Sample records for reactor site summary

  1. v 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) granted BNLs request to modify its State Pollutantv 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Executive Summary The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER the status of Brookhaven National Laboratorys (BNL) environmental pro- grams and performance and restoration

  2. N Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174MoreMuseum Day atMyNERSCVanN Reactor

  3. Savannah River Site K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandyberry, M.D.; Bailey, R.T.; Baker, W.H.; Kearnaghan, D.P.; O`Kula, K.R.; Wittman, R.S.; Woody, N.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N.; Weingardt, J.J. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the results of a Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Measures of adverse consequences to health and safety resulting from representations of severe accidents in SRS reactors are presented. In addition, the report gives a summary of the methods employed to represent these accidents and to assess the resultant consequences. The report is issued to provide useful information to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the risk of operation of SRS reactors, for insights into severe accident phenomena that contribute to this risk, and in support of improved bases for other DOE programs in Heavy Water Reactor safety.

  4. Nevada Test Site Environmental Summary Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  5. Nevada Test Site Summary 2006 (Volume 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security-related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  6. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2007 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  7. Current Month Summary - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site OfficeCoursePublic Current900Met and Climate

  8. Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site, Summary Report...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Summary Report - October 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site, Summary Report - October 2002 October 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and...

  9. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NTS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NTS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  10. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE SITE REMEDIATION PROJECT SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE SITE REMEDIATION PROJECT SUMMARY May 15, 2007 · The Colorado School of Mines Research Institute Site (the "Site) has been undergoing additional investigation RESEARCH INSTITUTE REMEDIATION PROJECT SUMMARY Page Two May 15, 2007 · The revised Remedial Investigation

  11. Horsehead Resource Development Company, Inc. , flame reactor technology. Technology demonstration summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, the Horsehead Resource Development Company, Inc., (HRD) Flame Reactor was evaluated during a series of test runs. The tests were conducted at the HRD facility in Monaca, PA, using 72 tons of secondary lead smelter soda slag (waste feed) from the National Smelting and Refining Company, Inc., site in Atlanta, GA. The waste feed contained lead, zinc, iron, and many other metals and inorganic compounds. This summary includes an overview of the demonstration, a technology description, analytical results, and conclusions.

  12. Paducah Site annual environmental report summary for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This pamphlet contains summaries of the environmental programs at the Paducah Gaseous Plant site, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1994.

  13. Savannah River Site production reactor technical specifications. K Production Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These technical specifications are explicit restrictions on the operation of the Savannah River Site K Production Reactor. They are designed to preserve the validity of the plant safety analysis by ensuring that the plant is operated within the required conditions bounded by the analysis, and with the operable equipment that is assumed to mitigate the consequences of an accident. Technical specifications preserve the primary success path relied upon to detect and respond to accidents. This report describes requirements on thermal-hydraulic limits; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance for the reactor, power distribution control, instrumentation, process water system, emergency cooling and emergency shutdown systems, confinement systems, plant systems, electrical systems, components handling, and special test exceptions; design features; and administrative controls.

  14. CSMRI SITE PROJECT SUMMARY September 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the EPA action a tailings pond had been operated in that portion of the Site. The new well detected

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY12 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY12.

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY13 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY13.

  17. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  18. Summary Site Environmental Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' California Laboratory (Sandia/California) publishes a complete environmental report annually to communicate environmental monitoring results and efforts to reduce pollution at the site. Information presented includes impacts to the surrounding area and the local community from operations at Sandia/California. The Site Environmental Report is distributed to the Department of Energy Federal, State, and local regulatory agencies; community officials; and the public (available in public reading rooms). This booklet summarizes the information provided in the Sandia/California Site Environmental Report for 1998. It is intended to serve the general public by presenting environmental information in less technical language than is used in the formal report.

  19. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4K1) Summary

  20. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  1. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  2. Giant Magellan Telescope Site Testing Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas-Osip, Joanna E; Prieto, Gabriel; Phillips, Mark M; Johns, Matt

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cerro Las Campanas located at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) in Chile has been selected as the site for the Giant Magellan Telescope. We report results obtained since the commencement, in 2005, of a systematic site testing survey of potential GMT sites at LCO. Meteorological (cloud cover, temperature, pressure, wind, and humidity) and DIMM seeing data have been obtained at three potential sites, and are compared with identical data taken at the site of the twin Magellan 6.5m telescopes. In addition, measurements of the turbulence profile of the free-atmosphere above LCO have been collected with a MASS/DIMM. Furthermore, we consider photometric quality, light pollution, and precipitable water vapor (PWV). LCO, and Co. Las Campanas in particular, have dark skies, little or no risk of future light pollution, excellent seeing, moderate winds, PWV adequate for mid-IR astronomy during a reasonable fraction of the nights, and a high fraction of clear nights overall. Finally, Co. Las Campanas meets or exceeds all the...

  3. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared and published each year to inform the public of the environmental activities that take place on the reservation and in the surrounding areas. It is written to comply with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. This document has been prepared to present the highlights of the Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2007 in an easy-to-read, summary format.

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

  5. Hanford Site Climatological Data Summary 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DJ Hoitink; JV Ramsdell; KW Burk

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site for calendar year 1998. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature; precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998); however, Appendix B--Wind Climatology (1994) is excluded. 1998 was much warmer than normal, tying 1992 as the warmest year on record. The average temperature was 56.4 F, 3.1 F above normal (53.3 F). The highest July temperature ever recorded was 112 F on July 27, 1998. The first week in May, three daily temperature records were broken or tied. November 1998 was the third warmest on record. For the year 1998, there were 73 days with maximum temperature >90 F, the third highest on record. For the 12-month period, 11 months were warmer than normal and 1 was cooler than normal. The summer (June, July, and August) and autumn (September, October, and November) of 1998 were the fourth warmest on record. 1998 was slightly wetter than normal. Precipitation totaled 6.45 in., 103% of normal (6.26 in.); snow-fall totaled 7.2 in., compared to the normal of 13.8 in. There were eight thunderstorms recorded at Hanford Meteorological Station in July 1998, tying 1983 for the most thunderstorms in July. The average wind speed during 1998 was 7.9 mph, 0.2 mph above normal (7.7 mph). There were 32 days with peak gusts {ge}40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26 mph. The peak gust during the year was 56 mph from the south-southwest on November 21. November 1998 had a record number of days (10) with wind gusts {ge}40 mph. The heating-degree days for 1997-1998 were 4,523 (14% below the 5,231 normal). Cooling-degree days for 1998 were 1,377 (38% above the 994 normal).

  6. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.R.

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  7. Protective actions as a factor in power reactor siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gant, K.S.; Schweitzer, M.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the relationship between a power reactor site and the ease of implementing protective actions (emergency measures a serious accident). Limiting populating density around a reactor lowers the number of people at risk but cannot assure that all protective actions are possible for those who reside near the reactor. While some protective measures can always be taken (i.e., expedient respiratory protection, sheltering) the ability to evacuate the area or find adequate shelter may depend on the characteristics of the area near the reactor site. Generic siting restrictions designed to identify and eliminate these site-specific constraints would be difficult to formulate. The authors suggest identifying possible impediments to protective actions at a proposed reactor site and addressing these problems in the emergency plans. 66 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  8. Paducah Site annual environmental report summary for 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcher, G. [ed.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at the Paducah Site, as well as the impacts of its operations on the environment and the public for 1995. The results of environmental monitoring are presented. The goal is to keep emissions as low as possible, enhance the strict safety controls that are in place and use state-of-the-art technology to complete environmental remediation projects in the most cost-effective and efficient manner possible.

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, JF

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''State-of-the-Environment'' on and around the Oak Ridge Reservation is a mission of highest importance to the Department of Energy and our contractors. In order to be fully aware of the consequences of our operations and cleanup, an annual multimillion-dollar monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of samples from air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plants, and animals. A mission of equal importance is to provide our stakeholders a complete understanding of this program. To do this we publish a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report and this summary document. The raw data is published separately in the Data Volume. All three documents can be found on the web, along with past documents, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. Though I work on numerous technical documents throughout the year, no document is more important to me than the Annual Site Environmental Report and its Summary because: (1) they represent the efforts of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out this extensive program, and who work hard to protect and enhance the environment; (2) they set out the programs in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public; and (3) the Summary is directed to the public with the hope that the information is understandable and of value in gaining an accurate picture of the Oak Ridge Reservation as a neighbor. I thank the Karns High School students and their teacher for accepting my challenge in writing this Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, for thinking out of the box, for doing such a fine job, and for all the artwork and photographs (the morning coffee in the classroom was greatly appreciated, leaks and all). They were an especially enjoyable class to work with, and I hope you, our stakeholders and the public, find their efforts of value.

  10. MIT Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) A Summary of Research Activities and Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disposal · Reactor Research/ Demonstration Facility · License by Test · Expert I&C System - Hands free.71MPa 69.7 C 4.67MPa Cooling RPV #12;BOP System Analysis and Dynamic Simulation Model DevelopmentMIT Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) A Summary of Research Activities and Accomplishments Andrew C

  11. Fusion-reactor-control study. Volume 1: summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study included the exploration of reactor dynamic response and the delineation of functional control requirements. Where possible, candidate control solutions were conceptualized and evaluated using a reactor control simulator that portrayed the evolution of the plasma over the entire reactor operating cycle.

  12. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report (NNSSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NNSS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NNSSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NNSS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NNSSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NNSS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The NNSS is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national security-related missions and high-risk operations. The NNSS is located about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The approximately 1,360-square-mile site is one of the largest restricted access areas in the United States. It is surrounded by federal installations with strictly controlled access, as well as by lands that are open to public entry.

  13. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanf, Robert W.; Morasch, Launa F.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet summarizes the information contained in ''Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004.'' The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of the activities at DOE's Hanford Site.

  14. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT SUMMARY FOR 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, M.; Meyer, A.

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report's purpose is to: ? Present summary environmental data that characterize Site environmental management performance, ? Describe compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements, and ? Highlight significant programs and efforts. Environmental monitoring is conducted extensively with a 2,000-square-mile network extending 25 miles from SRS, with some monitoring performed as far as 100 miles from the Site. The area includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia (GA) and South Carolina (SC). Thousands of samples of air, rainwater, surface water, drinking water, groundwater, food products, wildlife, soil, sediment, and vegetation are collected by SRS and analyzed for the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. During 2012, SRS accomplished several significant milestones while maintaining its record of environmental excellence, as its operations continued to result in minimal impact to the public and the environment. The Site?s radioactive and chemical discharges to air and water were well below regulatory standards for environmental and public health protection; its air and water quality met applicable requirements; and the potential radiation dose to the public was well below the DOE public dose limit.

  15. Pebble bed reactor fiscal year 1980: review summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on high-temperature reactor development is presented concerning reactor operating experience; core performance assessment; core control and shutdown; reflector and core support; maintenance and availability; safety aspects of PBR and prismatic comparison; PCRV dimensions; and fuel reprocessing cost estimate.

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, JF

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and our contractors strive to provide our stakeholders a comprehensive understanding of the consequences of DOE operations past and present. Toward this end a far-reaching multimillion-dollar annual monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plant, and animal samples. This effort represents the work of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out these extensive programs and work hard to protect and enhance the environment. We publish the results in a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER), and a separate Data Volume for those who wish to see the supporting data. These documents present all the facts and figures, but are highly technical and not easily understood, and it's essential we provide a summary document simple to read and understand. So each year I team with Karns High School and ask students to write an Annual Site Environmental Report Summary that will be both informative and enjoyable to read. These environmental documents are perhaps the most important DOE reports because they explain the environmental monitoring programs and show the consequences of our operations in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public. This ASER summary is written for you, the public, our most important stakeholder, with the hope that you find it comprehensible and of value in gaining an accurate understanding of the Oak Ridge Reservation. All three documents can be found on the web, along with previous publications, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. It's a great pleasure to meet my new class each year and capture fresh creative ideas. I'm always delighted to see their interest and desire to learn and to produce a document for the public that reflects their personality and skills, and one the public will utilize and find of value. I sincerely thank these talented Karns High School students and their exceptional teacher, Mrs. Heather Bock, for accepting my challenge to think out of the box and put together this DOE document. Thanks go out as well to each contributing art student, and of course to Principal Clifford Davis, Jr., for his enthusiastic support. When I gave this College Preparation English 4 Class the challenge I was given back all smiles, eagerness, and an ardent zeal to succeed. I hope you, our public, find this product of their effort of value and quality.

