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1

Dr. Hussein Khalil at Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technologies Subcommittee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue Blue ribbon presentation by Dr. Hussein Khalil Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Blue ribbon presentation by Hussein Khalil Hussein Khalil Dr. Hussein Khalil during the panel discussion Oct. 21, 2010 On October 12 Hussein Khalil, director of Argonne's Nuclear Engineering Division, participated in a Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technologies

2

Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage, and cleaning stations-have accumulated satisfactory construction and operation experiences. In addition, two special issues for future development are described in this report: large capacity interim storage and transuranic-bearing fuel handling.

Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Storage of spent fuel from the nation`s nuclear reactors: Status, technology, and policy options  

SciTech Connect

Since the beginning of the commercial nuclear electric power industry, it has been recognized that spent nuclear reactor fuel must be able to be readily removed from the reactor vessel in the plant and safely stored on-site. The need for adjacent ready storage is first for safety. In the event of an emergency, or necessary maintenance that requires the removal of irradiated fuel from the reactor vessel, cooled reserve storage capacity for the full amount of fuel from the reactor core must be available. Also, the uranium fuel in the reactor eventually reaches the point where its heat generation is below the planned efficiency for steam production which drives the turbines and generators. It then must be replaced by fresh uranium fuel, with the ``spent fuel`` elements being removed to a safe and convenient storage location near the reactor vessel. The federal nuclear waste repository program, even without delays in the current schedule of disposal becoming available in 2003, will result in a large percentage of the 111 existing operable commercial reactors requiring expansion of their spent fuel storage capacity. How that need can and will be met raises issues of both technology and policy that will be reviewed in this report.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development and transfer of fuel fabrication and utilization technology for research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 300 research reactors supplied with US-enriched uranium are currently in operation in about 40 countries, with a variety of types, sizes, experiment capabilities and applications. Despite the usefulness and popularity of research reactors, relatively few innovations in their core design have been made in the last fifteen years. The main reason can be better understood by reviewing briefly the history of research reactor fuel technology and enrichment levels. Stringent requirements on the enrichment of the uranium to be used in research reactors were considered and a program was launched to assist research reactors in continuing their operation with the new requirements and with minimum penalties. The goal of the new program, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is to develop the technical means to utilize LEU instead of HEU in research reactors without significant penalties in experiment performance, operating costs, reactor modifications, and safety characteristics. This paper reviews briefly the RERTR Program activities with special emphasis on the technology transfer aspects of interest to this conference.

Travelli, A.; Domagala, R.F.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Storage of spent fuel from the nation's nuclear reactors: Status, technology, and policy options  

SciTech Connect

Since the beginning of the commercial nuclear electric power industry, it has been recognized that spent nuclear reactor fuel must be able to be readily removed from the reactor vessel in the plant and safely stored on-site. The need for adjacent ready storage is first for safety. In the event of an emergency, or necessary maintenance that requires the removal of irradiated fuel from the reactor vessel, cooled reserve storage capacity for the full amount of fuel from the reactor core must be available. Also, the uranium fuel in the reactor eventually reaches the point where its heat generation is below the planned efficiency for steam production which drives the turbines and generators. It then must be replaced by fresh uranium fuel, with the spent fuel'' elements being removed to a safe and convenient storage location near the reactor vessel. The federal nuclear waste repository program, even without delays in the current schedule of disposal becoming available in 2003, will result in a large percentage of the 111 existing operable commercial reactors requiring expansion of their spent fuel storage capacity. How that need can and will be met raises issues of both technology and policy that will be reviewed in this report.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Fuels Technology - Capabilities - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Fuels Technology Advanced petroleum-based fuels Fuel-borne reductants On-board reforming Alternative fuels...

7

Nuclear Reactors and Technology  

SciTech Connect

This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel slug for a reactor which acts as a safety device is described. The fuel slug is an aluminum tube with a foil lining the inside surface of the tube, the foil being fabricated of uranium in a lead matrix.

Horning, W.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Donahue, D.J.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1963-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel...

12

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

13

Cermet fuel reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

FUEL ASSAY REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor having maximum sensitivity to perturbations is described comprising a core consisting of a horizontally disposed, rectangular, annular fuel zone containing enriched uranium dioxide dispersed in graphite, the concentration of uranium dioxide increasing from the outside to the inside of the fuel zone, an internal reflector of graphite containing an axial test opening disposed within the fuel zone, an external graphite reflector, means for changing the neutron spectrum in the test opening, and means for measuring perturbations in the neutron flux caused by the introduction of different fuel elements into the test opening. (AEC)

Spinrad, B.I.; Sandmeier, H.A.; Martens, F.H.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.eere.energy.gov/informationcenter hydrogen and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially

17

Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and thermophysical properties of the fuel and their compatibility with the reactor coolant, with corresponding differences in the challenges presented to the reactor developers. Accident phenomena are discussed for the sodium-cooled fast reactor based on the mechanistic progression of conditions from accident initiation to accident termination, whether a benign state is achieved or more severe consequences are expected. General principles connecting accident phenomena and fuel properties are developed from the oxide and metal fuel safety analyses, providing guidelines that can be used as part of the evaluation for selection of fuel type for the sodium-cooled fast reactor.

R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel element of the capillary tube type is described. The element consists of a thin walled tube, sealed at both ends, and having an interior coatlng of a fissionable material, such as uranium enriched in U-235. The tube wall is gas tight and is constructed of titanium, zirconium, or molybdenum.

Kesselring, K.A.; Seybolt, A.U.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel pump is described which offers long life, low susceptibility to radiation damage, and gaseous fission product removal. An inert-gas lubricated bearing supports a journal on one end of the drive shsft. The other end has an impeller and expansion chamber which effect pumping and gas- liquid separation. (T.R.H.)

Cobb, W.G.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Program on Technology Innovation: Readiness of Existing and New U.S. Reactors for Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expanding interest in nuclear power and advanced fuel cycles indicate that use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in the current and new U.S. reactor fleet could become an option for utilities in the coming decades. In light of this renewed interest, EPRI has reviewed the substantial knowledge base on MOX fuel irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs). The goal was to evaluate the technical feasibility of MOX fuel use in the U.S. reactor fleet for both existing and advanced LWR designs (Generation III/III+).

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies...

22

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: November 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

23

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletter Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

24

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter on...

25

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells...

26

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Animation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on...

27

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Information Technology Validation Search Search Help Technology Validation EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Technology Validation Printable Version Share this resource...

28

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Water reactor fuel cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a nuclear reactor fuel element cladding tube. It comprises: an outer cylindrical layer of a first zirconium alloy selected from the group consisting of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4; an inner cylindrical layer of a second zirconium alloy consisting essentially of about 0.19 to 0.6 wt.% tin, about 0.19 to less than 0.5 wt.% iron, about 100 to 700 ppm oxygen, less than 2000 ppm total impurities, and the remainder essentially zirconium; the inner layer characterized by aqueous corrosion resistance substantially the same as the first zirconium alloy; the inner layer characterized by improved resistance to PCI crack propagation under reactor operating conditions compared to the first zirconium alloy and substantially the same PCI crack propagation resistance compared to unalloyed zirconium; and the inner cylindrical layer is metallurgically bonded to the outer layer.

Foster, J.P.; McDonald, S.G.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

30

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

31

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on AddThis.com... Early Adoption of Fuel Cells Early Market Applications for Fuel Cells

33

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share Fuel...

34

REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: January 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell...

37

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: January 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell...

38

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell...

39

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

40

Fuel Reformation: Microchannel Reactor Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel processing is used to extract hydrogen from conventional vehicle fuel and allow fuel cell powered vehicles to use the existing petroleum fuel infrastructure. Kilowatt scale micro-channel steam reforming, water-gas shift and preferential oxida-tion reactors have been developed capable of achieving DOE required system performance metrics. Use of a microchannel design effectively supplies heat to the highly endothermic steam reforming reactor to maintain high conversions, controls the temperature profile for the exothermic water gas shift reactor, which optimizes the overall reaction conversion, and removes heat to prevent the unwanted hydrogen oxidation in the prefer-ential oxidation reactor. The reactors combined with micro-channel heat exchangers, when scaled to a full sized 50 kWe automotive system, will be less than 21 L in volume and 52 kg in weight.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Davis, James M.; Fischer, Christopher M.; King, David L.; Pederson, Larry R.; Rawlings, Gregg C.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe

43

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to someone by E-mail 3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

44

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2012 to someone by E-mail September 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

45

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe Program Presentations

46

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2013 to someone by E-mail August 2013 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

47

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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October 2012 to someone by E-mail October 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

48

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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April 2012 to someone by E-mail April 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives

49

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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3 to someone by E-mail 3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe Program Presentations

50

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe

51

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September/October 2013 to someone by E-mail September/October 2013 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications

52

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2012 to someone by E-mail August 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

53

AN ANALYSIS OF POWER REACTOR FUEL REPROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the projected economies and processing capacity requirements for a power reactor fuel reprocessing industry based on the recovery of fertile and fissionable materials from presently proposed power reactors within tbe confines of the continental United 8tates for the next five to ten years. An analysis of the present general state of development of a technology required for such an Industry is given. A summary of results of power reactor reprocessing chemical and engineering development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from July 1955 through December 1956 is given. (auth)

Culler, F.L. Jr.; Blanco, R.E.; Goeller, H.E.; Watson, C.D.

1957-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

FUSED REACTOR FUELS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a nuciear reactor fuel composition comprising (1) from about 0.01 to about 50 wt.% based on the total weight of said composition of at least one element selected from the class consisting of uranium, thorium, and plutonium, wherein said eiement is present in the form of at least one component selected from the class consisting of oxides, halides, and salts of oxygenated anions, with components comprising (2) at least one member selected from the class consisting of (a) sulfur, wherein the sulfur is in the form of at least one entity selected irom the class consisting of oxides of sulfur, metal sulfates, metal sulfites, metal halosulfonates, and acids of sulfur, (b) halogen, wherein said halogen is in the form of at least one compound selected from the class of metal halides, metal halosulfonates, and metal halophosphates, (c) phosphorus, wherein said phosphorus is in the form of at least one constituent selected from the class consisting of oxides of phosphorus, metal phosphates, metal phosphites, and metal halophosphates, (d) at least one oxide of a member selected from the class consisting of a metal and a metalloid wherein said oxide is free from an oxide of said element in (1); wherein the amount of at least one member selected from the class consisting of halogen and sulfur is at least about one at.% based on the amount of the sum of said sulfur, halogen, and phosphorus atom in said composition; and wherein the amount of said 2(a), 2(b) and 2(c) components in said composition which are free from said elements of uranium, thorium, arid plutonium, is at least about 60 wt.% based on the combined weight of the components of said composition which are free from said elements of uranium, thorium, and plutonium. (AEC)

Mayer, S.W.

1962-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, finds DOE funding has led to more than 360 hydrogen and fuel cell patents, 36 commercial...

56

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research, Development and Demonstration Plan* to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development and...

57

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

58

New Fuel Cycle and Fuel Management Options in Heavy Liquid Metal-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Fuel Management of Reactors Other Than Light Water Reactors

Ehud Greenspan; Pavel Hejzlar; Hiroshi Sekimoto; Georgy Toshinsky; David Wade

59

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element particularly adapted for use in nuclear reactors of high power density is offered. It has fissionable fuel pellet segments mounted in a tubular housing and defining a central passage in the fuel element. A burnable poison element extends through the central passage, which is designed to contain more poison material at the median portion than at the end portions thereby providing a more uniform hurnup and longer reactivity life.

Bassett, C.H.

1961-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

Bassett, C.H.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance November 16, 2009 - 1:12pm Addthis As part of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program, the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program has achieved a new international record for irradiation testing of next-generation particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). The AGR Fuel Development Program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 2002 to develop the advanced fabrication and characterization technologies, and provide irradiation and safety performance data required to license TRISO particle fuel for the NGNP and future HTGRs. The AGR

62

Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

63

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell ...  

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell Power Industry (ANL-IN-00-030) Argonne National Laboratory. Contact ANL About This ...

64

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

65

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

66

Advanced Reactor Development and Technology - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Overview Advanced Fast Reactor...

67

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising high density ceramic fissionable material enclosed in a tubular cladding of corrosion-resistant material is described. The fissionable material is in the form of segments of a tube which have cooperating tapered interfaces which produce outward radial displacement when the segments are urged axially together. A resilient means is provided within the tubular housing to constantly urge the fuel segments axially. This design maintains the fuel material in tight contacting engagement against the inner surface of the outer cladding tube to eliminate any gap therebetween which may be caused by differential thermal expansion between the fuel material and the material of the tube.

Bassett, C.H.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) States Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) Washington, DC Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 3/14/2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov * Introduction - Technology and Market Overview * DOE Program Overview - Mission & Structure - R&D Progress - Demonstration & Deployments * State Activities - Examples of potential opportunities Outline 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov Fuel cells - convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy, bypassing inefficiencies associated with thermal energy conversion. Available energy is equal to the Gibbs free energy. Combustion Engines - convert chemical energy into thermal energy and

69

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element possessing good stability and heat conducting properties is described. The fuel element comprises an outer tube formed of material selected from the group consisting of stainhess steel, V, Ti. Mo. or Zr, a fuel tube concentrically fitting within the outer tube and containing an oxide of an isotope selected from the group consisting of U/sup 235/, U/sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/, and a hollow, porous core concentrically fitting within the fuel tube and formed of an oxide of an element selected from the group consisting of Mg, Be, and Zr.

Shackleford, M.H.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Gas Reactor Technology R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy to Invest U.S. Department of Energy to Invest up to $7.3 Million for "Deep-Burn" Gas-Reactor Technology R&D Artist's rendering of Nuclear Plant An artist's rendering of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant concept. The U.S. Department of Energy today announced a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) valued at $7.3 million for universities, commercial entities, National Laboratories with expertise in the concept of nuclear fuel "Deep-Burn" in which plutonium and higher transuranics recycled from spent nuclear fuel are destroyed. The funding opportunity seeks to establish the technological foundations that will support the role of the very-high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) in the nuclear fuel cycle -- which is one of the prototype reactors being researched/developed under

71

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element comprising a plurality of nuclear fuel bearing strips is presented. The strips are folded along their longitudinal axes to an angle of about 60 deg and are secured at each end by ferrule to form an elongated assembly suitable for occupying a cylindrical coolant channel.

Gurinsky, D.H.; Powell, R.W.; Fox, M.

1959-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described whereby fuel tubes or pins are cut, loaded with fuel pellets and a heat transfer medium, sealed at each end with slotted fittings, and assembled into a rectangular tube bundle to form a fuel element. The tubes comprising the fuel element are laterally connected between their ends by clips and tabs to form a linear group of spaced parallel tubes, which receive their vertical support by resting on a grid. The advantages of this method are that it permits elimination of structural material (e.g., fuel-element cans) within the reactor core, and removal of at least one fuel pin from an element and replacement thereof so that a burnable poison may be utilized during the core lifetime. (AEC)

Dickson, J.J.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

73

Argonne TDC: Fuel Cell Technologies  

Emergency Response. Engineering. Environmental Research. Fuel Cells. Imaging Technology. Material Science. Nanotechnology. Physical Sciences. Sensor ...

74

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary to someone by Glossary to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Glossary

75

Nuclear reactor composite fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core and composite fuel assembly for a liquid-cooled breeder nuclear reactor including a plurality of elongated coextending driver and breeder fuel elements arranged to form a generally polygonal bundle within a thin-walled duct. The breeder elements are larger in cross section than the driver elements, and each breeder element is laterally bounded by a number of the driver elements. Each driver element further includes structure for spacing the driver elements from adjacent fuel elements and, where adjacent, the thin-walled duct. A core made up of the fuel elements can advantageously include fissile fuel of only one enrichment, while varying the effective enrichment of any given assembly or core region, merely by varying the relative number and size of the driver and breeder elements.

