prices, environmental governance, pollution abatement and control, environmental governance, and energy prices are major influential factors, with energy prices the most important components factor analysis to help build subindices measuring waste and pollution, sustainable energy

  3. CONSTRAINING THE BULK LORENTZ FACTOR OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OUTFLOW IN THE MAGNETIC-DOMINATED JET MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Zhe; Lin Hainan; Jiang Yunguo, E-mail: changz@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: linhn@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: jiangyg@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049 Beijing (China)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations by the Fermi-LAT showed that there are delayed arrivals of GeV photons relative to the onset of MeV photons in some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to avoid a large optical depth, the minimal value of the Lorentz factor has been estimated to be higher than 1000 in some of the brightest bursts. In this paper, we present a detailed calculation of the time delay between the MeV and GeV photons in the framework of the magnetic-dominated jet model. We find that the time delay strongly depends on the saturated bulk Lorentz factor of the jet. Inspired by this fact, we use this model to calculate the Lorentz factors of the four brightest Fermi bursts. The results indicate that the Lorentz factors are much smaller than those obtained from the 'single-zone' scenario. The short burst GRB 090510 has a minimal Lorentz factor of 385, while the three long bursts, GRB 080916c, GRB 090902b, and GRB 090926, have almost the same Lorentz factors with an average value near 260. Another interesting result is that, for long bursts, GeV photons are emitted after the bulk Lorentz factor saturates. For the short GRB, however, MeV and GeV photons are emitted at the same phase, i.e., either in the expansion phase or in the coasting phase.

  4. Optimization of the transmission of observable expectation values and observable statistics in Continuous Variable Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Albano Farias; J. Stephany

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the statistics of observables in continuous variable quantum teleportation in the formalism of the characteristic function. We derive expressions for average values of output state observables in particular cumulants which are additive in terms of the input state and the resource of teleportation. Working with Squeezed Bell-like states, which may be optimized in a free parameter for better teleportation performance we discuss the relation between resources optimal for fidelity and for different observable averages. We obtain the values of the free parameter which optimize the central momenta and cumulants up to fourth order. For the cumulants the distortion between in and out states due to teleportation depends only on the resource. We obtain optimal parameters for the second and fourth order cumulants which do not depend on the squeezing of the resource. The second order central momenta which is equal to the second order cumulants and the photon number average are optimized by the same resource. We show that the optimal fidelity resource, found in reference (Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 76}, 022301 (2007)) to depend also on the characteristics of input, tends for high squeezing to the resource which optimizes the second order momenta. A similar behavior is obtained for the resource which optimizes the photon statistics which is treated here using the sum of the squared differences in photon probabilities of input and output states as the distortion measure. This is interpreted to mean that the distortions associated to second order momenta dominates the behavior of the output state for large squeezing of the resource. Optimal fidelity and optimal photon statistics resources are compared and is shown that for mixtures of Fock states they are equivalent.

  5. PoGOLite -The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer CECILIA MARINI BETTOLO Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2008 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer Cecilia Marini Bettolo

  6. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning and desert dust observations from GOME and SCIAMACHY · Conclusions and Outlook #12; · Absorbing Aerosol

  7. Real-time Coastal Observation Network (ReCON)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research. Deploy observations systems on portable, low cost buoys and fixed platforms of opportunity systems. The project will establish a test bed for observing system network design studies and develop

  8. The edge observed : island landscape for a marine biology facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringer, Geraldine A

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the concept of edges through observation and design. The intent of the observation/design is to understand and to illustrate possibilities for design that will enrich the experience of the built ...

  9. New Blind Signatures Equivalent to Factorization (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pointcheval, David

    New Blind Signatures Equivalent to Factorization (Extended Abstract) David Pointcheval Jacques Stern Abstract In this paper, we present new blind signature schemes based on the factorization problem. They are the first blind sig- nature schemes proved secure relatively to factorization. By security, we mean

  10. REALIZING TWO-FACTOR AUTHENTICATION FOR THE BITCOIN PROTOCOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REALIZING TWO-FACTOR AUTHENTICATION FOR THE BITCOIN PROTOCOL Christopher Mann and Daniel Loebenberger 15 August 2014 Abstract. We show how to realize two-factor authentication for a Bitcoin wal- let a prototypic implementation of a Bitcoin wallet that offers both: two-factor authentication and verification

  11. SUCCESS FACTORS IN INFORMATION SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    SUCCESS FACTORS IN INFORMATION SECURITY IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS Maryam Al-Awadi University This paper will explore and identify success factors related to the implementation of information security was to identify those factors required to ensure successful implementation of information security, particularly

  12. Human Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to present the results of human factors experiments looking at the power system flow animation. IIHuman Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation Douglas A. Wiegmann, Gavin R. Essenberg experimental results associated with human factors aspects of using animation to display electric power system

  13. Observation of Kerr nonlinearity inObservation of Kerr nonlinearity in micromicro--cavities at room temperaturecavities at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    phenomenanonlinear phenomena nn High quality factorHigh quality factor (Q)(Q) and smalland small mode volumesmode 2 2 xC Vn n QQP P P eff pumpeff pump total probepump probe probe = sfthermal µ 52/1 == s n R DD

  14. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  15. ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF TWO FLARE LOOPS OBSERVED BY AIA AND EIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Qiu, J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze and model an M1.0 flare observed by SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS to investigate how flare loops are heated and evolve subsequently. The flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. The UV 1600 A emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Such behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit and the subsequent response in overlying coronal loops that evolve through different temperatures. Using the method we recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treating them as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, reasonably agree with observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend and their magnitudes are comparable by within a factor of two. Furthermore, we also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different loops with different heating functions as inferred from their footpoint UV emission, combined with their different lengths as measured from imaging observations, give rise to different coronal plasma evolution patterns captured both in the model and in observations.

  16. Effect of linear lumping on controllability and observability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tóth, János

    Effect of linear lumping on controllability and observability Zs´ofia Horv´ath October 2006 Email to reduce the number of state variables on controllability and observability of linear differential the effect of linear lumping on such properties of the system as controllability and observability and apply

  17. Navigation System for Ground Vehicles using Temporally Interconnected Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    navigation technique for an automotive vehicle. This method involves several observers, each designed for a particular type of trajectory, that are turned on and off according to a switching policy. Each observer of observer design of vehicular systems. A typical example of such practices1 is found in the navigation

  18. Spectral learning of linear dynamics from generalised-linear observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a non-linear and non-Gaussian observation process. We use this approach to obtain estimates to the generalised-linear regression model [8]), where the expected value of an observation is given by a monotonicSpectral learning of linear dynamics from generalised-linear observations with application

  19. AN ALTERNATIVE OBSERVER FOR ZERO DEFICIENCY CHEMICAL NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaves, Madalena

    for detectability, and went on to explicitly construct a full-state observer that is guaranteed to converge 1 Email by a construction di#11;erent from the one employed in a previous paper. The new observer exhibits slower (Sontag, 2001) for background material on stability), which dealt with the construction of observers

  20. Factors affecting the lipase activity of milk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tallamy, Paul Thomas

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    skimmilk as the enzyme source and pasteurized homogenized cream as the substrate during a study of milk lipase. The milk lipase was activated between a pH range of 5. 2 and 9. 8. 11 The optima of the lipase system under study varied... with the concentration of milk fat in the reaction mixture. Using high concentrations of milk fat (16%), optima were observed at pH 8. 5, 6. 5 ? 7. 0, and 7. 9. At relatively low substrate concentration (0. 92)() a broad pH optimum between 7. 0 and 8. 0 was recorded...