  17. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  18. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

  19. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

  20. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanf, Robert W.; Morasch, Launa F.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This small booklet provides highlights of the environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site during 2005. It is a summary of the information contained in the larger report: Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring for Calendar Year 2005.

  1. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, JF

    2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A mission of foremost importance to the Department of Energy and our contractors is to provide our stakeholders with a complete understanding of the consequences of our operations, both past and present. To do this, an extensive annual multimillion-dollar monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of samples from air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plants, and animals. The results are published in a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report available to all. We also publish a separate Data Volume for those who wish to see the raw data. Though these documents present all the facts and figures, they are long, technical, and not always easy to read. Thus, I team with a local high school each year and ask students to write an Annual Site Environmental Report Summary specifically for the public. These documents are perhaps the most important reports the Department of Energy produces. Why? First, they lay out the environmental monitoring programs and the consequences of Department of Energy operations in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public; second, they represent the efforts of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out these extensive programs and work hard to protect and enhance the environment; and third, the summary is written for you, the public, our most important stakeholder, with the hope that you find it understandable and of value in gaining an accurate understanding of the Oak Ridge Reservation. All three documents can be found on the web, along with previous years, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. Working with a new class each year brings new faces, new personalities, and new creative ideas. The students always amaze me with their interest and desire to produce a document the public will utilize and find of value. I personally thank the Karns High School students and their teacher, Ms Evelyn Hammonds, for accepting my challenge in writing this public document and for thinking out of the box as I asked. Thanks also to each contributing art student and Principal Clifford Davis for his support. This class was an especially enjoyable group to work with, and took off at full speed when I threw them the ball. I hope you, our public, find their efforts of value. I believe you will.

  2. D and DR Reactors - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site OfficeCoursePublicCurrentCurtis11 D I S C L A

  3. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  4. Program summary for the Civilian Reactor Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Civilian Reactor Development Program document has the prime purpose of summarizing the technical programs supported by the FY 1983 budget request. This section provides a statement of the overall program objectives and a general program overview. Section II presents the technical programs in a format intended to show logical technical interrelationships, and does not necessarily follow the structure of the formal budget presentation. Section III presents the technical organization and management structure of the program.

  5. FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ``Alternative Teams,`` chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S&S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT`s analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option.

  6. FMDP reactor alternative summary report. Volume 1 - existing LWR alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, S.R.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

    1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] are becoming surplus to national defense needs in both the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. This document summarizes the results of analysis concerned with existing light water reactor plutonium disposition alternatives.

  7. A Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor for Deployment at Remote Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J .J.; Smith, M.A.; Mosseytsev, A.V.; Yang, W.S.; Wade, D.C.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a small secure transportable autonomous lead-cooled fast reactor for deployment at remote sites.

  8. Site Suitability and Hazard Assessment Guide for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear reactor projects in the U.S. have traditionally employed large light water reactors (LWR) to generate regional supplies of electricity. Although large LWRs have consistently dominated commercial nuclear markets both domestically and abroad, the concept of small modular reactors (SMRs) capable of producing between 30 MW(t) and 900 MW(t) to generating steam for electricity is not new. Nor is the idea of locating small nuclear reactors in close proximity to and in physical connection with industrial processes to provide a long-term source of thermal energy. Growing problems associated continued use of fossil fuels and enhancements in efficiency and safety because of recent advancements in reactor technology suggest that the likelihood of near-term SMR technology(s) deployment at multiple locations within the United States is growing. Many different types of SMR technology are viable for siting in the domestic commercial energy market. However, the potential application of a particular proprietary SMR design will vary according to the target heat end-use application and the site upon which it is proposed to be located. Reactor heat applications most commonly referenced in connection with the SMR market include electric power production, district heating, desalinization, and the supply of thermal energy to various processes that require high temperature over long time periods, or a combination thereof. Indeed, the modular construction, reliability and long operational life purported to be associated with some SMR concepts now being discussed may offer flexibility and benefits no other technology can offer. Effective siting is one of the many early challenges that face a proposed SMR installation project. Site-specific factors dealing with support to facility construction and operation, risks to the plant and the surrounding area, and the consequences subsequent to those risks must be fully identified, analyzed, and possibly mitigated before a license will be granted to construct and operate a nuclear facility. Examples of significant site-related concerns include area geotechnical and geological hazard properties, local climatology and meteorology, water resource availability, the vulnerability of surrounding populations and the environmental to adverse effects in the unlikely event of radionuclide release, the socioeconomic impacts of SMR plant installation and the effects it has on aesthetics, proximity to energy use customers, the topography and area infrastructure that affect plant constructability and security, and concerns related to the transport, installation, operation and decommissioning of major plant components.

  9. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of December 31, 1995. Volume 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s monthly summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the operating data report submitted by licensees for each unit. This report is divided into two sections: the first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 availability factors, capacity factors, and forced outage rates are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensees and notes to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  10. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Argonne Site Office (Argonne)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24...

  11. Advanced Test Reactor probabilistic risk assessment methodology and results summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, S.A.; Atkinson, S.A.; Thatcher, T.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) Level 1 report documents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art study to establish and reduce the risk associated with operation of the ATR, expressed as a mean frequency of fuel damage. The ATR Level 1 PRA effort is unique and outstanding because of its consistent and state-of-the-art treatment of all facets of the risk study, its comprehensive and cost-effective risk reduction effort while the risk baseline was being established, and its thorough and comprehensive documentation. The PRA includes many improvements to the state-of-the-art, including the following: establishment of a comprehensive generic data base for component failures, treatment of initiating event frequencies given significant plant improvements in recent years, performance of efficient identification and screening of fire and flood events using code-assisted vital area analysis, identification and treatment of significant seismic-fire-flood-wind interactions, and modeling of large loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) and experiment loop ruptures leading to direct damage of the ATR core. 18 refs.

  12. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report Summary 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Wills, ed.

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the data reported in the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010.

  13. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report- February 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site

  14. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  15. Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -St. Louis International Airport, which is now referred to as the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS). In 1966

  16. Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    International Airport, which is now referred to as the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS). In 1966, the SLAPS wastes

  17. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Thomas Jefferson Site Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Thomas Jefferson Site Office.

  18. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Argonne Site Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Argonne Site Office.

  19. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Argonne Site Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the Argonne Site Office

  20. 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Berkeley Site Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2014 and 2015 within the Berkeley Site Office.

  1. June 28, 2005 France to Be Site of World's First Nuclear Fusion Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    June 28, 2005 France to Be Site of World's First Nuclear Fusion Reactor By CRAIG S. SMITH PARIS fusion reactor, an estimated $12 billion project that many scientists see as essential to solving chose the country as the site for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Japan, which had

  2. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights signifi cant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2008 information is included where appropriate.

  3. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2009 information is included where appropriate.

  4. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2010 information is included where appropriate.

  5. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 2 - CANDU heavy water reactor alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, S.R.; Spellman, D.J.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 2 of a four volume report, summarizes the results of these analyses for the CANDU reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

  6. Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulloway, H. M.

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

  7. Hanford Site Climatological Data Summary 2000 with Historical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoitink, Dana J.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Ramsdell, James V.

    2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site for calendar year 2000.

  8. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Y-12 Site Office (YSO)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Y-12 Site Office (YSO).

  9. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2013 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The information presented in this document is explained in greater detail in the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2013 (DOE/NV/25946--2182).

  10. Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation of pollution being used for coal ash deposits. Pollutants present in the ash can contaminate water resources and soil its research on the thermo-electric plant (TEP) and associated coal ash sites at Tuzla, Bosnia

  11. Reactor operation safety information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  12. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of 12-31-94: Volume 19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1994) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  13. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  14. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of December 31, 1991. Volume 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1991) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  15. Section S Summary of the Site-Wide Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Degradation Due to the Locations and Designs of New Facilities and Associated Lighting, Especially on Top of South Table Mountain. Final EA Page S-4 July 2003 Site-Wide...

  16. Hanford Site Climatological Data Summary 1999 with Historical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoitink, Dana J.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Ramsdell, James V.

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the Hanford Site for claendar year 1999. The information contained includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitaion and other meteorological parameters.

  17. EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Harford Site, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  18. Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Roberts

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

  19. EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  20. Hanford Site climatological data summary 1996, with historical data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoitink, D.J.; Burk, K.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site for calendar year 1996. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters.

  1. U.N. report concludes that Syrian site destroyed in 2007 was a nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.N. report concludes that Syrian site destroyed in 2007 was a nuclear reactor Joby Warrick, 24 May that Syria "very likely" was building a secret nuclear reactor in 2007 when the partially completed project, 2007, was a nuclear reactor intended for making fuel for nuclear bombs, a claim that Syria has

  2. | |SAVE THIS EMAIL THIS Close Japan ups bid for fusion reactor site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powered by | |SAVE THIS EMAIL THIS Close Japan ups bid for fusion reactor site TOKYO, Japan (AP billion if the project's sponsors build the reactor in Japan, a newspaper reported Wednesday. Construction of the U.S. $12 billion International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, or ITER, which would run

  3. Hanford Site climatological data summary 1997, with historical data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoitink, D.J.; Burk, K.W.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site for calendar year 1997. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink and Burk; however, Appendix B - Wind Climatology is excluded.

  4. Nevada Test Site FFCA Consent Order, March 27, 1996 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y ear R enewable E nergyEnergyNeedNevadaTest Site

  5. Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet Sandia National Laboratories,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARESAnalysis forAnnual ReportsAnnual Site

  6. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  7. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  8. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary 2002 Taking a Close Look Together

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    videos about the history, learn about the research going on, and talk to scientists about environmental1 Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary 2002 #12;2 Taking a Close Look the Oak Ridge Reservation and can now better interpret how they impact the environment. We see

  10. Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Richins; Stephen Novascone; Cheryl O'Brien

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors William Richins1, Stephen Novascone1, and Cheryl O’Brien1 1Idaho National Laboratory, US Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA, e-mail: William.Richins@inl.gov The Idaho National Laboratory (INL, USA) and IASMiRT sponsored an international forum Nov 5-6, 2008 in Porvoo, Finland for nuclear industry, academic, and regulatory representatives to identify structural issues in current and future advanced reactor design, especially for extreme conditions and external threats. The purpose of this Topical Workshop was to articulate research, engineering, and regulatory Code development needs. The topics addressed by the Workshop were selected to address critical industry needs specific to advanced reactor structures that have long lead times and can be the subject of future SMiRT technical sessions. The topics were; 1) structural/materials needs for extreme conditions and external threats in contemporary (Gen. III) and future (Gen. IV and NGNP) advanced reactors and 2) calibrating simulation software and methods that address topic 1 The workshop discussions and research needs identified are presented. The Workshop successfully produced interactive discussion on the two topics resulting in a list of research and technology needs. It is recommended that IASMiRT communicate the results of the discussion to industry and researchers to encourage new ideas and projects. In addition, opportunities exist to retrieve research reports and information that currently exists, and encourage more international cooperation and collaboration. It is recommended that IASMiRT continue with an off-year workshop series on select topics.

