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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

U.S. Department Of Energy Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Of Energy Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office Knolls Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination Summary Form BUILDING A10...

2

Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment September 19, 2012...

3

Accelerator Laboratory AGN-201M Nuclear Reactor Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Nuclear Power Institute (NPI) Nuclear Science Center (1MW Triga Reactor) (NSC) Nuclear SecurityAccelerator Laboratory AGN-201M Nuclear Reactor Laboratory Center for Large-scale Scientific Simulations (CLASS) Fuel Cycle and Materials Laboratory (FCML) Institute for National Security, Education

4

Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ADVANCED REACTORS DIVISION FUEL LABORATORIES CHESWICK, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Policy, Safety and Environment Office of Operational Safety Environmental...

5

Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor concept.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor and hot cell facility concepts. The reactor proposed is designed to be capable of producing 100% of the U.S. demand for the medical isotope {sup 99}Mo. The concept is novel in that the fuel for the reactor and the targets for the {sup 99}Mo production are the same. There is no driver core required. The fuel pins that are in the reactor core are processed on a 7 to 21 day irradiation cycle. The fuel is low enriched uranium oxide enriched to less than 20% {sup 235}U. The fuel pins are approximately 1 cm in diameter and 30 to 40 cm in height, clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy). Approximately 90 to 150 fuel pins are arranged in the core in a water pool {approx}30 ft deep. The reactor power level is 1 to 2 MW. The reactor concept is a simple design that is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days. The fuel fabrication, reactor design and operation, and {sup 99}Mo production processing use well-developed technologies that minimize the technological and licensing risks. There are no impediments that prevent this type of reactor, along with its collocated hot cell facility, from being designed, fabricated, and licensed today.

Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility Ames, Iowa  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,, *' ; . Final Radiological Condition of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility Ames, Iowa _, . AGENCY: Office of Operational Safety, Department of Energy ' ACTION: Notice of Availability of Archival Information Package SUMMARY: The'Office of Operational Safety of the Department O i Energy (DOE) has reviewed documentation relating to the decontamination and decommissioning operations conducted at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa and has prepared an archival informati0.n package to permanently document the results of the action and the site conditions and use restriction placed on the . site at the tim e of release. This review is based on post-decontamination survey data and other pertinent documentation referenced in and included in the archival package. The material and

7

Zero Power Reactor simulation | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zero Power Reactor simulation Share Description Ever wanted to see a nuclear reactor core in action? Here's a detailed simulation of the Zero Power Reactor experiment, run by...

8

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

9

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

10

Reactor Tree of Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Reactors > The Argonne Reactor Tree About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne...

11

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

12

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories pulse nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has designed, constructed and operated bare metal Godiva-type and pool-type pulse reactors since 1961. The reactor facilities were designed to support a wide spectrum of research, development, and testing activities associated with weapon and reactor systems.

Schmidt, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reuscher, J.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

14

Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment September 19, 2012 Presenter: Bentley Harwood, Advanced Test Reactor Nuclear Safety Engineer Battelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Topics covered: PRA studies began in the late 1980s 1989, ATR PRA published as a summary report 1991, ATR PRA full report 1994 and 2004 various model changes 2011, Consolidation, update and improvement of previous PRA work 2012/2013, PRA risk monitor implementation Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission Handling of Beyond Design Basis Events for

15

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

16

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

17

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

18

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

19

Reactor Decommissioning Projects | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science &...

20

An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

VDTs: Field levels, epidemiology, and laboratory studies  

SciTech Connect

As the use of video display terminals (VDTs) has expanded, questions have been raised as to whether working at a VDT affects the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. A particular focus for these questions has been the very low frequency (VLF) magnetic field produced by a VDT's horizontal deflection coil. VDTs also produce VLF electric fields, extremely low frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields, and static electric fields, Ten studies of pregnancy outcome in VDT operators have been conducted in six countries, and with one exception, none has concluded that magnetic fields from VDTs may predispose pregnant operators to spontaneous abortion or congenital malformation. The epidemiologic studies conducted thus far do not provide a basis for concluding that VDT work and adverse pregnancy outcome are associated. Studies of fetal resorptions and malformations in rodents exposed to VLF magnetic fields have produced inconsistent findings. Two laboratories in Sweden that studied mice have reported positive results, one laboratory showing field-related malformations (but not resorptions) and the other showing field-related resorptions (but not malformations). Two Canadian laboratories have reported negative results in rats and mice. Studies of avian embryos have also yielded inconsistent results, but lacking a maternal-fetal placental interface, avian embryos are a questionable model for evaluating human reproductive risks. Finally, VLF electric and magnetic fields measured at the operator position are in compliance with field strength standards and guidelines that have been established around the world. 55 refs.

Kavet, R.; Tell, R.A. (Richard Tell Associates, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Risk management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory research reactors  

SciTech Connect

In November of 1986, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was shut down by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) due to a concern regarding embrittlement of the reactor vessel. A massive review effort was undertaken by ORNL and the Department of Energy (DOE). This review resulted in an extensive list of analyses and design modifications to be completed before restart could take place. The review also focused on the improvement of management practices including implementation of several of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) requirements. One of the early items identified was the need to perform a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) on the reactor. It was decided by ORNL management that this PRA would not be just an exercise to assess the ``bottom`` line in order to restart, but would be used to improve the overall safety of the reactor, especially since resources (both manpower and dollars) were severely limited. The PRA would become a basic safety tool to be used instead of a more standard deterministic approach to safety used in commercial reactor power plants. This approach was further reinforced, because the reactor was nearly 25 years old at this time, and the design standards and regulations had changed significantly since the original design, and many of the safety issues could not be addressed by compliance to codes and standards.

Flanagan, G.F.; Linn, M.A.; Proctor, L.D.; Cook, D.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Compact reversed-field pinch reactors (CRFPR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unique confinement properties of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) are exploited to examine physics and technical issues related to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor. This resistive-coil, steady-state, toroidal device would use a dual-media power cycle driven by a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, and coils) with a power density and mass approaching values characteristic of pressurized-water fission rectors. A 1000-MWe(net) base case is selected from a comprehensive trade-off study to examine technological issues related to operating a high-power-density FPC. After describing the main physics and technology issues for this base-case reactor, directions for future study are suggested.

Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Hagenson, R.L.; Copenhaver, C.; Werley, K.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study  

SciTech Connect

This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

HAZARDS SUMMARY FOR THE L-77 LABORATORY REACTOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO  

SciTech Connect

A hazards summary report for the planned installation and operation of an L-77 Laboratory Reactor of the University of Nevada is presented. Site data, including information on the geography, geology, seismology, climatology, and hydrology of the area in which the reactor will be installed are included. The reactor site and administiation of the reactor facility are described along with the reactor, its uses, and its performance characteristics. Analyses of the nuclear, radiation, and operational hazards are also included. (auth)

1962-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

27

Early Exploration - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Exploration Early Exploration About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

28

Tokamak reactor poloidal field system study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors examined the poloidal field (PF) system, including plasma magnetics, magnet design, and electrical energy conversion systems. An overall PF system tradeoff study was carried out taking into account the reactor design constraints and the plasma requirements. The plasma requirements on PF coil currents and configurations are estimated by MHD equilibrium calculations over the ranges of beta ({bar {beta}}) current and shape of interest, e.g., {bar {beta}} < 10%, Ip {le} 4-5 MA, and D-shape with elongation up to 1.6. These ranges are consistent with the latest results in MHD stability and 1-D transport calculations. Critical physics variations in the study include whether electron preheating is successful and whether the plasma current buildup time can be increased from 1 second to 6 seconds. Important engineering options occur in PF coil configurations, coil conductors, coil-supply connection schemes, and power supply configurations. Important engineering concerns include device assembly/disassembly, machine access, remote maintenance requirements, systems integration and the ability to minimize the effect of major plasma disruptions. More than 60 PF system cases are examined with the help of PF system computer design codes. The resulting cost and technology requirements are compared. The findings include: (1) discovery of ways to preheat the plasma electrons so that the plasma permits a buildup time above 6 seconds, substantially reduces cost and technology requirements; (2) a hybrid PF coil system with major, slow, exterior superconducting coils and minor, fast, interior copper coils represents the best compromise between engineering and physics requirements; and (3) Motor-Generator-Flywheel (MGF) sets with 12 pulse thyristor bridges are found to be more economic and technically feasible than homopolar generators, superconducting energy storage coils and DC generators, for all startup cases (1-6 seconds).

Brown, T. G. [Grumman Aerospace; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia scientist John Ford places fuel rods in the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) test reactor - a reactor stripped down to its simplest form. The Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) provides a flexible, shielded location for performing critical experiments that employ different reactor core configurations and fuel types. The facility is also available for hands-on nuclear criticality safety training. Research and other activities The 7% series, an evaluation of various core characteristics for higher commercial-fuel enrichment, is currently under way at the SPRF/CX. Past critical experiments at the SPRF/CX have included the Burnup Credit

30

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

31

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Santa Susana Field Laboratory - CA 09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Santa Susana Field Laboratory - CA Santa Susana Field Laboratory - CA 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SANTA SUSANA FIELD LABORATORY (CA.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Remediation and certification complete Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Rockwell International, Energy Systems Group Atomics International CA.09-1 CA.09-2 Location: Chatsworth , California CA.09-3 Evaluation Year: 1985 CA.09-3 Site Operations: Conducted sodium reactor, irradiation and fuel burn up experimentation. CA.09-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Certification of remedial action completed CA.09-1 CA.09-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CA.09-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes CA.09-3 CA.09-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Remediation and certification complete CA.09-5

32

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment at diff erent temperatures * Biomass is heated by steam injection to temperatures of 120°C to 210°C in the pressurized mixing tube * Preheated, premixed biomass is retained for specified residence time in vertical holding vessel; material continuously moves by gravity from top to bottom of reactor in plug-fl ow fashion * Residence time is adjusted by changing amount of material held in vertical vessel relative to continuous fl ow of material entering and exiting vessel * Optional additional reactor vessel allows for secondary pretreatment at lower temperatures-120°C to 180°C-with potential to add other chemical catalysts * First vessel can operate at residence

33

Field Operations Management .:. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home OCFO Financial Calendar Home OCFO Financial Calendar Quicklinks: A-Z Index for the OCFO Berkeley Lab Home Contact Us: By Group Contact Us: By Subject Contact Us: Full Listing Employment Financial Systems Modernization (F$M) Fiscal Close Forms: By Group Forms: Full Listing Glossary OCFO EH&S OCFO HR OCFO Home Policies Signature Authority ---------------------------------- UCOP University of California DOE CFO U.S. Department of Energy --------------------------------- Cost Accounting Standards DOE Accounting Handbook Federal Accounting Standards Generally Accepted Accounting Principles OMB Circular Regulations & Procedures Manual (RPM) UC Accounting Manual UC/DOE Prime Contract (Contract 31) CFO Departments: Budget Office Business Systems Analysis Conference Services Controller's Office Field Operations Management Financial Policy & Assurance Procurement & Property Office of Sponsored Projects & Industry Partnerships Training Travel Office

34

Horizontal Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diff Diff erent pretreatment chemistry/ residence time combinations are possible using these multiple horizontal-tube reactors * Each tube is indirectly and directly steam heated to temperatures of 150 0 C to 210 0 C * Residence time is varied by changing the speed of the auger that moves the biomass through each tube reactor * Tubes are used individually or in combination to achieve diff erent pretreatment residence times * Smaller tubes made from Hastelloy, an acid-resistant material, are used with more corrosive chemicals and residence times from 3 to 20 minutes * Larger tubes made from 316 stainless steel are used for residence times from 20 to 120 minutes Horizontal Pretreatment Reactor System Versatile pretreatment system for a wide range of pretreatment chemistries

35

Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor restart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a critical evaluation of the effort for the restart of the Omega West reactor. It is divided into the following areas: progress made; difficulties in restart effort; current needs; and suggested detailed steps for improvement. A brief discussion is given for each area of study.

NONE

1993-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

36

Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

Nick A. Altic

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

Materials Physics Applications: The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Search National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, NHMFL Home About Us Organization DIVISION Materials Physics and Applications Division GROUPS Superconductivity Technology Center Condensed Matter and Magnet Science Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Materials Chemistry CONTACTS Group Leader Mike Hundley Director, NHMFL-PFF/Deputy Group Leader Chuck Mielke Head of Users Program Operations Jon Betts Professional Staff Assistant Julie T. Gallegos TA-03 Group Office TA-03, Building 0034, Room 101 Office Administrator Juanita Armijo TA-35 Group Office TA-35, Building 0127, Room C117 Office Administrator Angeline Willow 505-667-5032 National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Pulsed Field Facility The Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, is one of three campuses of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), the other two being at Florida State University, Tallahassee (continuous fields, magnetic resonance, and general headquarters) and the University of Florida ,Gainesville(ultra-low temperatures at high magnetic fields). The NHMFL is sponsored primarily by the National Science Foundation, Division of Materials Research, with additional support from the State of Florida and the US Department of Energy.

38

An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Correlating field and laboratory data for crude oil fouling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil fouling in a laboratory fouling unit was investigated. The study focused on the preheat-train heat exchangers located just before the crude unit furnace and operating at temperatures in excess of 200 C. A fouling rate model developed using laboratory data from crude blends was used to predict the threshold conditions where negligible fouling was expected under refinery conditions. The results from the model were compared to actual data from a fouling unit located at a refinery. The article discusses factors that may explain the performance of the model and the observed discrepancies between fouling data obtained in the laboratory and the field.

Asomaning, S.; Panchal, C.B.; Liao, C.F.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs.

Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Modern Status of Neutrino Experiments at the Underground Neutrino Laboratory of Kurchatov Institute Near Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The investigation of antineutrino-deuteron interaction at Krasnoyarsk reactor are discussed. The characteristics of the installation ''Deuteron'', present results and perspectives of Krasnoyarsk neutrino laboratory are presented.

Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; S. V. Sukhotin; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov

1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Several unit operations are combined into Several unit operations are combined into one robust system, off ering fl exible and staged process confi gurations in one vessel. Spraying, soaking, low-severity pretreat- ment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, concentration/evaporation, and distillation are amongst its many capabilities. * 1,900 L Horizontal Paddle Blender Vessel with Sidewall Liquid Drains * 6-60 rpm / 50 HP Tri-Directional Agitator * 3.4 bar & Vacuum ASME Design, 316L Stainless Steel * Heating/Cooling Jacket using Water or Steam * 150 L Chemical Mix Tank & Pump with Spray Injectors * Vent Condenser with Collection Tank and Vacuum Pump Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System Multifaceted system designed for complex feedstock impregnation and processing Integrated Biorefi nery Research Facility | NREL * Golden, Colorado | December 15, 2011 | NREL/PO-5100-56156

44

Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations  

SciTech Connect

The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project.

Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.; Garlock, G.A. [MOTA Corp., Cayce, SC (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m{sup 2} and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Field and laboratory study of polysaccharides in fracturing treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increased use of polysaccharides in fracturing treatments, subsequent problems have been encountered with inadequate polymer hydration, weak or over cross-linked fluid, formation of fish eyes, low viscosity and uncontrolled breakout. Problems have occurred due to inadvertent contamination from water supplies and fracturing tanks. In field studies of the Lost Hills and South Belridge areas in Kern County, California, field conditions and operational procedures were found to constitute critical factors in successful dispersion and in ideal cross-linking of polysaccharides. A comparison of field fluids with laboratory fluids was conducted with special emphasis on the quality of field water and on the effects of pH and temperature on the viscosity and sand fall rate. Laboratory tests indicate that fluid mixed in the field can exhibit a more effective cross-linking structure, a more stable viscosity strength and a lower sand fall rate if more control is exercised in the determination of pH range, in the selection of buffers and in the choice of treating water. Attention to these factors can reduce lost time, save expense, and increase well performance.

Freck, J.; Gottschling, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOEs Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.

Boing, L.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

52

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

53

EIS-0402: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL Area IV). SSFL Area IV, occupying approximately 290 acres of the total 2,852-acre SSFL site is located in the hills between Chatsworth and Simi Valley, CA, and was developed as a remote site to test rocket engines and conduct nuclear research. This EIS will evaluate alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of the affected environment, and disposal of all resulting waste at existing, approved sites.

54

Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory … East Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1483 DOE/EA-1483 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois March 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Chicago Operations Office Argonne Area Office Argonne, Illinois Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois Table of Contents Acronyms....................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Background ..........................................................................................................................1 1.1 Facility History ........................................................................................................1

55

Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned.

Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Compact-toroid fusion reactor based on the field-reversed theta pinch: reactor scaling and optimization for CTOR  

SciTech Connect

Early scoping studies based on approximate, analytic models have been extended on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach to examine a Compact Toroid (CT) reactor embodiment that uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plasmoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conduction shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radiation shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15.

Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wind resource evaluation at the Caltech Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind resource evaluation at the Caltech Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE) Quinn;Caltech Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (reduced visual signature) #12;Field Study Results 6 continuous hours existing wind farms Planform Kinetic Energy Flux = U (W m-2) mean power above cut

58

Rocketdyne Division annual site environmental report Santa Susana Field Laboratory and Desoto sites 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation (Rocketdyne). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the DeSoto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The DeSoto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. SSFL consists of four administrative areas used for research, development, and test operations as well as a buffer zone. A portion of Area I and all of Area II are owned by the U.S. Government and assigned to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A portion of Area IV is under option for purchase by the Department of Energy (DOE).

NONE

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Containment performance analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses salient aspects of methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from two conservatively scoped severe accident scenarios in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for steaming-pool-type accidents and an accident involving molten core-concrete interaction. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during postulated severe accidents. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms for each scenario, which are to be used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for these postulated severe accidents. Also highlighted will be a comparison of source terms estimated by two different versions of the MELCOR code.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory … East Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois AGENCY: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1483, evaluating the decontamination and decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), in Argonne, Illinois. The decontamination and decommissioning of the reactor is needed to ensure the protection of the health and safety of the public, DOE and contractor employees, and the environment, consistent with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not

63

Scientific Upgrades at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring a number of projects that will provide scientific upgrades to the neutron science facilities associated with the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Funding for the first upgrade project was initiated in 1996 and all presently identified upgrade projects are expected to be completed by the end of 2003. The upgrade projects include: (1) larger beam tubes, (2) a new monochromator drum for the HB-1 beam line, (3) a new HB-2 beam line system that includes one thermal guide and a new monochromator drum, (4) new instruments for the HB-2 beamline, (5) a new monochromator drum for the HB-3 beam line, (6) a supercritical hydrogen cold source system to be retrofitted into the HB-4 beam tube, (7) a 3.5 kW refrigeration system at 20 K to support the cold source and a new building to house it, (8) a new HB-4 beam line system composed of four cold neutron guides with various mirror coatings and associated shielding, (9) a number of new instruments for the cold beams including two new SANS instruments, and (10) construction of support buildings. This paper provides a short summary of these projects including their present status and schedule.

Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Jones, Amy [ORNL; Crow, Lowell [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Compact-Toroid fusion reactor based on the field-reversed theta pinch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early scoping studies based on approximate, analytic models have been extended on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach to examine a Compact Toroid (CTOR) reactor embodiment that uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plasmoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conducting shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radiation shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach, a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15.

Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EIS-0402: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California 2: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California EIS-0402: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL Area IV). SSFL Area IV, occupying approximately 290 acres of the total 2,852-acre SSFL site is located in the hills between Chatsworth and Simi Valley, CA, and was developed as a remote site to test rocket engines and conduct nuclear research. This EIS will evaluate alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of the affected environment, and disposal of all resulting waste at existing, approved sites. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

67

The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor: Design-point determination and parametric studies  

SciTech Connect

The multi-institutional TITAN study has examined the physics, technology, safety, and economics issues associated with the operation of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion reactor at high power density. A comprehensive system and trade study have been conducted as an integral and ongoing part of the reactor assessment. Attractive design points emerging from these parametric studies are subjected to more detailed analysis and design integration, the results of which are used to refine the parametric systems model. The design points and tradeoffs for two TITAN/RFP reactor embodiments are discussed. 14 refs.

Miller, R.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

One-dimensional thermonuclear burn computations for the Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR)  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual fusion reactor designs of the Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) have been based on profile-averaged zero-dimensional (point) plasma models. The plasma response/performance that has been predicted by the point plasma model is re-examined by a comprehensive one-dimensional (radial) burn code (RFPBRN) that has been developed and parametrically evaluated for the RFPR. The RFPR plasma parameters have been optimized and effects of turbulent transport and stability have been studied.

Nebel, R.A.; Miley, G.H.; Moses, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratorys Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007).

W. C. Adams

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

70

TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INLs High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INLs HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten-rhenium and platinum rhodium thermocouples can be avoided. INL is also developing an Ultrasonic Thermometry (UT) capability. In addition to small size, UTs offer several potential advantages over other temperature sensors. Measurements may be made near the melting point of the sensor material, potentially allowing monitoring of temperatures up to 3000 C. In addition, because no electrical insulation is required, shunting effects are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce acoustic discontinuities to the sensor, as this enables temperature measurements at several points along the sensor length. As discussed in this paper, the suite of temperature monitors offered by INL is not only available to ATR users, but also to users at other MTRs.

J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

72

Magnetic Field Generation in Planets and Satellites by Natural Nuclear Fission Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most fundamental problems in physics has been to understand the nature of the mechanism that generates the geomagnetic field and the magnetic fields of other planets and satellites. For decades, the dynamo mechanism, thought to be responsible for generating the geomagnetic field and other planetary magnetic fields, has been ascribed to convection in each planet's iron-alloy core. Recently, I described the problems inherent in Earth-core convection and proposed instead that the geomagnetic field is produced by a dynamo mechanism involving convection, not in the fluid core, but in the electrically conductive, fluid, fission-product sub-shell of a natural nuclear fission reactor at the center of the Earth, called the georeactor. Here I set forth in detail the commonality in the Solar System of the matter like that of the inside of the Earth, which is my basis for generalizing the concept of planetary magnetic field generation by natural planetocentric nuclear fission reactors.

J. Marvin Herndon

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. 109no. 31 12404-12407 On March 22nd 2012, the NHMFL ­ Pulsed Field Facility broke the 100T tesla barrier, setting a world record of 100.75 tesla for a non-destructive magnet. By using advanced

Weston, Ken

74

Fermi Surface of Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fermi Surface of ­Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory DMR-Award 0654118 DC Field Facility User Program The fermi surface of ­Uranium has been measured surface of alpha-uranium at ambient pressure, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Commun., 80, 241101 (2009). B//c-axis B

Weston, Ken

75

Closed-loop biomass co-firing in a laboratory reactor and in a full-scale boiler.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Co-firing tests were conducted in a pilot-scale reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and in a boiler at the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar factory at Puunene, Hawaii. Combustion tests were performed in the Sandia Multi-Fuel Combustor using Australian coal, whole fiber cane including tops and leaves processed at three different levels (milled only, milled and leached, and milled followed by leaching and subsequent milling), and fiber cane stripped of its tops and leaves and heavily processed through subsequent milling, leaching, and milling cycles. Testing was performed for pure fuels and for biomass co-firing with the coal at levels of 30% and 70% by mass. The laboratory tests revealed the following information: (1) The biomass fuels convert their native nitrogen into NO more efficiently than coal because of higher volatile content and more reactive nitrogen complexes. (2) Adding coal to whole fiber cane to reduce its tendency to form deposits should not adversely affect NO emissions. ( 3 ) Stripped cane does not offer a NO advantage over whole cane when co-fired with coal. During the field test, Sandia measured 0 2 , C02, CO, SO2, and NO concentrations in the stack and gas velocities near the superheater. Gas concentrations and velocities fluctuated more during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The mean 0 2 concentration was lower and the mean C02 concentration was higher during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. When normalized to a constant exhaust 0 2 concentration, mean CO concentration was higher and mean NO concentration was lower for biomass co-firing than for coal. The SO2 concentration tracked the use of Bunker C fuel oil. When normalized by the amount of boiler energy input, the amounts of NO and SO2 formed were lower during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The difference between NOx trends in the lab and in the field are most likely a result of less effective heat and mass transfer in the boiler. Particles were sampled near the superheater tube using an impaction probe and were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Particle loading appeared higher for biomass co-firing than for coal combustion, especially for the smaller particle diameters. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to detect silicon, aluminum, titanium, iron, calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium concentrations near the superheater. LIBS provided an abundant amount of real-time information. The major constituents of the fuel ash (silicon and aluminum) were also the major measured inorganic constituents of the combustion products. The combustion products were enriched in sodium relative to the fuel ash during all tests, and they were enriched in potassium for the biomass co-firing tests. Alkali metals are enriched because compounds containing these elements are more readily releasable into the combustion products than refractory components that remain in large particles such as silicon, aluminum, and titanium. Relative to the measured deposit chemistry, the combustion flows were enriched in iron, sodium, and potassium, constituents that are known to form fumes laden with fine particles and/or vapors. The LIBS results yield insight into the deposition mechanism: Impaction of larger particles dominates over fume deposition. The present application of LIBS reveals its potential to provide real-time field information on the deposition propensity of different fuels and the effects of different fuels and boiler operating conditions.

Jenkins, Bryan M. (University of California, Davis, CA); Williams, Robert B. (University of California, Davis, CA); Turn, Scott Q. (Hawaii Natural Energy Institute.); Jakeway, Lee A. (Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company); Blevins, Linda Gail

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface.

Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

Ward, Dann C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermal Sprays and Ceramic Coatings Assessments: Laboratory and Field Evaluations of Ceramic and Thermal Sprays Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments of Ceramic and Thermal Spray coatings both by laboratory evaluation and analysis of field samples. The field samples are presented as case studies describing the condition of the material solution applied. Several thermal sprays and ceramic coatings were tested and analyzed for their ability to mitigate fireside corrosion, reduce slagging and it's propensity to have circumferential cracking occur due to cyclic temperature variations. In addition, the case studies provide ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

KIRK WINTERHOLLER

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

Department of Reactor Technology Ris#-H-2101 Ris National Laboratory SRE-7-78  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. April 1978 Denmark NUCLEAR DISTRICT HEATING PLANT PRELIMINARY DESIGN CONCEPT by Kurt Hansen * Hans Erik-M-fnoi I Title and authors) NUCLEAR DISTRICT HEATING PLANT PRELIMINARY DESIGN CONCEPT by Kurt Hansen ft-7-78 16 0 tabtes + 2 fflvstrMnas Abstract A nuclear reactor for district heating is proposed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Nonclassical transport processes in geologic media: Review of field and laboratory observations and basic physical concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of the problem of solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous media. We first review field and laboratory observations that demonstrate nonclassical flow and transport behavior. The main physical principles causing anomalous transport regimes in fractured rock media are identified. The basic factors and physical concepts needed to describe anomalous transport in saturated and unsaturated fractured rock are discussed in detail.

Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Pruess, K.; Semenov, V.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Method for laboratory and field evaluation of a proposed polymer flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relevant components of a proposed flood in the Tensleep reservoir of the Frannie Phosphoria-Tensleep Unit in Park County, WY, were investigated. Laboratory testing consisted of polymer injectivity, stability, retention, and effective viscosity measurements. On the basis of polymer viscosity and retention tests, a polysaccharide polymer was chosen over a polyacrylamide polymer for extensive laboratory evaluation and field pilot tests. Field testing included injectivity, biological stability, and in-situ viscosity measurements. Pressure falloff tests following variable-rate injection of a polysaccharide polymer solution indicated the presence of a non-Newtonian, low-mobility bank. Even though good injectivity was obtained during injection of a 15% PV polymer slug, the proposed field project was not done. This was primarily because of low in-situ (reservoir) polymer solution viscosity and lack of proven microbial control in the near-wellbore region.

Castagno, R.E.; Shupe, R.D.; Gregory, M.D.; Lescarboura, J.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A method for laboratory and field evaluation of a proposed polymer flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relevant components of a proposed polymer flood in the Tensleep reservoir of the Frannie Phosphoria-Tensleep Unit in Park County, Wyoming, were investigated. Laboratory testing consisted of polymer injectivity, stability, retention, and effective viscosity measurements. Based on polymer viscosity and retention tests, a polysaccharide polymer was chosen over a polyacrylamide polymer for extensive laboratory evaluation and field pilot tests. Field testing included injectivity, injection rate, biological stability, and in-situ viscosity measurements. Pressure falloff tests following variable rate injection of a polysaccharide polymer solution indicated the presence of a non-Newtonian, low mobility bank. Even though good injectivity was obtained during injection of a 15% pore volume polymer slug, the proposed field project was not done. This was primarily due to low in-situ (reservoir) polymer solution viscosity and lack of proven microbial control in the near wellbore region.

Castagno, R.E.; Gregory, M.D.; Lescarboura, J.A.; Shupe, R.D.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

2012 Annual Planning Summary for Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, RMOTC, and Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, RMOTC, and Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office.

85

Minimization of Pressurized Water Reactor Radiation Fields through Fuel Deposit Engineering: Deposit Property Evaluation and Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide an initial assessment of the options for modification of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary side corrosion product deposits (crud) to minimize the incorporation of activated crud into out-of-core surfaces, thus reducing the intensity of out-of-core radiation fields. This report summarizes the current knowledge of PWR fuel crud characteristics, including crystallographic structure (crystal habits), and buildup mechanisms. The report also reviews the ...

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

Statistical analysis of magnetic field reversals in laboratory dynamo and in paleomagnetic measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical properties of the temporal distribution of polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are commonly assumed to be a realization of a renewal Poisson process with a variable rate. However, it has been recently shown that the polarity reversals strongly depart from a local Poisson statistics, because of temporal clustering. Such clustering arises from the presence of long-range correlations in the underlying dynamo process. Recently achieved laboratory dynamo also shows reversals. It is shown here that laboratory and paleomagnetic data are both characterized by the presence of long-range correlations.

Sorriso-Valvo, L; Bourgoin, M; Odier, P; Plihon, N; Volk, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

Roman, W.G.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

Laboratory and field testing of an aerosol-based duct-sealing technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory and field testing of an aerosol-based duct-sealing technology Laboratory and field testing of an aerosol-based duct-sealing technology for large commercial buildings. Title Laboratory and field testing of an aerosol-based duct-sealing technology for large commercial buildings. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44220 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Carrié, François Rémi, Ronnen M. Levinson, Tengfang T. Xu, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Mark P. Modera, and Duo Wang Journal ASHRAE Transactions Start Page Chapter Date Published January 2002 Abstract Laboratory and field experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of sealing leaks in commercial duct systems with an aerosol sealant. The method involves blowing an aerosol through the duct system to seal the leaks from the inside, the principle being that the aerosol particles deposit in the cracks as they try to escape under pressure. It was shown that the seals created with the current sealant material can withstand pressures far in excess of what is found in commercial-building duct systems. We also performed two field experiments in two large-commercial buildings. The ASHRAE leakage classes of the systems were reduced from 653 down to 103, and from 40 down to 3. Methods and devices specifically devised for this application proved to be very efficient at (a) increasing the sealing rate and (b) attaining state-of-the-art duct leakage classes. Additional research is needed to improve the aerosol injection and delivery processes.

89

Improving Gas Furnace Performance: A Field and Laboratory Study at End of Life  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas furnaces are rated for efficiency using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) test standard under controlled laboratory test conditions. In the home, these furnaces are then installed under conditions that can vary significantly from the standard, require adjustment by the installing contractor to adapt to field conditions, may or may not be inspected over their useful lifetimes, and can operate with little maintenance over a 30-year period or longer. At issue is whether the installation practices, field conditions, and wear over the life of the furnace reduce the efficiency significantly from the rated efficiency. In this project, nine furnaces, with 15-24 years of field service, were removed from Iowa homes and tested in the lab under four conditions to determine the effects of installation practices, field operating conditions, and age on efficiency.

Brand, L.; Yee, S.; Baker, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Laboratory and Field Evaluation of Four Heat Pump Water Heater Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water heating represents the second-largest load in residential buildings in the United States, and also a large load in many commercial and industrial buildings. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) continues research on heat pump water heater (HPWH) systems, which provide high-efficiency electric water heating using the heat pump cycle. In this study, four systems, representing both residential and commercial applications, were tested in the laboratory and/or in the field. An A.O. Smith ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, K{sub m}, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

Abichou, Tarek, E-mail: abichou@eng.fsu.edu [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Mahieu, Koenraad; Chanton, Jeff [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32311 (United States); Romdhane, Mehrez; Mansouri, Imane [Unite de Recherche M.A.C.S., Ecole Nationale d'Ingenieurs de Gabes, Route de Medenine, 6029 Gabes (Tunisia)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Optimization of Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Crud Characteristics for Reducing Radiation Fields: Evaluation of BWR Fuel Crud Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel crud formation and its properties are the combined result of many factors, including corrosion product input, zinc addition rates, reactor coolant chemistry, and fuel and core design. Crud deposition may impact fuel performance as well as radiation field generation. Many projects have evaluated changes in fuel crud properties resulting from changing reactor coolant chemistry. However, the desired crud properties for both good fuel performance and mitigation of radiation field source term are ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

Reactor pressure vessel integrity research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the related research programs at ORNL described herein to provide for the development and confirmation of the methods used for: (1) establishing the irradiation exposure conditions within the RPV in the Embrittlement Data Base and Dosimetry Evaluation Program, (2) assessing the effects of irradiation on the RPV materials in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program, and (3) developing overall structural and fracture analyses of RPVs in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program.

Corwin, W.R.; Pennell, W.E.; Pace, J.V.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

The hybrid reactor project based on the straight field line mirror concept  

SciTech Connect

The straight field line mirror (SFLM) concept is aiming towards a steady-state compact fusion neutron source. Besides the possibility for steady state operation for a year or more, the geometry is chosen to avoid high loads on materials and plasma facing components. A comparatively small fusion hybrid device with 'semi-poor' plasma confinement (with a low fusion Q factor) may be developed for industrial transmutation and energy production from spent nuclear fuel. This opportunity arises from a large fission to fusion energy multiplication ratio, Q{sub r} = P{sub fis}/P{sub fus}>>1. The upper bound on Q{sub r} is primarily determined by geometry and reactor safety. For the SFLM, the upper bound is Q{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 150, corresponding to a neutron multiplicity of k{sub eff}=0.97. Power production in a mirror hybrid is predicted for a substantially lower electron temperature than the requirement T{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 10 keV for a fusion reactor. Power production in the SFLM seems possible with Q Almost-Equal-To 0.15, which is 10 times lower than typically anticipated for hybrids (and 100 times smaller than required for a fusion reactor). This relaxes plasma confinement demands, and broadens the range for use of plasmas with supra-thermal ions in hybrid reactors. The SFLM concept is based on a mirror machine stabilized by qudrupolar magnetic fields and large expander tanks beyond the confinement region. The purpose of the expander tanks is to distribute axial plasma loss flow over a sufficiently large area so that the receiving plates can withstand the heat. Plasma stability is not relying on a plasma flow into the expander regions. With a suppressed plasma flow into the expander tanks, a possibility arise for higher electron temperature. A brief presentation will be given on basic theory for the SFLM with plasma stability and electron temperature issues, RF heating computations with sloshing ion formation, neutron transport computations with reactor safety margins and material load estimates, magnetic coil designs as well as a discussion on the implications of the geometry for possible diagnostics. Reactor safety issues are addressed and a vertical orientation of the device could assist passive coolant circulation. Specific attention is put to a device with a 25 m long confinement region and 40 cm plasma radius in the mid-plane. In an optimal case (k{sub eff}= 0.97) with a fusion power of only 10 MW, such a device may be capable of producing a power of 1.5 GW{sub th}.

Agren, O.; Noack, K.; Moiseenko, V. E.; Hagnestal, A.; Kaellne, J.; Anglart, H. [Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Royal Institute of Technology, Nuclear Reactor Technology, SE 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

Pure tension superconducting toroidal-field coil system design studies for the Argonne Experimental Power Reactor  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (TEPR) design studies, a toroidal field (TF) coil system has been designed. NbTi was chosen as the most suitable superconductor and 8T was regarded as a practical peak field level in this study. The 16-coil design was chosen as a reasonable compromise between 2 percent field ripple and 3 m access gap. To minimize the coil structure and the bending moments on the conductor, a pure tension coil shape is necessary. A correct approach for determining the pure tension coil profile in a bumpy TF coil system is given. Verification of the pure tension coil by a three- dimensional stress analysis is presented. For coil quench protection, a series- connected scheme is proposed. (auth)

Wang, S.T.; Purcell, J.R.; Demichele, D.W.; Turner, L.R.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Laboratory Measurement of Water Nucleation Using a Laminar Flow Tube Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Laminar Flow Tube Reactor (LFTR) was used to study the nucleation of water vapor. Computational analysis was carried out to define the operating conditions of the LFTR suitable for water nucleation measurements. An interface between the LFTR and a mass spectrometer was developed to analyze the chemical content of the freshly nucleated water particles. Presence of contaminants was detected in the initial configuration of the LFTR. As a result, improvements were made to the LFTR to achieve ultra-high purity conditions in the system. The nucleation rate of water vapor as a function of supersaturation was measured over the temperature range 210-250 K. The first measurement of the nucleation rate of water at a temperature of 210 K was obtained. Reasonable agreement with the classical theory predictions is observed for temperatures in the range 230-250 K. However, below 220 K, classical theory begins to overestimate nucleation rates compared to experimental data and the disagreement grows with decreasing temperature. The experimental data obtained provide an excellent benchmark for further nucleation studies of binary, ternary and more complex systems.