Burgess, Donn M. (Richland, WA); Marr, Duane R. (West Richland, WA); Cappiello, Michael W. (Richland, WA); Omberg, Ronald P. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offices, including Fuel Cell Technologies. Funding Opportunities SBIRSTTR Phase I Release 1 Technical Topics Announced for FY14-Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Topics Include...

77

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations to Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells

78

Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

500 2007 2013 Cumulative Number of Patents Fuel Cells ProductionDelivery Storage * DOE funding has led to 40 commercial hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and 65 emerging...

80

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT ASSEMBLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating nuclear reactor fuel element assemblies having a plurality of longitudinally extending flat fuel elements in spaced parallel relation to each other to form channels is presented. One side of a flat side plate is held contiguous to the ends of the elements and a welding means is passed along the other side of the platertransverse to the direction of the longitudinal extension of the elements. The setting and speed of travel of the welding means is set to cause penetration of the side plate with welds at bridge the gap in each channel between adjacent fuel elements with a weld-through bubble of predetermined size. The fabrication of a high strength, dependable fuel element is provided, and the reduction of distortion and high production costs are facilitated by this method. (AEC)

Stengel, F.G.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4/3/2012 4/3/2012 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Overview Flow Cell Workshop Washington, DC Dr. Sunita Satyapal & Dr. Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program 3/7/2011 Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Purpose To understand the applied research and development needs and the grand challenges for the use of flow cells as energy-storage devices. Objectives 1. Understand the needs for applied research from stakeholders. 2. Gather input for future development of roadmaps and technical targets for flow cells for various applications. 3. Identify grand challenges and prioritize R&D needs. Flow cells combine the unique advantages of batteries and fuel cells and can offer benefits for multiple energy storage applications.

82

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements.Unlike permanent nuclear reactor core components, nuclearof the first nuclear reactors, commercial nuclear fuel still

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

Hawke, Basil C. (Solana Beach, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo...

85

Energy Department Announces Small Modular Reactor Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Modular Reactor Technology Partnerships at Savannah River Site Energy Department Announces Small Modular Reactor Technology Partnerships at Savannah River Site March 2, 2012...

86

Energy Department Announces Small Modular Reactor Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Announces Small Modular Reactor Technology Partnerships at Savannah River Site Energy Department Announces Small Modular Reactor Technology Partnerships at...

87

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Databases The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is developing databases to make it easier for users to find up-to-date...

88

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events on Facebook Tweet...

89

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

90

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The removal of CO2 from power plants is challenging because existing methods to separate CO2 from the gas mixture requires a significant fraction of the power plant output. Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel technology that utilizes a metal oxide oxygen carrier to transport oxygen to the fuel thereby avoiding direct contact between fuel and air. The use of CLC has the advantages of reducing the energy penalty while

91

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

92

Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology  

SciTech Connect

This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and we posit that the exploration, development, and implementation of intrinsic mechanisms such as discussed here are part of a balanced approach aimed at preventing the misuse of nuclear material for nuclear-energy applications.

Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies The Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) sponsors research, development and deployment (RD&D) activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will pursue these advancements through RD&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and U.S. universities, as well as through collaboration with industry and international partners. These activities will focus on advancing scientific

96

Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ADVANCED REACTORS DIVISION FUEL LABORATORIES CHESWICK, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Policy, Safety and Environment Office of Operational Safety Environmental...

97

Accident Tolerant Fuels for Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Accident Tolerant Fuels for Light Water Reactors. Author(s), Steven J. Zinkle, Kurt A. Terrani, Lance L. Snead. On-Site Speaker (Planned) ...

98

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversible Fuel Cells Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

99

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Portable Power Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

100

Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gel-sphere-pac reactor fuel fabrication and its application to a variety of fuels  

SciTech Connect

The gel-sphere-pac fuel fabrication option was evaluated for its possible application to commercial scale fuel fabrication for 19 fuel element designs that use oxide fuel in metal clad rods. The dry gel spheres are prepared at the reprocessing plant and are then calcined, sintered, inspected, and loaded into fuel rods and packed by low-energy vibration. A fuel smear density of 83 to 88% theoretical can be obtained. All fuel fabrication process steps were defined and evaluated from fuel receiving to finished fuel element shipping. The evaluation also covers the feasibility of the process, the current status of technology, estimates of the required time and cost to develop the technology to commercial status, and the safety and licensability of commercial scale plants. The primary evaluation was for a Light-Water Reactor fuel element containing (U,Pu)O/sub 2/ fuel. The other 18 fuel element types - 3 for Light-Water Reactors, 1 for a Heavy-Water Reactor, 1 for a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor, 7 for Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors, and 3 pairs for Light-Water Prebreeder and Breeder Reactors - were compared with the Light-Water Reactor. The gel-sphere-pac option was found applicable to 17 of the 19 element types; the characteristics of a commercial scale plant were defined for these for making cost estimates for such plants. The evaluation clearly shows the gel-sphere-pac process to be a viable fuel fabrication option. Estimates indicate a significant potential fabrication cost advantage for the gel-sphere-pac process if a remotely operated and remotely maintained fuel fabrication plant is required.

Olsen, A.R.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts comprehensive efforts to overcome the technological, economic, and institutional barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells. The office is aligned with the strategic vision and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The office's efforts will help secure U.S. leadership in clean energy technologies and advance U.S. economic competitiveness and scientific innovation. What We Do DOE is the lead federal agency for directing and integrating activities in hydrogen and fuel cell R&D as authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is responsible for coordinating the R&D activities for DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes activities within four DOE offices (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy [EERE], Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and Office of Science).

103

Fuel Cycle Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Radiochemical Separation & Processing Recycle & Waste Management Uranium Enrichment Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Fuel Cycle Science & Technology SHARE Fuel Cycle Science and Technology The ORNL expertise and experience across the entire nuclear fuel cycle is underpinned by extensive facilities and a comprehensive modeling and simulation capability ORNL supports the understanding, development, evaluation and deployment of

104

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure  

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International Hydrogen International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications

105

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text  

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Delivery and Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications

106

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications  

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Cell Technical Cell Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards Market Analysis Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

107

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell  

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Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on AddThis.com...

108

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan* The Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration (MYRD&D) Plan* describes the goals,...

109

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletter: August 2013 The August 2013 issue of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office newsletter includes stories in these categories: In the News Funding Opportunities Webinars and...

110

DECONTAMINATION OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrometallurgical method of decontaminating neutronirradiated reactor fuel is presented. In accordance with the invention, neutron-irradiated reactor fuel may be decontaminated by countercurrently contacting the fuel with a bed of alkali and alkaine fluorides under an inert gas atmosphere and inductively melting the fuel and tracking the resulting descending molten fuel with induction heating as it passes through the bed. By this method, a large, continually fresh surface of salt is exposed to the descending molten fuel which enhances the efficiency of the scrubbing operation.

Buyers, A.G.; Rosen, F.D.; Motta, E.E.

1959-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uses of fuel cell technologies. MotorWeek H2 on the Horizon Video Learn how car makers, energy suppliers, and the government are bringing fuel cell electric vehicles and hydrogen...

112

Safeguards and nonproliferation aspects of a dry fuel recycling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory undertook an independent assessment of the proliferation potentials and safeguardability of a dry fuel recycling technology, whereby spent pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuels are used to fuel canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors. Objectives of this study included (1) the evaluation of presently available technologies that may be useful to safeguard technology options for dry fuel recycling (2) and identification of near-term and long-term research needs to develop process-specific safeguards requirements. The primary conclusion of this assessment is that like all other fuel cycle alternatives proposed in the past, the dry fuel recycle entails prolfferation risks and that there are no absolute technical fixes to eliminate such risks. This study further concludes that the proliferation risks of dry fuel recycling options are relatively minimal and presently known safeguards systems and technologies can be modified and/or adapted to meet the requirements of safeguarding such fuel recycle facilities.

Pillay, K.K.S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Liquid fossil fuel technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented under the following headings: (1) extraction (technology assessment, oil research, gas research); (2) liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); (3) utilization (energy conservation); and (4) project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are also listed. Some of the highlights for this period are: the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center was converted into NIPER, the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research on October 1, 1983; modelling of enthalpies, heat capacities and volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions began using a mass action model; a series of experiments were run on upgrading by hydrogenation SRC-II coal liquid at different degrees of severity and the products have been analyzed; heavy crude oil extracts were separated into fraction with high performance liquid chromatography by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the mass spectra and electron spin resonance were determin ed; and particulates from exhaust gases of diesel engines using fire fuel types are being collected and will be analyzed by chemical methods and results will be compared with those obtained by biological assay. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support  

SciTech Connect

The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

Douglas Morrell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Education  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Offices | Consumer Information Education Search Search Help Education EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Education Printable Version Share this resource Send a link...

116

EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results will be documented in a report by Pacific Northwest National Lab: "Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and...

117

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Education Students learn about solar energy. DOE supports demonstrations and commercialization by providing technically accurate and objective...

118

Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

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2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

120

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop  

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Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

122

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop Bethesda, Maryland Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 10/2/2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Overview Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean energy field with over 950 fuel cell patents issued in 2011. * Nearly double the second place holder, solar, which has ~540 patents. [1] http://cepgi.typepad.com/files/cepgi-4th-quarter-2011-1.pdf United States 46% Germany 7% Korea 7% Canada 3% Taiwan 1% Great Britain 1% France 1% Other 3% Japan 31% Fuel Cell Patents Geographic Distribution 2002-2011 Top 10 companies: GM, Honda, Samsung,

123

Medium Power Lead Alloy Reactors: Missions for this Reactor Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [~100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant. These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO2 power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a long operating cycle length by enhancing in-core breeding. For the actinide-burning mission three design variants were produced: (1) a fertile-free actinide burner, i.e., a single-tier strategy, (2) a minor actinide burner with plutonium burned in the LWR fleet, i.e., a two-tier strategy, and (3) an actinide burner with characteristics balanced to also favor economic electricity production.

Neil E. Todreas; Philip E. MacDonald; Pavel Hejzlar; Jacopo Buongiorno; Eric Loewen

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

FUEL PROGRAMMING FOR SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of fuel programming, i.e., the scheme used for changing fuel in a core, on the reactivity and specific power of a sodium graphite reactor is discussed Fuel programs considered Include replacing fuel a core-load at a time or a radial zone at a time, replacing fuel to manutain the same average exposure of fuel elements throughout the core, and replacing and transferring fuel elements to maintain more highly exposed fuel in the center or at the periphery of the core. Flux and criticality calculations show the degree of power flattening and the concurrent decrease in effective multiplication which results from maintaining more exposed fuel toward the core center. Corverse effects are shown for the case of maintaining more exposed fuel near the core periphery. The excess reactivity which must be controlled in the various programs is considered. Illustrative schedules for implementing each of these programs in an SGR are presented. (auth)

Connolly, T.J.

1959-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND CORE SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactors and in particular to an improved fuel element and a novel reactor core system for facilitating removal of contaminating fission products, as they are fermed, from association with the flssionable fuel, so as to mitigate the interferent effects of such fission products during reactor operation. The fuel elements are comprised of tubular members impervious to fluid and contatning on their interior surfaces a thin layer of fissionable material providing a central void. The core structure is comprised of a plurality of the tubular fuel elements arranged in parallel and a closed manifold connected to their ends. In the reactor the core structure is dispersed in a water moderator and coolant within a pressure vessel, and a means connected to said manifuld is provided for withdrawing and disposing of mobile fission product contamination from the interior of the feel tubes and manifold.

Moore, W.T.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Advanced Reactor Technology Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Technology Documents Advanced Reactor Technology Documents January 30, 2013 Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report This report documents the establishment of a technical review process and the findings of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) Technical Review Panel (TRP).1 The intent of the process is to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. A goal of the process is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. The process involved establishing evaluation criteria, conducting a pilot review, soliciting concept inputs from industry entities, reviewing the concepts by TRP members and compiling the

127

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants Fuels and Lubricants Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research

128

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Systems Integration  

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Systems Integration to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Systems Integration on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Systems Integration on...

129

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Durability Working Group  

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About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Durability Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

130

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Progress Reports  

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Progress Reports to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Progress Reports on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Progress Reports on...

131

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

132

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

133

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

134

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Related Financial Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

135

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technical Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

136

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Webinar Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

137

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Market Analysis Reports Reports about fuel cell and hydrogen technology market analysis...

138

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Information Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

139

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE Infrastructure Workshop  

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IPHE Infrastructure Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE Infrastructure Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE...

140

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Home Page  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

142

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webmaster Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Webmaster to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office -...

143

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Contacts to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office -...

144

Vehicles and Fuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Vehicles and Fuels Technology Marketing Summaries Here you’ll find marketing summaries of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies available for licensing from U.S ...

145

Fuel cycle problems in fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cycle problems of fusion reactors evolve around the breeding, recovery, containment, and recycling of tritium. These processes are described, and their implications and alternatives are discussed. Technically, fuel cycle problems are solvable; economically, their feasibility is not yet known. (auth)

Hickman, R.G.

1976-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fuels & Lubricant Technologies- FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels and lubricants research at FEERC involves study of the impacts of fuel and lubricant properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes liquid fuels from synthetic and renewable sources as well as conventional and unconventional fossil-based sources. Combustion and emissions studies are leveraged with relevant single and multi-cylinder engine setups in the FEERC and access to a suite of unique diagnostic tools and a vehicle dynamometer laboratory. ORNL/DOE research has been cited by EPA in important decisions such as the 2006 diesel sulfur rule and the 2010/2011 E15 waiver decision. Major program categories and examples

147

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Recent news stories and press releases related to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office are presented below. To see past news items, refer to the news archives for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, and 2003. Subscribe to Fuel Cell Technologies Office updates. January 10, 2014 Upcoming Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells Join the Energy Department at 2:00 p.m. ET on Thursday, January 16 for the first Energy 101 Google+ Hangout, which will focus on fuel cells. More January 10, 2014 Help Design the Hydrogen Fueling Station of Tomorrow The Energy Department posted a blog yesterday about the Hydrogen Education Foundation's Hydrogen Student Design Contest. More December 20, 2013 Your Holidays...Brought to You by Fuel Cells

148

Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect

For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

None available

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Workshop Hydrogen Production Workshop Sara Dillich U.S Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado September 24, 2013 2 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Overview Nearly 300 projects currently funded at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes Mission: Enable widespread commercialization of a portfolio of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies through applied research, technology development and demonstration, and diverse efforts to overcome institutional and market challenges. Key Goals : Develop hydrogen and fuel cell technologies for early markets (stationary power, lift trucks, portable power), mid-term markets (CHP, APUs, fleets and buses), and long-term markets (light duty vehicles).

150

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial

151

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars

152

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards Market Analysis Educational Publications Newsletter

155

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards

156

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

157

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

158

Technology Commercialization Showcase 2008: Hydrogen, Fuel ...  

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Sunita Satyapal ... fossil, nuclear, and renewable sources. 14%. Technology Validation. Validate complete

159

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transportation and Stationary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HOME ABOUT PROGRAM AREAS INFORMATION RESOURCES FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES TECHNOLOGIES MARKET TRANSFORMATION NEWS EVENTS EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Information...

160

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fuel assembly for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved fuel assembly is formed to minimize the amount of parasitic structural material wherein a plurality of hollow tubular members are juxtaposed to the fuel elements of the assembly. The tubular members may serve as guide tubes for control elements and are secured to a number of longitudinally spaced grid members along the fuel assembly. The grid members include means thereon engaging each of the fuel elements to laterally position the fuel elements in a predetermined array. Openings in the bottom of each hollow member serve as a shock absorber to cushion shock transmitted to the structure when the control elements are rapidly inserted in their corresponding tubular members.

Creagan, Robert J. (Pitcairn, PA); Frisch, Erling (Pittsburgh, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Program Overview Richard Farmer Richard Farmer Acting Acting Program Program Manager Manager Acting Acting Program Program Manager Manager 2010 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting 2010 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (7 June 2010) (7 June 2010) The Administration's Clean Energy Goals 9 9 Double Renewable Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012 9 Invest $150 billion over ten years i in energy R&D to transition to a clean energy economy clean energy economy 9 Reduce GHG emissions 83% by 2050 2 t t Æ Æ F l ll ff hi hl ffi i di f l d Fuel Cells Address Our Key Energy Challenges Increasing Energy Increasing Energy Ef ficiency and Resource Diversity Efficiency and Resource Diversity Æ Æ Fuel cells offer a highly efficient way to use diverse fuels and energy sources.