  1. Observations of the pulsation of the Cepheid l Car with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Davis; A. P. Jacob; J. G. Robertson; M. J. Ireland; J. R. North; W. J. Tango; P. G. Tuthill

    2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the southern Cepheid l Car to yield the mean angular diameter and angular pulsation amplitude have been made with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) at a wavelength of 696 nm. The resulting mean limb-darkened angular diameter is 2.990+-0.017 mas (i.e. +-0.6 per cent) with a maximum-to-minimum amplitude of 0.560+-0.018 mas corresponding to 18.7+-0.6 per cent in the mean stellar diameter. Careful attention has been paid to uncertainties, including those in measurements, in the adopted calibrator angular diameters, in the projected values of visibility squared at zero baseline, and to systematic effects. No evidence was found for a circumstellar envelope at 696 nm. The interferometric results have been combined with radial displacements of the stellar atmosphere derived from selected radial velocity data taken from the literature to determine the distance and mean diameter of l Car. The distance is determined to be 525+-26 pc and the mean radius 169+-8R{solar). Comparison with published values for the distance and mean radius show excellent agreement, particularly when a common scaling factor from observed radial velocity to pulsation velocity of the stellar atmosphere (the p-factor) is used.

  2. Observations of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamaru, S., E-mail: shingo.tamaru@aist.go.jp; Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Konoto, M.; Nozaki, T.; Fukushima, A.; Imamura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Arai, H.; Tsunegi, S.; Yuasa, S. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance were performed on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and in-plane magnetized reference layer (abbreviated as PMF-STO in the following) for the purpose of obtaining magnetic properties in the PMF-STO structure. The measured spectra clearly showed a large main peak and multiple smaller peaks on the high frequency side. A Lorentzian fit on the main peak yielded Gilbert damping factor of 0.0041. The observed peaks moved in proportion to the out-of-plane bias field. From the slope of the main peak frequency as a function of the bias field, Lande g factor was estimated to be about 2.13. The mode intervals showed a clear dependence on the diameter of the PMF-STOs, i.e., intervals are larger for a smaller diameter. These results suggest that the observed peaks should correspond to eigenmodes of lateral spin wave resonance in the perpendicularly magnetized free layer.

  3. X-ray/UV Observing Campaign on the Mrk 279 AGN Outflow: A Global Fitting Analysis of the UV Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack R. Gabel; Nahum Arav; Jelle S. Kaastra; Gerard A. Kriss; Ehud Behar; Elisa Costantini; C. Martin Gaskell; Kirk T. Korista; Ari Laor; Frits Paerels; Daniel Proga; Jessica Kim Quijano; Masao Sako; Jennifer E. Scott; Katrien C. Steenbrugge

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the intrinsic UV absorption in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 279 based on simultaneous long observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (41 ks) and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (91 ks). To extract the line-of-sight covering factors and ionic column densities, we separately fit two groups of absorption lines: the Lyman series and the CNO lithium-like doublets. For the CNO doublets we assume that all three ions share the same covering factors. The fitting method applied here overcomes some limitations of the traditional method using individual doublet pairs; it allows for the treatment of more complex, physically realistic scenarios for the absorption-emission geometry and eliminates systematic errors that we show are introduced by spectral noise. We derive velocity-dependent solutions based on two models of geometrical covering -- a single covering factor for all background emission sources, and separate covering factors for the continuum and emission lines. Although both models give good statistical fits to the observed absorption, we favor the model with two covering factors because: (a) the best-fit covering factors for both emission sources are similar for the independent Lyman series and CNO doublet fits; (b) the fits are consistent with full coverage of the continuum source and partial coverage of the emission lines by the absorbers, as expected from the relative sizes of the nuclear emission components; and (c) it provides a natural explanation for variability in the Ly$\\alpha$ absorption detected in an earlier epoch. We also explore physical and geometrical constraints on the outflow from these results.

  4. Partial and Complete Observables for Canonical General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dittrich

    2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we will consider the concepts of partial and complete observables for canonical general relativity. These concepts provide a method to calculate Dirac observables. The central result of this work is that one can compute Dirac observables for general relativity by dealing with just one constraint. For this we have to introduce spatial diffeomorphism invariant Hamiltonian constraints. It will turn out that these can be made to be Abelian. Furthermore the methods outlined here provide a connection between observables in the space--time picture, i.e. quantities invariant under space--time diffeomorphisms, and Dirac observables in the canonical picture.

  5. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  6. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  7. Kalman filter data assimilation: Targeting observations and parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellsky, Thomas, E-mail: bellskyt@asu.edu; Kostelich, Eric J.; Mahalov, Alex [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)] [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the effect of targeted observations on state and parameter estimates determined with Kalman filter data assimilation (DA) techniques. We first provide an analytical result demonstrating that targeting observations within the Kalman filter for a linear model can significantly reduce state estimation error as opposed to fixed or randomly located observations. We next conduct observing system simulation experiments for a chaotic model of meteorological interest, where we demonstrate that the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) with targeted observations based on largest ensemble variance is skillful in providing more accurate state estimates than the LETKF with randomly located observations. Additionally, we find that a hybrid ensemble Kalman filter parameter estimation method accurately updates model parameters within the targeted observation context to further improve state estimation.

  8. Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.

  9. Fractionation studies on the unidentified growth factor(s) in distillers dried solubles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannenburg, Warren Nathaniel

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ried solubles oan be preoipitate4 froa volu- tion with baaio lea4 acetate and tuagstic aoid, but SA ethyl alcohol does not precipitate the factor, In these axperiaents, vitaain Si~ was not found to be i4entioal with the factor extracted bg netlg... t iii Jrieil; ue j ~ out llut in vrrr un ll , ri, ', I'ei l' . r. vii. , t . . ' CJ, cuti et Jl ~ ( r r) u, , rr li- . . I t I'J urrr sa . r 166 ur. . lxrli J . . eal in a gui'll'ieu rrrtlun arrJ u ucrV6J t. rt 1 i:: re, uri 6 Obt Jiired, rit. r C...

  10. Chemical factors that control lignin polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangha, Amandeep K [ORNL] [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL] [ORNL; Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin is a complex, branched polymer that reinforces plant tissue. Understanding the factors that govern lignin structure is of central importance to the development of technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into fuels because lignin imparts resistance to chemical, enzymatic and mechanical deconstruction. Lignin is formed by enzymatic oxidation of phenolic monomers (monolignols) of three main types, guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S) and p- hydroxyphenyl (H). It is known that increasing the relative abundance of H subunits results in lower molecular-weight lignin polymers, and hence more easily deconstructed biomass, but it is not known why. Here, we report an analysis of frontier molecular orbitals in mono-, di- and trilignols, calculated using density functional theory, which points to a requirement of strong p- electron density on the reacting phenolic oxygen atom of the neutral precursor for enzymatic oxidation to occur. This model is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism and for the first time explains why H subunits in certain linkages ( - or -5) react poorly and tend to cap the polymer. In general, -5 linkages with either a G or H terminus are predicted to inhibit elongation. More broadly, the model correctly accounts for the reactivity of the phenolic groups in a diverse set of dilignols comprising H and G subunits. Thus, we provide a coherent framework for understanding the propensity toward growth or termination of different terminal subunits in lignin.