  11. Hanford Site climatological data summary 1995 with historical data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoitink, D.J.; Burk, K.W.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site for calendar year 1995. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995); however, Appendix B--Wind Climatology (1994) is excluded. 1995 was warmer than normal, averaging 54.7 F, 1.4 F above normal (53.3 F). For the 12-month period, 8 months were warmer than normal, and 4 were cooler than normal. 1995 was the wettest year on record. Precipitation totaled 12.31 in., 197% of normal (6.26 in.); snowfall totaled 7.7 in., compared to the normal of 13.8 in. The average wind speed during 1995 was 7.8 mph, 0.1 mph above normal (7.7 mph). The peak gust during the year was 61 mph from the south-southwest on December 12. There were 27 days with peak gusts {ge} 40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26.

  12. Data Summary Report for teh Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulstrom, L.

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This data summary report summarizes the investigation results to evaluate the nature and distribution of Hanford Site-related contaminants present in the Columbia River. As detailed in DOE/RL-2008-11, more than 2,000 environmental samples were collected from the Columbia River between 2008 and 2010. These samples consisted of island soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater upwelling (pore water, surface water, and sediment), and fish tissue.

  13. Hanford Site climatological data summary 1999 with historical data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DJ Hoitink; KW Burk; JV Ramsdell

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site for calendar year 1999. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink et al. (1999), and Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998); however, Appendix B-Wind Climatology (1994) is excluded. 1999 was warmer than normal at the Hanford Meteorology Station with an average temperature of 54.4 F, 1.1 F above normal (53.3 F). The hottest temperature was 105 F on July 28, while the coldest was 18 F on January 3. The maximum temperature of 64 F on August 30 was the lowest maximum temperature ever recorded in August, while the maximum temperature of 76 F on November 13 was the highest maximum temperature ever recorded in November. For the 12-month period, 6 months were warmer than normal and 6 were cooler than normal. 1999 was the fourth driest year on record. Precipitation totaled 3.75 inches, 60% of normal (6.26 inches); snowfall totaled 0.6 inch, the least calendar year snowfall on record (compared to the normal of 13.8 inches). 1999 was the windiest year on record with an average wind speed of 8.8 mph, 1.1 mph above normal (7.7 mph). There were 48 days with peak gust {ge} 40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26 mph. The peak gust during the year was 65 mph on February 6. The heating-degree days for 1998--1999 were 4,802 (8% below the 5,231 normal). Cooling-degree days for 1999 were 891 (10% below the 994 normal).

  14. Executive summary: Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. The scope of the environmental monitoring program at the Weldon Spring site has changed since it was initiated. Previously, the program focused on investigations of the extent and level of contaminants in the groundwater, surface waters, buildings, and air at the site. In 1992, the level of remedial activities required monitoring for potential impacts of those activities, particularly on surface water runoff and airborne effluents. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site; estimates of effluent releases; and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Also, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1992 to support environmental protection programs are reviewed.

  15. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/2003/12/27/k20031227000018.html 3 national visits related to proposed site for experimental reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minister communication meeting on Japanese Proposed site for Thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor realize the Japanese proposed site for the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER international support for experimental reactor ITER of the fusion centering on proposed site in Aomori

  16. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.

    2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary of Argonne National Laboratory's Site Environmental Report for calendar year 2007 was written by 20 students at Downers Grove South High School in Downers Grove, Ill. The student authors are classmates in Mr. Howard's Bio II course. Biology II is a research-based class that teaches students the process of research by showing them how the sciences apply to daily life. For the past seven years, Argonne has worked with Biology II students to create a short document summarizing the Site Environmental Report to provide the public with an easy-to-read summary of the annual 300-page technical report on the results of Argonne's on-site environmental monitoring program. The summary is made available online and given to visitors to Argonne, researchers interested in collaborating with Argonne, future employees, and many others. In addition to providing Argonne and the public with an easily understandable short summary of a large technical document, the participating students learn about professional environmental monitoring procedures, achieve a better understanding of the time and effort put forth into summarizing and publishing research, and gain confidence in their own abilities to express themselves in writing. The Argonne Summary Site Environmental Report fits into the educational needs for 12th grade students. Illinois State Educational Goal 12 states that a student should understand the fundamental concepts, principles, and interconnections of the life, physical, and earth/space sciences. To create this summary booklet, the students had to read and understand the larger technical report, which discusses in-depth many activities and programs that have been established by Argonne to maintain a safe local environment. Creating this Summary Site Environmental Report also helps students fulfill Illinois State Learning Standard 12B5a, which requires that students be able to analyze and explain biodiversity issues, and the causes and effects of extinction. The same standard requires that Illinois students examine the impact of diminishing biodiversity due to human activity. An example of this would be the Argonne Restoration Prairie, which is discussed within the report. Because humans had to destroy part of a natural prairie in order to build, they must also plant an equivalent amount of prairie to make up for what was destroyed. The summary project perfectly meets Illinois State Learning Standard 13B section 5b, which requires students to be able to design and conduct an environmental impact study, analyze findings, and justify recommendations. Students volunteered for the project for two main reasons: We would become published authors, and could include that fact on important documents, like college applications, and we felt we were doing a good deed for the public, considering that without our summary the public may have no real idea how Argonne complies with various environmental protection acts and programs within the state. The summarization process was not easy, considering that we had never seen much of this kind of information before, especially in such detail. The project required a high level of commitment from all involved. This commitment ensured that the summary would be done on time and would be available to the public in the shortest time possible. Argonne representatives Norbert Golchert and Dave Baurac met with students and gave background information on Argonne and explained the importance of the research being done. In addition, they explained in-depth how the public benefits from the summarization. At the end of the presentation, students asked some questions, which were answered in specifics. The Report was divided into 10 sections, with groups of two students covering each section. The groups were eager to begin work on their assigned sections. After reading the complete report each group focused on a particular section. After much careful reading and analysis, we produced an outline. From the outline, partners divided work equally and began to carefully summarize. Groups summaries were edited,

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - auxiliary reactor area-1 Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plans eyed for fusion project site Summary: said. The six parties involved in the Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project have been... unable to agree where to locate...

  18. Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Production Reactors at the US DOE Hanford Site - 13438

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilperoort, Daryl L.; Faulk, Darrin [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine plutonium production reactors located on DOE's Hanford Site are being placed into an Interim Safe Storage (ISS) period that extends to 2068. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for ISS [1] was completed in 1993 and proposed a 75-year storage period that began when the EIS was finalized. Remote electronic monitoring of the temperature and water level alarms inside the safe storage enclosure (SSE) with visual inspection inside the SSE every 5 years are the only planned operational activities during this ISS period. At the end of the ISS period, the reactor cores will be removed intact and buried in a landfill on the Hanford Site. The ISS period allows for radioactive decay of isotopes, primarily Co-60 and Cs-137, to reduce the dose exposure during disposal of the reactor cores. Six of the nine reactors have been placed into ISS by having an SSE constructed around the reactor core. (authors)

  19. Environmental Assessment: Relocation and storage of TRIGA{reg_sign} reactor fuel, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to allow the shutdown of the Hanford 308 Building in the 300 Area, it is proposed to relocate fuel assemblies (101 irradiated, three unirradiated) from the Mark I TRIGA Reactor storage pool. The irradiated fuel assemblies would be stored in casks in the Interim Storage Area in the Hanford 400 Area; the three unirradiated ones would be transferred to another TRIGA reactor. The relocation is not expected to change the offsite exposure from all Hanford Site 300 and 400 Area operations.

  20. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary for second quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the second quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented constitutes the QEDS. The data were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), merged into the database during the second quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Air data are not stored in the database and KPA data are not merged into the regular database. All data received and verified during the second quarter were within a permissible range of variability, except for those listed. Above normal occurrences are cited for groundwater, air, and NPDES data. There were no above normal occurrences for springs or surface water. The attached tables present the most recent data for air and the data merged into the database during the second quarter 1998 for groundwater, NPDES, surface water, and springs.

  1. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

  2. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

  3. Atoms in Appalachia. Historical report on the Clinch River Breeder Reactor site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaffer, D

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The background information concerning the acquisition of the land for siting the Clinch River Breeder Reactor is presented. Historical information is also presented concerning the land acquisition for the Oak Ridge facilities known as the Manhattan Project during World War II.

  4. Summary report on reprocessing evaluation of selected inactive uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has been assisting the Department of Energy in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program (UMTRAP) the purpose of which is to implement the provisions of Title I of Public Law 95-604, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.'' As part of this program, there was a need to evaluate the mineral concentration of the residual radioactive materials at some of the designated processing sites to determine whether mineral recovery would be practicable. Accordingly, Sandia contracted Mountain States Research and Development (MSRD), a division of Mountain States Mineral Enterprises, to drill, sample, and test tailings at 12 sites to evaluate the cost of and the revenue that could be derived from mineral recovery. UMTRAP related environmental and engineering sampling and support activities were performed in conjunction with the MSRD operations. This summary report presents a brief description of the various activities in the program and of the data and information obtained and summarizes the results. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  5. Fuel Summary for Peach Bottom Unit 1 High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karel I. Kingrey

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fuel summary report contains background and summary information for the Peach Bottom Unit 1, High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2. This report contains detailed information about the fuel in the two cores, the Peach Bottom Unit 1 operating history, nuclear parameters, physical and chemical characteristics, and shipping and storage canister related data. The data in this document have been compiled from a large number of sources and are not qualified beyond the qualification of the source documents. This report is intended to provide an overview of the existing data pertaining to spent fuel management and point to pertinent reference source documents. For design applications, the original source documentation must be used. While all referenced sources are available as records or controlled documents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), some of the sources were marked as informal or draft reports. This is noted where applicable. In some instances, source documents are not consistent. Where they are known, this document identifies those instances and provides clarification where possible. However, as stated above, this document has not been independently qualified and such clarifications are only included for information purposes. Some of the information in this summary is available in multiple source documents. An effort has been made to clearly identify at least one record document as the source for the information included in this report.

  6. In summary: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roush, D.; Mitchell, R.G.; Peterson, D.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Every human is exposed to natural radiation. This exposure comes from many sources, including cosmic radiation from outer space, naturally-occurring radon, and radioactivity from substances in our bodies. In addition to natural sources of radiation, humans can also be exposed to man-made sources of radiation. Examples of man-made sources include nuclear medicine, X-rays, nuclear weapons testing, and accidents at nuclear power plants. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research facility that deals, in part, with studying nuclear reactors and storing radioactive materials. Careful handling and rigorous procedures do not completely eliminate the risk of releasing radioactivity. So, there is a remote possibility for a member of the public near the INEL to be exposed to radioactivity from the INEL. Extensive monitoring of the environment takes place on and around the INEL. These programs search for radionuclides and other contaminants. The results of these programs are presented each year in a site environmental report. This document summarizes the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1995.

  7. Technology demonstration summary: Bio Trol soil-washing system for treatment of a wood-preserving site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program was instituted in 1986 to promote the development and application of innovative technologies to the remediation of Superfund and other sites contaminated with hazardous wastes. The Project Summary highlights the results of an evaluation of a specific arrangement of the three technologies of the BSWS. The system consists of multiple stages of physical abrasion, attrition, flotation, and washing of excavated soil in the BSW. The site selected for the evaluation is a wood preserving facility in New Brighton, MN, where creosote and pentachlorophenol were used for several decades.

  8. Summary of activities to remove the aircraft hydrant system (Panero site) at March Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrian, G.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the activities to remove the underground storage tank farm (Panero Site, Operable Unit 3, Installation Restoration Program) used for aircraft refueling at March AFB. This summary report is organized into four sections: introduction--gives the scope, information summary, and composition of the report; planned work scope--states the scope of work as provided in the Performance Work Statement for Removal of Aircraft Fuel Hydrant System March Air Force Base, California; demolition results--records the accomplishments for each task defined in the Performance Work Statement; and recycling efforts--record the efforts to reduce generating unnecessary waste.