163

RE fuel Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RE fuel Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name RE-fuel Technology Ltd Place Wiltshire, United Kingdom Sector Efficiency Product RE-Fuel is developing high efficiency redox...

164

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell...

165

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Webinar Archives 2011 Webinar Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Webinars Archives Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

166

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Catalysis Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis Working Catalysis Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Catalysis Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Catalysis Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Catalysis Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Catalysis Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Catalysis Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Catalysis Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis

167

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2012 Webinar Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Webinar Archives 2 Webinar Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2012 Webinar Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2012 Webinar Archives on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2012 Webinar Archives on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2012 Webinar Archives on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2012 Webinar Archives on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2012 Webinar Archives on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Webinars Archives Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

168

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts

169

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Presentations Program Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

170

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities on AddThis.com... Current Opportunities Past Opportunities Recovery Act Selected Awards Requests for Information Related Opportunities

171

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and fuel cells offer great  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary fuel cell technol vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated in addition to hydrogen fuel for local demonstration fuel cell vehicles. As advanced vehicles begin to enter

172

Current Projects for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis > Current Projects Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics...

173

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologie...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies Federal Facilities Guide Read Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers for step-by-step guidance...

174

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be

175

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Technology Bulletins Technology Bulletins to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on AddThis.com... Technology Bulletins The Alternative Fuels Data Center provides technology bulletins to inform transportation industry decision makers about technological breakthroughs, issues, and news about alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. For more information, read: E15 Approved for Use in 2001 and Newer Vehicles Updated 2/11

176

Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance  

SciTech Connect

The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He/sup 3/ reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored.

Powell, J.R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

Ougouag, Abderrafi M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Shelley, ID); Gougar, Hans D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop on Facebook Tweet...

179

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordinatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting on Facebook Tweet about...

180

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supporting the role that fuel cells play in our nation's energy portfolio. Through its market transformation efforts, the Fuel Cell Technologies Office seeks to accelerate the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Sensor Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSA Standards DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Element One, Inc. EmersonTherm-O-Disc FM Global Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Energy Association H2scan Honeywell Analytics Intelligent...

182

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations The Fuel Cell Technologies Office staff members give presentations about fuel cells and hydrogen at a variety of conferences. Some of their presentations are below....

183

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

used. Technology Solicitation Title Open Date Close Date Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Trucks, Roof-top Backup Power, and Advanced Hydrogen...

184

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster discusses hydrogen fuel cell transit bus evaluations conducted for the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT). It was presented at the 2006 HFCIT Program Review.

Eudy, L.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is a comprehensive portfolio of activities that address the full range of barriers facing the development and deployment of hydrogen and fuel...

186

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Small Modular Reactor Technologies Small modular reactors can also be made in factories and transported to sites where they would be ready to "plug and play" upon arrival, reducing both capital costs and construction times. The smaller size also makes these reactors ideal for small electric grids and for locations that

187

Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials Award Recipient Estimated Award Amount* Award Location Supporting Organizations Project Description University of Nebraska $979,978 Lincoln, NE Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA), Texas A&M (College Station, TX) Project will explore the development of advanced metal/ceramic composites. These improvements could lead to more efficient production of electricity in advanced reactors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory $849,000 Oak Ridge, TN University of Wisconsin-Madison (Madison, WI) Project will develop novel high-temperature high-strength steels with the help of computational modeling, which could lead to increased efficiency in advanced reactors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

188

PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office FY2014 Budget Request Briefing on April 12 Apr 9, 2013 The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will hold a budget briefing for stakeholders on Friday, April...

190

Fuel qualification issues and strategies for reactor-based surplus plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed irradiation of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial reactors as a disposition method for surplus plutonium from the weapons program. The burning of MOX fuel in reactors is supported by an extensive technology base; however, the infrastructure required to implement reactor-based plutonium disposition does not exist domestically. This report identifies and examines the actions required to qualify and license weapons-grade (WG) plutonium-based MOX fuels for use in domestic commercial light-water reactors (LWRs).

Cowell, B.S.; Copeland, G.L.; Moses, D.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Electrorefining {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} reactor fuel  

SciTech Connect

Principles of purifying of uranium metal by electrorefining are reviewed. Metal reactor fuel after irradiation is a form of impure uranium. Dissolution and deposition electrorefining processes were developed for spent metal fuel under the Integral Fast Reactor Program. Application of these processes to the conditioning of spent N-reactor fuel slugs is examined.

Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Natural Fueling of a Tokamak Fusion Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural fueling mechanism that helps to maintain the main core deuterium and tritium (DT) density profiles in a tokamak fusion reactor is discussed. In H-mode plasmas dominated by ion- temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, cold DT ions near the edge will naturally pinch radially inward towards the core. This mechanism is due to the quasi-neutral heat flux dominated nature of ITG turbulence and still applies when trapped and passing kinetic electron effects are included. Fueling using shallow pellet injection or supersonic gas jets is augmented by an inward pinch of could DT fuel. The natural fueling mechanism is demonstrated using the three-dimensional toroidal electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence code GEM and is analyzed using quasilinear theory. Profiles similar to those used for conservative ITER transport modeling that have a completely flat density profile are examined and it is found that natural fueling actually reduces the linear growth rates and energy transport.

Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Perkins, Francis W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

NEUTRONIC REACTOR AND FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a reactor design of the type which employs solid fuel elements disposed in channels within the moderator through which channels and around the fuel elements is conveyed a coolant fiuid. The coolant channels are comprised of aluminum tubes extending through a solid moderator such as graphite and the fuel elements are comprised of an elongated solid body of natural uranium jacketed in an aluminum jacket with the ends thereof closed by aluminum caps of substantially greater thickness than the jacket was and in good thermal contact with the fuel material to facilitate the conduction of heat from the central portion of said ends to the coolant surrounding the fuel element to prevent overheating of said central portion.

Szilard, L.; Young, G.J.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Educational Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage

195

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: November 2013 Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 2013 November 2013 Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: November 2013 Newsletter on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: November 2013 Newsletter on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: November 2013 Newsletter on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: November 2013 Newsletter on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: November 2013 Newsletter on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: November 2013 Newsletter on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery

196

Nuclear reactor core and fuel element therefor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. This core consists of vertical columns of disengageable fuel elements stacked one atop another. These columns are arranged in side-by-side relationship to form a substantially continuous horizontal array. Each of the fuel elements include a block of refractory material having relatively good thermal conductivity and neutron moderating characteristics. The block has a pair of parallel flat top and bottom end faces and sides which are substantially prependicular to the end faces. The sides of each block is aligned vertically within a vertical column, with the sides of vertically adjacent blocks. Each of the blocks contains fuel chambers, including outer rows containing only fuel chambers along the sides of the block have nuclear fuel material disposed in them. The blocks also contain vertical coolant holes which are located inside the fuel chambers in the outer rows and the fuel chambers which are not located in the outer rows with the fuel chambers and which extend axially completely through from end face to end face and form continuous vertical intracolumn coolant passageways in the reactor core. The blocks have vertical grooves extending along the sides of the blocks form interblock channels which align in groups to form continuous vertical intercolumn coolant passsageways in the reactor core. The blocks are in the form of a regular hexagonal prism with each side of the block having vertical gooves defining one half of one of the coolant interblock channels, six corner edges on the blocks have vertical groves defining one-third of an interblock channel, the vertical sides of the blocks defining planar vertical surfaces.

Fortescue, P.

1986-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element comprising a large number og wafers of fissionable material and a protective jacket having compartments holding these wafers is described. The compartments of the jacket aid the removal of heat from the wafers, keep the wafers or fragments thereof from migrating in the jacket, and permit the escape of gaseous fission products.

Carney, K.G. Jr.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

198

PYROCHEMICAL DECONTAMINATION METHOD FOR REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyro-chemical method is presented for decontaminating neutron irradiated uranium and separating plutonium therefrom by contact in the molten state with a metal chloride salt. Uranium trichloride and uranium tetrachloride either alone or in admixture with alkaline metal and alkaline eanth metal fluorides under specified temperature and specified phase ratio conditions extract substantially all of the uranium from the irradiated uranium fuel together with certain fission products. The phases are then separated leaving purified uranium metal. The uranium and plutonium in the salt phase can be reduced to forin a highly decontaminated uraniumplutonium alloy. The present method possesses advantages for economically decontaminating irradiated nuclear fuel elements since irradiated fuel may be proccessed immediately after withdrawal from the reactor and the uranium need not be dissolved and later reduced to the metallic form. Accordingly, the uranium may be economically refabricated and reinserted into the reactor.

Buyers, A.G.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

MODELING ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FRESH FUEL SHIPPING CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor Fresh Fuel Shipping Container (ATR FFSC) is currently licensed per 10 CFR 71 to transport a fresh fuel element for either the Advanced Test Reactor, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). During the licensing process, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) raised a number of issues relating to the criticality analysis, namely (1) lack of a tolerance study on the fuel and packaging, (2) moderation conditions during normal conditions of transport (NCT), (3) treatment of minor hydrogenous packaging materials, and (4) treatment of potential fuel damage under hypothetical accident conditions (HAC). These concerns were adequately addressed by modifying the criticality analysis. A tolerance study was added for both the packaging and fuel elements, full-moderation was included in the NCT models, minor hydrogenous packaging materials were included, and fuel element damage was considered for the MURR and MITR-II fuel types.

Rick J. Migliore

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fusion reactors for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the types of processes now being considered for synthetic fuels production from fusion energy, together with an example of each type are listed. The process efficiency is defined as the chemical energy in the generated hydrogen (at the higher heating value (HHV)) divided by the total fusion energy release, including alpha particles and secondary neutron reactions in the blanket. Except where specifically noted, both high and low temperature blanket heats are counted as part of total fusion energy release.

Powell, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Welding austenitic steel clads for fast reactor fuel pins  

SciTech Connect

ABS>From symposium on fuel and elements for fast reactors; Brussels. Belgium (2 Jul 1973). Developmental programs aimed at fabrication of stainless steelclad PuO/sub 2/ fuel pins are described. Information and data are included on welding fast reactor fuel cans, methods of reducing the incidence of weld cracking, effects of weld stresses, and fuel plug design. (JRD)

Papeleux, P.; Flipot, A.J.; Lafontaine, I.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Partnership for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the...

203

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement Nuclear Reactor Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation Bilateral...

204

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Activities to Key Activities to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Key Activities The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to

205

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Home Page...

206

Energy Department Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center to Advance Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Department Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center to Advance...

207

2008 FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and hot water from a 400 kW fuel cell. Gills Onions' processing facility captures waste biogas2008 FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT JUNE 2010 #12;2008 FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT i and the fuel cell industry. The authors especially wish to thank Sunita Satyapal, Nancy Garland, and the staff

208

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

209

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

210

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

211

Vehicles and Fuels Technologies Available for Licensing ...  

Vehicles and Fuels Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and participating research institutions have ...

212

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis...

213

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary This glossary contains terms and acronyms related to hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z - Acronyms A AC Generator (or Alternator) An electric device that produces an electric current that reverses direction many times per second. Also called a synchronous generator. Adsorption The adhesion of the molecules of gases, dissolved substances, or liquids to the surface of the solids or liquids with which they are in contact. Air The mixture of oxygen, nitrogen, and other gases that, with varying amounts of water vapor, forms the atmosphere of the earth. Alkaline Fuel Cell (AFC) A type of hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell in which the electrolyte is concentrated potassium hydroxide (KOH) and the hydroxide ions (OH-) are transported from the cathode to the anode.

214

Fuel Rod Cooling in Natural Uranium Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of the transfer of heat from a cylindrical fuel rod surrounded by a fast flowing coolant in an annular duct, with maximum power output limited by fuel rod temperatures, coolant pressure drop and pumping power requirements. A method is also presented for comparing and evaluating various liquid and gaseous coolants within these limitations. The report also shows and discusses some calculated results obtained for the systems considred in the study of natural U reactors for the production of Pu and useful power (NAA-SR-137).

Trilling, C.A.

1952-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

215

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element structure particularly useful in high temperature nuclear reactors is presented. Basically, the structure comprises two coaxial graphite sleeves integrally joined together by radial fins. Due to the high structural strength of graphite at high temperatures and the rigidity of this structure, nuclear fuel encased within the inner sleeve in contiguous relation therewith is supported and prevented from expanding radially at high temperatures. Thus, the necessity of relying on the usual cladding materials with relatively low temperature limitations for structural strength is removed. (AEC)

Davidson, J.K.

1963-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

216

International Fuel Technology Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Technology Inc Fuel Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name International Fuel Technology Inc Place St. Louis, Missouri Zip 63105 Product Supplier of environmentally friendly surfactant-based fuel additives designed to significantly reduce harmful emissions produced from internal combustion engines. References International Fuel Technology Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. International Fuel Technology Inc is a company located in St. Louis, Missouri . References ↑ "International Fuel Technology Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Fuel_Technology_Inc&oldid=347044" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

217

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels. Fuel cells have the potential to replace the internal-combustion engine in...

218

Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NUCLEAR REACTOR AND THERMIONIC FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent relates to the direct conversion of fission heat to electricity by use of thermionic plasma diodes having fissionable material cathodes, said diodes arranged to form a critical mass in a nuclear reactor. The patent describes a fuel element comprising a plurality of diodes each having a fissionable material cathode, an anode around said cathode, and an ionizable gas therebetween. Provision is made for flowing the gas and current serially through the diodes. (AEC)

Rasor, N.S.; Hirsch, R.L.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Publications Educational Publications Increase your H2IQ Access easy-to-understand fact sheets and other information designed to introduce hydrogen and fuel cell technologies to non-technical audiences. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Fact Sheets Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fact Sheet Progress and Accomplishments in Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Highlights from U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Recovery Act Projects World's First Tri-Generation Energy Station - Fountain Valley Fuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt Entities Jobs in Fuel Cell Technologies Hydrogen Fuel Cells Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Distribution and Delivery Hydrogen Market Transformation Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Safety Hydrogen Technology Validation Comparison of Fuel Cell Technologies Hydrogen-Powered Buses

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Post Irradiation Evaluation of BWR Fuel From Hope Creek Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Occasionally, in some BWRs, fuel pellet washout from a single degraded fuel rod has resulted in high offgas levels that were sufficient to impede the reactor operation. In addition, certain sound fuel rods have exhibited high eddy-current liftoff values during routine poolside measurements. Investigators pursued these two recent BWR fuel issues by performing detailed hotcell examinations on selected fuel rods from the Hope Creek reactor. The results provided insights into the mechanisms involved and poss...

1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Enabling Technologies Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation Nuclear...

223

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - National Fuel Cell Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center The National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC) at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) plays a crucial role in NREL's independent, third-party analysis of hydrogen fuel cell technologies in real-world operation. The NFCTEC is designed for secure management, storage, and processing of proprietary data from industry. Access to the off-network NFCTEC is limited to NREL's Technology Validation Team, which analyzes detailed data and reports on fuel cell technology status, progress, and technical challenges. Graphic representing NREL's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and the variety of applications from which it gathers data, including fuel cell (FC) stacks, FC backup power, FC forklifts, FC cars, FC buses, and FC prime power, and hydrogen infrastructure.

224

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

variety of other fuels, including natural gas and renewable fuels such as methanol or biogas. Hydrogen and fuel cells can provide these benefits and address critical challenges in...