  11. A review of electrochromic window performance factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Rubin, M.; Lee, E.S.; Sullivan, R.; Finlayson, E.; Hopkins, D.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance factors which will influence the market acceptance of electrochromic windows are reviewed. A set of data representing the optical properties of existing and foreseeable electrochromic window devices was generated. The issue of reflective versus absorbing electrochromics was explored. This data was used in the DOE 2.1 building energy model to calculate the expected energy savings compared to conventional glazings. The effects of several different control strategies were tested. Significant energy and peak electric demand benefits were obtained for some electrochromic types. Use of predictive control algorithms to optimize cooling control may result in greater energy savings. Initial economic results considering annual savings, cooling equipment cost savings, and electrochromic window costs are presented. Calculations of thermal and visual comfort show additional benefits from electrochromics but more work is needed to quantify their importance. The design freedom and aesthetic possibilities of these dynamic glazings should provide additional market benefits, but their impact is difficult to assess at this time. Ultimately, a full assessment of the market viability of electrochromics must consider the impacts of all of these issues.

  12. Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R. (BNL); Xing, J.; DAgostino, A. (NRC)

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

  13. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  14. Boltzmann brains and the scale-factor cutoff measure of the multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Simone, Andrea; Guth, Alan H. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Linde, Andrei [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yukawa Institute of Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Noorbala, Mahdiyar [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Salem, Michael P.; Vilenkin, Alexander [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To make predictions for an eternally inflating 'multiverse', one must adopt a procedure for regulating its divergent spacetime volume. Recently, a new test of such spacetime measures has emerged: normal observers - who evolve in pocket universes cooling from hot big bang conditions - must not be vastly outnumbered by 'Boltzmann brains' - freak observers that pop in and out of existence as a result of rare quantum fluctuations. If the Boltzmann brains prevail, then a randomly chosen observer would be overwhelmingly likely to be surrounded by an empty world, where all but vacuum energy has redshifted away, rather than the rich structure that we observe. Using the scale-factor cutoff measure, we calculate the ratio of Boltzmann brains to normal observers. We find the ratio to be finite, and give an expression for it in terms of Boltzmann brain nucleation rates and vacuum decay rates. We discuss the conditions that these rates must obey for the ratio to be acceptable, and we discuss estimates of the rates under a variety of assumptions.

  15. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

  16. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early-embryonic transcriptional regulation, and a significant proportion may be nonfunctional. Surprisingly, for five of the six factors, their recognition sites are not unambiguously more constrained evolutionarily than the immediate flanking DNA, even in more highly bound and presumably functional regions, indicating that comparative DNA sequence analysis is limited in its ability to identify functional transcription factor targets.

  17. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 97, No. 4, pp. 13341345, August 2007, doi: 10.1785/0120060148 Propagating Waves in the Steel, Moment-Frame Factor Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    University of California, Los Angeles, Factor building. Waveform data from the 72-channel array in the 17-dimensional model of the Factor building has been developed based on structural drawings. Observed displacements base. The impulse response functions were then stacked to bring out wave-propagation effects more

  18. HST Observations and Photoionization Modeling of the LINER Galaxy NGC 1052

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Gabel; F. C. Bruhweiler; D. M. Crenshaw; S. B. Kraemer; C. L. Miskey

    2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of available Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectroscopic and imaging observations of the low ionization nuclear emission line region (LINER) galaxy NGC 1052. The WFPC2 imagery clearly differentiates extended nebular Halpha emission from that of the compact core. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) observations provide a full set of optical and UV data (1200-6800 Angstroms). These spectral data sample the innermost region (0."86 x 0."86 ~ 82pc x 82pc) and exclude the extended Halpha emission seen in the WFPC2 image. The derived emission line fluxes allow a detailed analysis of the physical conditions within the nucleus. The measured flux ratio for Halpha/Hbeta, F{Halpha}/F{Hbeta}=4.53, indicates substantial intrinsic reddening, E(B-V)=0.42, for the nuclear nebular emission. This is the first finding of a large extinction of the nuclear emission line fluxes in NGC 1052. If the central ionizing continuum is assumed to be attenuated by a comparable amount, then the emission line fluxes can be reproduced well by a simple photoionization model using a central power law continuum source with a spectral index of alpha = -1.2 as deduced from the observed flux distribution. A multi-density, dusty gas gives the best fit to the observed emission line spectrum. Our calculations show that the small contribution from a highly ionized gas observed in NGC 1052 can also be reproduced solely by photoionization modeling. The high gas covering factor determined from our model is consistent with the assumption that our line of sight to the central engine is obscured.

  19. 86, 43, and 22 GHz VLBI Observations of 3C120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose-Luis Gomez; Alan P. Marscher; Antonio Alberdi

    1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first 86 GHz VLBI observations of the radio galaxy 3C~120, together with contemporaneous 43 and 22 GHz polarimetric VLBA observations. The very high angular resolution obtained at 86 GHz provides an upper limit to the size of the core of 54 $\\mu$as (0.025 $h^{-1}$pc). This represents a direct determination of the base of the jet which is independent of variability arguments (which depend on uncertain estimates of the Doppler factor), and places it below approximately one light-month. Comparison with previous VLBA observations after a one-year interval shows pronounced changes in the structure and polarization of the jet. Most of the components are found to follow a curved path while undergoing a steepening of their spectra accompanied by a decrease in total and polarized emission. However, at least one component is observed to follow a quasi-ballistic motion, accompanied by a flattening of its spectrum, as well as an increase in total and polarized flux. This may be explained by its interaction with the external medium, resulting in a shock that enhances the emission and aligns the magnetic field perpendicular to the component motion, thereby producing an increase of the degree of polarization from undetected values to as high as 15%. A second strong component, with the highest degree of polarization (23%), is found to have experienced a displacement from the ridge line of the structural position angle of the jet as it moved downstream. We have found a mean swing to the south of the position angle of the innermost components of $\\sim 6^{\\circ}$ between late 1996 and 1997, which may be responsible for the jet curvature observed at parsec and kiloparsec scales.

  20. Intrinsic Absorption in the Spectrum of Mrk 279: Simultaneous Chandra, FUSE, and STIS Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennifer E. Scott; Gerard A. Kriss; Julia C. Lee; Nahum Arav; Patrick Ogle; Kenneth Roraback; Kimberly Weaver; Tal Alexander; Michael Brotherton; Richard F. Green; John Hutchings; Mary Elizabeth Kaiser; Herman Marshall; William Oegerle; Wei Zheng

    2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the intrinsic X-ray and far-ultraviolet absorption in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy Markarian 279 using simultaneous observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). We also present FUSE observations made at three additional epochs. We detect the Fe K-alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, and its flux is consistent with the low X-ray continuum flux level of Mrk 279 at the time of the observation. Due to low signal-to-noise ratios in the Chandra spectrum, no O VII or O VIII absorption features are observable in the Chandra data, but the UV spectra reveal strong and complex absorption from HI and high-ionization species such as O VI, N V, and C IV, as well as from low-ionization species such as C III, N III, C II, and N II in some velocity components. The far-UV spectral coverage of the FUSE data provides information on high-order Lyman series absorption, which we use to calculate the optical depths and line and continuum covering fractions in the intrinsic HI absorbing gas in a self-consistent fashion. The UV continuum flux of Mrk 279 decreases by a factor of ~7.5 over the time spanning these observations and we discuss the implications of the response of the absorption features to this change. From arguments based on the velocities, profile shapes, covering fractions and variability of the UV absorption, we conclude that some of the absorption components, particularly those showing prominent low-ionization lines, are likely associated with the host galaxy of Mrk 279, and possibly with its interaction with a close companion galaxy, while the remainder arises in a nuclear outflow.