  9. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

  10. In Summary: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. A. Luft; R. B. Evans; T. Saffle; R. G. Mitchell; D. B. Martin

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists from the Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO), the US Geological Survey, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Naval Reactors Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-West, and others monitored the environment on and around the INEEL to find contaminants attributable to the INEEL. During 1998, exposures from the INEEL to the public were found to be negligible. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and LMITCO made progress in developing and implementing a site-wide Environmental Management System. This system provides an underlying structure to make the management of environmental activities at the INEEL more systematic and predictable. Pathways by which INEEL contaminants might reach people off the INEEL were monitored. These included air, precipitation, water, locally grown food (milk, lettuce, wheat, and potatoes), livestock, game animals, soil, and direct ionizing radiation. Results from samples collected to monitor these pathways often contain ''background radioactivity,'' which is radioactivity from natural sources and nuclear weapons tests carried out between 1945 and 1980. According to results obtained in 1998, radioactivity from operations at the INEEL could not be distinguished from this background radioactivity in the regions surrounding the INEEL. Because radioactivity from the INEEL was not detected by offsite environmental surveillance methods, computer models were used to estimate the radiation dose to the public. The hypothetical maximum dose to an individual from INEEL operations was calculated to be 0.08 millirem. That is 0.002 percent of an average person's annual dose of 360 millirem from natural background radiation in southeast Idaho.

  11. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Advanced Test Reactor Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Drum TRA010029

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. R. Adams; R. P. Grant; P. R. Smith; J. L. Weisgerber

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of one drum containing contact-handled transuranic (TRU) actinide standards generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) for storage and subsequent shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for final disposal. The drum (i.e., Integrated Waste Tracking System Bar Code Number TRA010029) is currently stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex. The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and applicable sections of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and disposal of this TRU waste generated from ATR. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for this TRU waste originating from ATR.

  12. Meeting Summary Advanced Light Water Reactor Fuels Industry Meeting Washington DC October 27 - 28, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group first met in November of 2010 with the objective of looking 20 years ahead to the role that advanced fuels could play in improving light water reactor technology, such as waste reduction and economics. When the group met again in March 2011, the Fukushima incident was still unfolding. After the March meeting, the focus of the program changed to determining what we could do in the near term to improve fuel accident tolerance. Any discussion of fuels with enhanced accident tolerance will likely need to consider an advanced light water reactor with enhanced accident tolerance, along with the fuel. The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group met in Washington D.C. on October 72-18, 2011 to continue discussions on this important topic.

  13. 2007 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of an annual review of conditions affecting the operation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). The Area 5 RWMS PA documentation consists of the original PA (Shott et al., 1998), referred to as the 1998 Area 5 RWMS PA and supporting addenda (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2001b; 2006a). The Area 5 RWMS CA was issued as a single document (BN, 2001a) and has a single addendum (BN, 2001c). The Area 3 PA and CA were issued in a single document (Shott et al., 2000). The Maintenance Plan for the PAs and CAs (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2006) and the Disposal Authorization Statements (DASs) for the Area 3 and 5 RWMSs (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2000; 2002) require preparation of an annual summary and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the PAs and CAs. The annual summary report is submitted to DOE Headquarters. Following the annual report format in the DOE PA/CA Maintenance Guide (DOE, 1999), this report presents the annual summary for the PAs in Section 2.0 and the CAs in Section 3.0. The annual summary for the PAs includes the following: Section 2.1 summarizes changes in waste disposal operations; Section 2.1.5 provides an evaluation of the new estimates of the closure inventories derived from the actual disposals through fiscal year (FY) 2007; Section 2.2 summarizes the results of the monitoring conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's (NNSA/NSO's) Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (BN, 2005), and the research and development (R&D) activities; Section 2.4 is a summary of changes in facility design, operation, or expected future conditions; monitoring and R&D activities; and the maintenance program; and Section 2.5 discusses the recommended changes in disposal facility design and operations, monitoring and R&D activities, and the maintenance program. Similarly, the annual summary for the CAs (presented in Section 3.0) includes the following: Section 3.1 presents the assessment of the adequacy of the CAs, with a summary of the relevant factors reviewed in FY 2007; Section 3.2 presents an assessment of the relevant site activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that would impact the sources of residual radioactive material considered in the CAs; Section 3.3 summarizes the monitoring and R&D results that were reviewed in FY 2007; Section 3.4 presents a summary of changes in relevant site programs (including monitoring, R&D, and the maintenance program) that occurred since the CAs were prepared; and Section 3.5 summarizes the recommended changes to these programs.

  14. 2010 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2010. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2010 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  15. SUMMARY OF ‘AFIP’ FULL SIZED PLATE IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Adam B; Wachs, Daniel M

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent testing at the Idaho National Laboratory has included four AFIP (ATR Full Size plate In center flux trap Position) experiments. These experiments included both dispersion plates and monolithic plates fabricated by both hot isostatic pressing and friction bonding utilizing both thermally sprayed inter-layers and zirconium barriers. These plates were tested between 100 and 350 w/cm2 at low temperatures and high burn-ups. The post irradiation exams performed have indicated good performance under the conditions tested and a summary of the findings and irradiation history are included herein.

  16. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  17. Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;::Sampling atpff!' ;-g /Site

  18. Response of structures to energetic events for the Savannah River Site production reactors probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa Cruz, S.M.; Smith, D.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Yau, W.F. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of structures to energetic events postulated to arise in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor is addressed. Energetic events that arise in PRAs can damage structures and therefore have a significant influence on subsequent accident progression. Consequently, the structural response is important to the calculated risk of operating a plant. Difficulties are encountered, however, in the analysis of structural response of components to energetic loadings. First, the analysis of energetic events often does not provide well-defined static or dynamic loads acting on the structures. Secondly, risk assessments, by their nature, address a wide range of events that are not necessarily precisely defined. This paper describes an approach taken to develop the structural analysis required to support the PRA of the SRS production reactor, that overcomes these difficulties.

  19. Response of structures to energetic events for the Savannah River Site production reactors probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa Cruz, S.M.; Smith, D.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yau, W.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of structures to energetic events postulated to arise in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor is addressed. Energetic events that arise in PRAs can damage structures and therefore have a significant influence on subsequent accident progression. Consequently, the structural response is important to the calculated risk of operating a plant. Difficulties are encountered, however, in the analysis of structural response of components to energetic loadings. First, the analysis of energetic events often does not provide well-defined static or dynamic loads acting on the structures. Secondly, risk assessments, by their nature, address a wide range of events that are not necessarily precisely defined. This paper describes an approach taken to develop the structural analysis required to support the PRA of the SRS production reactor, that overcomes these difficulties.

  20. ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE HEATING OF SOILS AT C-REACTOR AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blundy, R; Michael Morgenstern, M; Joseph Amari, J; Annamarie MacMurray, A; Mark Farrar, M; Terry Killeen, T

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated solvent contamination of soils and groundwater is an endemic problem at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and originated as by-products from the nuclear materials manufacturing process. Five nuclear reactors at the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the nation's defense program throughout the cold war era. An important step in the process was thorough degreasing of the fuel and target assemblies prior to irradiation. Discharges from this degreasing process resulted in significant groundwater contamination that would continue well into the future unless a soil remediation action was performed. The largest reactor contamination plume originated from C-Reactor and an interim action was selected in 2004 to remove the residual trichloroethylene (TCE) source material by electrical resistance heating (ERH) technology. This would be followed by monitoring to determine the rate of decrease in concentration in the contaminant plume. Because of the existence of numerous chlorinated solvent sources around SRS, it was elected to generate in-house expertise in the design and operation of ERH, together with the construction of a portable ERH/SVE system that could be deployed at multiple locations around the site. This paper describes the waste unit characteristics, the ERH system design and operation, together with extensive data accumulated from the first deployment adjacent to the C-Reactor building. The installation heated the vadose zone down to 62 feet bgs over a 60 day period during the summer of 2006 and raised soil temperatures to over 200 F. A total of 730 lbs of trichloroethylene (TCE) were removed over this period, and subsequent sampling indicated a removal efficiency of 99.4%.

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-H-1, 116-H Reactor Stack Burial Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-053

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The 132-H-1 waste site includes the 116-H exhaust stack burial trench and the buried stack foundation (which contains an embedded vertical 15-cm (6-in) condensate drain line). The 116-H reactor exhaust stack and foundation were decommissioned and demolished using explosives in 1983, with the rubble buried in situ beneath clean fill at least 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  2. Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

  3. Summary of Apollo; A D- sup 3 He tokamak reactor design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Blanchard, T.P.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Emert, G.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Maynard, C.W.; Mogahed, E.A.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the key features of Apollo, a conceptual D-{sup 3}He tokamak reactor for commercial electricity production, are summarized. The 1000-MW (electric) design utilizes direct conversion of transport, neutron, and bremsstrahlung radiation power. The direct conversion method uses reactants, and the thermal conversion cycle uses an organic coolant. Apollo operates in the first-stability regime, with a major radius of 7.89 m, a peak magnetic field on the toroidal field coils of 19.3 T, a 53-MA plasma current, and a 6.7% beta value. The low neutron production of the D-{sup 3}He fuel cycle greatly reduces the radiation damage rate and allows a full-lifetime first wall and structure made of standard steels with only slight modifications to reduce activation levels.

  4. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. Hulstrom

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

  5. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. Hulstrom

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

  6. Hanford Site Environment Safety and Health (ES and H) FY 1999 and FY 2000 Execution Commitment Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the S&H resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 1999 and 2000 information (Sieracki 1999) and data contained in the ''Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk Management Summary'' (RL 1999) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2000 finding of Office of Environmental Management (EM) and Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) activities is based on the President's budget of $1,065.1 million and $28.0 million, plus $2.7 million carryover finding, respectively, as of October 31, 1999. Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2002 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2000. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 1999 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H ''Guidance for FY200l Budget Formulations and Execution'' (DOE 1999).

  7. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement: Quarterly environmental data summary for third quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the third quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented in this letter and attachment constitute the QEDS. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the third quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined above normal Level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal Level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits, and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in the event that above normal data occur.

  8. Optimization of a Small Modular Lead Fast Reactor with Steam Cycle for Remote Siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Earl E.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric thermal-hydraulic studies needed to develop and optimize the design of a small modular 25 MWt lead-bismuth reactor plant have been performed. The starting point was the design of a liquid metal version of the secure transportable autonomous reactor (STAR-LM) plant of 300 to 400 MWt with a steam power cycle.1 The primary flow is driven entirely by natural convection. The new plant is to be extremely small so that its main components can be transported to the reactor site by truck. The analytical model includes the two major components of the primary loop, the reactor and a once-through steam generator, which is a shell-and-tube heat exchanger with straight vertical tubes. The modeling includes the changes between the beginning and the end of plant life due to the gradual buildup of a layer of magnetite on the surfaces of the fuel pins and on the outer surfaces of the steam generator tubes. Three reactor parametric studies were performed-one for each of three sets of reactor geometric parameters. In each study the pin-bundle pressure drop, the vertical height of the primary loop, the hydraulic diameter of the core, the number of fuel pins, and peak fuel and cladding temperatures were determined for a range of values of fuel pin linear power. Four steam generator parametric studies were performed. The first three have fixed tube inner diameters of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 cm, respectively. In the fourth study the tube inner diameter was allowed to vary and the margin to critical heat flux, CHF, was maintained at 20%. In the steam generator studies the independent parameters include tube length and tube-bundle pitch-to-diameter ratio and the dependent variables include steam generator cross-sectional area, the number of tubes, the vertical height of the primary loop, and the steam generator pressure drop. The results show that an acceptable optimum thermal-hydraulic design for a 25 MWt STAR-LM is feasible. (authors)

  9. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and development (R&D) activities on advanced, higher performance Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels have been ongoing for the last few years. Following the unfortunate March 2011 events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the R&D shifted toward enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs. Qualitative attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance, such as improved reaction kinetics with steam resulting in slower hydrogen generation rate, provide guidance for the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. A common set of technical metrics should be established to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs on a more quantitative basis. “Metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. This report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to evaluate the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed toward qualification.