225

Technology Insights and Perspectives for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Concepts  

SciTech Connect

The following report provides a rich resource of information for exploring fuel cycle characteristics. The most noteworthy trends can be traced back to the utilization efficiency of natural uranium resources. By definition, complete uranium utilization occurs only when all of the natural uranium resource can be introduced into the nuclear reactor long enough for all of it to undergo fission. Achieving near complete uranium utilization requires technologies that can achieve full recycle or at least nearly full recycle of the initial natural uranium consumed from the Earth. Greater than 99% of all natural uranium is fertile, and thus is not conducive to fission. This fact requires the fuel cycle to convert large quantities of non-fissile material into fissile transuranics. Step increases in waste benefits are closely related to the step increase in uranium utilization going from non-breeding fuel cycles to breeding fuel cycles. The amount of mass requiring a disposal path is tightly coupled to the quantity of actinides in the waste stream. Complete uranium utilization by definition means that zero (practically, near zero) actinide mass is present in the waste stream. Therefore, fuel cycles with complete (uranium and transuranic) recycle discharge predominately fission products with some actinide process losses. Fuel cycles without complete recycle discharge a much more massive waste stream because only a fraction of the initial actinide mass is burned prior to disposal. In a nuclear growth scenario, the relevant acceptable frequency for core damage events in nuclear reactors is inversely proportional to the number of reactors deployed in a fuel cycle. For ten times the reactors in a fleet, it should be expected that the fleet-average core damage frequency be decreased by a factor of ten. The relevant proliferation resistance of a fuel cycle system is enhanced with: decreasing reliance on domestic fuel cycle services, decreasing adaptability for technology misuse, enablement of material accountability, and decreasing material attractiveness.

S. Bays; S. Piet; N. Soelberg; M. Lineberry; B. Dixon

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record, Record # 11003, Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

failure modes. (4) DOE targets are for real-world applications; refer to Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program Plan. 3 On Road Durability Through the...

227

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year`s report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Key Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Activities Key Activities The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to advance the development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Research, Development, and Demonstration Key areas of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) include the following: Fuel Cell R&D, which seeks to improve the durability, reduce the cost, and improve the performance of fuel cell systems, through advances in fuel cell stack and balance of plant components Hydrogen Fuel R&D, which focuses on enabling the production of low-cost hydrogen fuel from diverse renewable pathways and addressing key challenges to hydrogen delivery and storage Manufacturing R&D, which works to develop and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technologies and processes that will reduce the cost of fuel cell systems and hydrogen technologies

230

The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ``advanced reactors,`` it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ``advanced reactors`` are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970`s. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing.

Lancaster, D.

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Updated Uranium Fuel Cycle Environmental Impacts for Advanced Reactor Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to update the environmental impacts from the uranium fuel cycle for select advanced (GEN III+) reactor designs.

Nitschke, R.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT JUNE 2010 2008 FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT i Authors This report was written primarily by Bill Vincent of the Breakthrough Technologies Institute in Washington, DC, with significant assistance from Jennifer Gangi, Sandra Curtin, and Elizabeth Delmont. Acknowledgments This report was the result of hard work and valuable contributions from government staff and the fuel cell industry. The authors especially wish to thank Sunita Satyapal, Nancy Garland, and the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program for their support and guidance in the preparation of this report. The authors also wish to thank Robert Rose and Bud DeFlaviis of the U.S. Fuel Cell Council; Lisa Callaghan-Jerram of Fuel Cell Today; Alison Wise and Rachel Gelman

233

Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Preparations for the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modifications to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility-South (HFEF/S) have been in progress since mid-1988 to ready the facility for demonstration of the unique Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) pyroprocess fuel cycle. This paper updates the last report on this subject to the American Nuclear Society and describes the progress made in the modifications to the facility and in fabrication of the new process equipment. The IFR is a breeder reactor, which is central to the capability of any reactor concept to contribute to mitigation of environmental impacts of fossil fuel combustion. As a fast breeder, fuel of course must be recycled in order to have any chance of an economical fuel cycle. The pyroprocess fuel cycle, relying on a metal alloy reactor fuel rather than oxide, has the potential to be economical even at small-scale deployment. Establishing this quantitatively is one important goal of the IFR fuel cycle demonstration.

Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). This pursuit involves ...

Shuffler, Carter Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping...

238

Fabrication of advanced oxide fuels containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R and D of advanced fuel containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors is described related to the composite fuel with MgO matrix. Fabrication tests of MgO composite fuels containing Am were done by a practical process that could be adapted to the presently used commercial manufacturing technology. Am-containing MgO composite fuels having good characteristics, i.e., having no defects, a high density, a homogeneous dispersion of host phase, were obtained. As related technology, burn-up characteristics of a fast reactor core loaded with the present MgO composite fuel were also analyzed, mainly in terms of core criticality. Furthermore, phase relations of MA oxide which was assumed to be contained in MgO matrix fuel were experimentally investigated. (authors)

Miwa, Shuhei; Osaka, Masahiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Ishi, Yohei; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tions, distributed power generation, and cogeneration (in which excess heat released during electricity the imported petroleum we currently use in our cars and trucks. Why Fuel Cells? Fuel cells directly convert the chemical energy in hydrogen to electricity, with pure water and potentially useful heat as the only

240

2010 Annual Progress Report for Fuels Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

annual progress report 2010 Fuels Technologies i FY 2010 Progress Report Fuels Technologies Approved by Kevin Stork Team Leader, Fuels Technologies Vehicle Technologies Program FY 2010 Progress rePort For Fuels technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 February 2011 DOE-FT-2010AR ii Fuels Technologies FY 2010 Progress Report Acknowledgement We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Alliance Technical Services, Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for their technical and artistic contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all the participants for their contributions to the programs and all the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Standards and Methods Development to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Research Standards and Methods Development on Facebook...

242

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

delivery, storage, and fuel cell technologies. In carrying out this mission, the DOE FCT Office selects research and development and other projects through open and...

243

Vehicles and Fuels Technologies Available for Licensing ...  

Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. Send a link to Vehicles and Fuels Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy Innovation Portalto ...

244

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

within the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office and the DOE offices of Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, and Science. It describes the Program's activities, the specific obstacles...

245

Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cell systems and for the practical generation, storage, and delivery of hydrogen as an energy carrier. The lab's Fuel Cell Technologies Program conducts its research and...

246

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technologies: Improved Electrode ...  

They are highly fuel-efficient and almost non-polluting, making them an attractive alternative for energy generation. ... Energy Innovation Portal Technologies.

247

Energy Basics: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Photo of a woman scientist using a machine that is purifying biological catalysts for hydrogen production. Hydrogen is the...

248

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Systems Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Consumer Information Systems Analysis Search Search Help Systems Analysis EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Systems Analysis Printable Version Share this resource Send...

249

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Consumer Information Hydrogen Storage Search Search Help Hydrogen Storage EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Storage Printable Version Share this resource Send...

250

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Consumer Information Hydrogen Delivery Search Search Help Hydrogen Delivery EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Delivery Printable Version Share this resource...

251

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Compression, Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost...

252

Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microtur

253

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technical Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

codes and standards; and hydrogen and fuel cell technology market analysis. This information is provided in documents such as technical and project reports, conference...

254

Fuel Cell Backup Power Technology Validation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about fuel cell backup power technology validation activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Fuel Cell Bus Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) held a Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on June 7, 2010 in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program Annual Merit Review. The workshop plenary and breakout session brought together technical experts from industry, end users, academia, DOE national laboratories, and other government agencies to address the status and technology needs of fuel cell powered buses. Meeting Summary Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report Presentations Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Overview & Purpose, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, DOE Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology, Nico Bouwkamp, CaFCP and Leslie Eudy, NREL Progress and Challenges for PEM Transit Fleet Applications, Tom Madden, UTC Power, LLC

256

Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Legacy > Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

257

Fuel performance comparison between Savannah River reactors and the US commercial nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a review of fuel/target performance of the Savannah River Reactors which was made to compare their in-core performance with that of the commercial nuclear reactors in the US.

Paik, I.K.; Ellison, P.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Local Governments For Early Adopters For Students & Educators Careers in Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells...

259

CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF PELLET-CLADDING INTERACTION IN LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANS/ENS Topical Meeting on Reactor Safety Aspects of FuelINTERACTION IN LiaiT-WATER-REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS by D. R.PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical

Olander, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

PROCESSING OF MOLTEN SALT POWER REACTOR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

ABS> Fuel reprocessing methods are being investigated for molten salt nuclear reactors which use LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt as a solvent for UF/sub 4/ and ThF/sub 4/. A liquid HF dissolution procedure coupled with fluorination has been developed for recovery of the uranium and LiF- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt which is highly enriched in Li/sup 7/. The recovered salt is decontaminated in the process from the major reactor poisons; namely, rare earths and neptunium. A brief investigation of alternate methods, including oxide precipitation, partial freezing, and metal reduction, indicated that such methods may give some separation of the solvent salt from reactor poisons, but they do not appear to be sufficiently quantitative for a simple processing operation. Solubilities of LiF and BeF/sub 2/ in aqueous 70t0 100% HF are presented. The BeF/sub 2/ solubility is appreciably increased in the presence of water and large amounts of LiF. Salt solubilities of 150 g/liter are attainable. Tracer experiments indicate that rare earth solubilities, relative to LiF-- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt solubility, increase from about 10/sup -4/ mole% in 98% HF to 0.003 mole% in 80% HF. Fluorination of uranium from LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt was demonstrated. This appears feasible also for the recovery of the relatively small ccncentration of uranium produced in the LiF- BeF/sub 2/ThF/sub 4/ blanket. A proposed chemical flowsheet is presented on the basis of this exploratory work as applied to the semicontinuous processing of a 600 Mw power reactor. (auth)

Campbell, D.O.; Cathers, G.I.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2012 Webinar Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Webinar Archives 2 Webinar Archives Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinars and state and regional initiatives webinars held in 2012 through the descriptions and linked materials below. Also view webinar archives from other years. Webinars presented in 2012: DOE Updates JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC 1.1) Model Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Opportunities Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting California Fuel Cell Partnership's Roadmap to the Commercialization of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts Fuel Cells for Portable Power BNL's Low-Platinum Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs)

262

2011 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 FUEL CELL 2011 FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT ii Authors This report was a collaborative effort by staff of the Breakthrough Technologies Institute, Inc., in Washington, DC. Acknowledgement The authors relied upon the hard work and valuable contributions of many men and women in government and in the fuel cell industry. The authors especially wish to thank Sunita Satyapal and the staff of the US Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program for their support and guidance. The authors also wish to thank Rachel Gelman of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the many others who made this report possible. iii Contents List of Figures .....................................................................................................................................................v

263

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record 12012: Fuel Cell Bus Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Record #: 12012 Date: March 2, 2012 Title: Fuel Cell Bus Targets Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Sunita Satyapal * Date: September 12, 2012 Item: Performance, cost, and durability targets for fuel cell transit buses are presented in Table 1. These market-driven targets represent technical requirements needed to compete with alternative technologies. They do not represent expectations for the status of the technology in future years. Table 1. Performance, cost, and durability targets for fuel cell transit buses. Units 2012 Status 2016 Target Ultimate Target Bus Lifetime years/miles 5/100,000 1 12/500,000 12/500,000 Power Plant Lifetime 2,3 hours 12,000 18,000 25,000

264

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/9/2011 9/9/2011 eere.energy.gov FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM MANUFACTURING WORKSHOP Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Manager 8/11/2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 9/9/2011 eere.energy.gov Purpose * Identify and prioritize challenges and barriers to manufacture of hydrogen and fuel cell systems and components * Identify and prioritize R&D activities that government can support to overcome the barriers Workshop Objectives Workshop Output: * Preliminary list of R&D needs for hydrogen and fuel cell manufacturing * Report of workshop proceedings including plenary presentations and summary of participant input (to be made available online) Post-Workshop Output:

265

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell devices to charge electronics such as cell phones and audio players. EERE funding for hydrogen and fuel cells has led to more than 450 patents, 60 commercial...

266

Experience with non-fuel-bearing components in LWR (light-water reactor) fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

Many non-fuel-bearing components are so closely associated with the spent fuel assemblies that their integrity and behavior must be taken into consideration with the fuel assemblies, when handling spent fuel of planning waste management activities. Presented herein is some of the experience that has been gained over the past two decades from non-fuel-bearing components in light-water reactors (LWRs), both pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Among the most important of these components are the control rod systems, the absorber and burnable poison rods, and the fuel assembly channels. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fuel Cycle Technology Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Technology Documents Fuel Cycle Technology Documents January 11, 2013 Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Issued on January 11, 2013, the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste is a framework for moving toward a sustainable program to deploy an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. October 30, 2012 2012 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Report The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security

268

Fuel cycle design and analysis of SABR: subrcritical advanced burner reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Various fuel cycles for a sodium-cooled, subcritical, fast reactor with a fusion neutron source for the transmutation of light water reactor spent fuel have been… (more)

Sommer, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lattice type fissionable fuel structure for a nuclear reactor is described. The fissionable material is formed into a plurality of rod-llke bodies with each encased in a fluid-tight jacket. A plurality of spaced longitudinal fins are mounted on the exterior and extend radially from each jacket, with a portion of the fins extending radially beyond the remainder of the fins. A collar of short length for each body is mounted on the extended fins for spacing the bodies, and adjacent bodies abut each other through these collars. Should distortion of the bodies take place, coilapse of the outer fins is limited by the shorter flns, thereby insuring some coolant flow at all times. (AEC)

Duffy, J.G. Jr.

1961-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lattice-type fissionable fuel structure for a nuclear reactor is offered. The fissionable material is formed into a plurality of rod-like bodies each encased in a fluid-tight jacket. A plurality of spaced longitudinal fins are mounted on the exterior of and extend radially from each jacket, and a portion of the fins extends radially beyond the remainder of the fins. A collar of short lengih for each body is mounted on the extended fins for spacing the bodies, and adjacent bodies abut each other through these collars. Should distortion of the bodies take place, collapse of the outer fins is limited by the shorter fins thereby insuring some coolant flow therethrough at all times.

Duffy, J.G. Jr.

1961-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Metal-fueled HWR (heavy water reactors) severe accident issues: Differences and similarities to commercial LWRs (light water reactors)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differences and similarities in severe accident progression and phenomena between commercial Light Water Reactors (LWR) and metal-fueled isotopic production Heavy Water Reactors (HWR) are described. It is very important to distinguish between accident progression in the two systems because each reactor type behaves in a unique manner to a fuel melting accident. Some of the lessons learned as a result of the extensive commercial severe accident research are not applicable to metal-fueled heavy water reactors. A direct application of severe accident phenomena developed from oxide-fueled LWRs to metal-fueled HWRs may lead to large errors or substantial uncertainties. In general, the application of severe accident LWR concepts to HWRs should be done with the intent to define the relevant issues, define differences, and determine areas of overlap. This paper describes the relevant differences between LWR and metal-fueled HWR severe accident phenomena. Also included in the paper is a description of the phenomena that govern the source term in HWRs, the areas where research is needed to resolve major uncertainties, and areas in which LWR technology can be directly applied with few modifications.

Ellison, P.G.; Hyder, M.L.; Monson, P.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Coryell, E.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

RAPHAEL: The European Union's (Very) High Temperature Reactor Technology Project  

SciTech Connect

Since the late 1990, the European Union (EU) was conducting work on High Temperature Reactors (HTR) confirming their high potential in terms of safety (inherent safety features), environmental impact (robust fuel with no significant radioactive release), sustainability (high efficiency, potential suitability for various fuel cycles), and economics (simplifications arising from safety features). In April 2005, the EU Commission has started a new 4-year Integrated Project on Very High Temperature Reactors (RAPHAEL: Reactor for Process Heat And Electricity) as part of its 6{sup th} Framework Programme. The European Commission and the 33 partners from industry, R and D organizations and academia finance the project together. After the successful performance of earlier HTR-related EU projects which included the recovery of some earlier German experience and the re-establishment of strategically important R and D capabilities in Europe, RAPHAEL focuses now on key technologies required for an industrial VHTR deployment, both specific to very high temperature and generic to all types of modular HTR with emphasis on combined process heat and electricity generation. Advanced technologies are explored in order to meet the performance challenges required for a VHTR (900-1000 deg C, up to 200 GWd/tHM). To facilitate the planned sharing of significant parts of RAPHAEL results with the signatories of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) VHTR projects, RAPHAEL is structured in a similar way as the corresponding GIF VHTR projects. (authors)

Fuetterer, Michael A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Besson, D.; Bogusch, E.; Carluec, B.; Hittner, D.; Verrier, D. [AREVA Framatome-ANP (France); Billot, Ph.; Phelip, M. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (France); Buckthorpe, D. [NNC Ltd, Knutsford (United Kingdom); Casalta, S. [European Commission, DG RTD, Brussels (Belgium); Chauvet, V. [STEP, Paris (France); Van Heek, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Petten (Netherlands); Von Lensa, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Pirson, J. [Tractebel Engineering, Brussels (Belgium); Scheuermann, W. [Institut fuer Kernenergetik, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases and thus reduce three temperature losses in the system associated with (1) heat transfer from the fuel to the reactor coolant, (2) temperature rise across the reactor core, and (3) heat transfer across the heat exchangers between the reactor and H2 production plant. Lowering the peak reactor temperatures and thus reducing the high-temperature materials requirements may make the AHTR the enabling technology for low-cost nuclear hydrogen production.

Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

274

Meeting Summary Advanced Light Water Reactor Fuels Industry Meeting Washington DC October 27 - 28, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group first met in November of 2010 with the objective of looking 20 years ahead to the role that advanced fuels could play in improving light water reactor technology, such as waste reduction and economics. When the group met again in March 2011, the Fukushima incident was still unfolding. After the March meeting, the focus of the program changed to determining what we could do in the near term to improve fuel accident tolerance. Any discussion of fuels with enhanced accident tolerance will likely need to consider an advanced light water reactor with enhanced accident tolerance, along with the fuel. The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group met in Washington D.C. on October 72-18, 2011 to continue discussions on this important topic.

Not Listed

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Preparation of high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for the preparation of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel elements wherein uncarbonized fuel rods are inserted in appropriate channels of an HTGR fuel element block and the entire block is inserted in an autoclave for in situ carbonization under high pressure. The method is particularly applicable to remote handling techniques.

Bradley, Ronnie A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Status of Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cell technology development and commercialization continues to be a major thrust in the alternative energy sector of distributed generation (DG). Second generation, molten carbonate fuel cell technology (MCFC) is now entering a critical commercialization phase. Given recent MCFC developments and advances in other distributed generation technologies, an assessment and update on the prospects for MCFC power systems is needed to guide future utility investments.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell TypesFuel Cell Types Note: ITSOFC is intermediate temperature SOFC and TSOFC is tubular SOFC #12

278

High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell  

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Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Digg

280

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies in the Media Spotlight Vehicle Technologies in the Media Spotlight August 19, 2013 Automakers have made steady progress reducing the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch fuel cell electric vehicles in the U.S. market between 2015 and 2020. A recent Denver Post article highlights the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's contribution to the progress that automakers have made in getting their fuel cell electric vehicles ready for production. "When I started working on fuel cells in the '90s, people said it was a good field because a solution would always be five years away," said Brian Pivovar, who leads NREL's fuel cell research. "Not anymore." The article references a variety of NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microbial Fuel Cells Offer Innovative Technology for Oil, Gas ...  

Microbial Fuel Cells Offer Innovative Technology ... where organics and salt contaminate water in significant amounts during fossil fuels production.

282

PROTEUS - Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Toolset for Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis PROTEUS Faster and more accurate neutronics calculations enable optimum reactor design... Argonne National Laboratory's powerful reactor physics toolset, PROTEUS, empowers users to create optimal reactor designs quickly, reliably and accurately. ...Reducing costs for designers of fast spectrum reactors. PROTEUS' long history of validation provides confidence in predictive simulations Argonne's simulation tools have more than 30 years of validation history against numerous experiments and measurements. The tools within PROTEUS work together, using the same interface files for easier integration of calculations. Multi-group Fast Reactor Cross Section Processing: MC 2 -3 No other fast spectrum multigroup generation tool

283

Spent fuel utilization in a compact traveling wave reactor  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, several innovative designs of nuclear reactors are proposed. One of them is Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR). The unique characteristic of a TWR is the capability of breeding its own fuel in the reactor. The reactor is fueled by mostly depleted, natural uranium or spent nuclear fuel and a small amount of enriched uranium to initiate the fission process. Later on in the core, the reactor gradually converts the non-fissile material into the fissile in a process like a traveling wave. In this work, a TWR with spent nuclear fuel blanket was studied. Several parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, and fission power, were analyzed. The discharge burnup composition was also analyzed. The calculation is performed by a continuous energy Monte Carlo code McCARD.

Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology 373-1 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen and fuel cells. This information is provided in documents such as technical and project reports, conference proceedings and journal articles, technical presentations, and...

285

Proliferation resistance for fast reactors and related fuel cycles: issues and impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power may depend to a significant degree on the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen proliferation resistance and nuclear materials accountability. The challenges for fast reactors and related fuel cycles are especially critical. They are being explored in the Generation IV Tnternational Forum (GIF) and the Tnternational Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) initiative, as well as by many states that are looking to these systems for the efficient lise of uranium resources and long-term energy security. How do any proliferation risks they may pose compare to other reactors, both existing and under development, and their fuel cycles? Can they be designed with intrinsic (technological) features to make these systems more proliferation resistant? What roles can extrinsic (institutional) features play in proliferation resistance? What are the anticipated safeguards requirements, and will new technologies and approaches need to be developed? How can safeguards be facilitated by the design process? These and other questions require a rethinking of proliferation resistance and the prospects for new technologies and other intrinsic and extrinsic features being developed that are responsive to specific issues for fast reactors and related fuel cycles and to the broader threat environment in which these systems will have to operate. There are no technologies that can wholly eliminate the risk of proliferation by a determined state, but technology and design can playa role in reducing state threats and perhaps in eliminating non-state threats. There will be a significant role for extrinsic factors, especially the various measures - from safeguards and physical protection to export controls - embodied in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. This paper will offer an assessment of the issues surrounding, and the prospects for, efforts to develop proliferation resistance for fast reactors and related fuel cycles in the context of a nuclear renaissance. The focus of the analysis is on fast reactors.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the DOE Hydrogen Program (PDF 1.1 MB), JoAnn Milliken, DOE Hydrogen Program Manager SOFC Technology R&D Needs (PDF 1.7 MB), Steven Shaffer, Delphi Chief Engineer, Fuel Cell...

287

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells Today: Early Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Here (music) Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies are beginning to enter the market and learning demonstrations are spreading to various parts of the country. As you begin to see...

288

Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor physics and fuel cycle analysis is a core competency of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division. The Division has played a major role in the design and analysis of advanced reactors, particularly liquid-metal-cooled reactors. NE researchers have concentrated on developing computer codes for

289

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Codes and Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Digg

290

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refueling Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen on Digg

291

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Matching Government Needs with...  

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Government Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Matching Government Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells on...

292

Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than...

293

A dynamic fuel cycle analysis for a heterogeneous thorium-DUPIC recycle in CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect

A heterogeneous thorium fuel recycle scenario in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor has been analyzed by the dynamic analysis method. The thorium recycling is performed through a dry process which has a strong proliferation resistance. In the fuel cycle model, the existing nuclear power plant construction plan was considered up to 2016, while the nuclear demand growth rate from the year 2016 was assumed to be 0%. In this analysis, the spent fuel inventory as well as the amount of plutonium, minor actinides, and fission products of a multiple thorium recycling fuel cycle were estimated and compared to those of the once-through fuel cycle. The analysis results have shown that the heterogeneous thorium fuel cycle can be constructed through the dry process technology. It is also shown that the heterogeneous thorium fuel cycle can reduce the spent fuel inventory and save on the natural uranium resources when compared with the once-through cycle. (authors)

Jeong, C. J.; Park, C. J.; Choi, H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., P.O. Box 150, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants Research Fuels and Lubricants Research As transportation accounts for two-thirds of the nearly $1 billion the U.S. spends daily on foreign oil, it is vital to increase our use of alternative fuels. Increasing the fuels available to drivers reduces price volatility, supports domestic industries, and increases environmental sustainability. The DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center provides basic information on alternative fuels, including Biodiesel, Ethanol, Natural Gas, Propane, and Hydrogen. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research to improve how vehicles use these many of these fuels in the future, as well as activities to increase their availability today. It also researches how new petroleum-based fuels affect advanced combustion systems and how lubricants can improve the efficiency of vehicles currently on the road.

295

Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

Radulescu, Laura ['Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, PO BOX MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Pavelescu, Margarit [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Bucharest (Romania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hot Fuel Examination Facility's neutron radiography reactor  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory-West is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and is operated by the University of Chicago for the United States Department of Energy in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, LMFBR. The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both nondestructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the nondestructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography, which is provided by the NRAD reactor facility (a TRIGA type reactor) below the HFEF hot cell.

Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC) (Revised...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and fuel cell organizations Contact Us If you are interested in working with the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center, please contact: NREL's Technology...

298

Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2013 Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology Supported by Research Funding...

299

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen...

300

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Storage Systems Analysis Working...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: FY 2007 Financial Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

302

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Systems Analysis Workshop...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

303

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure...  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

304

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: FY 2006 Financial Awards  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

305

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Events EventsDetail  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

306

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis...  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

307

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery...  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

308

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Announces New Hydrogen Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

309

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Organization Chart and Contacts  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

310

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

311

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

312

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

313

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage Workshop Proceedings  

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Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage Workshop Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen...

314

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Marketing Summaries Here you’ll find marketing summaries of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies available for licensing from U.S ...

315

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Merit Review Proceedings  

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Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Merit Review Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Merit Review...

316

Fuel rod retention device for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for supporting a nuclear fuel rod in a fuel rod assembly which allows the rod to be removed without disturbing other rods in the assembly. A fuel rod cap connects the rod to a bolt which is supported in the assembly end fitting by means of a locking assembly. The device is designed so that the bolt is held securely during normal reactor operation yet may be easily disengaged and the fuel rod removed when desired.

Hylton, Charles L. (Madison Heights, VA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

Timothy A. Hyde

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

DOE

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 °C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 °C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 °C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design ‘fixes’, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

Douglas L. Porter

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300°C and 900°C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

David Petti

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

2007 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect

The fuel cell industry, which has experienced continued increases in sales, is an emerging clean energy industry with the potential for significant growth in the stationary, portable, and transportation sectors. Fuel cells produce electricity in a highly efficient electrochemical process from a variety of fuels with low to zero emissions. This report describes data compiled in 2008 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2007 with some comparison to two previous years. The report begins with a discussion of worldwide trends in units shipped and financing for the fuel cell industry for 2007. It continues by focusing on the North American and U.S. markets. After providing this industry-wide overview, the report identifies trends for each of the major fuel cell applications -- stationary power, portable power, and transportation -- including data on the range of fuel cell technologies -- polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), alkaline fuel cell (AFC), molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), and direct-methanol fuel cell (DMFC) -- used for these applications.

McMurphy, K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

FY 2005 Progress Report for Fuels Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Progress Report Progress rePort for fuels technologies Less dependence on foreign oil, and eventual transition to an emissions-free, petroleum-free vehicle F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2005 Progress Report for Fuels Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen January 2006 Fuels Technologies FY 2005 Progress Report Contents I Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 II Fuels and Lubricants to Enable High Efficiency Engine Operation while Meeting 2007 - 2010 Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

323

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Christy Cooper Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program FORS 5G-064 (202) 586-1885 christy.cooper@ee.doe.gov Education...

324

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webmaster Please use this form to send us your comments, report problems, andor ask questions about information on the Fuel Cell Technologies Program Web site. If it regards a...

325

Biogas Technologies and Integration with Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL BIOGAS WORKSHOP NREL BIOGAS WORKSHOP BIOGAS TECHNOLOGIES AND INTEGRATION WITH FUEL CELLS Ian Handley Ros Roca Envirotec USA American Biogas Council SUMMARY * Introduction and Background * Anaerobic Digestion * Biogas Utilization * Biogas Upgrading Technology * Biogas Specification * Biogas to Fuel Cell * Conclusions Promoting the use of Biogas and Anaerobic Digestion O 149 Members from the U.S., Germany, Italy, Canada and the UK O All Industry Sectors Represented Key Industry Goals: O Promote biogas markets, technologies and infrastructure O Achieve policy parity O Promote as a best practice for environmental stewardship and greenhouse gas reduction www.americanbiogascouncil.org Products and technologies for environmental protection Pneumatic waste

326

Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. initial results suggest that full-scale PBR, elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of {approximately}60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperature limit, average energy deposition of {approximately}100 MW/L may be achievable.

Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. initial results suggest that full-scale PBR, elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of {approximately}60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperature limit, average energy deposition of {approximately}100 MW/L may be achievable.

Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

1993-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

An Overview of Stationary Fuel Cell Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology developments occurring in the past few years have resulted in the initial commercialization of phosphoric acid (PA) fuel cells. Ongoing research and development (R and D) promises further improvement in PA fuel cell technology, as well as the development of proton exchange membrane (PEM), molten carbonate (MC), and solid oxide (SO) fuel cell technologies. In the long run, this collection of fuel cell options will be able to serve a wide range of electric power and cogeneration applications. A fuel cell converts the chemical energy of a fuel into electrical energy without the use of a thermal cycle or rotating equipment. In contrast, most electrical generating devices (e.g., steam and gas turbine cycles, reciprocating engines) first convert chemical energy into thermal energy and then mechanical energy before finally generating electricity. Like a battery, a fuel cell is an electrochemical device, but there are important differences. Batteries store chemical energy and convert it into electrical energy on demand, until the chemical energy has been depleted. Depleted secondary batteries may be recharged by applying an external power source, while depleted primary batteries must be replaced. Fuel cells, on the other hand, will operate continuously, as long as they are externally supplied with a fuel and an oxidant.

DR Brown; R Jones

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reactor physics assessment of thick silicon carbide clad PWR fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity make silicon carbide (SiC) a potential fuel cladding material that may improve the economics and safety of light water reactors (LWRs). "Thick" SiC ...

Bloore, David A. (David Allan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Innovative fuel designs for high power density pressurized water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the ways to lower the cost of nuclear energy is to increase the power density of the reactor core. Features of fuel design that enhance the potential for high power density are derived based on characteristics of ...

Feng, Dandong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Monte Carlo method of evaluating heterogeneous effects in plate-fueled reactors  

SciTech Connect

Few-group nuclear cross sections for small plate-fueled, light and heavy water test reactors are frequently generated with unit cell models that contain a homogeneous mixture of fuel, cladding, and water. The heterogeneous unit cells do not need to be represented explicitly for neutronics calculations when the plate and coolant channel thicknesses are small compared with the mean-free-path of neutrons. However, neutron and photon heating calculations were performed with heterogeneous fuel models to predict accurately the heat deposited in the fuel meat, cladding, and coolant. Heat deposited in the coolant channels and outside the fuel elements does not have a direct impact on the peak fuel meat temperature but must be included in the total coolant system heat balance. The results of a heterogeneous Monte Carlo calculation that estimates the heat loads in different fuel regions are presented and the fact that similar homogeneous fuel models can be used for many calculations. The calculations presented here were performed on models of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor 2 (MITR-2). The ANS is a small, 362-MW (fission), plate-fueled, heavy water reactor designed to produce an intense steady-state source of neutrons.

Thayer, R.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Ryskamp, J.M. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

Guon, Jerold (Woodland Hills, CA); Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA); Specht, Eugene R. (Simi Valley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

VENTED FUEL ELEMENT FOR GAS-COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hollow, porous-walled fuel element filled with fissionable fuel and provided with an outlet port through its wall is described. In operation in a gas-cooled reactor, the element is connected, through its outlet port, to the vacuum side of a pump that causes a portion of the coolant gas flowing over the exterior surface of the element to be drawn through the porous walls thereof and out through the outlet port. This continuous purging gas flow sweeps away gaseous fission products as they are released by the fissioning fuel. (AEC) A fuel element for a nuclear reactor incorporating a body of metal of melting point lower than the temperature of operation of the reactor and a nuclear fuel in finely divided form dispersed in the body of metal as a settled slurry is presented. (AEC)

Furgerson, W.T.