  1. Gamma-Ray Emission in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres: From Theory to Fermi Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantinos Kalapotharakos; Alice K. Harding; Demosthenes Kazanas

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the patterns of $\\gamma$-ray emission due to curvature radiation in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. Our ultimate goal is to construct macrophysical models that are able to reproduce the observed $\\gamma$-ray light-curve phenomenology recently published in the Second Fermi Pulsar Catalog. We apply specific forms of Ohm's law on the open field lines using a broad range for the macroscopic conductivity values that result in solutions ranging, from near-vacuum to near Force-Free. Using these solutions, we generate model $\\gamma$-ray light curves by calculating realistic trajectories and Lorentz factors of radiating particles, under the influence of both the accelerating electric fields and curvature radiation-reaction. We further constrain our models using the observed dependence of the phase-lags between the radio and $\\gamma$-ray emission on the $\\gamma$-ray peak-separation. We perform a statistical comparison of our model radio-lag vs peak-separation diagram and the one obtained for the Fermi standard pulsars. We find that for models of uniform conductivity over the entire open magnetic field line region, agreement with observations favors higher values of this parameter. We find, however, significant improvement in fitting the data with models that employ a hybrid form of conductivity; specifically, infinite conductivity interior to the light-cylinder and high but finite conductivity on the outside. In these models the $\\gamma$-ray emission is produced in regions near the equatorial current sheet but modulated by the local physical properties. These models have radio-lags near the observed values and statistically best reproduce the observed light-curve phenomenology. Additionally, these models produce GeV photon cut-off energies.

  2. NS&T Managment Observations - 1st Quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gianotto

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  3. Lightlike simultaneity, comoving observers and distances in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. J. Bolós

    2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We state a condition for an observer to be comoving with another observer in general relativity, based on the concept of lightlike simultaneity. Taking into account this condition, we study relative velocities, Doppler effect and light aberration. We obtain that comoving observers observe the same light ray with the same frequency and direction, and so gravitational redshift effect is a particular case of Doppler effect. We also define a distance between an observer and the events that it observes, that coincides with the known affine distance. We show that affine distance is a particular case of radar distance in the Minkowski space-time and generalizes the proper radial distance in the Schwarzschild space-time. Finally, we show that affine distance gives us a new concept of distance in Robertson-Walker space-times, according to Hubble law.

  4. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  5. Factors influencing methane distribution in Texas ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, C.; Grossman, E.L.; Ammerman, J.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine the factors that influence the distribution of methane in Texas ground water, water samples were collected from 40 wells in east-central and central Texas aquifers. Among the chemical parameters examined, sulfate is most important in controlling methane distribution. Methane occurs in high concentration in east-central Texas only where sulfate concentration is low, supporting the hypothesis that abundant microbial methane production does not begin until sulfate is depleted. Because water samples from central Texas are high in either oxygen or sulfate, methane concentrations are low in these waters. A positive correlation between methane and sulfate in these waters indicates a different, perhaps thermogenic, origin for the trace methane. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of dissolved methane ranged from {minus}80{per_thousand} to {minus}21{per_thousand} in east-central Texas and {minus}41.2{per_thousand} to {minus}8.5{per_thousand} in central Texas. Low values of < {minus}50{per_thousand} in the east-central Texas ground water indicate a microbial origin for methane and are consistent with the observed sulfate-methane relationship; high {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of > {minus}31{per_thousand} likely result from bacterial methane oxidation. Similarly, methane with high {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios in central Texas may reflect partial oxidation of the methane pool. Overall, water samples from both regions show a positive correlation between sulfate concentration and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of methane, suggesting that methane oxidation may be associated with sulfate reduction in Texas ground water.

  6. Factors Affecting Prostate Volume Estimation in Computed Tomography Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Cheng-Hsiu [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shyh-Jen [Divisions of Experimental Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Alex Tong-Long [Divisions of Urology, Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chao-An, E-mail: calin@pme.nthu.edu.t [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to investigate how apex-localizing methods and the computed tomography (CT) slice thickness affected the CT-based prostate volume estimation. Twenty-eight volunteers underwent evaluations of prostate volume by CT, where the contour segmentations were performed by three observers. The bottom of ischial tuberosities (ITs) and the bulb of the penis were used as reference positions to locate the apex, and the distances to the apex were recorded as 1.3 and 2.0 cm, respectively. Interobserver variations to locate ITs and the bulb of the penis were, on average, 0.10 cm (range 0.03-0.38 cm) and 0.30 cm (range 0.00-0.98 cm), respectively. The range of CT slice thickness varied from 0.08-0.48 cm and was adopted to examine the influence of the variation on volume estimation. The volume deviation from the reference case (0.08 cm), which increases in tandem with the slice thickness, was within {+-} 3 cm{sup 3}, regardless of the adopted apex-locating reference positions. In addition, the maximum error of apex identification was 1.5 times of slice thickness. Finally, based on the precise CT films and the methods of apex identification, there were strong positive correlation coefficients for the estimated prostate volume by CT and the transabdominal ultrasonography, as found in the present study (r > 0.87; p < 0.0001), and this was confirmed by Bland-Altman analysis. These results will help to identify factors that affect prostate volume calculation and to contribute to the improved estimation of the prostate volume based on CT images.

  7. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  8. In Situ Observation of the Electrochemical Lithiation of a Single...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (TEM) observations of the structural evolution and phase transformation of lithium-ion battery anode during the battery charging process. A nanobattery consisting of a single...

  9. ORNL researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observation of atoms moving inside bulk material Selected frames from a sequence of scanning transmission electron microscope images showing the diffusion pathway of a Ce dopant...

  10. Observation of green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles. Observation of green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles. Abstract: Green emission at around 500...

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear...

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear...

  13. Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiss, Jessica M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 12 sequential images sam- pled at 7.5Hz. Observations 2,distributions of six sam- ple image sequences selected from

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    half imported from the ocean by Northeasterly trade winds. Climate models predict a drying in the Amazon with reduced carbon uptake while observationally guided assessments...

  15. ISSN 18458319 COMMON SPHINX AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrozek, Tomasz

    with a use of the BESSY synchrotron. In space observations were made in the range 1.2-15 keV with 480 e

  16. AAO support observations for the Hubble Deep Field Sout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Boyle

    1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present proposed ground-based support observations at the AAO for the forthcoming Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) campaign.

  17. agile grb observations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the XRT observations, are consistent with the afterglow emission from an interstellar medium (ISM) environment. Bing Zhang; Y. Z. Fan; Jaroslaw Dyks; Shiho Kobayashi; Peter...

  18. The Observers' Paradox: Apparent Computational Complexity in Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollack, Jordan B.

    The Observers' Paradox: Apparent Computational Complexity in Physical Systems John F. Kolen Research Department of Computer and Information Sciences The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 kolen

  19. average observational quantities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposed observationally viable alternative to homogeneous cosmology with smooth dark energy, the timescape cosmology. In the timescape model cosmic acceleration is realized as an...

  20. airborne radar observations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ionospheric modication by high power radio waves Physics Websites Summary: with the Finland component of CUTLASS, and the rst observations of articial irregularities by...

  1. Transport Regulation from Theory to Practice: General Observations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transport Regulation from Theory to Practice: General Observations and a Case Study Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transport Regulation from Theory to...

  2. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  3. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110731A: GeV EMISSION FROM ONSET TO AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)] [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'M. Merlin' dell'Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica 'M. Merlin' dell'Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G. A. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain)] [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caraveo, P. A., E-mail: kocevski@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: johan.bregeon@pi.infn.it, E-mail: srazzaque@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: eleonora.troja@nasa.gov, E-mail: dgruber@mpe.mpg.de [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet {Gamma} {approx} 500-550.