Mikheev, Vladimir B. (InnovaTek, Inc); Irving, Patricia M. (InnovaTek); Laulainen, Nels S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Barlow, Stephan E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Pervukhin, Viktor V. (Institute of Inorganic Chemistry of SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia)

2002-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ecological Assessment of Hazardous Waste Sites: A Field and Laboratory Reference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecological Assessment of Ecological Assessment of Hazardous Waste Sites: A Field and Laboratory Reference U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Research Laboratory 200 S. W. 35th Street Corvallis, OR 97333 ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENTS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: A FIELD AND LABORATORY REFERENCE DOCUMENT Edited By William Warren-Hicks l Benjamin R. Parkhurst 2 Samuel S. Baker, Jr. 1 1 Kilkelly Environmental Associates Highway 70 West - The Water Garden Raleigh, NC 27622 2 Western Aquatics, Inc. P.O. BOX 546 203 Grand Avenue Laramie, WY 82070 DISCLAIMER T h e i n f o r m a t i o n i n t h i s d o c u m e n t h a s b e e n f u n d e d b y t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s Environmental Protection Agent h by Contract Number 68-03-3439 to Kilkelly Environmenta] Associates, Raleig , NC 27622. It has been subject to the Agency's peer and administrative review, and it has been approved for publication as an EPA

98

Toroidal fusion reactor design based on the reversed-field pinch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The toroidal reversed-field pinch (RFP) achieves gross equilibrium and stability with a combination of high shear and wall stabilization, rather than the imposition of tokamak-like q-constraints. Consequently, confinement is provided primarily by poloidal magnetic fields, poloidal betas as large as approximately 0.58 are obtainable, the high ohmic-heating (toroidal) current densities promise a sole means of heating a D-T plasma to ignition, and the plasma aspect ratio is not limited by stability/equilibrium constraints. A reactor-like plasma model has been developed in order to quantify and to assess the general features of a power system based upon RFP confinement. An ''operating point'' has been generated on the basis of this plasma model and a relatively detailed engineering energy balance. These results are used to generate a conceptual engineering model of the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR) which includes a general description of a 750 MWe power plant and the preliminary consideration of vacuum/fueling, first wall, blanket, magnet coils, iron core, and the energy storage/transfer system.

Hagenson, R.L.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRON SPECTRUM OF THE HB-4 COLD SOURCE AT THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Proceedings of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Brookhaven National Laboratory workshop on neutron scattering instrumentation at high-flux reactors  

SciTech Connect

For the first three decades following World War II, the US, which pioneered the field of neutron scattering research, enjoyed uncontested leadership in the field. By the mid-1970's, other countries, most notably through the West European consortium at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, had begun funding neutron scattering on a scale unmatched in this country. By the early 1980's, observers charged with defining US scientific priorities began to stress the need for upgrading and expansion of US research reactor facilities. The conceptual design of the ANS facility is now well under way, and line-item funding for more advanced design is being sought for FY 1992. This should lead to a construction request in FY 1994 and start-up in FY 1999, assuming an optimal funding profile. While it may be too early to finalize designs for instruments whose construction is nearly a decade removed, it is imperative that we begin to develop the necessary concepts to ensure state-of-the-art instrumentation for the ANS. It is in this context that this Instrumentation Workshop was planned. The workshop touched upon many ideas that must be considered for the ANS, and as anticipated, several of the discussions and findings were relevant to the planning of the HFBR Upgrade. In addition, this report recognizes numerous opportunities for further breakthroughs on neutron instrumentation in areas such as improved detection schemes (including better tailored scintillation materials and image plates, and increased speed in both detection and data handling), in-beam monitors, transmission white beam polarizers, multilayers and supermirrors, and more. Each individual report has been cataloged separately.

McBee, M.R. (ed.); Axe, J.D.; Hayter, J.B.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

102

Pacific Northwest Laboratory report on controlled thermonuclear reactor technology, January 1975 - September 1975  

SciTech Connect

The PNL staff has been studying fusion technology in areas such as economics, fusion-fission hybrid concepts, materials, neutronics, environment and safety. These studies have been scoped to make efficient use of ERDA resources, and to complement and support efforts at other laboratories. The effect the plasma and associated radiation and emission will have upon the surfaces of the first wall are being studied. Neutron sputtering experiments were made on niobium and gold and the results were evaluated for absolute neutron yields. Molybdenum and vanadium were studied for effects of ion bombardment under various conditions of helium injection. Graphite cloth is being irradiated for examination of radiation effects because it is suggested for use in several CTR concepts as a shield between the plasma and the first wall. Helium effects are being studied to characterize degradation of structural metal properties. Work is progressing on absolute measurement of the electrical resistivity of insulators and the demonstration of the feasibility of producing insulating coatings by sputter deposition. (auth)

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material - There are likely multiple phases of material in the salt (metal or compound), either suspended through the salt matrix, layered in the bottom of the tank, or both. These phases may contribute to plugging during any planned transfer. There is not enough data to know for sure. (4) Probe heat trace - The alternate transfer method does not include heat tracing of the bottom of the probe. There is a concern that this may cool the salt and other phases of materials present enough to block the flow of salt. (5) Stress-corrosion cracking - Additionally, there is a concern regarding moisture that may have been introduced into the tanks. Due to time constraints, this concern was not validated. However, if moisture was introduced into the tanks and not removed during heating the tanks before HF and F2 sparging, there would be an additional concern regarding the potential for stress-corrosion cracking of the tank walls.

Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Other Locales Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Laboratory for Cloud Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Laboratory for Cloud Process S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8028 Clouds associated with the Gulf Stream Locale, (Figure 1) are in general due to the cyclogenesis or redevelopments of the storms off the east coast of the United States in winters, movement along the coast of the storms that are generated over the Gulf of Mexico in the spring and fall and mesoscale convective circulations present in all seasons. During the summer and early fall ,this region is also susceptible to hurricanes moving from the south. There have been several attempts to reproduce some of the observed synoptic and mesoscale features of these sys- tems (e.g., Krei1zberg and Perkey 1977; Holt et al. 1990;

105

Laboratory Studies of the Short-term Responses of Freshwater Fish to Electromagnetic Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies are being proposed as an environmentally preferred means of generating electricity from river and tidal currents. Among the potential issues that must be investigated in order to resolve environmental concerns are the effects on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields created by underwater generators and transmission cables. The behavioral responses of common freshwater fishes to static and variable electromagnetic fields (EMF) that may be emitted by hydrokinetic projects were evaluated in laboratory experiments. Various fish species were exposed to either static (DC) EMF fields created by a permanent bar magnet or variable (AC) EMF fields created by a switched electromagnet for 48 h, fish locations were recorded with a digital imaging system, and changes in activity level and distribution relative to the magnet position were quantified at 5-min intervals. Experiments with fathead minnows, redear sunfish, striped bass, lake sturgeon, and channel catfish produced mixed results. Except for fathead minnows there was no effect on activity level. Only redear sunfish and channel catfish exhibited a change in distribution relative to the position of the magnet with an apparent attraction to the EMF source. In separate experiments, rapid behavioral responses of paddlefish and lake sturgeon to onset of the AC field were recorded with high-speed video. Paddlefish did not react to a variable, 60-Hz magnetic field like that which would be emitted by an AC generator or cable, but lake sturgeon consistently responded to the variable, AC-generated magnetic field with a variety of altered swimming behaviors. These results will be useful for determining under what circumstances cables or generators need to be positioned to minimize interactions with sensitive species.

Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

U.S. Department of Energy Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

use soil cleanup objectives. The ICM will be conducted by a DOE-EM SPRU contractor (URS). URS work will entail the preparation of an excavation plan in accordance with the ICM...

107

Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling ...

Baustian, Kelly J.

108

Principles of Reactor Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Physics M A Smith Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Engineering Division Phone: 630-252-9747, Email: masmith@anl.gov Abstract: Nuclear reactor physics deals with...

109

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Laboratory Measurements of Heterogeneous Reactions on Sulfuric Acid Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing evidence from field, modeling, and laboratory studies suggests that heterogeneous reactions on stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles may contribute to global ozone depiction. Using a Knudsen cell reactor technique, the authors have ...

Leah R. Williams; Jeffrey A. Manion; David M. Golden; Margaret A. Tolbert

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Structural characteristics of proposed ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) TF (toroidal field) coil conductor  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the effect of transverse loading on a cable-in-conduit conductor which has been proposed for the toroidal field coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The primary components of this conductor are a loose cable of superconducting wires, a thin-wall tube for helium containment, and a U-shaped structural channel. A method is given where the geometry of this conductor can be optimized for a given set of operating conditions. It is shown, using finite-element modeling, that the structural channel is effective in supporting loads due to transverse forces and internal pressure. In addition, it is shown that the superconducting cable is effectively shielded from external transverse loads that might otherwise degrade its current carrying capacity. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Gibson, C.R.; Miller, J.R.

1988-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

Scientific Image Gallery from the Applied Superconductivity Center at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Applied Superconductivity Center (ASC) is nested with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Originally located at the University of Wisconsin, ASC transferred to NHMFL or Magnet Lab in 2003. ASC investigates both low and high-temperature materials. Focus areas include grain boundaries; coated conductors, BSCCO, and a new superconductor known as MgB2. The ASC Image Gallery provides graphs with text descriptions and single images with captions. The single images are organized into collections under scientific titles, such as MgB2 mentioned above. Click on the Videos link to see two 3D videos and be sure to check out the link to image collections at other organizations performing superconductivity research.

114

Grant Awarded to California for Oversight of Santa Susana Field Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contacts Contacts Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati - The Department of Energy today awarded a grant to the State of California Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) for regulatory functions necessary to oversee investigation and cleanup at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) project at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL), Canoga Park, California. The $5.6 million grant has five one-year performance periods. DOE must comply with the requirements for characterization and cleanup in the 2007 Consent Order with the State of California for groundwater and the 2010 Administrative Order on Consent for soils. ETEC's historic mission involved nuclear research and development for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor to DOE. In the mid-1950s, a

115

Grant Awarded to California for Oversight of Santa Susana Field Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contact Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The Department of Energy today awarded a grant to the State of California Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) for regulatory functions necessary to oversee investigation and cleanup at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) project at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL), Canoga Park, California. The $5.6 million grant has five one-year performance periods. DOE must comply with the requirements for characterization and cleanup in the 2007 Consent Order with the State of California for groundwater and the 2010 Administrative Order on Consent for soils. ETEC's historic mission involved nuclear research and development for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor to DOE. In the mid-1950s, a

116

Silica Deposition in Field and Laboratory Thermal Tests of Yucca Mountain Tuff  

SciTech Connect

A field thermal test was conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to observe changes in the Topopah Spring Tuff middle nonlithophysal zone geohydrologic system due to thermal loading. A laboratory-scale crushed-tuff hydrothermal column test was used to investigate the tuff as a potential construction material within a nuclear-waste repository. Results of similar column tests have been cited as indications that silica deposition would plug the rock fractures above a repository and create unfavorable drainage conditions. Data from field and laboratory tests are used here to predict the magnitude of fracture sealing. For the crushed-tuff column test, a one-meter-high column was packed with crushed tuff to a porosity of about 50%. Water filling the lowermost 10 cm of the column was boiled and the vapor condensed at the top of the column, percolating down to the boiling zone. After 100 days, intergranular pore space in the saturated portion of the column was almost filled with amorphous silica. The Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain is a heating test in the unsaturated zone. It consists of a four-year heating phase, now complete, followed by a four-year cooling phase. Heaters in a 60-m-long drift and in the adjacent rock have heated the drift walls to 200 C. As the rock was heated, fluids naturally present in the rock migrated away from the heat sources. A boiling zone now separates an inner dry-out zone from an outer condensation zone. A heat-pipe region exists in the outer margin of the boiling zone above the heated drift. Amorphous silica coatings up to a few micrometers thick were deposited in this region. Deposits were observed in less than 10% of the fractures in the heat pipe region. Drift-scale test results yield a silica deposition rate of about 250 {micro}m/1000 years in 10% of the fractures in the heat-pipe region. We did not calculate deposition rates from our column test, but a rate of 9.1 mm/1000 years in all fractures of the heat-pipe region is predicted by Sun and Rimstidt (2002) from the results of a similar test. We believe the rate based on field-test observations is a better prediction because the field test more closely resembles the expected environment in a repository. Rates based on column-test results may be reasonable for local zones of preferred fluid flow.

S.S. Levy; S.J. Chipera; M.G. Snow

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Impact of magnetic field inhomogeneity on electron cyclotron radiative loss in tokamak reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential importance of electron cyclotron (EC) emission in the local electron power balance in the steady-state regimes of ITER operation with high temperatures, as well as in the DEMO reactor, requires accurate calculation of the one-dimensional (over magnetic surfaces) distribution of the net radiated power density, P{sub EC}({rho}). When the central electron temperature increases to {approx}30 keV, the local EC radiative loss comprises a substantial fraction of the heating power from fusion alphas and is close to the total auxiliary NBI heating power, P{sub EC}(0) Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.3P{sub {alpha}}(0) Asymptotically-Equal-To P{sub aux}(0). In the present paper, the model of EC radiative transport in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is extended to the case of an inhomogeneous magnetic field B(R, Z). The impact of such inhomogeneity on local and total power losses is analyzed in the framework of this model by using the CYNEQ code. It is shown that, for the magnetic field B, temperature T{sub e}, density n{sub e}, and wall reflection coefficient R{sub w} expected in ITER and DEMO, accurate simulations of the EC radiative loss require self-consistent 1.5D transport analysis (i.e., one-dimensional simulations of plasma transport and two-dimensional simulations of plasma equilibrium). It is shown that EC radiative transport can be described with good accuracy in the 1D approximation with the surface-averaged magnetic field, B({rho}) = Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket B(R, Z) Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket {sub ms}. This makes it possible to substantially reduce the computational time required for time-dependent self-consistent 1.5D transport analysis. Benchmarking of the CYNEQ results with available results of the RAYTEC, EXACTEC, and CYTRAN codes is performed for various approximations of the magnetic field.

Kukushkin, A. B.; Minashin, P. V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Tokamak Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Polevoi, A. R. [Route de Vinon sur Verdon, ITER Organization (France)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

119

Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 flux traps (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loops temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

Douglas M. Gerstner

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Groundwater Protection Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Long Term Surveillance & Maintenance High Flux Beam Reactor Long Term Surveillance & Maintenance The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)...

122

Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

Radev, R

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

123

INFORMATION MEETING ON GAS-COOLED POWER REACTORS, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OCTOBER 21-22, 1958  

SciTech Connect

This meeting is one of a series of Civilian Power Reactor Conferences and was held colncident with an AEC invitation to industry to bid on the construction of a gas-cooled facility. Papers are presented on design studles, hazards, components, costs, materials, and design concepts for specific reactors. (W.D.M.)

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February...

125

Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the effect on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields (EMF) created by the projects. The submerged electrical generator will emit an EMF into the surrounding water, as will underwater cables used to transmit electricity from the generator to the shore, between individual units in an array (inter-turbine cables), and between the array and a submerged step-up transformer. The electric current moving through these cables will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of fish and benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011). Those experiments found little indication that the behaviors of these freshwater species were a

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Retrofit of waste-to-energy facilities equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Volume II: Field and laboratory reports, Part 2 of 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II (part 2 of 2) of ''Retrofit of Waste-to-energy Facilities Equipped with Electrostatic Precipitators'' contains the field and laboratory reports, including: (1) field reports, (2) analytic laboratory reports, (3) chain of custody forms, and (4) TCLP laboratory reports.

Rigo, H.G. [Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc., Berea, OH (US); Chandler, A.J. [A.J. Chandler & Associates, Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East project final report.  

SciTech Connect

The ATSR D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: (1) Removal of radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the ATSR Reactor facility; (2) Decontamination of the ATSR Reactor facility to unrestricted use levels; and (3)Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure). These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the ATSR Reactor facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The reactor aluminum, reactor lead, graphite piles in room E-111, and the contaminated concrete in room E-102 were the primary areas of concern. NES, Incorporated (Danbury, CT) characterized the ATSR Reactor facility from January to March 1998. The characterization identified a total of thirteen radionuclides, with a total activity of 64.84 mCi (2.4 GBq). The primary radionuclides of concern were Co{sup 60}, Eu{sup 152}, Cs{sup 137}, and U{sup 238}. No additional radionuclides were identified during the D&D of the facility. The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the reactor tank and shield tank. Contact radiation levels of 30 mrem/hr (0.3 mSv/hr) were measured on reactor internals during dismantlement of the reactor. A level of 3 mrem/hr (0.03 mSv/hr) was observed in a small area (hot spot) in room E-102. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem/yr (50 mSv/yr); the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr).

Fellhauer, C.; Garlock, G.; Mathiesen, J.

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Comparison of zero-dimensional and one-dimensional thermonuclear burn computations for the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR)  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual fusion reactor designs of the Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) have been based on profile-averaged zero-dimensional (point) plasma models. The plasma response/performance that has been predicted by the point plasma model is re-examined by a comprehensive one-dimensional (radial) burn code that has been developed and parametrically evaluated for the RFPR. Agreement is good between the zero-dimensional and one-dimensional models, giving more confidence in the RFPR design point reported previously from the zero-dimensional analysis.

Nebel, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Moses, R.W.; Krakowski, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY REPORT FOR THE REACTOR BUILDING, HOT LABORATORY, PRIMARY PUMP HOUSE, AND LAND AREAS AT THE PLUM BROOK REACTOR FACILITY, SANDUSKY, OHIO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later called the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities

Erika N. Bailey

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fusion component design for the moving-ring field-reversed mirror reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This partial report on the reactor design contains sections on the following: (1) burner section magnet system design, (2) plasma ring energy recovery, (3) vacuum system, (4) cryogenic system, (5) tritium flows and inventories, and (6) reactor design and layout. (MOW)

Carlson, G.A.

1981-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Identification and evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of fluoride fuel and flush salts from the molten salt reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an initial identification and evaluation of the alternatives for disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts stored in the drain tanks at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will serve as a resource for the U.S. Department of Energy contractor preparing the feasibility study for this activity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). This document will also facilitate further discussion on the range of credible alternatives, and the relative merits of alternatives, throughout the time that a final alternative is selected under the CERCLA process.