  10. Process Modeling Phase I Summary Report for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of preliminary work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate application of computational fluid dynamics modeling to the scale-up of a Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) process for nuclear fuels coating. Specifically, this work, referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase I, was conducted between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2006 in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Program. The objective was to develop, demonstrate and "freeze" a version of ORNL's computational model of the TRI ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel-particle coating process that can be specifically used to assist coater scale-up activities as part of the production of AGR-2 fuel. The results in this report are intended to serve as input for making decisions about initiating additional FBCVD modeling work (referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase II) in support of AGR-2. The main computational tool used to implement the model is the general-purpose multiphase fluid-dynamics computer code known as MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges), which is documented in detail on the DOE-sponsored website http://www.mfix.org. Additional computational tools are also being developed by ORNL for post-processing MFIX output to efficiently summarize the important information generated by the coater simulations. The summarized information includes quantitative spatial and temporal measures (referred to as discriminating characteristics, or DCs) by which different coater designs and operating conditions can be compared and correlated with trends in product quality. The ORNL FBCVD modeling work is being conducted in conjunction with experimental coater studies at ORNL with natural uranium CO (NUCO) and surrogate fuel kernels. Data are also being obtained from ambient-temperature, spouted-bed characterization experiments at the University of Tennessee and theoretical studies of carbon and silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition kinetics at Iowa State University. Prior to the current scale-up activity, considerable effort has gone in to adapting the MFIX code to incorporate the unique features of fuel coating reactors and also in validating the resulting simulation features with experimental observations. Much of this work is documented in previous AGR reports and publications (Pannala et al., 2004, Pannala et al., 2005, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005a, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005b and Finney et al., 2005). As a result of the previous work described above, the ORNL coater model now has the capability for simulating full spatio-temporal details of the gas-particle hydrodynamics and gas-particle heat and mass transfer in the TRISO coater. This capability provides a great deal of information about many of the processes believed to control quality, but the model is not yet sufficiently developed to fully predict coating quality for any given coater design and/or set of operating conditions because the detailed chemical reaction kinetics needed to make the model fully predictive are not yet available. Nevertheless, the model at its current stage of development already provides the most comprehensive and detailed quantitative information available about gas flows, solid flows, temperatures, and species inside the coater during operation. This level of information ought to be highly useful in expediting the scale-up process (e.g., in correlating observations and minimizing the number of pilot-scale tests required). However, previous work had not yet demonstrated that the typical design and/or operating changes known to affect product quality at the lab scale could be clearly discriminated by the existing model. The Modeling Scale-Up Phase I work was initiated to produce such a demonstration, and two detailed examples are discussed in this report.

  11. The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

  12. SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  13. Candidate wind turbine generator site: annual data summary, January 1981-December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarized hourly meteorological data for 34 candidate and wind turbine generator sites for calendar year 1981 are presented. These data are collected for the purpose of evaluating the wind energy potential at these sites and are used to assist in selection of potential sites for installation and testing of large wind turbines in electric utility systems. For each site, wind speed, direction, and distribution data are given in eight tables. Use of information from these tables, with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for wind energy production at each site.

  14. Economic impacts on the United States of siting decisions for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peerenboom, J.P.; Hanson, M.E.; Huddleston, J.R. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study that examines and compares the probable short-term economic impacts of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) on the United States (U.S.) if (1) ITER were to be sited in the U.S., or (2) ITER were to be sited in one of the other countries that, along with the U.S., is currently participating in the ITER program. Life-cycle costs associated with ITER construction, operation, and decommissioning are analyzed to assess their economic impact. A number of possible U.S. host and U.S. non-host technology and cost-sharing arrangements with the other ITER Parties are examined, although cost-sharing arrangements and the process by which the Parties will select a host country and an ITER site remain open issues. Both national and local/regional economic impacts, as measured by gross domestic product, regional output, employment, net exports, and income, are considered. These impacts represent a portion of the complex, interrelated set of economic considerations that characterize U.S. host and U.S. non-host participation in ITER. A number of other potentially important economic and noneconomic considerations are discussed qualitatively.

  15. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  16. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC SO) (See also Science).

  17. Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    site considerations such as seismic and brown versus green field, (3) the public communication plan, (4) future public use options, and (5) the baseline schedule. What the ETR...

  18. Geotechnical characterization of the North Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 1, Data summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brechtel, C.E.; Lin, Ming; Martin, E. [Agapito Associates, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Kessel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of geological and geotechnical characterization of the Miocene volcanic tuff rocks of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush groups that the tunnel boring machine will encounter during excavation of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) North Ramp. The is being constructed by the DOE as part of the Yucca Mountain Project site characterization activities. The purpose of these activities is to evaluate the feasibility of locating a potential high-level nuclear waste repository on lands adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This report was prepared as part of the Soil and Rock Properties Studies in accordance with the 8.3.1.14.2 Study Plan. This report is volume 1 of the data summary.

  19. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 1: Final summary report; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  20. Summary of some feasibility studies for site-specific solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some feasibility studies for several different site specific solar industrial process heat applications are summarized. The followng applications are examined. Leather Tanning; Concrete Production: Lumber and Paper Processing; Milk Processing; Molding, Curing or Drying; Automobile Manufacture; and Food Processing and Preparation. For each application, site and process data, system design, and performance and cost estimates are summarized.

  1. Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

  2. Technical summary of groundwater quality protection program at the Savannah River Site, 1952--1986. Volume 1, Site geohydrology and waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, J.D. [ed.] [Exploration Resources, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information regarding the status of and groundwater quality at the waste sites at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). Specific information provided for each waste site at SRS includes its location, size, inventory (when known), and history. Many waste sites at SRS are considered to be of little environmental concern because they contain nontoxic or inert material such as construction rubble and debris. Other waste sites, however, either are known to have had an effect on groundwater quality or are suspected of having the potential to affect groundwater. Monitoring wells have been installed at most of these sites; monitoring wells are scheduled for installation at the remaining sites. Results of the groundwater analyses from these monitoring wells, presented in the appendices, are used in the report to help identify potential contaminants of concern, if any, at each waste site. The list of actions proposed for each waste site in Christensen and Gordon`s 1983 report are summarized, and an update is provided for each site. Planned actions for the future are also outlined.

  3. Department of Energy's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), September 15--19, 1980: An independent on-site safety review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this on-site safety review was to make a broad management assessment of HFBR operations, rather than conduct a detailed in-depth audit. The result of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations for the most part are based upon licensed reactor facility practices used to meet industry standards. These standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the past AEC and ERDA policy, the team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative in that the HFBR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (low pressure, temperature, power, etc.) than a licensed reactor.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel contained significantly less aluminum surface area that the P-reactor vessel based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations.

  5. Alternative energy facility siting policies for urban coastal areas: executive summary of findings and policy recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morell, D; Singer, G

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was made of siting issues in the coastal zone, one of the nation's most critical natural resource areas and one which is often the target for energy development proposals. The analysis addressed the changing perceptions of citizens toward energy development in the coastal zone, emphasizing urban communities where access to the waterfront and revitalization of waterfront property are of interest to the citizen. The findings of this analysis are based on an examination of energy development along New Jersey's urban waterfront and along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast, and on redevelopment efforts in Seattle, San Francisco, Boston, and elsewhere. The case studies demonstrate the significance of local attitudes and regional cooperation in the siting process. In highly urbanized areas, air quality has become a predominant concern among citizen groups and an influential factor in development of alternative energy facility siting strategies, such as consideration of inland siting connected by pipeline to a smaller coastal facility. The study addresses the economic impact of the permitting process on the desirability of energy facility investments, and the possible effects of the location selected for the facility on the permitting process and investment economics. The economic analysis demonstrates the importance of viewing energy facility investments in a broad perspective that includes the positive or negative impacts of various alternative siting patterns on the permitting process. Conclusions drawn from the studies regarding Federal, state, local, and corporate politics; regulatory, permitting, licensing, environmental assessment, and site selection are summarized. (MCW)

  6. EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA, prepared by the Department of the Navy, evaluates the environmental impacts of the disposal of decommissioned, defueled, naval reactor plants from the USS Enterprise at DOE’s Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. DOE participated as a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EA. The Department of the Navy issued its FONSI on August 23, 2012.

  7. EIS-0147: Continued Operation of the K-,L-, and P- Reactors, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzes the environmental impacts of the proposed action, which is to continue operation of K-, L-, and P-Reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to ensure the capability to produce nuclear materials, and to produce nuclear materials as necessary for United States defense and nondefense programs.

  8. History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980`s. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history.

  9. Independent Verification Final Summary Report for the David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the independent verification was to determine if BJC performed the appropriate actions to meet the specified “hot spot” cleanup criteria of 500 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) uranium-238 (U-238) in surface soil. Specific tasks performed by the independent verification team (IVT) to satisfy this objective included: 1) performing radiological walkover surveys, and 2) collecting soil samples for independent analyses. The independent verification (IV) efforts were designed to evaluate radioactive contaminants (specifically U-238) in the exposed surfaces below one foot of the original site grade, given that the top one foot layer of soil on the site was removed in its entirety.

  10. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 48-acre David Witherspoon, Inc. (DWI) 1630 Site operated as an unregulated industrial landfill and scrap yard. The Tennessee Division of Superfund (TDSF) closed the landfill in 1974. During the period of operation, the site received solid and liquid wastes from salvage and industrial operations. The site consists of five separate tracts of land including a small portion located across the Norfolk Southern Railroad track. The landfill occupies approximately 5 acres of the site, and roughly 20 acres of the 48 acres contains surface and buried debris associated with the DWI dismantling business operation. Beginning in 1968, the state of Tennessee licensed DWI to receive scrap metal at the DWI 1630 Site, contaminated with natural uranium and enriched uranium (235U) not exceeding 0.1 percent by weight (TDSF 1990). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to undertake remedial actions at the DWI 1630 Site as specified under a Consent Order with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) (Consent Order No. 90-3443, April 4, 1991), and as further delineated by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between DOE and the State of Tennessee (MOU Regarding Implementation of Consent Orders, October 6, 1994). The soil and debris removal at the DWI 1630 Site is being performed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. Remediation consists of removing contaminated soil and debris from the DWI 1630 site except for the landfill area and repairing the landfill cap. The DWI 1630 remediation waste that is being disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as defined as waste lot (WL) 146.1 and consists primarily of soils and soil like material, incidental debris and secondary waste generated from the excavation of debris and soil from the DWI 1630 site. The WL 146.1 includes soil, soil like material (e.g., shredded or chipped vegetation, ash), discrete debris items (e.g., equipment, drums, large scrap metal, cylinders, and cable) and populations of debris type items (e.g., piles of bricks, small scrap metal, roofing material, scaffolding, and shelving) that are located throughout the DWI 1630 site. The project also generates an additional small volume of secondary waste [e.g., personal protective equipment (PPE), and miscellaneous construction waste] that is bagged and included in bulk soil shipments to the EMWMF. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF does not allow for material that does not meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs). The waste being excavated in certain areas of the DWI 1630 site contained soil that did not meet RCRA LDR criteria; therefore this waste had to be segregated for treatment or alternate disposal offsite. This document identifies the approach taken by the DWI 1630 project to further characterize the areas identified during the Phase II Remedial Investigation (RI) as potentially containing RCRA-characteristic waste. This document also describes the methodology used to determine excavation limits for areas determined to be RCRA waste, post excavation sampling, and the treatment and disposal of this material.