  4. The Relation between Solar Eruption Topologies and Observed Flare Features I: Flare Ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savcheva, A; McKillop, S; McCauley, P; Hanson, E; Su, Y; Werner, E; DeLuca, E E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a topological magnetic field investigation of seven two-ribbon flares in sigmoidal active regions observed with Hinode, STEREO, and SDO. We first derive the 3D coronal magnetic field structure of all regions using marginally unstable 3D coronal magnetic field models created with the flux rope insertion method. The unstable models have been shown to be a good model of the flaring magnetic field configurations. Regions are selected based on their pre-flare configurations along with the appearance and observational coverage of flare ribbons, and the model is constrained using pre-flare features observed in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray passbands. We perform a topology analysis of the models by computing the squashing factor, Q, in order to determine the locations of prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). QSLs from these maps are compared to flare ribbons at their full extents. We show that in all cases the straight segments of the two J-shaped ribbons are matched very well by the flux...

  5. INTEGRAL observations of the field of the BL Lacertae object S5~0716+714

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Pian; L. Foschini; V. Beckmann

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed observations of the blazar S5 0716+714 with INTEGRAL on 2-6 April 2004. In the first months of 2004, the source had increased steadily in optical brightness and had undergone two outbursts. During the latter, occurred in March, it reached the extreme level of R = 12.1 mag, which triggered our INTEGRAL program. The target has been detected with IBIS/ISGRI up to 60 keV, with a flux of ~3 x 10e-11 erg/s/cm2 in the 30-60 keV interval, a factor of ~2 higher than observed by the BeppoSAX PDS in October 2000. In the field of S5 0716+714 we have also detected the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar S5 0836+710 and the two Seyfert galaxies Mkn 3 and Mkn 6. Their IBIS/ISGRI spectra are rather flat, albeit consistent with those measured by BeppoSAX. In the spectrum of Mkn 3 we find some evidence of a break between ~60 and ~100 keV, reminiscent of the high energy cut-offs observed in other Seyfert galaxies. This is the first report of INTEGRAL spectra of weak Active Galactic Nuclei.

  6. Thermoelectric power factor enhancement with gate-all-around silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtin, Benjamin M., E-mail: bcurtin@ece.ucsb.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bowers, John E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoelectric properties of gate-all-around silicon nanowires (Si NWs) are calculated to determine the potential for significant power factor enhancement. The Boltzmann transport equation and relaxation time approximation are employed to develop an electron transport model used to determine the field-effect mobility, electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and power factor for Si NWs with cross-sectional areas between 4?nm?×?4?nm and 12?nm?×?12?nm and a range of gate biases. Electrical conductivity for the gated Si NWs was much higher than that of doped Si due to the lack of ionized impurities and correspondingly greater carrier mobility. A significant increase in electrical conductivity with decreasing Si NW cross-sectional area was also observed due to a large increase in the average carrier density. For all Si NWs, the Seebeck coefficient was lower than that of doped bulk Si due to the different energy dependence between ionized impurity and phonon-mediated scattering processes. This decrease was also confirmed with Seebeck coefficient measurements of multigated Si NWs and n-type Si thin-films. Quantum confinement was also found to increase the Seebeck coefficient for <8?nm?×?8?nm Si NWs and also at high charge densities. A maximum power factor of 6.8?×?10{sup ?3}?W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?2} was calculated for the 6?nm?×?6?nm Si NWs with typical Si/SiO{sub 2} interface roughness, which is 2–3?×?those obtained experimentally for bulk Si. The power factor was also found to greatly depend on surface roughness, with a root-mean-square roughness of <0.8?nm necessary for power factor enhancement. An increase in ZT may also be possible if a low thermal conductivity can be obtained with minimal surface roughness.

  7. Spectrum of local boundary operators from boundary form factor bootstrap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Szots; G. Takacs

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the recently introduced boundary form factor bootstrap equations, we map the complete space of their solutions for the boundary version of the scaling Lee-Yang model and sinh-Gordon theory. We show that the complete space of solutions, graded by the ultraviolet behaviour of the form factors can be brought into correspondence with the spectrum of local boundary operators expected from boundary conformal field theory, which is a major evidence for the correctness of the boundary form factor bootstrap framework.

  8. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from behind-the-limb solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Allafort, Alice

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermi-LAT >30 MeV observations have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. These sample both the impulsive and long duration phases of GOES M and X class flares. Of particular interest is the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources and implications for the particle acceleration mechanisms.

  9. Distribution of {Omega}{sub k} from the scale-factor cutoff measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Simone, Andrea [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Salem, Michael P. [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Our Universe may be contained in one among a diverging number of bubbles that nucleate within an eternally inflating multiverse. A promising measure to regulate the diverging spacetime volume of such a multiverse is the scale-factor cutoff, one feature of which is bubbles are not rewarded for having a longer duration of slow-roll inflation. Thus, depending on the landscape distribution of the number of e-folds of inflation among bubbles like ours, we might hope to measure spatial curvature. We study a recently proposed cartoon model of inflation in the landscape and find a reasonable chance (about 10%) that the curvature in our Universe is well above the value expected from cosmic variance. Anthropic selection does not strongly select for curvature as small as is observed (relative somewhat larger values), meaning the observational bound on curvature can be used to rule out landscape models that typically give too little inflation.

  10. Regions of influence for several methods of factoring polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Tommy Joe

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , or if preferred, over the field of complex numbers be denoted n n-1 f(x) = x + a x + + a x + a n-1 n' Let a factor of the above be (2) III m-1 g(x) x + p x +'''+ p x + p m-1 Ill If an iterative technique is used to find the factor (2) then iteration must... factors of any degree, it is [Sj presented in this section for quadratic factors only, to permit easy comparison with Bairstow's Method. 2 Let f(x) be as in (1), and let g(x) = x + plx + p be any 2 quadratic expression. Then the process of long...

  11. Factors Affecting the Battery Performance of Anthraquinone-based...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Affecting the Battery Performance of Anthraquinone-based Organic Cathode Materials. Factors Affecting the Battery Performance of Anthraquinone-based Organic Cathode Materials....

  12. Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004...

  13. apoptosis inducing factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    independent cathepsins tumor necrosis factor Lasse Foghsgaard; Dorte Wissing; Daniel Mauch; Ulrik Lademann; Lone Bastholm; Marianne Boes; Folmer Elling; Marcel Leist;...

  14. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geothermal, digester and landfill gas, small hydro, andenergy sources, such as landfill gas. Market Factors Theenergy sources, such as landfill gas. Integrated Resource

  15. adp ribosylation factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

  16. anthracis edema factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

  17. anthracis lethal factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

  18. alfa como factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B -> K Jpsi data to extract a set of parameters which give the relevant hadronic matrix elements in terms of factorized amplitudes. Various sources of theoretical uncertainties...

  19. Article Published on LED Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of a comprehensive lifetime rating - as well as the problematic relationship between SSL lifetime and lumen maintenance - determining an appropriate LLD factor for LED products...

  20. Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: interfacial energetics and blend microstructure April 29, 2009 at 3pm36-428 Jenny Nelson...

  1. Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Geothermal Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Analysis Of Factors Affecting Natural Source Slf Electromagnetic...

  2. Billing Factors for Operating Reserves September 30, 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are effective on October 1, 2014. This implements the FERC approved standard BAL-002-WECC-2. Operating Reserve - Spinning Reserve: The Billing Factor for the rates specified in...

  3. angiogenesis regulatory factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Earnhart, Dietrich H. 2006-03-13 6 Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation Texas A&M University - TxSpace...

  4. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Capacity Factors Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related...

  5. Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation) Re-direct Destination: Fungal free enzymes and bacterial...