NONE

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised "Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines" to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Electric air filtration: theory, laboratory studies, hardware development, and field evaluations  

SciTech Connect

We summarize the results of a seven-year research project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop electric air filters that extend the service life of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the nuclear industry. This project was unique to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and it entailed comprehensive theory, laboratory studies, and hardware development. We present our work in three major areas: (1) theory of and instrumentation for filter test methods, (2) theoretical and laboratory studies of electric air filters, and (3) development and evaluation of eight experimental electric air filters.

Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.; Kuhl, W.; Lum, B.; Bogdanoff, A.; Hebard, H.; Hall, M.; Banks, D.; Mazumder, M.; Johnson, J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advances in the Estimation of Ice Particle Fall Speeds Using Laboratory and Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate estimates for the fall speed of natural hydrometeors are vital if their evolution in clouds is to be understood quantitatively. In this study, laboratory measurements of the terminal velocity ?t for a variety of ice particle models ...

A. J. Heymsfield; C. D. Westbrook

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Leaching of Inorganic Constituents From Coal Combustion By-Products Under Field and Laboratory Conditions: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last two decades, EPRI has sponsored research to develop technical insights into leaching and attenuation processes and the migration of inorganic waste constituents under actual disposal conditions. This report provides an in-depth analysis of leaching data collected from several EPRI field and laboratory studies. These studies can help utilities accurately assess risks from leachate release and migration and determine the need for engineering controls to protect the environment in the vicinity...

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Impacts of PRB Coals on SCR Catalyst Life and Performance: Field Data from In Situ Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the greater use of both Powder River basin (PRB) coals and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) in the utility industry, there is a concern about the effects of the high calcium coals on SCR catalyst life and performance. Using the "in situ" reactor approach, two catalysts are invloved in an ongoing long-term activity evaluation program at two test sites. The "in situ" reactor is a 2" by 2" (50mm x 50mm) cross-section probe installed in the economizer exit of utility boilers. It subjects catalyst sam...

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nondestructive Evaluation: Boiling Water Reactor Bottom Head Drain Line Examination - Field Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes newly developed technology for the examination of the boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel drain line. The technology targets the examination of the elbow and piping section deemed most susceptible to flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) attack. The technology developed includes a remotely operated sensor manipulator and an ultrasound data acquisition system to perform thickness measurements throughout the affected components.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

140

Field performance of residential refrigerators: A comparison with the laboratory test  

SciTech Connect

The field electricity use of 209 refrigerators was compared to their labeled consumption. The mean field use of all units was 1009 kWh/year, 882 kWh/year for top-freezers, and 1366 kWh/year for side-by-sides. There was considerable scatter in the results but, in general, the label overpredicted field use. The relationship could be best described with the formula, Annual Field Use = 0.94 {times} (Annual Label Us) - 85. For a typical unit with a labeled use of 1160 kWh/year, the field use was about 15% lower. There was considerable seasonality in energy use: the peak weeks generally occurred around the beginning of August. However, there was no simple relationship between the label value and the peak-week consumption.

Meier, A.; Jansky, R.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Field performance of residential refrigerators: A comparison with the laboratory test  

SciTech Connect

The field electricity use of 209 refrigerators was compared to their labeled consumption. The mean field use of all units was 1009 kWh/year, 882 kWh/year for top-freezers, and 1366 kWh/year for side-by-sides. There was considerable scatter in the results but, in general, the label overpredicted field use. The relationship could be best described with the formula, Annual Field Use = 0.94 [times] (Annual Label Us) - 85. For a typical unit with a labeled use of 1160 kWh/year, the field use was about 15% lower. There was considerable seasonality in energy use: the peak weeks generally occurred around the beginning of August. However, there was no simple relationship between the label value and the peak-week consumption.

Meier, A.; Jansky, R.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Advanced Control Design and Field Testing for Wind Turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines require active control systems to operate at variable rotational speeds. As turbines become larger and more flexible, advanced control algorithms become necessary to meet multiple objectives such as speed regulation, blade load mitigation, and mode stabilization. At the same time, they must maximize energy capture. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed control design and testing capabilities to meet these growing challenges.

Hand, M. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility.

Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ames Laboratory Research...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility - IA 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility (IA.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

145

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A...

146

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor...

147

Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Laboratory and Field Measurements of Electrical Resistivity to Determine Saturation and Detect Fractures in a Heated Rock Mass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of intact and fractured representative geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to infer saturation and fracture location in a large-scale field test. Measurements were performed to simulate test conditions with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures to 145 C. Measurements presented are a first step toward making the search for fractures using electrical methods quantitatively. Intact samples showed a gradual resistivity increase when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, while fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling. The resistivity change is greatest for samples with the most exposed surface area. Analysis of a field test provided the opportunity to evaluate fracture detection using electrical methods at a large scale. Interpretation of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images of resistivity contrasts, aided by laboratory derived resistivity-saturation-temperature relationships, indicates that dynamic saturation changes in a heated rock mass are observable and that fractures experiencing drying or resaturation can be identified. The same techniques can be used to locate fractures in geothermal reservoirs using electrical field methods.

Roberts, J J; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

QCDOC - Gauge field configurations/Lattice Archives at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

While many of the QCD lattice configurations developed by the various DOE groups working in this arena may be stored in the Gauge Connection at NERSC (see http://qcd.nersc.gov/), there are still small collections to be found elsewhere. The collection at Brookhaven National Laboratory is one of these, a small collection of configurations generated specifically by the QCDOC Collaboration. There is a small collection of publicly available configurations that can be accessed without registration. Group downloads require registration for a password.

None

150

Usability evaluation for mobile device: a comparison of laboratory and field tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usability testing of mobile devices is an emerging area of research in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. Guidelines had been established as to how usability tests should be conducted. However, there are limitations to the effectiveness of conventional ... Keywords: dynamics environment, mobile devices, usability

Henry Been-Lirn Duh; Gerald C. B. Tan; Vivian Hsueh-hua Chen

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Status and Highlights of Educational Programming Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Research in Science Education Journal. (DOI) 10.1007/s11165-011-9231-8.; Hughes, R. (2010). Keeping women changes in students' and teachers' perception of scientists and attitudes toward science Hughes, R., Dixon-011-9231-8.; Hughes, R. (2010). Keeping women in STEM fields. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology

Weston, Ken

152

Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium treatment within the EBR-II primary sodium cooling system and related systems.

Steven R. Sherman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Study on severe accident fuel dispersion behavior in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Core flow blockage events are a leading contributor to core damage initiation risk in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. During such an accident, insufficient cooling of the fuel could result in core heatup and melting under full coolant flow condition. Coolant inertia forces acting on the melt surface would likely break up the melt into small particles. Under thermal-hydraulic conditions of ANS coolant channel, micro-fine melt particles are expected. Heat transfer between melt particle and coolant, which affects particle breakup, was studied. The study indicates that the thermal effect on melt fragmentation seems to be negligible because the time corresponding to the breakup due to hydrodynamic forces is much shorter than the time for the melt surface to solidify. The study included modeling and analyses to predict transient behavior and transport of debris particles throughout the coolant system. The transient model accounts for the surface forces acting on the particle that results from the pressure variation on the surface, inertia, virtual mass, viscous force due to relative motion of particle in the coolant, gravitation, and resistance due to inhomogenous coolant velocity radially across piping due to possible turbulent coolant motions. Results indicate that debris particles would reside longest in heat exchangers because of lower coolant velocity there. Also core debris tends to move together upon melting and entrainment.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Xiang, J.Y. [Wabash Coll., Crawfordsville, IN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Study on severe accident fuel dispersion behavior in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Core flow blockage events have been identified as a leading contributor to core damage initiation risk in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. During such an accident, insufficient cooling of the fuel in a few adjacent blocked coolant channels out of several hundred channels, could also result in core heatup and melting under full coolant flow condition in other coolant channels. Coolant inertia forces acting on the melt surface would likely break up the melt into small particles. Under thermal-hydraulic conditions of ANS coolant channel, micro-fine melt particles are expected. Heat transfer between melt particle and coolant, which affects the particle breakup characteristics, was studied. The study indicates that the thermal effect on melt fragmentation seems to be negligible because the time corresponding to the breakup due to hydrodynamic forces is much shorter than the time for the melt surface to solidify. The study included modeling and analyses to predict transient behavior and transport of debris particles throughout the coolant system. The transient model accounts for the surface forces acting on the particle that result from the pressure variation on the surface, inertia, virtual mass, viscous force due to the relative motion of the particle in the coolant, gravitation, and resistance due to inhomogeneous coolant velocity radially across piping due to expected turbulent coolant motions. The results indicate that debris particles would reside longest in the heat exchangers because of lower coolant velocity there. Also they are entrained and move together in a cloud.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, M. A.; Pratt, Kerri; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hallar, Anna G.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Retrofit of waste-to-energy facilities equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Volume II: Field and Laboratory Reports, Part 1 of 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II (part 1 of 2) of ''Retrofit of Waste-to-energy Facilities Equipped with Electrostatic Precipitators'' contains the documentation and raw data, including: (1) field reports, (2) analytic laboratory reports, (3) chain of custody forms, and (4) TCLP laboratory reports.

Rigo, H.G. [Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc., Berea, OH (US); Chandler, A.J. [A.J. Chandler & Associates, Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Source-Term and building-Wake Consequence Modeling for the Godiva IV Reactor at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were to evaluate the consequences of a postulated accident to onsite security personnel stationed near the facility during operations of the Godiva IV critical assembly and to identify controls needed to protect these personnel in case of an extreme criticality excursion equivalent to the design-basis accident (DBA). This paper presents the methodology and results of the source-term calculations, building ventilation rates, air concentrations, and consequence calculations that were performed using a multidisciplinary approach with several phenomenology models. Identification of controls needed to mitigate the consequences to near-field receptors is discussed.

Letellier, B.C.; McClure, P.; Restrepo, L.

1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

In Situ Grouting of Liquid Waste Disposal Trenches and Experimental Reactor Fuel Disposal Wells at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the early to mid-1960's, liquid low-level wastes (LLLW) generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were disposed of in specially-constructed, gravel-filled trenches within the Melton Valley watershed at the lab. The initial selected remedy for Trenches 5 and 7 was in situ vitrification; however, an amendment to the record of decision changed the remedy to in situ grouting of the trenches. The work was accomplished by filling the void space within the crushed stone section of each trench with cementitious grout. The contaminated soil surrounding the trenches (1-m perimeter) was then grouted with acrylamide grout. At the HRE fuel wells, a 1-m ring of soil surrounding the fuel wells was grouted with acrylamide. The results of the hydraulic conductivity tests ranged from 4.74 x 10{sup -6} to 3.60 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec, values that were well below the 1 x 10{sup -5} cm/sec design criterion. In summary: The ISG Project was conducted to decrease hydraulic conductivity and thereby decrease water flow and contaminate migration from the area of the trenches. The initial remedy for Trenches 5 and 7 in the Melton Valley ROD was for in situ vitrification of the trench matrix. The remedy was changed to in situ grouting of the trenches and HRE fuel wells through an amendment to the ROD after moisture was found in the trenches. The grouting of the trenches was accomplished by filling the void space within the crushed stone section of each trench with cementitious grout. The contaminated soil surrounding the trenches (1-m perimeter) was then grouted with acrylamide grout to further reduce water infiltration. Soil backfill above each of the seven HRE fuel wells was removed to a depth of approximately 1 m by augering, and the soils were replaced with a cement plug to prevent water infiltration from migrating down the original borehole. Soil surrounding the fuel wells was then grouted with acrylamide to ensure water infiltration through the HRE fuel wells is prevented. A summary of the quantities used is shown. After completion of grouting, in-situ hydraulic conductivities of the grouted materials were measured to verify attainment of the design objective. The areas were then covered with multi-layer caps as part of the MV hydrologic isolation project. (authors)

Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J.; Lambert, R. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trujillo, E. [BWXT Pantex, LLC, Amarillo, TX (United States); Julius, J. [U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

164

Idaho National Laboratory - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, May 19,...

165

Reactor Operations informal monthly report December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor operations at the MRR and HFBR reactors at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented for December 1994. Reactor run-time and power levels, instrumentation, mechanical maintenance, occurrence reports, and safety information are included.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) History of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) You are here: DOE-ID Home > Inside ID > Brief History Site History The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), an 890-square-mile section of desert in southeast Idaho, was established in 1949 as the National Reactor Testing Station. Initially, the missions at the INL were the development of civilian and defense nuclear reactor technologies and management of spent nuclear fuel. Fifty-two reactors—most of them first-of-a-kind—were built, including the Navy’s first prototype nuclear propulsion plant. Of the 52 reactors, three remain in operation at the site. In 1951, the INL achieved one of the most significant scientific accomplishments of the century—the first use of nuclear fission to produce a usable quantity of electricity at the Experimental Breeder Reactor No.

167

California's Public Health Laboratories: Inter-organizational cooperation models to bolster laboratory capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Health Services, Laboratory Field Services,delivering health services, including laboratories. Duringof Health Services, Environmental Laboratory Certification (

Hsieh, Kristina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Laboratory and Field Evaluation of Imidacloprid against Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) and Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) Subterranean Termites in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In one study described herein, 20 privately owned structures were treated with a 0.05% application of imidacloprid (Premise 75 WSP) in order to control infestations of subterranean termites. All applications were made at 15 L per 3.05 linear m per 0.30 m of depth. Ten structures were infested with Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) and ten structures were infested with Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki. All structures were inspected through 42 months post-treatment. Only one structure infested with R. flavipes required post-treatment action. Six structures infested with C. formosanus required post-treatment action. In another study, efficacy data were gathered on Premise Granules when broadcast over an open field and when utilized as a "spot treatment" for control of subterranean termites infesting structures. Open field grids with active R. flavipes were utilized in this study. Grids measuring 8.53 m x 7.32 m were marked off, in-ground commercial termite monitors were installed, and grids were treated with Premise Granules. Untreated southern yellow pine surface boards were then placed in grids to determine if Premise Granules would suppress foraging and feeding on surface boards. Premise Granules did suppress surface feeding of R. flavipes for 9 months post-treatment, although termites were active throughout the study in in-ground commercial termite monitors within treated grids. In a third study, 10 structures built on monolithic slabs, five received a "spot treatment" with Premise Granules at points of subterranean termite infestation 0.61 m either side of active exterior subterranean termite mud tubes. Structures were inspected through 12 mo post-treatment. Suppression of R. flavipes was sustained for 8 wks in all treatment replications following application of granules, with failures at 8, 12, and 28 weeks post-treatment. A laboratory trial was initiated to simulate field treatments with Premise 75 WP 0.10 % AI imidacloprid for treatments of structures. The focus of this research was to investigate the dissipation and translocation of imidacloprid in urban environments. Treated sandy loam soil was added to 19-L buckets. Four different plant species commonly found in urban environments were planted in buckets. Results in these trials indicate that imidacloprid was soluble and that there is leaching.

Keefer, Tony Christopher

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

1962-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines - Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

171

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

172

Final Report - Phase II - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Past research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. The project reported on here was an extension ($20,575) of the prior (much larger) project. This report is focused only on the work completed during the extension period. Further information on the larger impacts of our research, including 28 publications, can be found in the final report for the following projects: 1) Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study Grant # DE-FG03-01ER63270, and 2) Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions Grant # DE-FG03-98ER62630/A001 In this Phase II project, the toxic effects of uranium(VI) were studied using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in a medium containing bicarbonate or 1, 4-piperazinediethane sulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (PIPES) buffer (each at 30 mM, pH 7). The toxicity of uranium(VI) was dependent on the medium buffer and was observed in terms of longer lag times and in some cases, no measurable growth. The minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) was 140 ?M U(VI) in PIPES buffered medium. This is 36 times lower than previously reported for D. desulfuricans. These results suggest that U(VI) toxicity and the detoxification mechanisms of G20 depend greatly on the chemical forms of U(VI) present and the buffer present in a system. Phase II of this project was supported at a cost of $20,575 with most funds expended to support Rajesh Sani salary and benefits. Results have been published in a peer reviewed journal article.

Brent Peyton; Rajesh Sani

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Comprehensive Habit Diagram for Atmospheric Ice Crystals: Confirmation from the Laboratory, AIRS II, and Other Field Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent laboratory experiments and in situ observations have produced results in broad agreement with respect to ice crystal habits in the atmosphere. These studies reveal that the ice crystal habit at ?20C is platelike, extending to ?40C, and ...

Matthew P. Bailey; John Hallett

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Measurement of the Hydraulic Conductivity of Gravels Using a Laboratory Permeameter and Silty Sands Using Field Testing with Observation Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new laboratory permeameter was developed for measuring the hydraulic conductivity of gravels ranging from 0.1 to 2 m/s. The release of pneumatic pressure applied (more)

Judge, Aaron

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

An Overview of the ASCOT Multi-Laboratory Field Experiments in Relation to Drainage Winds and Ambient Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary analyses of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain data were conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine how the development and persistence of local nocturnal drainage flow are affected by large-scale (synoptic- and ...

M. M. Orgill; R. I. Schreck

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Thomas Wallner | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel economy Fuel injection Heavy-duty vehicles Hybrid & electric vehicles Hydrogen & fuel cells Internal combustion Powertrain research Vehicle testing Building design Manufacturing Energy sources Renewable energy Bioenergy Solar energy Wind energy Fossil fuels Oil Nuclear energy Nuclear energy modeling & simulation Nuclear fuel cycle Geology & disposal Reactors Nuclear reactor safety Nuclear reactor materials Energy usage Energy life-cycle analysis Energy storage Batteries Lithium-ion batteries Lithium-air batteries Smart Grid

177

The Integral Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Lineberry, M.J. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A laboratory and pilot plant scaled continuous stirred reactor separator for the production of ethanol from sugars, corn grits/starch or biomass streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved bio-reactor has been developed to allow the high speed, continues, low energy conversion of various substrates to ethanol. The Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS) incorporates gas stripping of the ethanol using a recalculating gas stream between cascading stirred reactors in series. We have operated a 4 liter lab scale unit, and built and operated a 24,000 liter pilot scale version of the bioreactor. High rates of fermentation are maintained in the reactor stages using a highly flocculent yeast strain. Ethanol is recovered from the stripping gas using a hydrophobic solvent absorber (isothermal), after which the gas is returned to the bioreactor. Ethanol can then be removed from the solvent to recover a highly concentrated ethanol product. We have applied the lab scale CSRS to sugars (glucose/sucrose), molasses, and raw starch with simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the starch granules (SSF). The pilot scale CSRS has been operated as a cascade reactor using dextrins as a feed. Operating data from both the lab and pilot scale CSRS are presented. Details of how the system might be applied to cellulosics, with some preliminary data are also given.