1963-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Fuel-Cell Technology Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Fuel cell Approximate operating temperature °C °F Polymer electrolyte (PEFC) 80 175 Alkaline (AFC) 100 212 Phosphoric acid (PAFC) 200 390 Molten carbonate (MCFC) 650 1200 Solid oxide (SOFC) 600â??1000 1110â??1830...

337

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cepgi.typepad.comfilescepgi-4th-quarter-2011-1.pdf United States 46% Germany 7% Korea 7% Canada 3% Taiwan 1% Great Britain 1% France 1% Other 3% Japan 31% Fuel Cell Patents...

338

Assessment of innovative fuel designs for high performance light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To increase the power density and maximum allowable fuel burnup in light water reactors, new fuel rod designs are investigated. Such fuel is desirable for improving the economic performance light water reactors loaded with ...

Carpenter, David Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

340

Fuel Cells as an Emerging Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been directing a fuel cell research and development program since 1976. The intention of this program is to pursue improvements in utilization of domestic natural gas, coal, and alternate fuels to produce electric power as a part of the National Energy Plan. The goal of this program is to develop the technology base required to enable private sector commercialization of this new energy option for power generation to take place. Under sponsorship of DOE and other Government and private agencies, fuel cell technology has evolved from limited applications for alkaline fuel cells in the space program of the 1960's to large multikilowatt and multimegawatt power plants capable of utilization by the industrial sector in many types of applications. This paper will briefly examine the technical progress and status of this technology.

Jewell, D. M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Processing of FRG high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements at General Atomic under the US/FRG cooperative agreement for spent fuel elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the United States (US) are cooperating on certain aspects of gas-cooled reactor technology under an umbrella agreement. Under the spent fuel treatment development section of the agreement, both FRG mixed uranium/ thorium and low-enriched uranium fuel spheres have been processed in the Department of Energy-sponsored cold pilot plant for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel processing at General Atomic Company in San Diego, California. The FRG fuel spheres were crushed and burned to recover coated fuel particles suitable for further treatment for uranium recovery. Successful completion of the tests described in this paper demonstrated certain modifications to the US HTGR fuel burining process necessary for FRG fuel treatment. Results of the tests will be used in the design of a US/FRG joint prototype headend facility for HTGR fuel.

Holder, N.D.; Strand, J.B.; Schwarz, F.A.; Drake, R.N.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Technology Advancement Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast

343

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: April 3, 2000 2: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on

344

NEUTRON REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT UTILIZING ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to clad fuel elements for use in neutronic reactors and is drawn to such a fuel element which consists of a core of fissionable material, comprised of an alloy of zirconium and U/sup 235/ enriched uranium, encased in a jacket of a binary zirconium-tin alloy in which the tin content ranges between 1 and 15% by weight.

Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.; Szumachowski, E.R.

1957-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Tsinghua University in Beijing co-hosted the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27-29, 2010 in Beijing, China. High pressure vessel experts gathered to share lessons learned from compressed natural gas (CNG) and hydrogen vehicle deployments, and to identify R&D needs to aid the global harmonization of regulations, codes and standards to enable the successful deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The forum also included additional discussion resulting from the DOE and U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) co-sponsored International Workshop on Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels held on December 10-11, 2009 in Washington, D.C.

347

NREL: Technology Deployment - Alternative Fuels Data Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuels Data Center Alternative Fuels Data Center NREL developed and manages the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC), the U.S. Department of Energy's comprehensive clearinghouse of information and data related to the deployment of alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and energy efficiency in transportation for fleets, fuel providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders working to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Interactive Transportation Deployment Tools NREL's large suite of free online tools assist fleets and drivers in selecting and deploying the technologies and strategies that will best help them meet their environmental and energy goals. Fleets and drivers can use calculators, interactive maps, and data searches to evaluate, select, and deploy alternative fuels and advanced vehicles as

348

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Electrolysis Water Electrolysis Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Water Electrolysis Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

349

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Transport Modeling Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

350

Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on AddThis.com...

351

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #684: July 18, 2011 Fuel Economy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2011 Fuel Economy versus Fuel Savings to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 684: July 18, 2011 Fuel Economy versus Fuel Savings on Facebook Tweet about...

353

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Roadmaps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This page contains documents that outline U.S. DOE efforts to develop a hydrogen-based energy system. Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future, published...

354

Reactor technology. Progress report, January-March 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress is reported concerning space reactor (SPAR) electric power supply; GCFR reactor safety experiments; structural analysis of HTGR, PWR, and BWR containment vessels and pressure vessels; heat pipe technology development; and nuclear criticality experiments and safety.

Breslow, M.; Sullivan, S. (eds.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Technology Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section...

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption

358

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

359

Medium-Power Lead-Alloy Reactors: Missions for This Reactor Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [{approx}100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant.These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO{sub 2} power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a long operating cycle length by enhancing in-core breeding. For the actinide-burning mission three design variants were produced: (1) a fertile-free actinide burner, i.e., a single-tier strategy, (2) a minor actinide burner with plutonium burned in the LWR fleet, i.e., a two-tier strategy, and (3) an actinide burner with characteristics balanced to also favor economic electricity production.

Todreas, Neil E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); MacDonald, Philip E. [INEEL0Bechtel BWXT Idaho (United States); Hejzlar, Pavel [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Loewen, Eric P. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: US DOE 10/2010 Source: US DOE 10/2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Fuel Cell Seminar & Exposition San Antonio, TX October 19, 2010 Agenda * Overview * RD&D Progress * Analysis & Key Publications * Budget Update * Next Steps - DOE Releases Program Plan for Stakeholder Input - Upcoming Workshops & Solicitations Source: US DOE 10/2010 2  Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012  Invest $150 billion over ten years in energy R&D to transition to a clean energy economy  Reduce GHG emissions 83% by 2050 Administration's Clean Energy Goals 3 Key Examples US DOE 10/2010 4 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vehicle Technologies Office: Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Biodiesel and Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines

362

Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency  

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Maximizing Alternative Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

363

The Stirred Tank Reactor Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and operation of a differential Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is described. The fuel cell design is based on coupled Stirred Tank Reactors (STR); the gas phase in each reactor compartment was well mixed. The characteristic times for reactant flow, gas phase diffusion and reaction were chosen so that the gas compositions at both the anode and cathode are uniform. The STR PEM fuel cell is one-dimensional; the only spatial gradients are transverse to the membrane. The STR PEM fuel cell was employed to examine fuel cell start- up, and its dynamic responses to changes in load, temperature and reactant flow rates. Multiple time scales in systems response are found to correspond to water absorption by the membrane, water transport through the membrane and stress-related mechanical changes of the membrane.

Benziger, J; Karnas, E; Moxley, J; Teuscher, C; Kevrekidis, Yu G; Benziger, Jay

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Performance and fuel cycle cost study of the R2 reactor with HEU and LEU fuels  

SciTech Connect

A systematic study of the experiment performance and fuel cycle costs of the 50 MW R2 reactor operated by Studsvik Energiteknik AB has been performed using the current R2 HEU fuel, a variety of LEU fuel element designs, and two core-box/reflector configurations. The results include the relative performance of both in-core and ex-core experiments, control rod worths, and relative annual fuel cycle costs.

Pond, R.B.; Freese, K.E.; Matos, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells: How They Work and How They're  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells: How They Fuel Cells: How They Work and How They're Used (Text Alternative Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells: How They Work and How They're Used (Text Alternative Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells: How They Work and How They're Used (Text Alternative Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells: How They Work and How They're Used (Text Alternative Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells: How They Work and How They're Used (Text Alternative Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells: How They Work and How They're Used (Text Alternative Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells:

367

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MotorWeek Fuel Cell MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

368

Fuel Cell-Fuel Cell Hybrid System Contact NETL Technology Transfer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell-Fuel Cell Hybrid System Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov November 2012 Opportunity Research on the patented technology "Fuel Cell-Fuel Cell...

369

Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cleaning Using Advanced Ultrasonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Ultrasonic Fuel Cleaning Technology (patent pending) was successfully qualified and demonstrated in the field at AmerenUE Callaway Plant under joint sponsorship of the EPRI Robust Fuel Program, Working Group 1 Fuel/Water Chemistry, and an AmerenUE Tailored Collaboration. In October 1999, the project team cleaned sixteen reload assemblies, which are currently undergoing re-irradiation in Cycle 11 at Callaway Plant. The assemblies show no evidence to date of any adverse fuel performance as a consequen...

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

370

High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reactor physics behavior of transuranic-bearing TRISO-particle fuel in a pressurized water reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) - only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is retained. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

Pope, M. A.; Sen, R. S.; Ougouag, A. M.; Youinou, G. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Boer, B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); SCK-CEN, Boertang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Reactor Physics Behavior of Transuranic-Bearing TRISO-Particle Fuel in a Pressurized Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU)-only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electrometallurgical treatment of degraded N-reactor fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

N-Reactor fuel constitutes almost 80% of the entire mass of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) spent fuel inventory. The current plan for disposition of this fuel calls for interim dry storage, followed by direct repository disposal. However, this approach may not be viable for the entire inventory of N-Reactor fuel. The physical condition and chemical composition of much of the fuel have changed during the period that it has been in storage. The cladding of many of the fuel elements has been breached, allowing the metallic uranium fuel to react with water in the storage pools producing uranium oxides (U{sub x}O{sub y}) and uranium hydride (UH{sub 3}). Even if the breached fuel is placed in dry storage, it may continue to undergo significant changes caused by the reaction of exposed uranium with any remaining water in the container. Uranium oxides, uranium hydride, and hydrogen gas are expected to form as a result of this reaction. The presence of potentially explosive hydrogen and uranium hydride, which under certain conditions is pyrophoric, raises technical concerns that will need to be addressed. The electrometallurgical treatment process developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has potential for conditioning degraded N-Reactor fuel for long-term storage or disposal. The first step in evaluating the applicability of this process is the preparation of degraded fuel that is similar to the actual degraded N-Reactor fuel. Subsequently, the simulated degraded fuel can be introduced into an electrorefiner to examine the effect of corrosion products on the electrorefining process. Some of the technical issues to be resolved include the viability of direct electrorefining without a head-end reduction step, the effect of adherent corrosion products on the electrorefining kinetics, and the recovery and treatment of loose corrosion products that pull away from the degraded fuel. This paper presents results from an experimental study of the preparation, characterization, and subsequent electrometallurgical treatment of samples of simulated degraded N-Reactor fuel.

Gourishankar, K. V.; Karell, E. J.; Everhart, R. E.; Indacochea, E.

2000-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

374

System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

Matchett, Richard L. (Bethel Park, PA); Roof, David R. (North Huntingdon, PA); Kikta, Thomas J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wilczynski, Rosemarie (McKees Rocks, PA); Nilsen, Roy J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bacvinskas, William S. (Bethel Park, PA); Fodor, George (Pittsburgh, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

377

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

378

HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions  

SciTech Connect

This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR “full recycle” service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the “pebble bed” approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R&D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in “limited separation” or “minimum fuel treatment” separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication. Several issues are outside the scope of this report, including the following: thorium fuel cycles, gas-cooled fast reactors, the reliability of TRISO-coated particles (billions in a reactor), and how soon any new reactor or fuel type could be licensed and then deployed and therefore impact fuel cycle performance measures.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Nick Soelberg

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Research Council Reviews...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Research Council Reviews FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Research Program to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Research Council Reviews...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications News Release Release Date: July 23, 2013 National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies SOFC Solid oxide fuel cells are among the...

382

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: FY 2008 Financial Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: FY 2008 Financial Awards to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell...

383

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on October 24, 2006 Review of Working Group Charter & DOE RD&D Targets for Hydrogen Production from Renewable Liquid Fuels, Arlene Anderson, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies...

384

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Webinar (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel...

385

Reactor Physics Assessment of the Inclusion of Unseparated Neptunium in MOX Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing the number of actinide separation streams in a spent fuel recovery process would reduce the cost and complexity of the process, and lower the quantity and numbers of solvents needed. It is more difficult and costly to separate Np and recombine it with Am-Cm prior to co-conversion than to simply co-strip it with the U-Pu-Np. Inclusion of the Np in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for light water reactor (LWR) applications should not seriously affect the operating behavior of the reactor, nor should it pose insurmountable fuel design issues. In this work, the U, Pu, and Np from typical discharged and cooled PWR spent nuclear fuel are assumed to be used together in the preparation of MOX fuel for use in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The reactor grade Pu isotopic vector is used in the model and the relative mass ratio of the Pu and Np content (Np/Pu mass is 0.061) from the cooled spent fuel is maintained but the overall Pu-Np MOX wt% is adjusted with respect to the U content (assumed to be at 0.25 wt% 235U enrichment) to offset reactivity and cycle length effects. The SCALE 5.1 scientific package (especially modules TRITON, NEWT, ORIGEN-S, ORIGEN-ARP) was used for the calculations presented in this paper. A typical Westinghouse 17x17 fuel assembly design was modeled at nominal PWR operating conditions. It was seen that U-Pu-Np MOX fuel with NpO2 and PuO2 representing 11.5wt% of the total MOX fuel would be similar to standard MOX fuel in which PuO2 is 9wt% of the fuel. The reactivity, isotopic composition, and neutron and ? sources, and the decay heat details for the discharged MOX fuel are presented and discussed in this paper.

Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. The focus of this document will be the overall range of DOE's structural materials research activities being conducted to support VHTR development. By far, the largest portion of material's R&D supporting VHTR development is that being performed directly as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Supplementary VHTR materials R&D being performed in the DOE program, including university and international research programs and that being performed under direct contracts with the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, will also be described. Specific areas of high-priority materials research that will be needed to deploy the NGNP and provide a basis for subsequent VHTRs are described, including the following: (1) Graphite: (a) Extensive unirradiated materials characterization and assessment of irradiation effects on properties must be performed to qualify new grades of graphite for nuclear service, including thermo-physical and mechanical properties and their changes, statistical variations from billot-to-billot and lot-to-lot, creep, and especially, irradiation creep. (b) Predictive models, as well as codification of the requirements and design methods for graphite core supports, must be developed to provide a basis for licensing. (2) Ceramics: Both fibrous and load-bearing ceramics must be qualified for environmental and radiation service as insulating materials. (3) Ceramic Composites: Carbon-carbon and SiC-SiC composites must be qualified for specialized usage in selected high-temperature components, such as core stabilizers, control rods, and insulating covers and ducting. This will require development of component-specific designs and fabrication processes, materials characterization, assessment of environmental and irradiation effects, and establishment of codes and standards for materials testing and design requirements. (4) Pressure Vessel Steels: (a) Qualification of short-term, high-temperature properties of light water rea

Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

CHEMICAL PROBLEMS OF NON-AQUEOUS FLUID-FUEL REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The three main chemical problems of non-aqueous fluidfuel reactors are selection of a fuel system which meets nuclear and thermal requirements, control of corrosion of structural materials, and development of an efficient and economical separation process. The problems of the fastneutron reactor with a core of fused NaCl, PbCl/sub 2/, UCl/sub 4/ mixture and a blanket of fused UCl/ sub 4/ are discussed, except for the separation process. Brief treatment is given the Bi- U - Pu fuel system for thermal reactors, including tentative flowsheets for the separation process. A detailed discussion of the experiments of Bareis at Brookhaven and related experiments on the distribution of various metals between liquid Bi and fused-salt solutions is given, the experimental results correlated, and application made to reactor problems. A general discussion is given of nonaqueous high-temperature separation processes (L.M.T.)

Scatchard, G.; Clark, H.M.; Golden, S.; Boltax, A.; Schuhmann, R. Jr.

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF), is a risk-informed ...