  6. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors: Free Space and Medium Modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent developments in the study of electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, both in free space and in the nuclear medium. For the free nucleon case, we discuss the ratio of electric to magnetic proton form factors, and the influence of two-photon exchange on the form factor extraction. For the bound nucleon, we examine the implications of the small but non-zero modification of proton form factors in the nuclear medium suggested by recent data on polarized proton knockout reactions off He-4, and discuss constraints which it could place on models of the nuclear EMC effect.

  7. Impact of different building ventilation modes on occupant expectations of the main IEQ factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungsoo; de Dear, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupants satisfied Bonus Factor Proportional Factor Highthat Basic, Proportional and Bonus Factors have with overallNO Prop. YES Basic YES Bonus NO Prop. NO Prop. Satisfied

  8. Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru Renos Vakis, Elisabeth Sadoulet, and Alain de Janvry October 2003 Abstract Farmers incur proportional and fixed transactions costs these transactions costs. When opportunities exist to sell a crop on alternative markets, the observed choice

  9. Infrared Observations of Soft GammaRay Repeaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ian Andrew

    Infrared Observations of Soft Gamma­Ray Repeaters I. A. Smith Department of Space Physics been found for SGR 0525--66. This paper gives a brief overview of some recent and ongoing infrared observing programs. For a more detailed review article, see Smith (1997) [2]. INFRARED SPECTRA OF SGR 1806

  10. Observations of non-conjugate theta aurora N. stgaard,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Observations of non-conjugate theta aurora N. Østgaard,1 S. B. Mende,1 H. U. Frey,1 L. A. Frank,2 particle measurements we report two events where a theta aurora was observed in one hemisphere for the occurrence of non-conjugate theta aurora. INDEX TERMS: 2475 Ionosphere: Polar cap ionosphere; 2704

  11. Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft F. Nemec,1,2 O. Santoli´k,3 January 2006; published 22 April 2006. [1] Results of a systematic survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation from the electric power systems which are magnetically conjugated with the place of observation

  12. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We report the observation of single top-quark production using 3.2??fb[superscript -1] of pp? collision data with ?s=1.96??TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The significance of the observed data is 5.0 ...

  13. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias climatological surface wind speed probability density functions (PDFs) estimated from observations and use them to evaluate, for the first time, contemporaneous wind PDFs predicted by a GCM. The ob- servations include NASA

  14. Pulsar-Wind Nebulae: Recent Progress in Observations and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Striani, Edoardo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review we describe recent observational and theoretical developments in our understanding of pulsar winds and pulsar-wind nebulae (PWNe). We put special emphasis on the results from observations of well-characterized PWNe of various types (e.g., torus-jet and bowshock-tail), the most recent MHD modeling efforts, and the status of the flaring Crab PWN puzzle.

  15. Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellinek, Mark

    ................................................ 352 4.4.4 Pack Ice Motion................................................... 355 4.5 Changes4 Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground Coordinating Lead Authors: Peter Lemke. Kaser, P. Mote, R.H. Thomas and T. Zhang, 2007: Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground. In

  16. Spin Observables in Reactions with Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Urrego Blanco, Juan Pablo [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with exotic nuclei will provide important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms. We are currently engaged in exploring the use of polarization observables with radioactive ion beams and in the development of a polarized cryogenic target.

  17. adaptive optics observations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adaptive optics observations First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Observations of quasar...

  18. 62 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Observations and infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . · The development of a risk-based asset replacement plan for 2014­15 and beyond was commenced, and an Asset Life-cycle, the Observing System Strategy has been developed and will be supported by an accompanying roadmap monitoring and review of the Bureau's observing systems is undertaken to assess performance and fitness

  19. High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability E.E. Ortiz, M.E. Mauel, D observed in high-beta plasma created in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). We have previously of anisotropic high beta equilibrium · Measuring Electrostatic Fluctuations · Hot Electron Interchange (HEI

  20. What is the reference frame of an accelerated observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -P. Marzlin

    1998-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The general construction of extended refrence frames for noninertial observers in flat space is studied. It is shown that, if the observer moves inertially before and after an arbitrary acceleration and rotation, the region where reference frames can coincide with an inertial system is bounded for final velocities exceeding 0.6 c.

  1. Version 3.0 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    D-33192 Version 3.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Data_04 Data November 5, 2007 Version 3.0 ii Earth Observing System (EOS) Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer Jet Propulsion Laboratory #12;TES Validation Report ­ Version F04_04 Data November 5, 2007 Version 3.0

  2. First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol Reinhard Beer,1 Mark W) and methanol (CH3OH), well above the normal background levels. This is the first time that these molecules have. Citation: Beer, R., et al. (2008), First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

  3. Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building for constraining climate predictions based on observations of past climate change. The first uses large ensembles

  4. Experimental Observation of Femtosecond Electron Beam Microbunching by Inverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Experimental Observation of Femtosecond Electron Beam Micro­bunching by Inverse Free­Electron­Laser scale of ß 2.5 ¯m by an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) accelerator was observed. The optimum Cerenkov accelerator (ICA)[5], inverse free electron laser (IFEL) [6] and plasma laser accelerators [7, 8

  5. Nembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nembhard, Harriet Black

    observations. The Shewhart chart has been well-discussed in the literature and introductory texts on SPC (seeNembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts for Systems with Response Lags Engineering April 2002 Abstract Previously, it has been held that statistical process control (SPC

  6. DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE T.J. Dekker1 , J.V. DePinto1 , S, collaborative, and consensus-based enterprise architecture design process was conducted under the direction that will achieve an integrated, comprehensive, and sustainable observing system enterprise for the Great Lakes

  7. Observability of Stuck-at-Faults with Differential Power Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ,flottes,rouzeyre}@lirmm.fr Abstract In this paper we propose an innovative method to test integrated circuits based on the use of the current consumed by the circuit during net transitions, it does not require observing primary outputs of the circuit and allows the test of hard-to-observe faults. Conversely to Iddq, this technique is not sensible

  8. LWA Station-Level Observing Procedure and Associated Metadata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    ) and declination (DEC). · Solar Tracking (TRK SOL). This is a beam output mode in which the beam tracks the Sun of observation "metadata"; that is, data which is produced by MCS as part of the processes of scheduling and conducting the observation. Metadata is distinct from the primary instrument output, which is captured by MCS

  9. Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

  10. absorption bands observed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption bands observed First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AKARI observations of ice...

  11. Measurement of the Neutron electric form factor at Q2=0.8 2(GeV\\\\c)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Glazier

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleon form factors allow a sensitive test for models of the nucleon. Recent experiments utilising polarisation observables have resulted, for the first time, in a model-independent determination of the neutron electric form factor GnE. This method employed an 80% longitudinally polarised, high intensity (10 uA) electon beam (883 MeV) that was quasi-elastically scattered off a liquid deuterium target in the reaction D (e, en)p. A neutron polarimeter was designed and installed to measure the ratio of transverse-to-longitudinal polarisation using neutron scattering asymmetries. This ratio allowed a determination of the neutron elastic form factor, GnE, free of the previous large systematic uncertainties associated with the deuterium wave function. The experiment took place in the A1 experimental hall at MAMI taking advantage of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer. A detailed investigation was carried out into the performance of the neutron polarimeter.

  12. NS&T Management Observations - 3rd Quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gianotto

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  13. Polarisation Observables in Antiproton Proton to Lepton Antilepton Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Elise [School of Mathematics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic form factors of hadrons as measured both in the space like and time like domains provide fundamental information on the nucleon structure and internal dynamics. General expressions, including the lepton mass, for the spin averaged differential cross section for the annihilation reaction lepton antilepton to proton antiproton are given, as well as general formulae for the single and double spin asymmetries. The time reversed reaction would involve a kinematic factor. We also present general expressions for the helicity amplitudes for this reaction.