Dale, M.C.; Lei, Shuiwang; Zhou, Chongde

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee Laboratory to Highlight Administration Support for Nuclear Energy Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee...

180

PROCEEDINGS OF THE US/UK MEETING ON THE COMPATIBILITY PROBLEMS OF GAS- COOLED REACTORS HELD AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, FEBRUARY 24-26, 1960  

SciTech Connect

Forty papers presented at the US/UK Meeting on the Compatibility Problems of Gas Cooled Reactors are given. Thirty-two of the papers are covered by separate abstracts. Eight papers were previously abstracted for NSA. (M.C.G.)

1961-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, March 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation March 1963. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1963-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, March 1964  

SciTech Connect

The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, March 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, and applied mathematics operation, and programming operations are discussed.

1964-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, October 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1963-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, September 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1963-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, August 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, August 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1963-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, June 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, June 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1963-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, April 1964  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, applied mathematics, programming operation, and radiation protection are discussed.

1964-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test...

189

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

Evan Harpeneau

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

190

Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields  

SciTech Connect

In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

192

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpeneau

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

193

Idaho National Laboratory - Technology Transfer - Technologies ...  

Idaho National Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing ... Environmental Flow-Through Reactor for the In Situ Assessment of Remediation Technologies in Vadose ...

194

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the 17-month period of its grant, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The reactor was operated 4115 hours during FY 1986 and for 6080 hours during the entire 17-month period, an average of 82 hours per week. Utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research; nuclear materials research and development; radiochemistry and trace analysis; nuclear medicine; radiation health physics; computer control of reactors; dose reduction in nuclear power reactors; reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT; MIT Research Reactor. Data on the above utilization for FY 1986 show that the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) engaged in joint activities with nine academic departments and interdepartmental laboratories at MIT, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, and 22 other universities and nonprofit research institutions, such as teaching hospitals.

Not Available

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

195

National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is one of 17 National Laboratories in the United States and is one of the two located in New Mexico. The Laboratory has...

196

A Laboratory Study of the Urban Heat Island in a Calm and Stably Stratified Environment. Part I: Temperature Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive and systematic water-tank study was performed to simulate the urban heat island under a calm and stably stratified environment. The objective was to examine the mean-temperature field, mixing height, and heat-island intensity as ...

Jie Lu; S. Pal Arya; William H. Snyder; Robert E. Lawson Jr.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reactor Operations informal monthly report September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents operations at the MRR and HFBR reactors at Brookhaven National Laboratory for September 1994. Reactor run-times, instrumentation, mechanical maintenance, occurrence reports and safety information are listed. Irradiation summaries are included.

Junker, L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NUCLEAR REACTORS AND EARTHQUAKES  

SciTech Connect

A book is presented which supplies pertinent seismological information to engineers in the nuclear reactor field. Data are presented on the occurrence, intensity, and wave shapes. Techniques are described for evaluating the response of structures to such events. Certain reactor types and their modes of operation are described briefly. Various protection systems are considered. Earthquake experience in industrial and reactor plants is described. (D.L.C.)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Field Operations Procedures Manual for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Advanced Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies The Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) sponsors research, development and deployment (RD&D) activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will pursue these advancements through RD&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and U.S. universities, as well as through collaboration with industry and international partners. These activities will focus on advancing scientific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sodium Reactor Experiment decommissioning. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) located at the Rockwell International Field Laboratories northwest of Los Angeles was developed to demonstrate a sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor for civilian use. The reactor reached full power in May 1958 and provided 37 GWh to the Southern California Edison Company grid before it was shut down in 1967. Decommissioning of the SRE began in 1974 with the objective of removing all significant radioactivity from the site and releasing the facility for unrestricted use. Planning documentation was prepared to describe in detail the equipment and techniques development and the decommissioning work scope. A plasma-arc manipulator was developed for remotely dissecting the highly radioactive reactor vessels. Other important developments included techniques for using explosives to cut reactor vessel internal piping, clamps, and brackets; decontaminating porous concrete surfaces; and disposing of massive equipment and structures. The documentation defined the decommissioning in an SRE dismantling plan, in activity requirements for elements of the decommissioning work scope, and in detailed procedures for each major task.

Carroll, J.W.; Conners, C.C.; Harris, J.M.; Marzec, J.M.; Ureda, B.F.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsins 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800C.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

204

Field and Laboratory Study of a Ground-Coupled Water Source Heat Pump with an Integral Enthalpy Exchange System for Classrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School classroom space-conditioning equipment in hot and humid climates is often excessively burdened by the requirement to dehumidify incoming air to maintain proper thermal comfort and air quality. To that end, application of new or modified technologies is needed to increase the dehumidification abilities of equipment without compromising energy efficiency or the need for fresh ventilation air. To study the effectiveness of integrated heat pump and enthalpy exchange equipment, a nominal 4-ton water-source heat pump, coupled with a geothermal water loop and incorporating a forced fresh-air enthalpy exchange system was installed in a typical middle school classroom in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This project is a joint effort among Oak Ridge School District, Tennessee Valley Authority, Energy Office of the State of Tennessee, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The retrofit classroom, along with a similar baseline classroom (employing a water source heat pump supplied by a boiler/cooling tower loop), were instrumented with an Internet-based system to control and monitor performance, efficiency, and a variety of air states. Those include classroom air, outdoor air, semi-conditioned fresh air, and supply air. Particular attention was dedicated to the humidity content and the carbon dioxide content of conditioned space (classroom) air and to the intake rate of forced fresh air. This field study builds on a previous laboratory study of a water-source heat pump coupled to an enthalpy recovery system. The laboratory work showed good potential for reducing the moisture load from forced ventilation air. At simulated outdoor conditions of 90F (32.2C) and 90% RH, the enthalpy recovery wheel in the nominal 2-ton system was able to capture and exhaust 9.9 lb of moisture that would otherwise have to be handled solely by the cooling coil.

Domitrovic, R.; Hayzen, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.; Chen, F. C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Using laboratory flow experiments and reactive chemical transport modeling for designing waterflooding of the Agua Fria Reservoir, Poza Rica-Altamira Field, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Waterflooding for enhanced oil recovery requires that injected waters must be chemically compatible with connate reservoir waters, in order to avoid mineral dissolution-and-precipitation cycles that could seriously degrade formation permeability and injectivity. Formation plugging is a concern especially in reservoirs with a large content of carbonates, such as calcite and dolomite, as such minerals typically react rapidly with an aqueous phase, and have strongly temperature-dependent solubility. Clay swelling can also pose problems. During a preliminary waterflooding pilot project, the Poza Rica-Altamira oil field, bordering the Gulf coast in the eastern part of Mexico, experienced injectivity loss after five months of reinjection of formation waters into well AF-847 in 1999. Acidizing with HCl restored injectivity. We report on laboratory experiments and reactive chemistry modeling studies that were undertaken in preparation for long-term waterflooding at Agua Frma. Using analogous core plugs obtained from the same reservoir interval, laboratory coreflood experiments were conducted to examine sensitivity of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects to water composition. Native reservoir water, chemically altered waters, and distilled water were used, and temporal changes in core permeability, mineral abundances and aqueous concentrations of solutes were monitored. The experiments were simulated with the multi-phase, nonisothermal reactive transport code TOUGHREACT, and reasonable to good agreement was obtained for changes in solute concentrations. Clay swelling caused an additional impact on permeability behavior during coreflood experiments, whereas the modeled permeability depends exclusively on chemical processes. TOUGHREACT was then used for reservoir-scale simulation of injecting ambient-temperature water (30 C, 86 F) into a reservoir with initial temperature of 80 C (176 F). Untreated native reservoir water was found to cause serious porosity and permeability reduction due to calcite precipitation, which is promoted by the retrograde solubility of this mineral. Using treated water that performed well in the laboratory flow experiments was found to avoid excessive precipitation, and allowed injection to proceed.

Birkle, P.; Pruess, K.; Xu, T.; Figueroa, R.A. Hernandez; Lopez, M. Diaz; Lopez, E. Contreras

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

207

Survey of Optimization of Reactor Coolant Cleanup Systems: For Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of the reactor coolant cleanup systems in the boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment is important for controlling the transport of corrosion products (metals and activated metals), fission products, and coolant impurities (soluble and insoluble) throughout the reactor coolant loop, and this optimization contributes to reducing primary system radiation fields. The removal of radionuclides and corrosion products is just one of many functions (both ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

High poloidal beta equilibria in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor limited by a natural inboard poloidal field null  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (Plasma Phys. Controlled Nucl. Fusion Research {bold 1}, 51 (1986)) has produced plasma equilibria with values of {Lambda}{equivalent to}{beta}{sub {ital p} eq}+{ital l}{sub {ital i}}/2 as large as 7, {epsilon}{beta}{sub {ital p} dia}{equivalent to}2{mu}{sub 0}{epsilon}{l angle}{ital p}{sub {perpendicular}}{r angle}/{l angle}{l angle}{ital B}{sub {ital p}}{r angle}{r angle}{sup 2} as large as 1.6, and Troyon normalized diamagnetic beta (Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 26}, 209 (1984); Phys. Lett. {bold 110A}, 29 (1985)), {beta}{sub {ital N}dia}{equivalent to}10{sup 8}{l angle}{beta}{sub {ital t}{perpendicular}}{r angle}{ital aB}{sub 0}/{ital I}{sub {ital p}} as large as 4.7. When {epsilon}{beta}{sub {ital p} dia}{approx gt}1.25, a separatrix entered the vacuum chamber, producing a naturally diverted discharge that was sustained for many energy confinement times, {tau}{sub {ital E}}. The largest values of {epsilon}{beta}{sub {ital p}} and plasma stored energy were obtained when the plasma current was ramped down prior to neutral beam injection. The measured peak ion and electron temperatures were as large as 24 and 8.5 keV, respectively. Plasma stored energy in excess of 2.5 MJ and {tau}{sub {ital E}} greater than 130 msec were obtained. Confinement times of greater than 3 times that expected from L-mode predictions have been achieved. The fusion power gain {ital Q}{sub DD} reached a value of 1.3{times}10{sup {minus}3} in a discharge with {ital I}{sub {ital p}}=1 MA and {epsilon}{beta}{sub {ital p} dia}=0.85. A large, sustained negative loop voltage during the steady-state portion of the discharge indicates that a substantial noninductive component of {ital I}{sub {ital p}} exists in these plasmas. Transport code analysis indicates that the bootstrap current constitutes up to 65% of {ital I}{sub {ital p}}.

Sabbagh, S.A.; Gross, R.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A. (Department of Applied Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (USA)); Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chance, M.S.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Hatcher, R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hirshman, S.P.; Janos, A.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Manickam, J.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, D.K.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (USA)); Kesner, J.; Marmar, E.S.; Terry, J.L. (MIT Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (USA))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Reactor-relevant quiescent H-mode operation using torque from non-axisymmetric, non-resonant magnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from recent experiments demonstrate that quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) sustained by magnetic torque from non-axisymmetric magnetic fields is a promising operating mode for future burning plasmas. Using magnetic torque from n=3 fields to replace counter-I{sub p} torque from neutral beam injection (NBI), we have achieved long duration, counter-rotating QH-mode operation with NBI torque ranging from counter-I{sub p} to up to co-I{sub p} values of 1-1.3 Nm. This co-I{sub p} torque is 3 to 4 times the scaled torque that ITER will have. These experiments utilized an ITER-relevant lower single-null plasma shape and were done with ITER-relevant values of {nu}{sub ped}{sup *} and {beta}{sub N}{sup ped}. These discharges exhibited confinement quality H{sub 98y2}=1.3, in the range required for ITER. In preliminary experiments using n=3 fields only from a coil outside the toroidal coil, QH-mode plasmas with low q{sub 95}=3.4 have reached fusion gain values of G={beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2}=0.4, which is the desired value for ITER. Shots with the same coil configuration also operated with net zero NBI torque. The limits on G and co-I{sub p} torque have not yet been established for this coil configuration. QH-mode work to has made significant contact with theory. The importance of edge rotational shear is consistent with peeling-ballooning mode theory. Qualitative and quantitative agreements with the predicted neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque is seen.

Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; Snyder, P. B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Solomon, W. M.; Park, J.-K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Numerical simulation of the air flow field in a laboratory fume hood using the CFD-ACE(TM) computational fluid dynamics code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was the numerical simulation of the air flow field within a standard laboratory fume hood using the k-6 turbulence model. The study investigated the flow field at different sash openings. The results of the computation realized information on the hood entry losses and other design parameters that are of interest to the users, designers and owners of fume hoods. After the specification of the problem and generation of the mesh, the modeled hood was simulated using CFD-ACE TM , a commercial computational fluid dynamics software package. The code is based on the finite volume method. In defining the grid, due care was exercised in maintaining the cell aspect ratio and grid orthogonality within the recommended limits. The air flow patterns at full open sash compared favorably with experimental results. The results at lowered sash revealed air flow characteristics and slot volume flows that were not reported in previously published literature on fume hoods. These results along with smaller hood entry losses confirmed the better performance of fume hoods at sash openings that are less than half open. Further, comparison between the computed volume flow rates and published design data was favorable.

D'Sousa, Cedric Benedict

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Near-field characterization of hydrogen and helium operation on the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) diagnostic neutral beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Optical Multichannel Analyzer has been used to measure beam divergence and composition. This measurement is usually performed near the center of the neutralizer or beyond the magnet. In the past, these locations suffered difficult beam composition analysis and low light intensity, respectively. It has been determined that the light emission is relatively independent of neutralizer line density in the near field, allowing near-field measurements to overcome both difficulties. At optimum perveance, but under conditions of high gas throughput, the helium 1/e-divergence angle was measured to be 1.5{degree}. Further investigation found that the divergence decreased with gas throughput down to 1.25{degree}. Mimimum divergences for the full-, half-, and third-energy hydrogen components were 1.1{degree}, 1.2{degree}, and 1.4{degree}, respectively. Relative neutral hydrogen particle fluxes available for injection into TFTR are a function of perveance. At maximum perveance, the full-, half-, and third-energy atom fractions were 0.25 {plus minus} 0.04, 0.5 {plus minus} 0.04, and 0.25 {plus minus} 0.05, respectively. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Kamperschroer, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Roquemore, A.L.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

214

Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Mixed field dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy at the MITR-II research reactor  

SciTech Connect

During the past several years, there has been growing interest in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using epithermal neutron beams. The dosimetry of these beams is challenging. The incident beam is comprised mostly of epithermal neutrons, but there is some contamination from photons and fast neutrons. Within the patient, the neutron spectrum changes rapidly as the incident epithermal neutrons scatter and thermalize, and a photon field is generated from neutron capture in hydrogen. In this paper, a method to determine the doses from thermal and fast neutrons, photons, and the B-10([ital n],[alpha])Li-7 reaction is presented. The photon and fast neutron doses are measured with ionization chambers, in realistic phantoms, using the dual chamber technique. The thermal neutron flux is measured with gold foils using the cadmium difference technique; the thermal neutron and B-10 doses are determined by the kerma factor method. Representative results are presented for a unilateral irradiation of the head. Sources of error in the method as applied to BNCT dosimetry, and the uncertainties in the calculated doses are discussed.

Rogus, R.D.; Harling, O.K.; Yanch, J.C. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Achievements: Nuclear Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne National Laboratory Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

217

Experimental Breeder Reactor I Preservation Plan  

SciTech Connect

Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR I) is a National Historic Landmark located at the Idaho National Laboratory, a Department of Energy laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The facility is significant for its association and contributions to the development of nuclear reactor testing and development. This Plan includes a structural assessment of the interior and exterior of the EBR I Reactor Building from a preservation, rather than an engineering stand point and recommendations for maintenance to ensure its continued protection.

Julie Braun

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

D. Kokkinos

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1960  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

Sale, W.

1960-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation August 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1961-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, February 1962  

SciTech Connect

The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, and programming are discussed.

1962-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation October 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation September 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1961-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation process, reactor technology employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, and radiation protection are discussed.

1962-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1962. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1962-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation August 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1959  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July, 1959. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1959-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1969. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1961-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, April 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1961-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, February 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1961-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation July 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1957  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1957-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1957  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1957-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1960  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October, 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1960-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation March 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1959  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1959. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1962  

SciTech Connect

The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, and programming are discussed.

1962-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, January 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, January 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1961-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation October 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1961-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation June 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 1, 2002 THROUGH MARCH 31, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct energy conversion is the only potential means for producing electrical energy from a fission reactor without the Carnot efficiency limitations. This project was undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratories, The University of Florida, Texas A&M University and General Atomics to explore the possibilities of direct energy conversion. Other means of producing electrical energy from a fission reactor, without any moving parts, are also within the statement of proposed work. This report documents the efforts of General Atomics. Sandia National Laboratories, the lead laboratory, provides overall project reporting and documentation. The highlights of this reporting period are: (1) Cooling of the vapor core reactor and the MHD generator was incorporated into the Vapor Core Reactor model using standard heat transfer calculation methods. (2) Fission product removal, previously modeled as independent systems for each class of fission product, was incorporated into the overall fuel recycle loop of the Vapor Core Reactor. The model showed that the circulating activity levels are quite low. (3) Material distribution calculations were made for the ''pom-pom'' style cathode for the Fission Electric Cell. Use of a pom-pom cathode will eliminate the problem of hoop stress in the thin spherical cathode caused by the electric field.

L.C. BROWN

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Sandia National Laboratories Acoustic Cell Lysing for ...  

field work. The cell lysis unit can also be ... Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, ...

243

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Field sampling and analysis plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling and analysis (S & A) plan has been developed as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The S & A plan has been written in support of the remedial investigation (RI) plan for WAG 2 (ORNL 1990). WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), White Oak Creek embayment (WOCE) on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment (Fig. 1.1). The WOC system is the surface drainage for the major ORNL WAGs and has been exposed to a diversity of contaminants from operations and waste disposal activities in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 acts as a conduit through which hydrologic fluxes carry contaminants from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This document describes the following: an overview of the RI plan, background information for the WAG 2 system, and objectives of the S & A plan; the scope and implementation of the first 2 years of effort of the S & A plan and includes recent information about contaminants of concern, organization of S & A activities, interactions with other programs, and quality assurance specific to the S & A activities; provides details of the field sampling plans for sediment, surface water, groundwater, and biota, respectively; and describes the sample tracking and records management plan.