Denman, Matthew R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Hydrogen is an energy carrier, not an energy source-hydrogen stores and delivers energy in a usable form, but it must be produced from hydrogen containing compounds. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as coal (preferentially with carbon sequestration), natural gas, and biomass or using nuclear energy and renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydroelectric power to split water. This great potential for diversity of supply is an important reason why hydrogen is such a promising energy carrier. Hydrogen can be produced at large central plants, semi-centrally, or in small distributed units located at or very near the point of use, such as at refueling stations or stationary power

390

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive and MHE Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

391

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Accomplishments and Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accomplishments and Progress Accomplishments and Progress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts have greatly advanced the state of the art of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies-making significant progress toward overcoming many of the key challenges to widespread commercialization. DOE has also made major advances by demonstrating and validating the technologies under real-world conditions, supporting early markets through Recovery Act deployments, and leveraging domestic and international partnerships to advance the pace of commercialization. See the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's accomplishments fact sheet. Reducing the Cost and Improving the Durability and Performance of Fuel Cells Chart showing the cost of the automotive fuel cell system, which is projected to a high-volume manufacturing of 500,000 units per year. In 2002, the cost of the automotive fuel cell system (including balance of plant and stack) was $275/kW. The cost decreased to $108/kW in 2006, to $94/kW in 2007, to $73/kW in 2008, $61/kW in 2009, to $51/kW in 2010, and to $49/kW in 2011. The target cost for 2017 is $30/kW.

392

A Study of Fast Reactor Fuel Transmutation in a Candidate Dispersion Fuel Design  

SciTech Connect

Dispersion fuels represent a significant departure from typical ceramic fuels to address swelling and radiation damage in high burnup fuel. Such fuels use a manufacturing process in which fuel particles are encapsulated within a non-fuel matrix. Dispersion fuels have been studied since 1997 as part of an international effort to develop and test very high density fuel types for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program.[1] The Idaho National Laboratory is performing research in the development of an innovative dispersion fuel concept that will meet the challenges of transuranic (TRU) transmutation by providing an integral fission gas plenum within the fuel itself, to eliminate the swelling that accompanies the irradiation of TRU. In this process, a metal TRU vector produced in a separations process is atomized into solid microspheres. The dispersion fuel process overcoats the microspheres with a mixture of resin and hollow carbon microspheres to create a TRUC. The foam may then be heated and mixed with a metal power (e.g., Zr, Ti, or Si) and resin to form a matrix metal carbide, that may be compacted and extruded into fuel elements. In this paper, we perform reactor physics calculations for a core loaded with the conceptual fuel design. We will assume a “typical” TRU vector and a reference matrix density. We will employ a fuel and core design based on the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design.[2] Using the CSAS6 and TRITON modules of the SCALE system [3] for preliminary scoping studies, we will demonstrate the feasibility of reactor operations. This paper will describe the results of these analyses.

Mark DeHart; Hongbin Zhang; Eric Shaber; Matthew Jesse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety, Codes and Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen

394

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Duty Vehicle Light Duty Vehicle Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

395

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 Hydrogen Pipeline 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations

396

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on AddThis.com...

397

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on

398

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Refueling Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols Webinar (Text Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

399

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Safety (Text Alternative Version)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety (Text Safety (Text Alternative Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Safety (Text Alternative Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Safety (Text Alternative Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Safety (Text Alternative Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Safety (Text Alternative Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Safety (Text Alternative Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Safety (Text Alternative Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

400

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Onboard Storage Tank Onboard Storage Tank Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:

402

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

403

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2007 Hydrogen Pipeline 2007 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations

404

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Platinum Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings

405

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Cars (Text Alternative Version)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cars (Text Cars (Text Alternative Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Cars (Text Alternative Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Cars (Text Alternative Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Cars (Text Alternative Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Cars (Text Alternative Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Cars (Text Alternative Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Cars (Text Alternative Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

406

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage (Text Alternative Version)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage (Text Storage (Text Alternative Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage (Text Alternative Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage (Text Alternative Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage (Text Alternative Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage (Text Alternative Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage (Text Alternative Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage (Text Alternative Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

407

Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1984 to 2020  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original spent fuel utility data base (SFDB) has been adjusted to produce agreement with the EIA nuclear energy generation forecast. The procedure developed allows the detail of the utility data base to remain intact, while the overall nuclear generation is changed to match any uniform nuclear generation forecast. This procedure adjusts the weight of the reactor discharges as reported on the SFDB and makes a minimal (less than 10%) change in the original discharge exposures in order to preserve discharges of an integral number of fuel assemblies. The procedure used in developing the reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, as well as the resulting data bases themselves, are described in detail in this report. Discussions of the procedure cover the following topics: a description of the data base; data base adjustment procedures; addition of generic power reactors; and accuracy of the data base adjustments. Reactor-specific discharge and storage requirements are presented. Annual and cumulative discharge projections are provided. Annual and cumulative requirements for additional storage are shown for the maximum at-reactor (AR) storage assumption, and for the maximum AR with transshipment assumption. These compare directly to the storage requirements from the utility-supplied data, as reported in the Spent Fuel Storage Requirements Report. The results presented in this report include: the disaggregated spent fuel discharge projections; and disaggregated projections of requirements for additional spent fuel storage capacity prior to 1998. Descriptions of the methodology and the results are included in this report. Details supporting the discussions in the main body of the report, including descriptions of the capacity and fuel discharge projections, are included. 3 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

Heeb, C.M.; Libby, R.A.; Holter, G.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Remote Inspection Devices for Spent Reactor Enriched Uranium Fuel Elements  

SciTech Connect

A remote video inspection was developed and deployed in Argentina for the detailed inspection of highly radioactive spent reactor fuel (SNF) as a prerequisite to its shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the United States for long-term storage and disposition. The fuel is highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent assemblies dating from 1967 to 1989 and aluminum clad uranium-aluminum alloy of a typical material test reactor design. The specialized video system was designed for low cost, high portability, easy setup, and ease of usage, while accommodating the differing electrical systems (i.e. 110/60 Hz, 220/50 Hz) between the United States and Argentina.

Heckendorn, F.M.

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

409

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1994-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc (Quantum Technologies) Place Irvine, California Zip CA 92614 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar, Vehicles, Wind energy Product A California-based company with new energy activities in powertrains for hybrid vehicles, gas and hydrogen storage equipment manufacturing, and wind and solar energy. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

411

Retrievable fuel pin end member for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom end member (17b) on a retrievable fuel pin (13b) secures the pin (13b) within a nuclear reactor (12) by engaging on a transverse attachment rail (18) with a spring clip type of action. Removal and reinstallation if facilitated as only axial movement of the fuel pin (13b) is required for either operation. A pair of resilient axially extending blades (31) are spaced apart to define a slot (24) having a seat region (34) which receives the rail (18) and having a land region (37), closer to the tips (39) of the blades (31) which is normally of less width than the rail (18). Thus an axially directed force sufficient to wedge the resilient blades (31) apart is required to emplace or release the fuel pin (13b) such force being greater than the axial forces on the fuel pins (13b) which occur during operation of the reactor (12).

Rosa, Jerry M. (Los Gatos, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

PLUTONIUM FUEL PROCESSING AND FABRICATION FOR FAST CERAMIC REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

>A study was made of the processes available for fabrication of plutonium-containing fuel from a fast ceramic reacter, and for chemical reprocessing of irradiated fuel. Radiations from recycled plutonium are evaluated. Adaptation of conventional glove-box handling procedures to the fabrication of recycle plutonium appears practical. It is concluded that acceptable costs are obtainable using moderate extensions of conventional glove- box fabrication methods and wet processing techniques, provided a significant volume of production is available. The minimum economic scale for the preferred chemical reprocessing method, anion exchange, is about 500 Mw(e) of reactor capacity. The minimum scale of economic operation for the fuel refabrication facility corresponds to three 500 Mw(e) reactors, if only steady-state refueling provides the fabrication load. The minimum volume required falls to one 500 Mw(e) reactor, if the continued growth of capacity provides fabrication volume equal to that for refueling. The chemical reprocessing costs obtained range from 0.27 mills/kwh for 1500 Mw(e) of reactor capacity, to 0.10 mills/kwh for 3000 Mw(e) of capacity. The estimated fuel fabrication cost is l/kg of uranium and plutonium in the core region (excluding axial and radial blankets) or .06/ g of plutonium content, When axial blankets, fabricated in the same rods, are included; the combined average is 34/kg of uranium and plutonium. Radial blanket fabrication cost is /kg of uranium. The overall average of all fuel and blankets is /kg of uranium and plutonium. The fabrication cost is 0.29 mills/kwh for a production rate corresponding to 3000 Mw(e) of capacity (or 1500 Mw(e) of capacity plus growth equivalent to one additional reactor core per year). For one 525 Mw(e) reactor, (plus equivalent growth volume) the fabrication cost becomes 0.42 mills/ kwh. (All fuel throughputs are based on fuel life of 100,000 MWD/T.) Using the estimates developed, the total fuel cycle cost for a typical fast reactor design using PuO/sub 2/UO/sub 2/ fuel is estimated to be about 0.9 mills/kwh. (auth)

Zebroski, E.L.; Alter, H.W.; Collins, G.D.

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Proliferation resistant fuel for pebble bed modular reactors  

SciTech Connect

We show that it is possible to denature the Plutonium produced in Pebble Bed Modular Reactors (PBMR) by doping the nuclear fuel with either 3050 ppm of {sup 237}Np or 2100 ppm of Am vector. A correct choice of these isotopes concentration yields denatured Plutonium with isotopic ratio {sup 238}Pu/Pu {>=} 6%, for the entire fuel burnup cycle. The penalty for introducing these isotopes into the nuclear fuel is a subsequent shortening of the fuel burnup cycle, with respect to a non-doped reference fuel, by 41.2 Full Power Days (FPDs) and 19.9 FPDs, respectively, which correspond to 4070 MWd/ton and 1965 MWd/ton reduction in fuel discharge burnup. (authors)

Ronen, Y.; Aboudy, M.; Regev, D.; Gilad, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Means for supporting fuel elements in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A grid structure for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a plurality of connecting members forming at least one longitudinally extending opening peripheral and inner fuel element openings through each of which openings at least one nuclear fuel element extends, said connecting members forming wall means surrounding said each peripheral and inner fuel element opening, a pair of rigid projections longitudinally spaced from one another extending from a portion of said wall means into said each peripheral and inner opening for rigidly engaging said each fuel element, respectively, yet permit individual longitudinal slippage thereof, and resilient means formed integrally on and from said wall means and positioned in said each peripheral and inner opening in opposed relationship with said projections and located to engage said fuel element to bias the latter into engagement with said rigid projections, respectively

Andrews, Harry N. (Murrysville, PA); Keller, Herbert W. (Monroeville, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fuel Technologies: Goals, Strategies, and Top Accomplishments; Vehicle Technologies Program (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the top accomplishments, goals, and strategies of DOE's Fuel Technologies sub program.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THERMAL-FISSION NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel elements for thermal-fission nuclear reactors are described. The fuel element is comprised of a core of alumina, a film of a metal of the class consisting of copper, silver, and nickel on the outer face of the core, and a coating of an oxide of a metal isotope of the class consisting of Un/sup 235/, U/ sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/ on the metal f ilm.

Flint, O.

1961-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

417

Strengthening the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle against proliferation  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts several research programs that serve to reduce the risks of fissile-material diversion from the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle. The objectives are to provide economical and efficient neutron or power generation with the minimum of inherent risks, and to further minimize risks by utilizing sophisticated techniques to detect attempts at material diversion. This paper will discuss the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, the Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), and Proliferation-Resistant Closed-Cycle Reactors. The first two are sponsored by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation.

Travelli, A.; Snelgrove, J.; Persiani, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Fuel leak detection apparatus for gas cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is disclosed for detecting nuclear fuel leaks within nuclear power system reactors, such as high temperature gas cooled reactors. The apparatus includes a probe assembly that is inserted into the high temperature reactor coolant gaseous stream. The probe has an aperture adapted to communicate gaseous fluid between its inside and outside surfaces and also contains an inner tube for sampling gaseous fluid present near the aperture. A high pressure supply of noncontaminated gas is provided to selectively balance the pressure of the stream being sampled to prevent gas from entering the probe through the aperture. The apparatus includes valves that are operable to cause various directional flows and pressures, which valves are located outside of the reactor walls to permit maintenance work and the like to be performed without shutting down the reactor.

Burnette, Richard D. (San Diego, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Photo of hydrogen researcher. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal (with carbon sequestration); nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost reduction. For cost-competitive transportation, a key driver for energy independence, hydrogen must be comparable to conventional fuels and technologies on a per-mile basis in order to succeed in the commercial marketplace. Learn more about DOE's hydrogen cost goal and the analysis used in projecting the future cost of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy supports the research and development of a wide range of technologies to produce hydrogen economically and in environmentally friendly ways.

420

Fuel Cells Technology Transit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Transit Technology Transit Jump to: navigation, search Name Fuel Cells Technology Transit Place Clearwater, Florida Zip 33767 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Involved in the development and research of energy models on Hydrogen Energy Fuel Cell within the local and national arena. Coordinates 42.172132°, -98.189096° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.172132,"lon":-98.189096,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

practices resulting in lifecycle saving of over 52 trillion Btus. Increased funding for technical assistance S, P&D Brookhaven S, FC Idaho National Lab P&D #12;54 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US

422

M-1 N-Reactor fuel development. Excerpts from N-Reactor Department Research and Development Budget for FY-1967 and Revision of Budget for FY-1966  

SciTech Connect

The use of metallic uranium fuel elements on a large scale in a pressurized water cooled graphite moderated power reactor environment in N-Reactor not only represents an extrapolation from previous Hanford fuel technology but it represents the only production-scale application of this concept in this country or abroad. Provision of a supporting technology is and will continue to be a major activity at Hanford as only a limited amount of directly applicable R&D will be available from other sites. The major benefit to be achieved through an extensive and continuing fuel program is attainment of the full capabilities of the N-Reactor at much reduced fuel cycle costs. The current N-Reactor fuel design represents the best engineering judgment of what is required for adequate performance. While the design is intentionally conservative, some features may not fully provide the level of performance required to sustain efficient reactor operation. Results of production-scale irradiation experience and special test irradiations will provide direction to a continuing program to correct any excesses or deficiencies in the initial fuel design. Reduction of unwarranted conservatism in the design will lower fuel fabrication costs, and correction of deficiencies will lower irradiation costs through increased time operated efficiency. Costs of this program are summarized for 1965, 66, and 67. The paper describes the scope of the program, its relationship to other programs, and technical progress in FY-1965 which included improved performance of the fuel elements even with the large number of rapid shutdowns of the reactor.

1965-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

Waste generation process modeling and analysis for fuel reprocessing technologies  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of electric power generation requirements for the next century, even when taking the most conservative tack, indicate that the United States will have to increase its production capacity significantly. If the country determines that nuclear power will not be a significant component of this production capacity, the nuclear industry will have to die, as maintaining a small nuclear component will not be justifiable. However, if nuclear power is to be a significant component, it will probably require some form of reprocessing technology. The once-through fuel cycle is only feasible for a relatively small number of nuclear power plants. If we are maintaining several hundred reactors, the once-through fuel cycle is more expensive and ethically questionable.

Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Koehler, A. C. (Andrew C.); Farman, Richard F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap  

SciTech Connect

Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL] [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL] [ORNL; Pointer, William David [ORNL] [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #21: March 3, 1997 The Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 1997 The Fuel Savings Benefits of Increasing Fuel Economy to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 21: March 3, 1997 The Fuel Savings Benefits of Increasing...

426

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #772: March 25, 2013 Fuel Economy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2013 Fuel Economy by Speed: Slow Down to Save Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 772: March 25, 2013 Fuel Economy by Speed: Slow Down to Save...