  11. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CSMRI) SITE FLOOD PLAIN AREA CLEANUP FACT SHEET & PROJECT SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In 1992 a water main break at the Site flooded a tailings pond that overflowed into Clear Creek. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency excavated and stockpiled soil from the tailings pond and surrounding area at the west end of the former tailings pond area previously cleaned up by EPA was found to contain

  12. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Falls City site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Falls City site in order to update the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranum mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrolgy and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,700,000 for stabilization in place, to about $35,100,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Falls City tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The tailings piles are presently being rewashed for uranium recovery by Solution Engineering, Inc. The cost for further reprocessing would be about $250/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive for the foreseeable future.

  13. Study plan for conducting a section 316(a) demonstration: K-Reactor cooling tower, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began operation in 1954. The K-Reactor pumped secondary cooling water from the Savannah River and discharged directly to the Indian Grave Branch, a tributary of Pen Branch which flows to the Savannah River. During earlier operations, the temperature and discharge rates of cooling water from the K-reactor were up to approximately 70{degree}C and 400 cfs, substantially altering the thermal and flow regimes of this stream. These discharges resulted in adverse impacts to the receiving stream and wetlands along the receiving stream. As a component of a Consent Order (84-4-W as amended) with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, the Department of Energy (DOE) evaluated the alternatives for cooling thermal effluents from K Reactor and concluded that a natural draft recirculating cooling tower should be constructed. The cooling tower will mitigate thermal and flow factors that resulted in the previous impacts to the Indian Grave/Pen Branch ecosystem. The purpose of the proposed biological monitoring program is to provide information that will support a Section 316(a) Demonstration for Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch when K-Reactor is operated with the recirculating cooling tower. The data will be used to determine that Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch support Balanced Indigenous Communities when K-Reactor is operated with a recirculating cooling tower. 4 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  14. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneralGuiding Documents andNR-2May 2009 Hanford Site C

  15. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneralGuiding Documents andNR-2May 2009 Hanford Site C0

  16. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneralGuiding Documents andNR-2May 2009 Hanford Site

  17. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Ames Site Office | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE) |2 National EnergyDepartmentEnergy Ames Site

  18. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the FERMI Site Office | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE) |2 NationalEnergy FERMI Site Office.

  19. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Los Alamos Site Office | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE) |2 NationalEnergy FERMI SiteEnergy The

  20. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Ames Site Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  1. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for SLAC Site Office | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you're a homeZappos.com Innovative81of EnergySLAC Site

  2. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  3. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Ames Site Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  4. Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  5. Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSARDevelopmentalEfficiency | DepartmentSavannah River Site155-W

  6. Summary of canister overheating incident at the Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driggers, S.A.

    1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The granular activated carbon (GAC)-filled canister that overheated was being used to adsorb carbon tetrachloride vapors drawn from a well near the 216-Z-9 Trench, a subsurface disposal site in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The overheating incident resulted in a band of discolored paint on the exterior surface of the canister. Although there was no other known damage to equipment, no injuries to operating personnel, and no releases of hazardous materials, the incident is of concern because it was not anticipated. It also poses the possibility of release of carbon tetrachloride and other hazardous vapors if the incident were to recur. All soil vapor extraction system (VES) operations were halted until a better understanding of the cause of the incident could be determined and controls implemented to reduce the possibility of a recurrence. The focus of this report and the intent of all the activities associated with understanding the overheating incident has been to provide information that will allow safe restart of the VES operations, develop operational limits and controls to prevent recurrence of an overheating incident, and safely optimize recovery of carbon tetrachloride from the ground.

  7. Fiscal year 1996 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Site summary baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johndro-Collins, A.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical baseline is a hierarchical description of the Hanford Site cleanup mission. This technical baseline does not address the science, technology, or economic transition missions. It begins with a definition of the existing conditions at the Hanford Site, provides a description of the end product or mission accomplishments at completion, presents a statement of the major requirements and constraints that must be observed during the performance of the mission, and provides a statement of the top-level strategic approach to accomplish the mission. Mission-level interfaces are also described. This information is further defined hierarchically in increasing levels of detail. This definition is composed of the following major elements: functions that are key task descriptions; requirements that are the measurable standards to which the functions must be performed; architectures which are specific engineering solutions or systems that perform the functions described earlier; and verification ensuring the system satisfies the requirements and fulfills the functions. The above information is supplemented with the following: interface data; risk analyses and watch lists; assumptions; and required analyses.

  8. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet is designed to inform the public about what Argonne National Laboratory is doing to monitor its environment and to protect its employees and neighbors from any adverse environmental impacts from Argonne research. The Downers Grove South Biology II class was selected to write this booklet, which summarizes Argonne's environmental monitoring programs for 2006. Writing this booklet also satisfies the Illinois State Education Standard, which requires that students need to know and apply scientific concepts to graduate from high school. This project not only provides information to the public, it will help students become better learners. The Biology II class was assigned to condense Argonne's 300-page, highly technical Site Environmental Report into a 16-page plain-English booklet. The site assessment relates to the class because the primary focus of the Biology II class is ecology and the environment. Students developed better learning skills by working together cooperatively, writing and researching more effectively. Students used the Argonne Site Environmental Report, the Internet, text books and information from Argonne scientists to help with their research on their topics. The topics covered in this booklet are the history of Argonne, groundwater, habitat management, air quality, Argonne research, Argonne's environmental non-radiological program, radiation, and compliance. The students first had to read and discuss the Site Environmental Report and then assign topics to focus on. Dr. Norbert Golchert and Mr. David Baurac, both from Argonne, came into the class to help teach the topics more in depth. The class then prepared drafts and wrote a final copy. Ashley Vizek, a student in the Biology class stated, 'I reviewed my material and read it over and over. I then took time to plan my paper out and think about what I wanted to write about, put it into foundation questions and started to write my paper. I rewrote and revised so I think the amount of time that I put into the project will be worth it in the end because it is a cool thing to be a published writer'. While most students agree that putting the final paper together was the toughest part, the final result was worth the hard work. Christine Beuhler states, 'The time and effort was worth it because I learned a lot about the Argonne facility. This project also improved my analyzing, reading, and writing skills'. Emily Schimick and Kaitlin Hernandez agreed that the feeling of accomplishment when they finished the paper was their favorite part, while the reading of the Argonne Site Environmental Report was their least favorite because it was difficult to understand. The Downers Grove South Biology II class would like to thank our teacher Mr. Scott Howard, as well as Dr. Golchert and Mr. Baurac for their investment in time and energy in helping with the project. Dr. Golchert and Mr. Baurac gave us valuable assistance in the preparation of this project, and we owe them our deepest gratitude. Their real-life experience at Argonne was inspirational. Mr. Howard set the goals and made the commitment to our class to complete this project. Without their kind support, this project would not have been possible.

  9. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF STATE DATA RELATED TO ABANDONED CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Seay Nance

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2003 Spring Semi-Annual Report contains a summary of the Final Technical Report being prepared for the Soil Remediation Requirements at Commercial and Centralized Drilling-Fluid Disposal (CCDD) Sites project funded by the United States Department of Energy under DOE Award No. DE-AC26-99BC15225. The summary describes (1) the objectives of the investigation, (2) a rationale and methodology of the investigation, (3) sources of data, assessment of data quality, and data availability, (4) examples of well documented centralized and commercial drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites and other sites where drilling fluid was disposed of, and (5) examples of abandoned sites and measures undertaken for their assessment and remediation. The report also includes most of the figures, tables, and appendices that will be included in the final report.

  10. A summary of ecological investigations at the burial ground complex, Savannah River Site - 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G.P.; Hartman, G.D.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.; Roach, J.L.; Specht, W.L.; Westbury, H.M.; Wike, L.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of three ecological investigations that were conducted in 1994 at the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The three topics of study included remote sensing, aquatic toxicity testing, and qualitative surveys of herpetofauna and small mammals. Interim reports from each investigation are included in the appendices (A, B, and C). The objectives of the remote sensing effort were to compile historical aerial photography of the BGC and to develop a land use/cover map of the complex using recent aerial imagery. The goal of the aquatic toxicity testing was to determine if surface waters were toxic to aquatic biota whereas the objectives of the vertebrate surveys were to identify the species diversity and relative abundances of amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals inhabiting the study area.

  11. Summary of Degas II performance at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudeen, David K. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Lord, David L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil stored at the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) requires mitigation procedures to maintain oil vapor pressure within program delivery standards. Crude oil degasification is one effective method for lowering crude oil vapor pressure, and was implemented at the Big Hill SPR site from 2004-2006. Performance monitoring during and after degasification revealed a range of outcomes for caverns that had similar inventory and geometry. This report analyzed data from SPR degasification and developed a simple degas mixing (SDM) model to assist in the analysis. Cavern-scale oil mixing during degassing and existing oil heterogeneity in the caverns were identified as likely causes for the range of behaviors seen. Apparent cavern mixing patterns ranged from near complete mixing to near plug flow, with more mixing leading to less efficient degassing due to degassed oil re-entering the plant before 100% of the cavern oil volume was processed. The report suggests that the new cavern bubble point and vapor pressure regain rate after degassing be based on direct in-cavern measurements after degassing as opposed to using the plant outlet stream properties as a starting point, which understates starting bubble point and overstates vapor pressure regain. Several means to estimate the cavern bubble point after degas in the absence of direct measurement are presented and discussed.

  12. Summary Of Cold Crucible Vitrification Tests Results With Savannah River Site High Level Waste Surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovsky, Sergey; Marra, James; Lebedev, Vladimir

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The cold crucible inductive melting (CCIM) technology successfully applied for vitrification of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW) at SIA Radon, Russia, was tested to be implemented for vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) stored at Savannah River Site, USA. Mixtures of Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and 4 (SB4) waste surrogates and borosilicate frits as slurries were vitrified in bench- (236 mm inner diameter) and full-scale (418 mm inner diameter) cold crucibles. Various process conditions were tested and major process variables were determined. Melts were poured into 10L canisters and cooled to room temperature in air or in heat-insulated boxes by a regime similar to Canister Centerline Cooling (CCC) used at DWPF. The products with waste loading from ~40 to ~65 wt.% were investigated in details. The products contained 40 to 55 wt.% waste oxides were predominantly amorphous; at higher waste loadings (WL) spinel structure phases and nepheline were present. Normalized release values for Li, B, Na, and Si determined by PCT procedure remain lower than those from EA glass at waste loadings of up to 60 wt.%.

  13. Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, M.B.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

  14. SRS Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

  15. SRS Small Modular Reactors

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

  16. EIS-0275: Disposal of the S1C Prototype Reactor Plant, Hanford Site, Richland, WA (Navy Document)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the Office of Naval Reactors (Naval Reactors) proposed action to dismantle the defueled S1C Prototype reactor plant.