Boston, H.L.; Ashwood, T.L.; Borders, D.M.; Chidambariah, V.; Downing, D.J.; Fontaine, T.A.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Miller, D.E.; Moore, G.K.; Suter, G.W.; Tardiff, M.F.; Watts, J.A.; Wickliff, D.S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Documents | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear reactor materials ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics...

246

Laboratory Reagents  

SciTech Connect

Replaced by WMH-310, Section 4.17. This document outlined the basic methodology for preparing laboratory reagents used in the 222-S Standards Laboratory. Included were general guidelines for drying, weighing, transferring, dissolving, and diluting techniques common when preparing laboratory reagents and standards. Appendix A contained some of the reagents prepared by the laboratory.

CARLSON, D.D.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fission energy: The integral fast reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a such next- generation reactor concept. The IFR concept has a number of specific technical advantages that collectively address the potential difficulties facing the expansion of nuclear power deployment. In particular, the IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next-generation reactor as discussed below. This document discusses these requirements.

Chang, Yoon I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Neutron beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a 250-kW TRIGA Reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory and is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The reactor and its facilities regarding radiography are detailed in another paper at this conference; this paper summarizes neutron flux measurements and calculations that have been performed to better understand and potentially improve the neutronics characteristics of the reactor.

Imel, G.R.; Urbatsch, T.; Pruett, D.P.; Ross, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

Daniels, F.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate the laboratory procedure is a valid indica-Design Options to Improve the Energy Efficiency of a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate commercially manufactured refrigerators were u~ as laboratory test beds, a testing sequence of ..as PHASE I cabinets with an optimized Option 2 Evaporator/condenser size, surface r~frige~tion circuit or cvcle were

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

253

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for the University of Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energys (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at the University of Florida. This project was successfully completed through an integrated and collaborative effort involving the INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (Headquarters and Field Office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Universities, and contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and SNF shipping and disposition. With the work completed with these two universities, and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

CONVECTION REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

1960-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

record neutron beam at Los record neutron beam at Los Alamos National Laboratory July 10, 2012 New method has potential to advance materials measurement LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 10, 2012-Using a one-of-a-kind laser system at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists have created the largest neutron beam ever made by a short-pulse laser, breaking a world record. Neutron beams are usually made with particle accelerators or nuclear reactors and are commonly used in a wide variety of scientific research, particularly in advanced materials science. Using the TRIDENT laser, a unique and powerful 200 trillion-watt short-pulse laser, scientists from Los Alamos, the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany, and Sandia National Laboratories focus high-intensity light on an ultra-thin plastic sheet

256

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory has three nuclear reactors on its site that were used for scientific research. The reactors are all shut down, and the Laboratory is addressing environmental issues associated with their operations. photo of BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - Beginning operations in 1950, the graphite reactor was used for research in medicine, biology, chemistry, physics and nuclear engineering. One of the most significant achievements at this facility was the development of technetium-99m, a radiopharmaceutical widely used to image almost any organ in the body. The graphite reactor was shut down in 1969. Parts of it have been decommissioned, with the remainder to be addressed by 2011. More history

257

Brookhaven National Laboratory | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Site Overview The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) (predecessor to U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). Formerly Camp Upton, a U.S. Army installation site, Brookhaven is located on 5,263-acre site on Long Island in Upton, New York, approximately 60 miles east of New York City. Historically, BNL was involved in the construction of accelerators and research reactors such as the Cosmotron, the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) and the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). These accelerators and reactors lead the way in high-energy physics experiments and subsequent discoveries. To complete the EM BNL mission the following must be completed, all

258

Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials Award Recipient Estimated Award Amount* Award Location Supporting Organizations Project Description University of Nebraska $979,978 Lincoln, NE Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA), Texas A&M (College Station, TX) Project will explore the development of advanced metal/ceramic composites. These improvements could lead to more efficient production of electricity in advanced reactors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory $849,000 Oak Ridge, TN University of Wisconsin-Madison (Madison, WI) Project will develop novel high-temperature high-strength steels with the help of computational modeling, which could lead to increased efficiency in advanced reactors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

259

Rebuilding the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor: A feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

After nearly thirty years of operation, Brookhaven`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is still one of the world`s premier steady-state neutron sources. A major center for condensed matter studies, it currently supports fifteen separate beamlines conducting research in fields as diverse as crystallography, solid-state, nuclear and surface physics, polymer physics and structural biology and will very likely be able to do so for perhaps another decade. But beyond that point the HFBR will be running on borrowed time. Unless appropriate remedial action is taken, progressive radiation-induced embrittlement problems will eventually shut it down. Recognizing the HFBR`s value as a national scientific resource, members of the Laboratory`s scientific and reactor operations staffs began earlier this year to consider what could be done both to extend its useful life and to assure that it continues to provide state-of-the-art research facilities for the scientific community. This report summarizes the findings of that study. It addresses two basic issues: (i) identification and replacement of lifetime-limiting components and (ii) modifications and additions that could expand and enhance the reactor`s research capabilities.

Brynda, W.J.; Passell, L.; Rorer, D.C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Neutrino Oscillations with Reactor Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prospect measurements of neutrino oscillations with reactor neutrinos are reviewed in this document. The following items are described: neutrinos oscillations status, reactor neutrino experimental strategy, impact of uncertainties on the neutrino oscillation sensitivity and, finally, the experiments in the field. This is the synthesis of the talk delivered during the NOW2006 conference at Otranto (Italy) during September 2006.

Anatael Cabrera

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. INEL is a multiprogram, laboratory site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Overall site management is provided by the DOE Field Office, Idaho; however, the DOE Field Office, Chicago has responsibility for the Argonne National Laboratory-West facilities and operations through the Argonne Area Office. In addition, the Idaho Branch Office of the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office has responsibility for the Naval Reactor Facility (NRF) at the INEL. The assessment included all DOE elements having ongoing program activities at the site except for the NRF. In addition, the Safety and Health Subteam did not review the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. facilities and operations. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from June 17 to August 2, 1991, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal INEL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Argonne National Laboratory - West -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Argonne National Laboratory - West Argonne National Laboratory - West - 014 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Argonne National Laboratory - West (014) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The primary mission of the Argonne National Laboratory-West was to support liquid metal reactor research and development for the Department of Energy¿s Integral Fast Reactor Program, but the program was terminated. Activities at the Laboratory now include technology development for spent nuclear fuel and waste treatment, reactor and fuel cycle safety, and facility decommissioning. The decommissioning and other clean up is being

263

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

264

Materials Development for the Traveling Wave Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors ... First-Principles Theory of Magnetism, Crystal Field and Phonon Spectrum of...

265

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Review: Solar Thermal Reactors for Materials Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, there are no industrial scale solar reactors used for material processing and only small research units have been tried. Various laboratory scale solar...

267

Neutronics and radiation damage calculations for fusion reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the neutronics calculations that have been carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess radiation damage problems in fusion reactors are presented and discussed.

Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Gabriel, T.A.; Santoro, R.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The First Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Chicago Pile-1(CP-1) was the world's firstnuclear reactor.CP-1 was built on aracketscourt, under the abandoned west stands of the originalAlonzo Stagg Fieldstadium, at theUniversity of...

269

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

BNL | Our History: Reactors as Research Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> See also: Accelerators > See also: Accelerators Brookhaven History: Using Reactors as Research Tools BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the Laboratory's first big machine and the first peace-time reactor built in the United States following World War II. The reactor's primary mission was to produce neutrons for scientific experimentation and to refine reactor technology. At the time, the BGRR could accommodate more simultaneous experiments than any other reactor. Scientists and engineers from every corner of the U.S. came to use the reactor, which was not only a source of neutrons for experiments, but also an excellent training facility. Researchers used the BGRR's neutrons as tools for studying atomic nuclei and the structure of solids, and to investigate many physical, chemical and

271

Gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing.

Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)...

273

Safeguards Laboratory (SL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safeguards Laboratory Safeguards Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Safeguards Laboratory is a Department of Energy user facility equipped with a comprehensive set of field-deployable instrumentation for safeguards system development and personnel training. Mock-ups using industrial equipment and reference nuclear materials simulate real-world conditions for training, testing, and evaluations. The lab's openness and availability to the private sector enable development of new technologies that combat the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Applications Training and International Outreach Nondestructive Analysis Measurements Instrument Evaluations Integrated Safeguards Methodologies Measurement Technique Development Specifications Gamma and X-ray detection systems Handheld survey instruments

274

Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of inherent safety concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and thermophysical properties of the fuel and their compatibility with the reactor coolant, with corresponding differences in the challenges presented to the reactor developers. Accident phenomena are discussed for the sodium-cooled fast reactor based on the mechanistic progression of conditions from accident initiation to accident termination, whether a benign state is achieved or more severe consequences are expected. General principles connecting accident phenomena and fuel properties are developed from the oxide and metal fuel safety analyses, providing guidelines that can be used as part of the evaluation for selection of fuel type for the sodium-cooled fast reactor.

R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Laboratory Directed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The approach was to design such magnets and test various manufacturing techniques (grinding, EDM, etc.) and check the quality of the resulting field. The resulting field...

276

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

Wigner, E.P.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume II of IV, Results of Laboratory and Field Research on New Concepts in Weir and Pool Fishways, 1982-1984 Final Project Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive review of fishway design practice led to new design concepts that had previously been untested. This concept was based on the observation that fish can be stimulated to leap when presented with certain hydraulic conditions. A laboratory test program was conducted to develop this concept into a new fishway configuration. Field testing revealed that components of the new design improved fish passage. Verification of the initial premise that fish can be stimulated to leap needs further study.

Aaserude, Robert G.; Orsborn, John F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Telephone costs at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a fusion energy research laboratory located on the Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro, New Jersey. Princeton University operates the laboratory under contact with the US Department of Energy (DOE). PPPL researches nuclear fusion and plasma physics and investigates the potential of a commercial fusion reactor. The objective of the audit was to determine whether PPPL was monitoring telephone use and costs in order to prevent personal toll costs from being charged to the DOE contract. Our audit disclosed that 5 out of the 10 PPPL cost centers we reviewed were not following established policies and procedures for monitoring telephone toll charges. This condition resulted because PPPL's management did not adequately review telephone use and costs. As a result, PPPL charged personal toll calls to DOE. Therefore, we recommend that the Manager, DOE Field Office, Chicago, (CH) direct PPPL to enforce its telephone policies and procedures to ensure that personal toll calls are not charged to DOE. The Acting Manager, CH, concurred with our recommendations and agreed to implement corrective actions.

1991-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1959  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1959. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, radiation protection, and laboratory auxiliaries operation area discussed.

1959-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, October 1956  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for October 1956.

1956-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, January 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, January, 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, radiation protection, laboratory auxiliaries operation, and technical administration operation area discussed.

1962-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1961  

SciTech Connect

The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, June 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, laboratory auxiliaries operation, and professional placement and relations practices are discussed.

1961-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1958  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, June, 1958. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics, instrumentation research, employee relations, operations research, synthesis operation, programming, radiation protection, and laboratory auxiliaries operation are discussed.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1961  

SciTech Connect

The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, laboratory auxiliaries operation, and technical administration operation are discussed.

1962-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1957  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for December 1957.

1958-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1961  

SciTech Connect

The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, laboratory auxiliaries operation, and professional placement and relations practices are discussed.

1961-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, November 1956  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operations research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for November, 1956.

1956-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, February 1958  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for February 1958.

1958-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, November 1957  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for November 1957.

1957-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

291

Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Co  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. With main facilities in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, Calif., Sandia has major R&D responsibilities in national security, energy and environmental technologies and economic competitiveness. Annular Core Research Reactor Facility At the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) facility, Sandia researchers can subject various test objects to a

292

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

NEW HOT LABORATORY FACILITIES AT LOS ALAMOS  

SciTech Connect

New Hot Laboratory Facilities which support three major research programs directed by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the University of California are described. For the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program, a hot cell addition to the Radio Chemistry Building at Los Alamos will be completed early in 1963, and construction is expected to start soon on the hot cell addition to the Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly Building at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Nevada. Integral hot laboratories are designed in the facilities for the Ultra High Temperature Reactor Experiment and the Fast Reactor Core Test at Los Alamos. (auth)

Wherritt, C.R.; Franke, P.; Field, R.E.; Lyle, A.R.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Downloads | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Solar energy ---Wind energy --Fossil fuels ---Natural Gas --Hydrogen --Nuclear energy ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor...

295

NREL Launches Collaborative Resource for Field Test Best Practices (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic portal documents and shares state-of-the-art Dynamic portal documents and shares state-of-the-art residential field test tools and techniques. Field testing is a science and an art-a tricky process that develops through a lot of trial and error. Researchers in the Advanced Residential Buildings group at the National Renewable Energy Labora- tory (NREL) regularly conduct field experiments and long-term monitoring in occupied and unoc- cupied houses throughout the United States. The goal is to capture real-world performance of energy- efficient systems, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Build- ing America program. In addition to the technical challenges of making accurate field measurements, NREL researchers realized another problem: the vast body of field test know-how based on years of collective experience is currently scattered throughout the

296

United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support  

SciTech Connect

The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

Douglas Morrell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE...

298

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

299

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

Wigner, E.P.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

REACTOR SHIELD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

302

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

303

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is developing the scientific basis to extend existing nuclear power plant operating life beyond the current 60-year licensing period and ensure long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security. The program is conducted in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, industry, and international partners. Idaho National Laboratory serves as the Technical Integration Office and coordinates the research and development (R&D) projects in the following pathways: Materials Aging and Degradation Assessment, Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems

305

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols  

SciTech Connect

Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

306

Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Savannah River Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Transfer Laboratory, recently- constructed adjacent to the main Savannah River Laboratory building, was designed to mock up nuclear heating and cooling of reactor components under a variety- of conditions. Nuclear heating is simulated by electrical resistance heating of test sections with a 3 MW directcurrent power supply. Cooling is provided by water. Three test stations (A, B, and C) are available for testing full-size fuel assemblies, measuring flow instabilities, and for measuring burnout heat fluxes. Safeguards provided in the design of the facility and conservative operating procedures minimize or elimnate potential hazards. (auth)

Knoebel, D.H.; Harris, S.D.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

311

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

312

Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Research Reactor BMRR The last of the Lab's reactors, the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), was shut down in December 2000. The BMRR was a three megawatt...

313

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

315

Fusion reactors: a remote possibility  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of controlled thermonuclear reactor experiments will be faced with the handling problems of tritium and neutron activation that will dominate the safety and maintenance problems of future fusion reactors. The nuclear industry has been working with highly radioactive systems for many years and has developed the tools and methods to do safely productive work in the presence of high radiation fields. These methods can be applied to CTR work by extending them to the unique problems associated with fusion reactors. (auth)

Doggett, J.N.

1975-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - March 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandia National Laboratories - March Sandia National Laboratories - March 2013 Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - March 2013 March 2013 Operational Awareness Oversight of Sandia National Laboratories [HIAR SNL-2013-03-18] The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Independent Oversight activity was to perform an operational awareness site visit to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to discuss Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) issues and improvement plan. SNL management also briefed Independent Oversight on engineered safety implementation. Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - March 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - April 2012 Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories -

317

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

318

POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

Zinn, W.H.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

322

PROTEUS - Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Toolset for Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis PROTEUS Faster and more accurate neutronics calculations enable optimum reactor design... Argonne National Laboratory's powerful reactor physics toolset, PROTEUS, empowers users to create optimal reactor designs quickly, reliably and accurately. ...Reducing costs for designers of fast spectrum reactors. PROTEUS' long history of validation provides confidence in predictive simulations Argonne's simulation tools have more than 30 years of validation history against numerous experiments and measurements. The tools within PROTEUS work together, using the same interface files for easier integration of calculations. Multi-group Fast Reactor Cross Section Processing: MC 2 -3 No other fast spectrum multigroup generation tool

323

Press Releases | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear reactor materials ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics...

324

Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear reactor materials ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics...

325

Science Highlights | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear reactor materials ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics...

326

Success Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear reactor materials ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics...

327

Employee Spotlights | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear reactor materials ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics...

328

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

331

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

332

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

333

Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Decommissioning Click here to view Click here to view Reactor Decommissioning Click on an image to enlarge A crane removes the reactor vessel from the Power Burst Facility...

334

National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, Jan. 3, 2013-In commemoration of its 70th anniversary, Los Alamos National Laboratory kicks off a yearlong lecture series on Wednesday, Jan. 9, at 5:30 p.m. with a presentation about homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau at the Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos. - 2 - The inaugural lecture is based on a book by local writers Dorothy Hoard, Judy Machen and Ellen McGehee about the area's settlement between 1887 and 1942. On hikes across the Pajarito Plateau, Hoard envisioned the Los Alamos area before modern roads and bridges made transportation much easier. The trails she walked

335

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume II: Monte Carlo Calculations for Nuclear Reactors. In-Core Management of Four Reactor Types. In-Core Management in CANDU-PHW Reactors. Reactor Dynamics. The Theory of Neutron Leakage in Reactor Lattices. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor is described comprising a plurality of horizontal trays containing a solution of a fissionable material, the trays being sleeved on a vertical tube which contains a vertically-reciprocable control rod, a gas-tight chamber enclosing the trays, and means for conducting vaporized moderator from the chamber and for replacing vaporized moderator in the trays. (AEC)

Wigner, E.P.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

Wende, Charles W. J. (West Chester, PA)

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

Anderson, H.L.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Idaho National Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Department of Energy National Laboratories. Laboratory or Facility Website ...

343

Aerosol Laboratory - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Engineering Capabilities > Engineering Experimentation > Aerosol Laboratory Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Aerosol Laboratory The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) houses equipment to measure and record the physical parameters necessary to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols. Bookmark and Share The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) has extensive analytic and experimental capabilities to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols formed from the condensation of vapors. Computer codes have been developed to

344

Field grouting summary report on the WAG 4 seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes A--D  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion data. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of Strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70% of the {sup 90}Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 X 10{sup {minus}6} cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground. The main report describes brief background to the project, describes and analyzes the grouting operations, draws conclusions from the work performed, and presents some of the lessons learned. Appendices contain: (A) pipe driving records; (B) casing grout injection records; (C) in-situ hydraulic conductivity testing records; and (D) grout quality control testing records.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Strategic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Strategic Initiative Fund, IG-0601...

346

Energy Systems Laboratory ESL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product ESL specializes in the research fields of metering, modeling and data analysis of energy use in buildings. References Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL)1 LinkedIn...