427

Energy Department Announces Small Modular Reactor Technology Partnerships  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Modular Reactor Technology Small Modular Reactor Technology Partnerships at Savannah River Site Energy Department Announces Small Modular Reactor Technology Partnerships at Savannah River Site March 2, 2012 - 10:27am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Energy Department and its Savannah River Site (SRS) announced today three public-private partnerships to develop deployment plans for small modular nuclear reactor (SMR) technologies at SRS facilities, near Aiken, South Carolina. As part of the Energy Department's commitment to advancing the next generation of nuclear reactor technologies and breaking down the technical and economic barriers to deployment, these Memorandums of Agreement (MOA) will help leverage Savannah River's land assets, energy facilities and nuclear expertise to

428

Fuel damage during off-normal transients in metal-fueled fast reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fuel damage during off-normal transients is a key issue in the safety of fast reactors because the fuel pin cladding provides the primary barrier to the release of radioactive materials. Part of the Safety Task of the Integral Fast Reactor Program is to provide assessments of the damage and margins to failure for metallic fuels over the wide range of transients that must be considered in safety analyses. This paper reviews the current status of the analytical and experimental programs that are providing the bases for these assessments. 13 refs., 2 figs.

Kramer, J.M.; Bauer, T.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #170: June 18, 2001 Fuel Economy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2001 Fuel Economy Saves to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 170: June 18, 2001 Fuel Economy Saves on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies...

430

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: FY 2003 Financial Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: FY 2003 Financial Awards to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: FY 2003 Financial Awards on...

431

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing R&D Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

432

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

433

Method of locating a leaking fuel element in a fast breeder power reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Leaking fuel elements in a fast reactor are identified by measuring the ratio of .sup.134 Xe to .sup.133 Xe in the reactor cover gas following detection of a fuel element leak, this ratio being indicative of the power and burnup of the failed fuel element. This procedure can be used to identify leaking fuel elements in a power breeder reactor while continuing operation of the reactor since the ratio measured is that of the gases stored in the plenum of the failed fuel element. Thus, use of a cleanup system for the cover gas makes it possible to identify sequentially a multiplicity of leaking fuel elements without shutting the reactor down.

Honekamp, John R. (Downers Grove, IL); Fryer, Richard M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Introduction of Thorium-Based Fuels in High Conversion Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regular Technical Paper / Special Issue on the Symposium on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Oxide and Novel LWR Fuels / Fission Reactors

V. Vallet; B. Gastaldi; J. Politello; A. Santamarina; L. Van Den Durpel

435

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AEC SYMPOSIUM FOR CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF IRRADIATED FUELS FROM POWER, TEST, AND RESEARCH REACTORS, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON, OCTOBER 20 AND 21, 1959  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented in this symposium of the technology currently available for processing spent fuels from research, test, and power reactors. Twenty-one papers are included. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper. (W.L.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Collins, Jack L. (Knoxville, TN); Shell, Sam E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

METHOD OF FORMING A FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for preparing a fuel element for a nuclear reactor. The method includes the steps of sandblasting a body of uranium dioxide to roughen the surface thereof, depositing a thin layer of carbon thereon by thermal decomposition of methane, and cladding the uranium dioxide body with zirconium by gas pressure bonding. (AEC)

Layer, E.H. Jr.; Peet, C.S.

1962-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Conceptual design of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor spent-fuel shipping cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of a baseline conceptual design of a spent fuel shipping cask for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are presented including an assessment of shielding, structural, thermal, fabrication and cask/plant interfacing problems. A basis for continued cask development and for new technological development is established. Alternates to the baseline design are briefly presented. Estimates of development schedules, cask utilization and cost schedules, and of personnel dose commitments during CRBR in-plant handling of the cask are also presented.

Pope, R.B.; Diggs, J.M. (eds.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Codes and Standards Outreach for Emerging Fuel Cell Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies. Provide information on hydrogen and fuel cell * technologies codes and standards to code officials, project developers, and other interested parties. Present...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 1 Executive Summary The United States pioneered the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, and we continue to lead the way as these technologies emerge from the...

442

Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals is claimed. The cell includes a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket. The anode basket is extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants; the anode basket contains the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

Miller, W.E.; Steindler, M.J.; Burris, L.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

443

Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals, the cell including a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket and the anode basket being extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants, the anode basket containing the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Steindler, Martin J. (Park Forest, IL); Burris, Leslie (Naperville, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A disposition strategy for highly enriched, aluminum-based fuel from research and test reactors  

SciTech Connect

The strategy proposed in this paper offers the Department of Energy an approach for disposing of aluminum-based, highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuels from foreign and domestic research reactors. The proposal is technically, socially, and economically sound. If implemented, it would advance US non-proliferation goals while also disposing of the spent fuel`s waste by timely and proven methods using existing technologies and facilities at SRS without prolonged and controversial storage of the spent fuel. The fuel would be processed through 221-H. The radioactive fission products (waste) would be treated along with existing SRS high level waste by vitrifying it as borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for disposal in the national geological repository. The HEU would be isotopically diluted, during processing, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) which can not be used to make weapons, thus eliminating proliferation concerns. The LEU can be sold to fabricators of either research reactor fuel or commercial power fuel. This proposed processing-LEU recycle approach has several important advantages over other alternatives, including: Lowest capital investment; lowest net total cost; quickest route to acceptable waste form and final geologic disposal; and likely lowest safety, health, and environmental impacts.

McKibben, J.M.; Gould, T.H.; McDonell, W.R.; Bickford, W.E.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Selected Past Financial Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis...

446

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Strategic Directions for Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis...

447

Available Technologies: Nanoporous PEM Fuel Cell for Enhanced ...  

IB-2013-081. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Fuel cells for aerospace, ground transportation, and consumer electronics; Artificial photosynthesis ; ADVANTAGES:

448

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Available for Licensing ...  

... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy Innovation Portal on Delicious ...

449

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Education Systems Analysis Contacts...

450

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procuring Fuel Cells Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for

451

Fuel Cell Technologies Office American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Parternship: Fuel Cell Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12/19/2013 eere.energy.gov 12/19/2013 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Office American Energy & Manufacturing Competitiveness Partnership http://www.aemcsummit.compete.org/ Fuel Cell Manufacturing Dr. Sunita Satyapal Director, Fuel Cell Technologies Office Dr. Nancy Garland Technology Development Manager, Manufacturing R&D, Fuel Cell Technologies Office 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 12/19/2013 eere.energy.gov The Future of Fuel Cell Manufacturing Panel Session * Federal program: DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office * National trade association: Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Energy Association * State Coalition Example: Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 12/19/2013 eere.energy.gov * Clean Energy Patent Growth Index

452

Configuration adjustment potential of the Very High Temperature Reactor prismatic cores with advanced actinide fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor actinides represent the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes. As one of their potential incineration options, partitioning and transmutation in fission reactors are seriously considered worldwide. If implemented, these technologies could also be a source of nuclear fuel materials required for sustainability of nuclear energy. The objective of this research was to evaluate performance characteristics of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) and their variations due to configuration adjustments targeting achievability of spectral variations. The development of realistic whole-core 3D VHTR models and their benchmarking against experimental data was an inherent part of the research effort. Although the performance analysis was primarily focused on prismatic core configurations, 3D pebble-bed core models were also created and analyzed. The whole-core 3D models representing the prismatic block and pebble-bed cores were created for use with the SCALE 5.0 code system. Each of the models required the Dancoff correction factor to be externally calculated. The code system DANCOFF-MCThe whole-core/system 3D models with multi-heterogeneity treatments were validated by the benchmark problems. Obtained results are in agreement with the available High Temperature Test Reactor data. Preliminary analyses of actinide-fueled VHTR configurations have indicated promising performance characteristics. Utilization of minor actinides as a fuel component would facilitate development of new fuel cycles and support sustainability of a fuel source for nuclear energy assuring future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. was utilized to perform the Dancoff factor calculations.

Ames, David E, II

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

FAST FUEL TEST REACTOR-FFTR CONCEPTUAL DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Fuel Test Reactor (FFTR) is a nuclear facility for the purpose of irradiating samples of fuels and structural components for use in fast reactors. The core consisis of a plate type element in a square configuration. Beryllium metal between the fuel elements is used to obtain a neutron energy spectrum in the hard intermediate region. Cooling of the core and test specimens is accomplished by means of liquid sodium. The design concept was carried through in sufficient degree in the following areas of preliminary concern: number and size of irradiation facilities, sample power requirements, plant layout to evaluate site requirements, plant and nuclear design parameters to evaluate essential equipment requirements. plant-capital-cost estimate, annual- operating-cost estimate, and estimate of construction time schedule. (W.D.M.)

Brubaker, R.; Hummel, H.H.; McArthy, A.; Smaardyk, A.; Kittel, J.H.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2011 Webinar Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Webinar Archives 1 Webinar Archives Increase your H2IQ Learn about Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinars and state and regional initiatives webinars held in 2011 through the descriptions and linked materials below. Also view webinar archives from other years. Webinars presented in 2011: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis - Spotlight on Giner and Proton Science Magazine Article Highlight: Moving Towards Near Zero Platinum Fuel Cells I2CNER: An International Collaboration to Enable a Carbon-Neutral, Energy Economy Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration December 13, 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has launched a hydrogen storage materials database to collect and disseminate materials data and accelerate advanced materials research and development. Marni Lenahan of BCS Incorporated demonstrated the functionality of the database including accessing and extracting data, submitting new material property data for inclusion, and performing organized searches.

455

Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in the Design of Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Experiments for Advanced Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Increased Enrichment/High Burnup and Light Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization

B. T. Rearden; W. J. Anderson; G. A. Harms

456

Optimization of Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Crud Characteristics for Reducing Radiation Fields: Evaluation of BWR Fuel Crud Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel crud formation and its properties are the combined result of many factors, including corrosion product input, zinc addition rates, reactor coolant chemistry, and fuel and core design. Crud deposition may impact fuel performance as well as radiation field generation. Many projects have evaluated changes in fuel crud properties resulting from changing reactor coolant chemistry. However, the desired crud properties for both good fuel performance and mitigation of radiation field source term are ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

457

The status of fuel cell technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brief status report provides an introduction to what fuel cells are, why they are important, what uses have been made of them to date, the goals and timetables of current programs, and who the players are in this vital technology. Copies of most of the slides presented and additional diagrams are appended to this paper. Further details can be obtained from the comprehensive texts cited in the bibliography. 11 refs., 44 figs.

O'Sullivan, J.B.

1991-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

458

Overview of the fast reactors fuels program. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

Each nation involved in LMFBR development has its unique energy strategies which consider energy growth projections, uranium resources, capital costs, and plant operational requirements. Common to all of these strategies is a history of fast reactor experience which dates back to the days of the Manhatten Project and includes the CLEMENTINE Reactor, which generated a few watts, LAMPRE, EBR-I, EBR-II, FERMI, SEFOR, FFTF, BR-1, -2, -5, -10, BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600, JOYO, RAPSODIE, Phenix, KNK-II, DFR, and PFR. Fast reactors under design or construction include PEC, CRBR, SuperPhenix, SNR-300, MONJU, and Madras (India). The parallel fuels and materials evolution has fully supported this reactor development. It has involved cermets, molten plutonium alloy, plutonium oxide, uranium metal or alloy, uranium oxide, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxides and carbides.

Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Hayward, B.R.; Rice, L.H.; Yoshikawa, H.H.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Fuel Cell Technologies SHARE Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Oak Ridge National Laboratory pursues activities that address the barriers facing the development and deployment of hydrogen and fuel cells, with the ultimate goals of decreasing our dependence on oil, reducing carbon emissions, and enabling clean, reliable power generation. Through collaborative research and development, ORNL is developing materials and processes for fuel cell systems and for the practical generation, storage, and delivery of hydrogen as an energy carrier. The lab's Fuel Cell Technologies Program conducts its research and development activities in seven interrelated areas: Hydrogen Production and Delivery - Production of hydrogen from domestic resources and minimizing environmental impacts and distribution of

460

A Parametric Study of the DUPIC Fuel Cycle to Reflect Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Management Strategy  

SciTech Connect

For both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) tandem analysis, the Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactor (DUPIC) fuel cycle in a CANDU 6 reactor is studied using the DRAGON/DONJON chain of codes with the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries. The reference feed material is a 17 x 17 French standard 900-MW(electric) PWR fuel. The PWR spent-fuel composition is obtained from two-dimensional DRAGON assembly transport and depletion calculations. After a number of years of cooling, this defines the initial fuel nuclide field in the CANDU unit cell calculations in DRAGON, where it is further depleted with the same neutron group structure. The resulting macroscopic cross sections are condensed and tabulated to be used in a full-core model of a CANDU 6 reactor to find an optimized channel fueling rate distribution on a time-average basis. Assuming equilibrium refueling conditions and a particular refueling sequence, instantaneous full-core diffusion calculations are finally performed with the DONJON code, from which both the channel power peaking factors and local parameter effects are estimated. A generic study of the DUPIC fuel cycle is carried out using the linear reactivity model for initial enrichments ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 wt% in a PWR. Because of the uneven power histories of the spent PWR assemblies, the spent PWR fuel composition is expected to differ from one assembly to the next. Uneven mixing of the powder during DUPIC fuel fabrication may lead to uncertainties in the composition of the fuel bundle and larger peaking factors in CANDU. A mixing method for reducing composition uncertainties is discussed.

Rozon, Daniel; Shen Wei [Institut de Genie Nucleaire (Canada)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor technologies fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes. Because of these advantages, as well as the ability to build cost-effective small-to-medium sized reactors, this design is currently being considered for construction in many countries, from Japan, where test reactors are being analyzed, to China. The use of TRISO-coated micro-particles as a fuel in these reactors leads to multi-heterogeneity physics features that must be properly treated and accounted for. Inherent interrelationships of neutron interactions, temperature effects, and structural effects, further challenge computational evaluations of High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The developed models and computational techniques have to be validated in code-to-code and, most importantly, code-to-experiment benchmark studies. This report quantifies the relative accuracy of various multi-heterogeneity treatments in whole-core 3D models for parametric studies of Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactors as well as provide preliminary results of the PBMR performance analysis. Data is gathered from two different models, one based upon a benchmark for the African PBMR-400 design, and another based on the PROTEUS criticality experiment, since the African design is a more realistic power reactor, but the PROTEUS experiment model can be used for calculations that cannot be performed on the more complex model. Early data was used to refine final models, and the resulting final models were used to conduct parametric studies on composition and geometry optimization based on pebble bed reactor physics in order to improve fuel utilization.

Kelly, Ryan 1989-

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Electrolytic recovery of reactor metal fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new electrolytic process and apparatus are provided using sodium, cerium or a similar metal in alloy or within a sodium beta or beta[double prime]-alumina sodium ion conductor to electrolytically displace each of the spent fuel metals except for cesium and strontium on a selective basis from the electrolyte to an inert metal cathode. Each of the metals can be deposited separately. An electrolytic transfer of spent fuel into the electrolyte includes a sodium or cerium salt in the electrolyte with sodium or cerium alloy being deposited on the cathode during the transfer of the metals from the spent fuel. The cathode with the deposit of sodium or cerium alloy is then shunted to an anode and the reverse transfer is carried out on a selective basis with each metal being deposited separately at the cathode. The result is that the sodium or cerium needed for the process is regenerated in the first step and no additional source of these reactants is required. 2 figs.

Miller, W.E.; Tomczuk, Z.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Biomass Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilize ceramic microchannel reactor technology for * reforming of natural gas and biogas fuels for subsequent electrochemical oxidation within a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC)....

464

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Workshop on...

466

Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Use of silicide fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor - to lengthen fuel element lifetimes  

SciTech Connect

Based on economic considerations, it has been proposed to increase the lifetime of LEU fuel elements in the Ford Nuclear Reactor by raising the {sup 235}U plate loading from 9.3 grams in aluminide (UAl{sub x}) fuel to 12.5 grams in silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel. For a representative core configuration, preliminary neutronic depletion and steady state thermal hydraulic calculations have been performed to investigate core characteristics during the transition from an all-aluminide to an all-silicide core. This paper discusses motivations for this fuel element upgrade, results from the calculations, and conclusions.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Phoenix Memorial Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies July 23, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies What does this project do? For more information on DOE's efforts to make solid oxide fuel cells an efficient and economically compelling option, please visit: The NETL Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Program Webpage Solid oxide fuel cells are among the cleanest, most efficient power-generating technologies now being developed. They provide excellent electrical efficiencies and are capable of operating on a wide variety of fuels, from coal and natural gas to landfill waste and hydrogen. And with continued advancements, s