  17. Summary of aerosol code-comparison results for LWR (Light-Water Reactor) aerosol containment tests LA1, LA2, and LA3: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.L.; Wilson, J.H.; Arwood, P.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light-Water Reactor (LWR) Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) are being performed in Richland, Washington, at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) under the leadershiop of an international project board and the Electric Power Research Institute. These tests have two objectives: to investigate, at large scale, the inherent aerosol retention behavior in LWR containments under simulated severe accident conditions, and to provide an experimental data base for validating aerosol behavior and thermal-hydraulic computer codes. Aerosol computer-code comparison activities for the LACE tests are being coordinated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For each of the six experiments, ''pretest'' calculations (for code-to-test data comparisons) are being performed. This paper presents a summary of the pretest aerosol-code results for tests LA1, LA2, and LA3. 7 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Summary Report on New Transmutation Analysis for the Evaluation of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Options in Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope; B. Forget; W. Skerjanc; M. Asgari

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1000 MWth commercial-scale Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) design was selected as the baseline in this scenario study. Traditional approaches to Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) transuranic waste (TRU) burning in a fast spectrum system have typically focused on the continual homogeneous recycling (reprocessing) of the discharge fast reactor fuel. The effective reduction of transuranic inventories has been quantified through the use of the transuranics conversion ratio (TRU CR). The implicit assumption in the use of this single parameter is a homogeneous fast reactor option where equal weight is given to the destruction of transuranics, either by fission or eventual fission via transmutation. This work explores the potential application of alternative fast reactor fuel cycles in which the minor actinide (MA) component of the TRU is considered ‘waste’, while the plutonium component is considered as fuel. Specifically, a set of potential designs that incorporate radial heterogeneous target assemblies is proposed and results relevant to transmutation and system analysis are presented. In this work we consider exclusively minor actinide-bearing radial targets in a continual reprocessing scenario (as opposed to deep-burn options). The potential use of targets in a deep burn mode is not necessarily ruled out as an option. However, due to work scope constraints and material limit considerations, it was preferred to leave the target assemblies reach either the assumed limit of 200 DPA at discharge or maximum allowable gas pressure caused by helium production from transmutation. The number and specific design of the target assemblies was chosen to satisfy the necessary core symmetry and physical dimensions (available space for a certain amount of mass in an assembly based on an iterated mass density).

  19. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation (PE) to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 1 is an executive summary both of the PE methodology and of the results obtained from the PEs. While this volume briefly reviews the scope and method of analyses, its main objective is to emphasize the important insights and conclusions derived from the conduct of the PEs. Volume 2 provides details about the site-selection process, the performance-evaluation methodology, and the overall results of the analysis. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussions of the results for each site.

  20. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  1. Summary Site Environmental Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This monitoring is done to measure Argonne's impact on groundwater quality from wastewater discharges, air discharges, and material released to the soil and groundwater....

  2. acid immunoaffinity reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sludge blanket reactors (more) Ning, Zuojun. 2009-01-01 8 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  3. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  4. Summary of the radiological assessment of the fuel cycle for a thorium-uranium carbide-fueled fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennery, V.J.; Bomar, E.S.; Bond, W.D.; Meyer, H.R.; Morse, L.E.; Till, J.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large fraction of the potential fuel for nuclear power reactors employing fissionable materials exists as ores of thorium. In addition, certain characteristics of a fuel system based on breeding of the fissionable isotope {sup 233}U from thorium offer the possibility of a greater resistance to the diversion of fissionable material for the fabrication of nuclear weapons. This report consolidates into a single source the principal content of two previous reports which assess the radiological environmental impact of mining and milling of thorium ore and of the reprocessing and refabrication of spent FBR thorium-uranium carbide fuel.

  5. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  6. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  7. EVALUATION OF ACTIVATION PRODUCTS IN REMAINING IN REMAINING K-, L- AND C-REACTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.; Webb, R.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic model and calculational methodology was previously developed for P-reactor and R-reactor to quantify the radioisotopes present in Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor tanks and the surrounding structural materials as a result of neutron activation of the materials during reactor operation. That methodology has been extended to K-reactor, L-reactor, and C-reactor. The analysis was performed to provide a best-estimate source term input to the Performance Assessment for an in-situ disposition strategy by Site Decommissioning and Demolition (SDD). The reactor structure model developed earlier for the P-reactor and R-reactor analyses was also used for the K-reactor and L-reactor. The model was suitably modified to handle the larger Creactor tank and associated structures. For all reactors, the structure model consisted of 3 annular zones, homogenized by the amount of structural materials in the zone, and 5 horizontal layers. The curie content on an individual radioisotope basis and total basis for each of the regions was determined. A summary of these results are provided herein. The efficacy of this methodology to accurately predict the radioisotopic content of the reactor systems in question has been demonstrated and is documented in Reference 1. As noted in that report, results for one reactor facility cannot be directly extrapolated to other SRS reactors.

  8. Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Proposed Hampton Roads Area Sites for a Possible Small Modular Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, R. J. [ORNL; Omitaomu, O. A. [ORNL

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research project is to use the OR-SAGE tool to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) in evaluating future electrical generation deployment options for small modular reactors (SMRs) in areas with significant energy demand from the federal sector. Deployment of SMRs in zones with high federal energy use can provide a means of meeting federal clean energy goals.

  9. Restart of K-Reactor, Savannah River Site: Safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) focuses on those issues required to support the restart of the K-Reactor at the Savannah River Plant. This SER provides the safety criteria for restart and documents the results of the staff reviews of the DOE and operating contractor activities to meet these criteria. To develop the restart criteria for the issues discussed in this SER, the Savannah River Restart Office and Savannah River Special Projects Office staffs relied, when possible, on commercial industry codes and standards and on NRC requirements and guidelines for the commercial nuclear industry. However, because of the age and uniqueness of the Savannah River reactors, criteria for the commercial plants were not always applicable. In these cases, alternate criteria were developed. The restart criteria applicable to each of the issues are identified in the safety evaluations for each issue. The restart criteria identified in this report are intended to apply only to restart of the Savannah River reactors. Following the development of the acceptance criteria, the DOE staff and their support contractors evaluated the results of the DOE and operating contractor (WSRC) activities to meet these criteria. The results of those evaluations are documented in this report. Deviations or failures to meet the requirements are either justified in the report or carried as open or confirmatory items to be completed and evaluated in supplements to this report before restart. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Evaluation of Suitability of Selected Set of Coal Plant Sites for Repowering with Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, Randy [ORNL; Copinger, Donald A [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the approach that ORNL developed for screening a sample set of small coal stations for possible repowering with SMRs; the methodology employed, including spatial modeling; and initial results for these sample plants. The objective in conducting this type of siting evaluation is to demonstrate the capability to characterize specific sample coal plant sites to identify any particular issues associated with repowering existing coal stations with SMRs using OR-SAGE; it is not intended to be a definitive assessment per se as to the absolute suitability of any particular site.

  11. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  12. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G. J.

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

  13. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  14. The decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of loss-of-fluid test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floerke, J.P.; Borschel, Th.F.; Rhodes, L.K. [CH2M-WG Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 2006, CH2M-WG Idaho completed the decontamination, decommissioning and demolition of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The 30-year-old research reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory site, posed significant challenges involving regulations governing the demolition of a historical facility, as well as worker safety issues associated with the removal of the reactor's domed structure. The LOFT facility was located at the west end of Test Area North (TAN), built in the 1950's to support the government's aircraft nuclear propulsion program. When President Kennedy cancelled the nuclear propulsion program in 1961, TAN began to host various other activities. The LOFT reactor became part of the new mission. The LOFT facility, constructed between 1965 and 1975, was a scaled-down version of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Its design allowed engineers, scientists, and operators to create or re-create loss-of-fluid accidents (reactor fuel meltdowns) under controlled conditions. The LOFT dome provided containment for a relatively small, mobile test reactor that was moved into and out of the facility on a railroad car. The dome was roughly 21 meters (70 feet) in diameter and 30 meters (98 feet) in height. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission received the results from the accident tests and incorporated the data into commercial reactor operating codes. The facility conducted 38 experiments, including several small loss-of-coolant experiments designed to simulate events such as the accident that occurred at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, before the LOFT facility was closed. Through formal survey and research, the LOFT facility was determined to be a DOE Signature Property, as defined by the 'INEEL Cultural Resource Management Plan', and thus eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the facility constituted an adverse effect on the historic property that required resolution through the contractor (CH2M-WG Idaho), the U.S. Department of Energy, the Idaho State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. The project team identified multiple hazards that would result if conventional techniques were used to demolish the dome. The physical structure of the vessel containment facility reached 30 meters (98 feet) above grade, presenting significant worker safety hazards created by hoisting and rigging activities. The dome also included a polar crane, 19 meters (62 feet) above grade, that posed similar hazards to workers. The need to work on significantly elevated surfaces, and the thickness of the dome walls - 30 millimeters (1-3/16 inches) of carbon steel - would prove difficult with traditional arc plasma cutting tools. The dome's proximity to operating facilities with equipment sensitive to vibration added to the demolition challenges. To address cultural resource issues, the project team engaged all parties in negotiations and in mapping a path foreword. Open and frequent communication resulted in a Memorandum of Agreement, with stipulations that mitigated the adverse affects of the intended demolition action. The unique mitigating actions resulted in a favorable agreement being signed and issued. To mitigate hazards posed by the height of the facility, the project team had to abandon traditional D and D techniques and employ other methods to complete demolition safely. A different approach and a change in demolition sequence resulted in the safe and efficient removal of the one-of-a-kind containment facility. The approach reduced the use of aerial lifts, aboveground size reduction, and dangerous hoisting and rigging activities that could pose significant hazards to workers. (authors)

  15. Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor, Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471Site-Wide Environmental ImpactFRONT COVER

  16. 2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  17. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

  18. Summary of flammable gas hazard and potential consequences in tank waste remediation system facility at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Vleet, R.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a summary of the flammable gas program since 1992. It provides the best understanding of generation, retention, release of flammable gases. It gives a composition for each of the flammable gas tanks, calculates postulated concentrations in the event of a release, calculates the pressure obtained during a burn, and provides radiological and toxicological consequences. Controls from the analysis are found in WHC-SD-WM-SAR-067.

  19. Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    for Passive corium cooling system under severe accident and reactor components (e.g. Fuel assembly, Steam Master's Program Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Application Code Name

  20. Implementation of MPC and A systems at the VNIIEF research (reactor) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skripka, G.; Koloyartsev, V.; Mikijchuk, N. [Rossijskij Federal`nyj Yadernyj Tsentr, Arzamas (Russian Federation). Nauchno-Issledovatel`skij Inst. Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the US-Russian Lab-to-Lab program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), an integrated MPC and A system is being installed at a large site within the VNIIEF complex to upgrade safeguards on the nuclear material stored and used at this site. In addition to storage facilities, the site houses a number of critical facilities at which nuclear physics research is conducted. The design of the MPC and A system is based on the test bed work presented earlier and provides the functions of nondestructive measurements for plutonium and highly enriched uranium, item control, personnel access control, radiation portal monitoring, and computed on-line accounting. The system controls, monitors, and accounts for nuclear material and people as the material moves through three material balance areas, a measurement room, and a number of control points. It also assists with physical inventory taking. The instrumentation used to implement these functions will include US commercial equipment as well as Russian-designed and -fabricated items.

  1. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  2. On-site radiation exposure in severe reactor accidents: Scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warman, E.A.; Karahalios, P.; Celnick, J.; McInall, S.; Frank, S. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a scoping study of onsite radiation exposures which could take place in each of three types of postulated reactor accidents are presented. The accident types are (1) a fuel handling accident at a Mark III BWR; an interfacing system LOCA or V sequence at a PWR; and and Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) at a Mark I BWR. Both external and internal dose pathways are considered. The results of the study indicate the prohibitively high radiation doses could be received in some plant areas if personnel were to remain there. However, times of the order of a few minutes to a few hours, depending on the type of accident, would be available before life-threatening doses would be accumulated assuming that the provided full face respiratory protection equipment were used promptly. Special attention was given radiation doses possibly received by control room personnel for several control room air in-leakage assumptions. For occupancy during severe accidents it would be advisable for control room personnel to use self-contained apparatus (SCBA) to limit exposure via inhalation. The results of this study will be useful to individuals responsible for accident management procedures. It is indicated that it will be important for each plant to develop estimates of the time of onset of prohibitively high radiation levels in various important plant areas. It is concluded that respiratory protection is a major factor owing to the large inhalation doses which might otherwise be encountered. 20 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

  4. WSRC Reactor Tank Inspection Program (RTIP) status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loibl, M.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) recently completed the initial phase of nondestructive inspections of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) reactor tanks. This program required almost three years to be conceptualized, fabricated, and tested. An additional 20 months were required to complete the NDE inspection of the P, K and L reactor tanks. The overall cost of the program to date is approximately $25 MM. This status report will address: (1) A brief review of the RTIP program and the constraints which had to be overcome (2) A summary of the examination results of the P,K, and L Reactor tanks. (3) A projection of the future enhancements and capabilities presently in development.