347

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to breed nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and burn actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is fertile or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing TRU-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II EBR-II at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Thermal Scout Pinpoints Hard-to-Find Problems in CSP Fields (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

receiver survey system uses an infrared camera, receiver survey system uses an infrared camera, GPS technology, and computer software to rapidly analyze concentrating solar power fields and locate defective receivers. In a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) system, collectors reflect the sun's rays onto long, tubular receivers that convert the sunlight into heat that is used to gener- ate electricity. The long-term performance of these receivers-designed to minimize heat loss to the environment while absorbing as much sunlight as possible-is critical for high efficiency and sustained performance. Traditionally, locating problems with receivers has been a costly, time-consuming, and labor- intensive effort, often requiring manual inspection of tens of thousands of receiver tubes. In most cases, operators must assess the entire output of a plant and roughly estimate the

349

Variability for Biomass Production and Plant Composition in Sericea Lespedeza Germplasm. Final report on a Field and Laboratory Research Program, September 30, 1990--December 31, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sericea lespedeza [Lespedeza cuneata] is a deep-rooted legume that can be established successfully on eroded and depleted croplands. It is tolerant of drought, high levels of aluminum, and low soil fertility; environmental conditions found throughout the southeastern region of the USA. Sericea lespedeza is capable of improving soil by increasing its organic matter and nitrogen content rapidly. A field with a four year stand of sericea lespedeza grown for soil conservation or biomass production may have over 7 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} of residues on the surface. Once established, sericea lespedeza maintenance costs are relatively small compared to other plants. While most herbaceous plants require nitrogen fertilization, sericea lespedeza fixes its own. Compared to most other crops, relatively few diseases and insect problems are associated with sericea lespedeza. A field experiment aimed at measuring biomass yield of 81 genotypes of sericea lespedeza over time and variation in biomass composition was conducted. Genotype R194-79-290-9 had the highest mean biomass yield and, consistently, ranked among the top four during the years that this study was conducted. Other genotypes that also had a good performance over the four years are the cultivar Serala and the breeding line 75-2-3. No significant differences were found among genotypes for percentage of crude protein content. There were significant differences among genotypes for neutral detergent fiber, hemicellulose, and holocellulose content. There were not significant differences among genotypes for acid detergent fiber, lignin and cellulose content. Further testing of the best genotypes should be conducted at several locations to determine the genotype to be released for the specific purpose of biomass production. Screening of accessions from the Plant Introduction System should be conducted to determine their variability for lignin and crude protein content.

Mosjidis, J.A. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Agronomy and Soils

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The First Decommissioning of a Fusion Reactor Fueled by Deuterium-Tritium  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University (PPPL) was the first fusion reactor fueled by a mixture of deuterium and tritium (D-T) to be decommissioned in the world. The decommissioning was performed over a period of three years and was completed safely, on schedule, and under budget. Provided is an overview of the project and detail of various factors which led to the success of the project. Discussion will cover management of the project, engineering planning before the project started and during the field work as it was being performed, training of workers in the field, the novel adaptation of tools from other industry, and the development of an innovative process for the use of diamond wire to segment the activated/contaminated vacuum vessel. The success of the TFTR decommissioning provides a viable model for the decommissioning of D-T burning fusion devices in the future.

Charles A. Gentile; Erik Perry; Keith Rule; Michael Williams; Robert Parsells; Michael Viola; James Chrzanowski

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

Virtual Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

Piet Hut

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advanced reactor development: The LMR integral fast reactor program at Argonne  

SciTech Connect

Reactor technology for the 21st Century must develop with characteristics that can now be seen to be important for the future, quite different from the things when the fundamental materials and design choices for present reactors were made in the 1950s. Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 3 figs.

Till, C.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

REACTOR UNLOADING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

Leverett, M.C.

1958-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

354

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

Treshow, M.

1958-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nergy nergy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Project Title: (0471-1544) Sheetak Inc. - Thermoelectric Reactors for Efficient Automotive Thermal Storage Location: *- Multiple States - New York, Pennsylvania, Texas Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: D Funding will support development of a novel system of thermoelectric reactors for efficient automotive thermal energy storage (TREATS) in electric vehicle and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Heating, Ventilation, and Cooling (HVAC) systems. Proposed work consists of indoor laboratory-based research and development, including (1) experimentation and analysis to assess the mechanics and dynamics of thermoelectric reactors, (2) design, fabrication, testing, and analysis of hot and cold reactors, (3) design, fabrication, testing, and

356

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

357

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels.

Lewis, Warren R. (Richland, WA)

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Graphite Reactor | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphite Reactor Graphite Reactor 'In the early, desperate days of World War II, the United States launched the top-secret, top-priority Manhattan Project...' In the early, desperate days of U.S. involvement in World War II, American scientists began to fear that the German discovery of uranium fission in 1939 might enable the Nazis to develop a super bomb. Afraid of losing this crucial race, the United States launched the top-secret, top-priority Manhattan Project. The plan was to create two atomic weapons-one fueled by plutonium, the other by enriched uranium. Hanford, Washington, was selected as the site for plutonium production, but before large reactors could be built there, a pilot plant was necessary to prove the feasibility of scaling up from laboratory experiments. A secluded, rural area near Clinton, Tennessee, was

360

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

Ruano, W.J.

1957-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

362

Laboratory Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Solid State Reactor Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research were undertaken: (1) establishing the design and safety-related basis via neutronic and reactor control assessments with the graphite foam as heat transfer medium; (2) evaluating the thermal performance of the graphite foam for heat removal, reactor stability, reactor operations, and overall core thermal characteristics; (3) characterizing the physical properties of the graphite foam under normal and irradiated conditions to determine any effects on structure, dimensional stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion; and (4) developing a power conversion system design to match the reactor operating parameters.

Mays, G.T.

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Photo of the Week: The Sixth Zero Power Reactor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Sixth Zero Power Reactor The Sixth Zero Power Reactor Photo of the Week: The Sixth Zero Power Reactor November 13, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis In 1958, Argonne National Laboratory began the construction of several zero-power reactors (ZPRs), which are nuclear fission reactors that don't actually generate any power. Scientists developed ZPRs to assess the performance of various reactor core configurations before actually building a full nuclear reactor. A series of ZPRs were built leading up to the construction of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, a sodium-cooled fast reactor power plant. In this 1970 photo, an Argonne scientist is loading the matrices of the ZPR-VI reactor prior to its first operation using plutonium fuel. | Photo courtesy of the Department of Energy. In 1958, Argonne National Laboratory began the construction of several

365

Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Italian hybrid and fission reactors scenario analysis  

SciTech Connect

Italy is a country where a long tradition of studies both in the fission and fusion field is consolidated; nevertheless a strong public opinion concerned with the destination of the Spent Nuclear Fuel hinders the development of nuclear power. The possibility to a severe reduction of the NSF mass generated from a fleet of nuclear reactors employing an hypothetical fusionfission hybrid reactor has been investigated in the Italian framework. The possibility to produce nuclear fuel for the fission nuclear reactors with the hybrid reactor was analyzed too.

Ciotti, M.; Manzano, J.; Sepielli, M. [ENEA CR Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi, 45, 00044, Frascati, Roma (Italy); ENEA CR casaccia, Via Anguillarese, 301, 00123, Santa Maria di Galeria, Roma (Italy)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear ... First- Principles Theory of Magnetism, Crystal Field and Phonon Spectrum of UO2.

368

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection Division Environmental Protection Division Home Reactor Projects Celebrating DOE's Cleanup Accomplishments (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) HFBR Overview HFBR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision HFBR Complex Cleanup Actions HFBR Documents HFBR Science & Accomplishments Groundwater Protection Group Environmental Protection Division Contact > See also: HFBR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor Under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) underwent stabilization and partial decommissioning to prepare the HFBR confinement for long-term safe

373

Ground test facility for nuclear testing of space reactor subsystems  

SciTech Connect

Two major reactor facilities at the INEL have been identified as easily adaptable for supporting the nuclear testing of the SP-100 reactor subsystem. They are the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) and the Loss of Fluid Test Reactor (LOFT). In addition, there are machine shops, analytical laboratories, hot cells, and the supporting services (fire protection, safety, security, medical, waste management, etc.) necessary to conducting a nuclear test program. This paper presents the conceptual approach for modifying these reactor facilities for the ground engineering test facility for the SP-100 nuclear subsystem. 4 figs.

Quapp, W.J.; Watts, K.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers are in the final stage of decommissioning a nuclear reactor after they recently removed thick steel shields once used to absorb neutrons produced for research. The Brookhaven National Laboratory is using $39 million from the Recovery Act to decommission the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, the world's first reactor built solely for peaceful research purposes. Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab More Documents & Publications Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop 2011 ARRA Newsletters Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell

376

Strategic Laboratory Leadership Program | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Erik Gottschalk (F); Devin Hodge (A); Jeff Chamberlain (A); Brad Ullrick (A); Bill Rainey (J). Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Strategic Laboratory Leadership...

377

ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious quantities of low-energy neutrons for absorption in a lattice of fertile material and moderator. The fertile material of the lattice is converted by neutron absorption reactions to an artificially produced material, e.g., plutonium, where depleted uranium is utilized as the fertile material.

Lawrence, E.O.; McMillan, E.M.; Alvarez, L.W.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photocatalytic reactor for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane.

Bischoff, Brian L. (Knoxville, TN); Fain, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stockdale, John A. D. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Capillary-Pumped Passive Reactor Concept for Space Nuclear Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To develop the passively-cooled space reactor concept using the capillary-induced lithium flow, since molten lithium possesses a very favorable surface tension characteristic. In space where the gravitational field is minimal, the gravity-assisted natural convection cooling is not effective nor an option for reactor heat removal, the capillary induced cooling becomes an attractive means of providing reactor cooling.

Dr. Thomas F. Lin; Dr. Thomas G. Hughes; Christopher G. Miller

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

AN ANALYSIS OF POWER REACTOR FUEL REPROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the projected economies and processing capacity requirements for a power reactor fuel reprocessing industry based on the recovery of fertile and fissionable materials from presently proposed power reactors within tbe confines of the continental United 8tates for the next five to ten years. An analysis of the present general state of development of a technology required for such an Industry is given. A summary of results of power reactor reprocessing chemical and engineering development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from July 1955 through December 1956 is given. (auth)

Culler, F.L. Jr.; Blanco, R.E.; Goeller, H.E.; Watson, C.D.

1957-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, February 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a progress report for the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of February 1992. The progress and activities in six categories were described in the report. The categories are reactor, tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general. Each category described numerous and varied activities. Some examples of these activities described are such things as radiation monitoring, maintenance, modifications, and remedial action.

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.; Ice, L.W. [ed.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed. (auth)

Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluation of Torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors. This scoping study, which uses an integrated cost-minimization code that incorporates costing and reactor component models self-consistently with a 1-D energy transport calculation, shows that a torsatron reactor could also be economically competitive with a tokamak reactor. The projected cost of electricity (COE) estimated using the Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Studies (ARIES) costing algorithms is 65.6 mill/kW(e)h in constant 1992 dollars for a reference 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor case. The COE is relatively insensitive (<10% variation) over a wide range of assumptions, including variations in the maximum field allowed on the coils, the coil elongation, the shape of the density profile, the beta limit, the confinement multiplier, and the presence of a large loss region for alpha particles. The largest variations in the COE occur for variations in the electrical power output demanded and the plasma-coil separation ratio.

Lyon, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gulec, K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

386

Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility April 23, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today designated the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility. Establishing the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility will help assert U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology, and will attract new users - universities, laboratories and industry - to conduct research at the ATR. This facility will support basic and applied nuclear research and development (R&D), furthering

387

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007, A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Managment Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

388

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

389

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

390

Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - March 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March March 2013 Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - March 2013 March 2013 Operational Awareness Oversight of Sandia National Laboratories [HIAR SNL-2013-03-18] The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Independent Oversight activity was to perform an operational awareness site visit to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to discuss Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) issues and improvement plan. SNL management also briefed Independent Oversight on engineered safety implementation. Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - March 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - April 2012 Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories -

391

Robotics Laboratory - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Engineering Capabilities > Engineering Experimentation > Robotics Laboratory Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Robotics Laboratory The Robotics Laboratory (RL) houses various remote manipulator systems, including the Dual Arm Work Platform, to support enhancements to teleoperation of remote systems for nuclear applications. Bookmark and Share Argonne scientists are using computer simulation and robot task programming tools to enhance the safety and efficiency of telerobotics in applications such as the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear power

392

Laboratories, Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy Group, Condensed Matter Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories: Photo Tour Laboratories: Photo Tour MBE Laboratory MBE Laboratory MBE Chamber MBE Chamber Temperature Controllers MBE Computers and Servers Pneumatic Hoses Transport between MBE Laboratory and Nano-Lithography Laboratory Backside of MBE chamber during growth, lit by Nano-Lithography Laboratory Nano-Lithography Laboratory Processing Chamber Laminar Flow Hood Mask Aligner Profilometer Probe Station Wire Bonder X-Ray Diffraction and Chemistry Laboratory X-Ray Diffraction System X-Ray Diffraction System X-Ray Diffraction System Chemistry Laboratory Chemistry Laboratory Mutual Inductance, Transport and Field Effect Laboratory Field Effect Measurement system Liquid Helium-4 Dipstick for Mutual Inductance Transport Measurement System COMBI Hall Effect, COMBI Transport and Mutual Inductance Measurements Laboratory

393

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1/4 scale transpiring wall reactor was designed and fabricated by Aerojet using their platelet technology. Sandia`s Engineering Evaluation Reactor serves as a test bed to supply, pressurize and heat the waste; collect, measure and analyze the effluent; and control operation of the system. This report describes the design, test capabilities, and operation of this versatile and unique test system with the transpiring wall reactor.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Engineering for Transportation and Environment Dept.; Rousar, D.C. [GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

CONTROL MEANS FOR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a tank just below the reactor, tubes extending from the tank into the reactor, and a thermally expansible liquid neutron absorbent material in the tank. The liquid in the tank is exposed to a beam of neutrons from the reactor which heats the liquid causing it to expand into the reactor when the neutron flux in the reactor rises above a predetermincd danger point. Boron triamine may be used for this purpose.

Manley, J.H.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY is....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scattering June 12-18, 2010 - Argonne National Laboratory June 19-26, 2010 - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory...

396

Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear Reactor Accidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Accidents The accidents at the Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl nuclear reactors have triggered particularly intense concern about radiation hazards. The TMI accident,...

398

Don Hillebrand | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cycle Geology & disposal Reactors Nuclear reactor safety Nuclear reactor materials Energy usage Energy life-cycle analysis Energy storage Batteries Lithium-ion batteries...

399

Ihor Hlohowskyj | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cycle Geology & disposal Reactors Nuclear reactor safety Nuclear reactor materials Energy usage Energy life-cycle analysis Energy storage Batteries Lithium-ion batteries...

400

Alex Martinson | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy Fossil fuels Oil Nuclear energy Nuclear energy modeling & simulation Nuclear fuel cycle Geology & disposal Reactors Nuclear reactor safety Nuclear reactor materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Environmental Cleanup, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab campus Cleanup Project Details Groundwater Peconic River Surface and Soil Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor High Flux Beam Reactor Brookhaven Medical Reactor...

402

State Laboratory Contacts IL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information IL. Idaho. ... State of Iowa Metrology Laboratory Ellsworth Community College 1100 College Ave. ...

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

403

Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) was initially designed and constructed to permit the safe handling of increasing levels of radiation in the chemical, physical, and metallurgical examination of nuclear reactor fuel elements and reactor parts. The IFEL was constructed in 1963 and is a two-story brick building with a partial basement. The front or northern-most section is a single-story office area. The two story area to the immediate rear houses the cell complex, the operating areas, and other supporting activities. The office area is isolated from the main part of the building, so the office area can be excluded from the secondary containment zone. The facility has a gross floor area of about 27,000 ft2.

404

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power plant is described comprising a turbine and employing round cylindrical fuel rods formed of BeO and UO/sub 2/ and stacks of hexagonal moderator blocks of BeO provided with passages that loosely receive the fuel rods so that coolant may flow through the passages over the fuels to remove heat. The coolant may be helium or steam and fiows through at least one more heat exchanger for producing vapor from a body of fluid separate from the coolant, which fluid is to drive the turbine for generating electricity. By this arrangement the turbine and directly associated parts are free of particles and radiations emanating from the reactor. (AEC)

Daniels, F.

1962-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Evaluation of LLNL's Nuclear Accident Dosimeters at the CALIBAN Reactor September 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses neutron activation elements in a Panasonic TLD holder as a personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD). The LLNL PNAD has periodically been tested using a Cf-252 neutron source, however until 2009, it was more than 25 years since the PNAD has been tested against a source of neutrons that arise from a reactor generated neutron spectrum that simulates a criticality. In October 2009, LLNL participated in an intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimeters at the CEA Valduc Silene reactor (Hickman, et.al. 2010). In September 2010, LLNL participated in a second intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimeters at CEA Valduc. The reactor generated neutron irradiations for the 2010 exercise were performed at the Caliban reactor. The Caliban results are described in this report. The procedure for measuring the nuclear accident dosimeters in the event of an accident has a solid foundation based on many experimental results and comparisons. The entire process, from receiving the activated NADs to collecting and storing them after counting was executed successfully in a field based operation. Under normal conditions at LLNL, detectors are ready and available 24/7 to perform the necessary measurement of nuclear accident components. Likewise LLNL maintains processing laboratories that are separated from the areas where measurements occur, but contained within the same facility for easy movement from processing area to measurement area. In the event of a loss of LLNL permanent facilities, the Caliban and previous Silene exercises have demonstrated that LLNL can establish field operations that will very good nuclear accident dosimetry results. There are still several aspects of LLNL's nuclear accident dosimetry program that have not been tested or confirmed. For instance, LLNL's method for using of biological samples (blood and hair) has not been verified since the method was first developed in the 1980's. Because LLNL and the other DOE participants were limited in what they were allowed to do at the Caliban and Silene exercises and testing of various elements of the nuclear accident dosimetry programs cannot always be performed as guests at other sites, it has become evident that DOE needs its own capability to test nuclear accident dosimeters. Angular dependence determination and correction factors for NADs desperately need testing as well as more evaluation regarding the correct determination of gamma doses. It will be critical to properly design any testing facility so that the necessary experiments can be performed by DOE laboratories as well as guest laboratories. Alternate methods of dose assessment such as using various metals commonly found in pockets and clothing have yet to be evaluated. The DOE is planning to utilize the Godiva or Flattop reactor for testing nuclear accident dosimeters. LLNL has been assigned the primary operational authority for such testing. Proper testing of nuclear accident dosimeters will require highly specific characterization of the pulse fields. Just as important as the characterization of the pulsed fields will be the design of facilities used to process the NADs. Appropriate facilities will be needed to allow for early access to dosimeters to test and develop quick sorting techniques. These facilities will need appropriate laboratory preparation space and an area for measurements. Finally, such a facility will allow greater numbers of LLNL and DOE laboratory personnel to train on the processing and interpretation of nuclear accident dosimeters and results. Until this facility is fully operational for test purposes, DOE laboratories may need to continue periodic testing as guests of other reactor facilities such as Silene and Caliban.