  14. Gray, W. D. (2003). Cognitive factors in homeland defense: The role of human factors in the novel intelligence from massive data (NIMD) project, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 1017-1018). Santa Monica, CA: Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Wayne

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intelligence from massive data (NIMD) project, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 1017-1018). Santa Monica, CA: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. COGNITIVE FACTORS IN HOMELAND DEFENSE: THE ROLE

  15. Implementing the Elliptic Curve Method of Factoring in Reconfigurable Hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaj, Krzysztof

    Bachimanchi1 1 Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030-exponential factoring algorithm, with expected run time of O(exp(c log p log log p) M(N)) where c > 0, p is a factor we aim to find, and M(N) denotes the cost of multiplication (mod N). ECM is the best method to perform

  16. FRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE. REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART THREE FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE OF FISHERY PRODUCTS Taking Place During Cold Storage of Fish Section 3 - Protective Coverings for Frozen Fish · · Pages 1

  17. Optimizing Thermoelectric Power Factor by Means of a Potential Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Optimizing Thermoelectric Power Factor by Means of a Potential Barrier Neophytos Neophytou}@iue.tuwien.ac.at Abstract Large efforts in improving thermoelectric energy conversion are devoted to energy filtering design, ~40% improvement in the thermoelectric power factor can be achieved if the following conditions

  18. ON THE GAGE FACTOR FOR OPTICAL FIBER GRATING STRAIN GAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong-Lae

    ON THE GAGE FACTOR FOR OPTICAL FIBER GRATING STRAIN GAGES Richard J. Black1 , David Zare1 , Levy Oblea1 , Yong-Lae Park1 , Behzad Moslehi1 , and Craig Neslen2 1 Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems of grating and fiber types. KEY WORDS: Fiber-Optic Gratings, Fiber-Optic Sensors, Strain Gage Factor 1

  19. Nucleon Form Factors experiments with 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of precision form factor experiments at high momentum transfer will be performed with the 11 GeV electron beam of CEBAF. We review the approved proposals and the conceptual schemes of several new suggestions. Form factor data will serve as a major input for the construction of a tomographic image of the nucleon.

  20. Multi-Factor Energy Price Models Exotic Derivatives Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaimungal, Sebastian

    Multi-Factor Energy Price Models and Exotic Derivatives Pricing by Samuel Hikspoors A thesis of Statistics University of Toronto c Copyright by Samuel Hikspoors 2008 #12;Multi-Factor Energy Price Models and practitioners alike recently started to develop the tools of energy derivatives pricing

  1. Scaling Factor Inconsistencies in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cowell

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half life can be suppressed by 15-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, $$ is overestimated.

  2. Scaling factor inconsistencies in neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half-life can be suppressed by 15%-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, is overestimated.

  3. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include sig- nificant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic

  4. Using computational tools to factor wind into architectural environment design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and an acceptable thermal comfort level, by means of passive cooling or natural ventilation. On the other hand, wind tools to factor wind into architectural environment design," Energy and Buildings, 36, 1197-1209. #121 Using computational tools to factor wind into architectural environment design Qingyan (Yan) Chen

  5. Journal Diffusion Factors a measure of diffusion? Tove Faber Frandsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Journal Diffusion Factors ­ a measure of diffusion? Tove Faber Frandsen Royal School of Library In this paper we show that the measure of diffusion introduced by Ian Rowlands called the Journal Diffusion Factor (JDF) is highly negatively correlated with the number of citations, leading highly cited journals

  6. Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary Computer Science Dept that is predominantly linear algebra · Conclusions A Catalog of Matrix Factorizations c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 or oscillation · understanding Markov chains c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 2 University of Maryland, College Park #12

  7. Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

    2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

  8. SWIFT X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF CLASSICAL NOVAE. II. THE SUPER SOFT SOURCE SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Greg J. [American Astronomical Society, 2000 Florida Avenue, NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20009-1231 (United States); Ness, Jan-Uwe [XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, ESAC, Apartado 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Evans, P. A.; Beardmore, A. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Walter, Frederick M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Andrew Helton, L. [SOFIA Science Center, USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, M.S. N211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Woodward, Charles E. [Minnesota Institute of Astrophysics, 116 Church Street S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bode, Mike [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Starrfield, Sumner [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Drake, Jeremy J., E-mail: Greg.Schwarz@aas.org [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 3, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Swift gamma-ray burst satellite is an excellent facility for studying novae. Its rapid response time and sensitive X-ray detector provides an unparalleled opportunity to investigate the previously poorly sampled evolution of novae in the X-ray regime. This paper presents Swift observations of 52 Galactic/Magellanic Cloud novae. We included the X-Ray Telescope (0.3-10 keV) instrument count rates and the UltraViolet and Optical Telescope (1700-8000 A) filter photometry. Also included in the analysis are the publicly available pointed observations of 10 additional novae the X-ray archives. This is the largest X-ray sample of Galactic/Magellanic Cloud novae yet assembled and consists of 26 novae with Super Soft X-ray emission, 19 from Swift observations. The data set shows that the faster novae have an early hard X-ray phase that is usually missing in slower novae. The Super Soft X-ray phase occurs earlier and does not last as long in fast novae compared to slower novae. All the Swift novae with sufficient observations show that novae are highly variable with rapid variability and different periodicities. In the majority of cases, nuclear burning ceases less than three years after the outburst begins. Previous relationships, such as the nuclear burning duration versus t{sub 2} or the expansion velocity of the eject and nuclear burning duration versus the orbital period, are shown to be poorly correlated with the full sample indicating that additional factors beyond the white dwarf mass and binary separation play important roles in the evolution of a nova outburst. Finally, we confirm two optical phenomena that are correlated with strong, soft X-ray emission which can be used to further increase the efficiency of X-ray campaigns.

  9. Observation of interference between two Bose condensates The spatial coherence of a Bose condensate was demonstrated by observing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observation of interference between two Bose condensates The spatial coherence of a Bose condensate was demonstrated by observing interference between two Bose condensates [1]. They were created by cooling atoms the condensates expand for 40 milliseconds and overlap (see figure). This demonstrates that Bose condensed atoms