Hickman, D P; Wysong, A R; Heinrichs, D P; Wong, C T; Merritt, M J; Topper, J D; Gressmann, F A; Madden, D J

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

PRELIMINARY HAZARD SUMMARY REPORT ON THE BOILING EXPERIMENTAL REACTOR (BER)  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary evaluation of the hazards associated with a 20-Mw boiling reactor for the purpose of determining site requirements is presented. The Boiling Experimental Reactor design, safety features, and performance are given and the surroundings of the site at Argonne National Laboratory are described. (T.R.H.)

West, J.M.; Anderson, C.A.; Dietrich, J.R.; Harrer, J.M.; Jameson, A.S.; Untermyer, S.

1954-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

(EAC): Laboratory Research and Field Experiences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentations are being solicited regarding EAC in areas such as Oil & Gas, ... Determination of Hydrogen Peak Temperatures and Trapping Energies of...

408

Validation of the RVACS (Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System)/RACS (Reactor Air Cooling System) model in SASSYS-1  

SciTech Connect

The SASSYS-1 LMR systems analysis code contains a model for transient analysis of heat removal by a RVACS (Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System) or a RACS (Reactor Air Cooling System) in an LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor). This model has been validated by comparisons of model predictions with experimental data from a large scale RVACS/RACS simulation experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory. 4 refs., 1 fig.

Dunn, F.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Reactor and method of operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

Wheeler, John A. (Princeton, NJ)

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

ORGANISATIONAL CHART 2009 Laboratory: Research, Development and Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORGANISATIONAL CHART 2009 Laboratory: Research, Development and Services *reports to the Director. Sampani Radiation Protection of the Center G. Pantelias* HEALTH PHYSICS & ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH LABORATORY. Kainourgiakis RADIATION PROTECTION & HEALTH PHYSICS OF THE REACTOR F. Tzika SUPPORT TO GAEC I. A. Papazoglou

411

Videos | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy ---Bioenergy ---Solar energy --Fossil fuels ---Natural Gas --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ---Reactors -Energy...

412

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Energy Technology National Energy Technology Laboratory Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by National Energy Technology Laboratory. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010917: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 25, 2013 CX-010916: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fate of Methane Emitted from Dissociating Marine Hydrates: Modeling, Laboratory, and Field Constraints CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

413

Russian RBMK reactor design information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document concerns the systems, design, and operations of the graphite-moderated, boiling, water-cooled, channel-type (RBMK) reactors located in the former Soviet Union (FSU). The Russian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Safety Institute (NSI) in Moscow, Russia, researched specific technical questions that were formulated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and provided detailed technical answers to those questions. The Russian response was prepared in English by NSI in a question-and-answer format. This report presents the results of that technical exchange in the context they were received from the NSI organization. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is generating this document to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) community in responding to requests from FSU states, which are seeking Western technological and financial assistance to improve the safety systems of the Russian-designed reactors. This report expands upon information that was previously available to the United States through bilateral information exchanges, international nuclear society meetings, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reactor safety programs, and Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) reports. The response to the PNL questions have not been edited or reviewed for technical consistency or accuracy by PNL staff or other US organizations, but are provided for use by the DOE community in the form they were received.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Corrosion-Product Release in Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colbalt released through corrosion is the primary source of radiation fields on out-of-core surfaces in pressurized water reactors. Lowering colbalt impurity levels in Inconel 600, a generator tubing material, could reduce radiation fields.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories - PA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories - Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories - PA 44 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories (PA.44 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Allegheny County , West Mifflin , Pennsylvania PA.44-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 PA.44-2 Site Operations: Conducted activities directed toward the design, development, testing, and operational follow of nuclear reactor propulsion plants for Naval surface and submarine vessels. PA.44-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Active DOE facility PA.44-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radioactive Materials Associated with Reactor Operation PA.44-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

416

Reactor safety method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

417

NEUTRONIC REACTOR MANIPULATING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cable connecting a control rod in a reactor with a motor outside the reactor for moving the rod, and a helical conduit in the reactor wall, through which the cable passes are described. The helical shape of the conduit prevents the escape of certain harmful radiations from the reactor. (AEC)

Ohlinger, L.A.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

High temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Reactivity worth measurements at the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. The objective of this work was to perform a series of experiments of reactivity worth measurements, using a digital reactivity meter developed at IPEN. The experiments employed small metallic and ceramic samples inserted in the central region of the core of the experimental IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The theoretical analysis was performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

Pinto, Leticia Negrao; Santos, Adimir dos [Nuclear Engineering Center, Nuclear and Energy Research Institute- IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

420

Developmental Light-Water Reactor Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the progress of the Developmental Light-Water Reactor (DLWR) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY 1989. It also includes (1) a brief description of the program, (2) definition of goals, (3) earlier achievements, and (4) proposed future activities.

Forsberg, C.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

US graphite reactor D&D experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

PRA insights applicable to the design of the Broad Applications Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Design insights applicable to the design of a new Broad Applications Test Reactor (BATR), being studied at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, are summarized. Sources of design insights include past probabilistic risk assessments and related studies for department of Energy-owned Class A reactors and for commercial reactors. The report includes a preliminary risk allocation scheme for the BATR.

Khericha, S.T.; Reilly, H.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored by electric currents. This lab will carry that investigation one step further, determining how changing magnetic fields can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation

Minnesota, University of

424

Field, laboratory, and modeling studies of water infiltration and runoff in subfreezing snow on regional scales to estimate future greenhouse-induced changes in sea-level. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The current DOE-supported research program (Reduce Uncertainty in Future Sea-Level Change Due to Ice Wastage) addressed the question of how the refreezing of meltwater in cold snow affects sea-level changes in a future changing climate. The continuation of that research, proposed here, takes an additional new approach by focusing on processes which can be defined and characterized by measurements on regional scales. This new emphasis is intended to be directly applicable to a large-scale analysis from which runoff forecasts (and consequent sea level change) from the entire arctic region can be made. The research proposed here addresses the problem of forecasting future sea-level change due to greenhouse-induced changes in runoff from polar glaciers and ice caps. The objectives of this work are (1) to observe in the field the processes of infiltration and refreezing which lead to the formation of impermeable firn layers; (2) to reproduce these observed processes in the laboratory to confirm and further quantify their understanding; (3) to develop and calibrate a regional scale numerical model which can simulate these processes, based on measured parameters and driven by boundary conditions determined by climate; and (4) to apply this model to predict the development of impermeable firn (and consequent runoff and discharge to the ocean) in response to predicted future climate change.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Enforcement Documents - Idaho National Laboratory | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory Enforcement Documents - Idaho National Laboratory October 4, 2012 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC - NEA-2012-01 Issued to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC related to an elevated extremity dose at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility and the plutonium contamination at the Zero Power Physics Reactor facility. January 13, 2012 Consent Order, Battelle Energy Alliance - NCO-2012-01 Issued to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, related to the Reactor Coolant Draining Event at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor October 13, 2011 Consent Order, URS Energy & Construction, Inc. - NCO-2011-02 Issued to URS Energy & Construction, Inc., related to Quality Improvement and Work Control Program Deficiencies associated with Construction of the

426

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

An Engineering Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A relatively inexpensive reactor for the specific purpose of testing a sub-critical portion of another reactor under conditions that would exist during actual operation is discussed. It is concluded that an engineering tool for reactor development work that bridges the present gap between exponential and criticality experiments and the actual full scale operating reactor is feasible. An example of such a test reactor which would not entail development effort to ut into operation is depicted.

Fahrner, T.; Stoker, R.L.; Thomson, A.S.

1951-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories - November 2013 Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories - November 2013 December 2013 Targeted Review of Activity-Level Implementation of Radiological Controls at Sandia National Laboratories This report documents the results of an independent oversight targeted review of radiological protection program activity-level implementation for Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Technical Area V facilities. SNL is managed by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) and is overseen by the National Nuclear Security Administration and its Sandia Field Office. This targeted review was performed at SNL September 23-27,

430

Risk assessment technique for evaluating research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to evaluate research laboratories according to risk, where risk is defined as the product of frequency and consequence. This technique was used to evaluate several laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the direction of the Department of Energy, Idaho Field Office to assist in the risk management of the Science and Technology Department laboratories. With this technique, laboratories can be compared according to risk, and management can use the results to make cost effective decisions associated with the operation of the facility.

Bolander, T.W.; Meale, B.M.; Eide, S.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Risk assessment technique for evaluating research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to evaluate research laboratories according to risk, where risk is defined as the product of frequency and consequence. This technique was used to evaluate several laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the direction of the Department of Energy, Idaho Field Office to assist in the risk management of the Science and Technology Department laboratories. With this technique, laboratories can be compared according to risk, and management can use the results to make cost effective decisions associated with the operation of the facility.

Bolander, T.W.; Meale, B.M.; Eide, S.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

SHARP: Reactor Performance and Safety Simulation Suite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARP SHARP Argonne National Laboratory's Reactor Performance and Safety Simulation Suite SHARP could save millions in nuclear reactor design and development... The Simulation-based High-efficiency Advanced Reactor Prototyping (SHARP) suite of codes enables virtual design and engineering of nuclear plant behavior that would be impractical from a traditional experimental approach. ...by leveraging the computational power of one of the world's most powerful supercomputers. Exploiting the power of Argonne Leadership Computing Facility's near-petascale computers, researchers have developed a set of simulation tools that provide a highly detailed description of the reactor core and the nuclear plant behavior. This enables the efficient and precise design of tomorrow's safe and clean nuclear energy sources.

433

DOE Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designated User Facilities Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility Argonne National Laboratory * Advanced Photon Source (APS) * Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research * Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) * Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) * Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) * Brookhaven National Laboratory * National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) * Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) * Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) * Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) * National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II ) (under construction) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory * Fermilab Accelerator Complex Idaho National Laboratory * Advanced Test Reactor ** * Wireless National User Facility (WNUF)

434

Update; Sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept developed by the team of Rockwell International, Combustion Engineering, and Bechtel during the 3-year period extending from January 1985 to December 1987 as one element in the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Program. In January 1988, the team was expanded to include Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., and the concept development was extended under DOE's Program for Improvement in Advanced Modular LMR Design. The SAFR plant concept employs a 450-MWe pool-type liquid metal cooled reactor as its basic module. The reactor assembly module is a standardized shop-fabricated unit that can be shipped to the plant site by barge for installation. Shop fabrication minimizes nuclear-grade field fabrication and reduces the plant construction schedule. Reactor modules can be used individually or in multiples at a given site to supply the needed generating capacity.

Oldenkamp, R.D.; Brunings, J.E. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Guenther, E. (Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (US)); Hren, R. (Bechtel National Inc., San Francisco, CA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Conceptual design study of spheromak reactors  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio A greater than or equal to 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) DT two-component, (2) DT ignited, and, (3) catalyzed DD ignited reactors. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MWm/sup -2/, it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4T (DT) and approx. 9T (cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of one-meter plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. Assessment of various methods of generating reactor-grade spheromak plasmas is discussed briefly.

Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure...

437

Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment & Supplies Equipment & Supplies John Bargar, SSRL Scientist Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All laboratories contain the following standard laboratory equipment: pH meters with standard buffers, analytical balances, microcentrifuges, vortex mixers, ultrasonic cleaning baths, magnetic stirrers, hot plates, and glassware. Most laboratories offer ice machines and cold rooms. Specialty storage areas for samples include a -80 freezer, argon and nitrogen glove boxes, radiation contamination areas, inert atmosphere chambers, and cold rooms. For specific information please see: Equipment Inventory Checkout Equipment & Supplies To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Inventory

438

Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program  

SciTech Connect

Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

Bernard, John A

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

Memorandum on Chemical Reactors and Reactor Hazards  

SciTech Connect

Two important problems in the investigation of reactor hazards are the chemical reactivity of various materials employed in reactor construction and the chracteristics of heat transfer under transient conditions, specifically heat transfer when driven by an exponentially increasing heat source (exp t/T). Although these problems are independent of each other, when studied in relation to reactor hazards they may occur in a closely coupled sequence. For example the onset of a dangerous chemical reactor may be due to structural failure of various reactor components under an exponentially rising heat source originating with a runaway nuclear reactor. For this reason, these two problems should eventually be studied together after an exploratory experimental survey has been made in which they are considered separately.

Mills, M.M.; Pearlman, H.; Ruebsamen, W.; Steele, G., Chrisney, J.

1951-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hot Fuel Examination Facility's neutron radiography reactor  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory-West is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and is operated by the University of Chicago for the United States Department of Energy in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, LMFBR. The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both nondestructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the nondestructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography, which is provided by the NRAD reactor facility (a TRIGA type reactor) below the HFEF hot cell.

Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

442

Physical protection of power reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Laboratories has applied a systematic approach to designing physical protection systems for nuclear facilities to commercial light-water reactor power plants. A number of candidate physical protection systems were developed and evaluated. Focus is placed on the design of access control subsystems at each of three plant layers: the protected area perimeter, building surfaces, and vital areas. Access control refers to barriers, detectors, and entry control devices and procedures used to keep unauthorized personnel and contraband out of the plant, and to control authorized entry into vital areas within the plant.

Darby, J.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

BATT Fabrication Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientist working in battery lab BATT Fabrication Laboratory The BATT Fab Lab (Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Fabrication Laboratory) conducts battery cell...

444

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY - Energy  

Laboratory Plan FY 2010-2019 June2,2010 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Accelerating Innovation Alane for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery June 2012

445

ARM - Laboratory Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive Data Management Facility Data Quality Program Engineering Support External Data Center Laboratory Partners Nine DOE national laboratories share the responsibility of...

446

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located...

447

EML: Environmental Measurements Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security and Privacy Notices History of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory The Manhattan ProjectAtomic Energy Commission (1942 1975) Our Laboratory traces its roots...

448

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratorys (LLNL) primary mission is research and development in support of national security. As a...

449

New Brunswick Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports New Brunswick Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the New Brunswick Laboratory, July 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the New...

450

Compendium of Benchmark Neutron Fields for Reactor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Page 2. Page 3. Page 4. Page 5. Page 6. Page 7. Page 8. Page 9. Page 10. Page 11. Page 12. Page 13. Page 14. Page 15. Page 16. Page ...

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

451

Summary of advanced LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) evaluations: PRISM (Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module) and SAFR (Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed independent analyses of two advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) concepts. The designs, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) (Berglund, 1987) and the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) (Baumeister, 1987), were developed primarily by General Electric (GE) and Rockwell International (RI), respectively. Technical support was provided to DOE, RI, and GE, by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), particularly with respect to the characteristics of the metal fuels. There are several examples in both PRISM and SAFR where inherent or passive systems provide for a safe response to off-normal conditions. This is in contrast to the engineered safety systems utilized on current US Light Water Reactor (LWR) designs. One important design inherency in the LMRs is the inherent shutdown'', which refers to the tendency of the reactor to transition to a much lower power level whenever temperatures rise significantly. This type of behavior was demonstrated in a series of unscrammed tests at EBR-II (NED, 1986). The second key design feature is the passive air cooling of the vessel to remove decay heat. These systems, designated RVACS in PRISM and RACS in SAFR, always operate and are believed to be able to prevent core damage in the event that no other means of heat removal is available. 27 refs., 78 figs., 3 tabs.

Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C.; Chan, B.C.; Kennett, R.J.; Cheng, H.S.; Kroeger, P.G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Advances in Tandem Mirror fusion power reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tandem Mirror exhibits several distinctive features which make the reactor embodiment of the principle very attractive: Simple low-technology linear central cell; steady-state operation; high-..beta.. operation; no driven current or disruptions; divertorless operation; direction conversion of end-loss power; low-surface heat loads; and advanced fusion fuel capability. In this paper, we examine these features in connection with two tandem mirror reactor designs, MARS and MINIMARS, and several advanced reactor concepts including the wall-stabilized reactor and the field-reversed mirror. With a novel compact end plug scheme employing octopole stabilization, MINIMARS is expressly designed for short construction times, factory-built modules, and a small (600 MWe) but economic reactor size. We have also configured the design for low radioactive afterheat and inherent/passive safety under LOCA/LOFA conditions, thereby obviating the need for expensive engineered safety systems. In contrast to the complex and expensive double-quadrupole end-cell of the MARS reactor, the compact octopole end-cell of MINIMARS enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths and considerably improves the economy of scale for small (approx.250 to 600 MWe) tandem mirror reactors. Finally, we examine the prospects for realizing the ultimate potential of the tandem mirror with regard to both innovative configurations and novel neutron energy conversion schemes, and stress that advanced fuel applications could exploit its unique reactor features.

Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.

1986-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

Basic and Applied Science Research Reactors - Reactors designed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th...

454

Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol  

SciTech Connect

The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

Bogard, J.S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Laboratories and Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories and Facilities Laboratories and Facilities Laboratories and Facilities Laboratories and Facilities National Energy Technology Laboratory - The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is the lead field center for the Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program. Scientists at its Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV, campuses conduct onsite research while contract administrators oversee nearly 700 federally-sponsored projects conducted by private sector research partners. The Houston, TX, office is part of the Laboratory's Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil. NETL's Arctic Energy Office in Anchorage, AK, facilitates energy research related to fossil energy resources and remote electrical power generation to address the State of Alaska's unique energy needs. Researchers at NETL-Albany, in

457

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Money Fund Overview The Seed Money Fund of the ORNL LDRD program supports innovative ideas that have the potential of enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical...

458

About Berkeley Lab: Laboratory Director, Associate Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009, replacing former laboratory Director Steve Chu, who was sworn in as U.S. Energy Secretary. Before becoming interim director, Alivisatos was the deputy director of Berkeley...

459

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging creative research to innovate solutions for our nation's greatest challenges. National laboratories have been entrusted with the role of serving as incubators for...

460

In The News | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear reactor materials ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactors laboratory field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is plasma research using small-scale laboratory experiments, where low-density plasmas are generated

Haviland, David

462

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

463

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems. NISTIR 7028 Type Evaluation Quality Manual Template. This NISTIR has been ...

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

464

State Laboratory Contacts AC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information AC. Alabama. Mailing Address, ... PDF. Alaska. Mailing Address, Contact Information. Alaska ...