  10. Suzaku And Multi-Wavelength Observations of OJ 287 During the Periodic Optical Outburst in 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seta, Hiromi; /Saitama U.; Isobe, N.; /Kyoto U.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; /Saitama U.; Yaji, Yuichi; /Saitama U.; Arai, Akira; /Hiroshima U.; Fukuhara, Masayuki; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Kohno, Kotaro; /Tokyo U.; Nakanishi, Koichiro; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Sasada, Mahito; /Hiroshima U.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Tosaki, Tomoka; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Uemura, Makoto; /Hiroshima U.; Anderhub, Hans; /Zurich, ETH; Antonelli, L.A.; /INFN, Rome; Antoranz, Pedro; /Madrid U.; Backes, Michael; /Dortmund U.; Baixeras, Carmen; /Barcelona, Autonoma U.; Balestra, Silvia; /Madrid U.; Barrio, Juan Abel; /Madrid U.; Bastieri, Denis; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; /IAC, La Laguna /Dortmund U. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /DESY /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /INFN, Rome /Dortmund U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /IAC, La Laguna /Madrid, CIEMAT /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Zurich, ETH /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Wurzburg U. /Barcelona, IFAE /UC, Davis /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Rome /UC, Davis /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Wurzburg U. /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Wurzburg U. /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /UC, Santa Cruz /Madrid U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Trieste /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Dortmund U. /Barcelona, IEEC /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /Zurich, ETH /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Wurzburg U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /INFN, Rome /Sierra Nevada Observ. /DESY /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /Wurzburg U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Zurich, ETH /Turku U. /INFN, Rome /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Barcelona, IFAE /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suzaku observations of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be {Lambda} = 1.65 {+-} 0.02 and S{sub 1keV} = 215 {+-} 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum ({Lambda} = 1.50 {+-} 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S{sub 1keV} = 404{sub -5}{sup +6} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to {approx} 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy {gamma}-ray observations of OJ 287 were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 {+-} 0.46 Jy and 8.93 {+-} 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 than those in the quiescent state (1.73 {+-} 0.26 Jy and 3.03 {+-} 0.01 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively). No notable {gamma}-ray events were detected in either observation. The spectral energy distribution of OJ 287 indicated that the X-ray spectrum was dominated by inverse Compton radiation in both observations, while synchrotron radiation exhibited a spectral cutoff around the optical frequency. Furthermore, no significant difference in the synchrotron cutoff frequency was found between the quiescent and flaring states. According to a simple synchrotron self-Compton model, the change of the spectral energy distribution is due to an increase in the energy density of electrons with small changes of both the magnetic field strength and the maximum Lorentz factor of electrons.

  11. Flexible Parametrization of Generalized Parton Distributions from Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary R. Goldstein; J. Osvaldo Gonzalez Hernandez; Simonetta Liuti

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a physically motivated parametrization of the chiral-even generalized parton distributions in the non-singlet sector obtained from a global analysis using a set of available experimental data. Our analysis is valid in the kinematical region of intermediate Bjorken $x$ and for $Q^2$ in the multi-GeV region which is accessible at present and currently planned facilities. Relevant data included in our fit are from the nucleon elastic form factors measurements, from deep inelastic scattering experiments. Additional information provided by lattice calculations of the higher moments of generalized parton distributions, is also considered. Recently extracted observables from Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon are reproduced by our fit.

  12. Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

  13. Quenching Factor for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils in a Plastic Scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Reichhart; D. Yu. Akimov; H. M. Araujo; E. J. Barnes; V. A. Belov; A. A. Burenkov; V. Chepel; A. Currie; L. DeViveiros; B. Edwards; V. Francis; C. Ghag; A. Hollingsworth; M. Horn; G. E. Kalmus; A. S. Kobyakin; A. G. Kovalenko; V. N. Lebedenko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; P. Majewski; A. St J. Murphy; F. Neves; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; R. Preece; J. J. Quenby; P. R. Scovell; C. Silva; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; P. F. Smith; V. N. Stekhanov; T. J. Sumner; C. Thorne; R. J. Walker

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Plastic scintillators are widely used in industry, medicine and scientific research, including nuclear and particle physics. Although one of their most common applications is in neutron detection, experimental data on their response to low-energy nuclear recoils are scarce. Here, the relative scintillation efficiency for neutron-induced nuclear recoils in a polystyrene-based plastic scintillator (UPS-923A) is presented, exploring recoil energies between 125 keV and 850 keV. Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating light collection efficiency and energy resolution effects, are used to generate neutron scattering spectra which are matched to observed distributions of scintillation signals to parameterise the energy-dependent quenching factor. At energies above 300 keV the dependence is reasonably described using the semi-empirical formulation of Birks and a kB factor of (0.014+/-0.002) g/MeVcm^2 has been determined. Below that energy the measured quenching factor falls more steeply than predicted by the Birks formalism.

  14. The effects of growth factors on testicular germ cell apoptosis in the stallion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Casey Leanne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recombinant growth factors, stem cell factor (SCF), leukemia inhibiting factor (LIF), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and one hormone, estradiol (E?), alone or in combination, to prevent apoptosis of germ cells in short-term equine...

  15. Observer-dependent optical properties of stationary axisymmetric spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Fernando de Felice; Andrea Geralico

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The world lines of null particles admit arbitrary parametrizations. In the presence of a family of observers one may introduce along a null world line an extension of the so-called Cattaneo's relative standard time parameter (valid for massive particles) which plays a special role. Another possibility is to use the coordinate time itself as a parameter. The relation between relative standard time and coordinate time allows for the introduction of an observer-dependent optical path and associated refraction index. Both these quantities are studied here working out explicit examples concerning familiar null orbits and observers in black hole spacetimes.

  16. Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project: Observations and Source Lists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Getman; E. Flaccomio; P. S. Broos; N. Grosso; M. Tsujimoto; L. Townsley; G. P. Garmire; J. Kastner; J. Li; F. R. Harnden, Jr.; S. Wolk; S. S. Murray; C. J. Lada; A. A. Muench; M. J. McCaughrean; G. Meeus; F. Damiani; G. Micela; S. Sciortino; J. Bally; L. A. Hillenbrand; W. Herbst; T. Preibisch; E. D. Feigelson

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the data reduction methods and the derived catalog of more than 1600 X-ray point sources from the exceptionally deep January 2003 Chandra X-ray Observatory observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster and embedded populations around OMC-1. The observation was obtained with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and has been nicknamed the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP). With an 838 ks exposure made over a continuous period of 13.2 days, the COUP observation provides the most uniform and comprehensive dataset on the X-ray emission of normal stars ever obtained in the history of X-ray astronomy.

  17. Polarization Observables in the Photoproduction of Two Pseudoscalar Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston Roberts

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The many polarization observables that can be measured in process like {gamma}N {yields} M{sub 1}M{sub 2}B, where M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} are pseudoscalar mesons and B is a spin-1/2 baryon, are discussed. The relationships among these observables, their symmetries, as well as inequalities that they satisfy are briefly discussed. Within the context of a particular model for {gamma}N {yields} NKK, some of the observables are calculated, and their sensitivity to the ingredients of the model, and hence to the underlying dynamics of the process, are discussed.

  18. Photon impact factor and k{sub T}-factorization for DIS in the next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Balitsky, Giovanni Chirilli

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photon impact factor for the BFKL pomeron is calculated in the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximation using the operator expansion in Wilson lines. The result is represented as an NLO k{sub T}-factorization formula for structure functions of small-x deep inelastic scattering.

  19. FIRST COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROTON-TO-ELECTRON MASS RATIO FROM OBSERVATIONS OF ROTATIONAL TRANSITIONS OF METHANOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Lovell, J. E. J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Voronkov, M. A.; Breen, S. L., E-mail: Simon.Ellingsen@utas.edu.au [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to measure the absorption from the 2{sub 0} {yields} 3{sub -1} E 12.2 GHz transition of methanol toward the z = 0.89 lensing galaxy in the PKS B1830-211 gravitational lens system. Comparison of the velocity of the main absorption feature with the published absorption spectrum from the 1{sub 0} {yields} 2{sub -1} E transition of methanol shows that they differ by -0.6 {+-} 1.6 km s{sup -1}. We can use these observations to constrain the changes in the proton-to-electron mass ratio {mu} from z = 0.89 to the present to 0.8 {+-} 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}. This result is consistent, and of similar precision to recent observations at z = 0.68 achieved through comparison of a variety of rotational and inversion transitions, and approximately a factor of two better than previous constraints obtained in this source. Future more sensitive observations that incorporate additional rotational methanol transitions offer the prospect of improving current results by a factor of 5-10.

  20. Observation and Control of Electronic Phases in Strongly Correlated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observation and Control of Electronic Phases in Strongly Correlated Oxides Apr 09 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Zac Ward, Materials Science and Technology Division, ORNL PSD Materials...