  5. 2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  6. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Anthony A. [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  7. Summary environmental site assessment report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oxnard Facility, Oxnard, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the investigations conducted by Rust Geotech at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oxnard facility, 1235 East Wooley Road, Oxnard, California. These investigations were designed to locate, identify, and characterize any regulated contaminated media on the site. The effort included site visits; research of ownership, historical uses of the Oxnard facility and adjacent properties, incidences of and investigations for contaminants on adjacent properties, and the physical setting of the site; sampling and analysis; and reporting. These investigations identified two friable asbestos gaskets on the site, which were removed, and nonfriable asbestos, which will be managed through the implementation of an asbestos management plan. The California primary drinking water standards were exceeded for aluminum on two groundwater samples and for lead in one sample collected from the shallow aquifer underlying the site; remediation of the groundwater in this aquifer is not warranted because it is not used. Treated water is available from a municipal water system. Three sludge samples indicated elevated heavy metals concentrations; the sludge must be handled as a hazardous waste if disposed. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected at concentrations below remediation criteria in facility soils at two locations. In accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and State of California guidance, remediation of the PCBs is not required. No other hazardous substances were detected in concentrations exceeding regulatory limits.

  8. Task summary for cone penetrating testing sounding and soil and groundwater sampling Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salmon Site (SS), located in Mississippi, was the site of two nuclear and two gas explosion testes conducted deep underground in the Tatum Salt Dome between 1964 and 1970. As a consequence radionuclides generated during the testing were released into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, incidental liquid and solid wastes that contained radioactivity were generated, resulting in some soil, ground water and equipment contamination. US DOE is conducting a series of investigations as a part of the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (under CERCLA) This report summarizes the cone penetrometer testing (CPT) and sampling program conducted in fall 1993, providing a description of the activities and a discussion of the results. The objectives of the CPT program were to determine subsurface conditions and stratification; determine the depth to the potentiometric surface; obtain soil samples from predetermined depths; obtain groundwater samples at predetermined depths.

  9. Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Nevada Test Site- Summary Report, October 2002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of Energy’s Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) and emergency management programs at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nevada Test Site (NTS) in September and October

  10. Summary of Natural Resources that Potentially Influence Human Intrusion at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, Raytheon Services Nevada completed a review of natural resource literature and other sources to identify potentially exploitable resources and potential future land uses near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, that could lead to future inadvertent human intrusion and subsequent release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. National Security Technologies, LLC, revised the original limited-distribution document to conform to current editorial standards and U.S. Department of Energy requirements for public release. The researchers examined the potential for future development of sand, gravel, mineral, petroleum, water resources, and rural land uses, such as agriculture, grazing, and hunting. The study was part of the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes. Sand and gravel are not considered exploitable site resources because the materials are common throughout the area and the quality at the Area 5 RWMS is not ideal for typical commercial uses. Site information also indicates a very low mineral potential for the area. None of the 23 mining districts in southern Nye County report occurrences of economic mineral deposits in unconsolidated alluvium. The potential for oil and natural gas is low for southern Nye County. No occurrences of coal, tar sand, or oil shale on the NTS are reported in available literature. Several potential future uses of water were considered. Agricultural irrigation is impractical due to poor soils and existing water supply regulations. Use of water for geothermal energy development is unlikely because temperatures are too low for typical commercial applications using current technology. Human consumption of water has the most potential for cause of intrusion. The economics of future water needs may create a demand for the development of deep carbonate aquifers in the region. However, the Area 5 RWMS is not an optimal location for extraction of groundwater from the deep carbonate aquifer. Grazing and hunting are unlikely to be potential causes for inadvertent human intrusion into waste areas because of vegetation characteristics and lack of significant game animal populations.

  11. A Summary of Fault Recurrence and Strain Rates in the Vicinity of the Hanford Site--Topical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to fault recurrence and strain rates within the Yakima Fold Belt. Strain rates have met with contention in the expert community and may have a significant potential for impact on the seismic hazard estimate at the Hanford Site. This report identifies the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some prospective approaches to reducing uncertainties about earthquake recurrence rates for the Yakima Fold Belt.

  12. Regional groundwater flow model for C, K. L. and P reactor areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.P.

    2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi2 surrounding the C, K, L, and P reactor areas has been developed. The reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department. The model provides a quantitative understanding of groundwater flow on a regional scale within the near surface aquifers and deeper semi-confined to confined aquifers. The model incorporates historical and current field characterization data up through Spring 1999. Model preprocessing is automated so that future updates and modifications can be performed quickly and efficiently. The CKLP regional reactor model can be used to guide characterization, perform scoping analyses of contaminant transport, and serve as a common base for subsequent finer-scale transport and remedial/feasibility models for each reactor area.

  13. advanced passive reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas 2006-01-01 12 Radiation Hardness of Passive Fibre Optic Components for the Future Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor CiteSeer Summary: thermon uclearfusion reactor ITER will...

  14. advanced fusion reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaborators 7 China To Build Its Own Fusion Reactor ENERGY TECH Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project reached agreement in...

  15. astra research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR 3, the Isotope Laboratory 140 Compound cryopump for fusion reactors CERN Preprints Summary: We reconsider an...

  16. ardennes reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    d'un parasite cycle Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 12 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  17. aprf reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the specimen. The sensitivity Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  18. a-2 reactor bohunice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barbara Ricci; Virginia Strati; Gerti Xhixha 2014-11-24 7 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  19. a-1 reactor bohunice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of degree one rather than rational points. Nguyen Le Dang Thi 7 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  20. DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional seats available for tours of the B Reactor National Historic Landmark this July and August.

  1. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

  2. Evaluation of melter technologies for vitrification of Hanford site low-level tank waste - phase 1 testing summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Following negotiation of the fourth amendment to the Tri- Party Agreement for Hanford Site cleanup, commercially available melter technologies were tested during 1994 and 1995 for vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream to be derived from retrieval and pretreatment of the radioactive defense wastes stored in 177 underground tanks. Seven vendors were selected for Phase 1 testing to demonstrate vitrification of a high-sodium content liquid LLW simulant. The tested melter technologies included four Joule-heated melters, a carbon electrode melter, a combustion melter, and a plasma melter. Various dry and slurry melter feed preparation processes also were tested. The technologies and Phase 1 testing results were evaluated and a preliminary technology down-selection completed. This report describes the Phase 1 LLW melter vendor testing and the tested technologies, and summarizes the testing results and the preliminary technology recommendations.

  3. B Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederalAshleymonthlyAwards

  4. C Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience, and8 FY0 By Kortny Rolston,HYPREO P EC

  5. H Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic Engine GyroSolé(tm) engine * Simple *

  6. F Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE, Ford,ExtractingMaterialsProjects

  7. ( )Ministers delay decision on site for 10-billion-dollar nuclear fusion reactor 20/12/2003 The European Union, the United States and four other countries failed in talks agree on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of transporting nuclear material and storing dangerous long-term radioactive waste. Nuclear fusion takes( )Ministers delay decision on site for 10-billion-dollar nuclear fusion reactor 20-dollar international nuclear fusion reactor. Delegates from the European Union, the United States, China, Japan, South

  8. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

  9. SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND...

  10. Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States); Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R. [Fluor Federal Services, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to sustain heavy equipment yet, low breakout force to permit efficient removal by track hoe bucket or equivalent construction equipment. Further, flow of slurries through small orifice geometries of moderate head pressures was another typical design requirement. Phase separation of less than 1 percent was a typical design requirement for slurries. On the order of 30,000 cubic meters of cementitious grout have recently been placed in the above noted U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site facilities or structures. Each has presented a unique challenge in mix design, equipment, grout injection or placement, and ultimate facility or structure performance. Unconfined compressive and shear strength, flow, density, mass attenuation coefficient, phase separation, air content, wash-out, parameters and others, unique to each facility or structure, dictate the grout mix design for each. Each mix design was tested under laboratory and scaled field conditions as a precursor to field deployment. Further, after injection or placement of each grout formulation, the material was field inspected either by standard laboratory testing protocols, direct physical evaluation, or both. (authors)

  11. FROM CONCEPT TO REALITY, IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF THE P AND R REACTORS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musall, J.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    SRS recently completed an approximately three year effort to decommission two SRS reactors: P-Reactor (Building 105-P) and R-Reactor (Building 105-R). Completed in December 2011, the concurrent decommissionings marked the completion of two relatively complex and difficult facility disposition projects at the SRS. Buildings 105-P and 105-R began operating as production reactors in the early 1950s with the mission of producing weapons material (e.g., tritium and plutonium-239). The 'P' Reactor and was shutdown in 1991 while the 'R' Reactor and was shutdown in 1964. In the intervening period between shutdown and deactivation & decommissioning (D&D), Buildings 105-P and 105-R saw limited use (e.g., storage of excess heavy water and depleted uranium oxide). For Building 105-P, deactivation was initiated in April 2007 and was essentially complete by June 2010. For Building 105-R, deactivation was initiated in August 2008 and was essentially complete by September 2010. For both buildings, the primary objective of deactivation was to remove/mitigate hazards associated with the remaining hazardous materials, and thus prepare the buildings for in-situ decommissioning. Deactivation removed the following hazardous materials to the extent practical: combustibles/flammables, residual heavy water, acids, friable asbestos (as needed to protect workers performing deactivation and decommissioning), miscellaneous chemicals, lead/brass components, Freon(reg sign), oils, mercury/PCB containing components, mold and some radiologically-contaminated equipment. In addition to the removal of hazardous materials, deactivation included the removal of hazardous energy, exterior metallic components (representing an immediate fall hazard), and historical artifacts along with the evaporation of water from the two Disassembly Basins. Finally, so as to facilitate occupancy during the subsequent in-situ decommissioning, deactivation implemented repairs to the buildings and provided temporary power.

  12. Reactor Operations informal monthly report September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Junker, L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents operations at the MRR and HFBR reactors at Brookhaven National Laboratory for September 1994. Reactor run-times, instrumentation, mechanical maintenance, occurrence reports and safety information are listed. Irradiation summaries are included.

  13. Final Site Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report #2 for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Roberts

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of August through November 2006, ORISE performed a comprehensive IV at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility. The objective of the ORISE IV was to validate the licensee’s final status survey processes and data, and to assure the requirements of the DP and FSSP were met.

  14. Summary of the HANFORD SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................7 Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order ........................................................................................................11 Facility Decommissioning........................................................................................................23 Potential Radiological Doses from 2004 Hanford Operations

  15. Summary of the HANFORD SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .........................................................................................................9 Hanford Cleanup Operations................................................12 Liquid Waste Management..................................................................................................14 Solid Waste Management

  16. Yesterday's Daily Summary - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contributeSecuritysupports neighbors's/UTAnaYe

  17. Untitled Page -- Considered Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona ArizonaWyoming Wyoming wy_map RivertonYou

  18. Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona ArizonaWyoming Wyoming wy_map

  19. Yesterday's Daily Summary - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12 recognized forCyclotron Chemistry Dept.Met

  20. WSRC Reactor Tank Inspection Program (RTIP) status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loibl, M.W.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) recently completed the initial phase of nondestructive inspections of the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) reactor tanks. This program required almost three years to be conceptualized, fabricated, and tested. An additional 20 months were required to complete the NDE inspection of the P, K and L reactor tanks. The overall cost of the program to date is approximately $25 MM. This status report will address: (1) A brief review of the RTIP program and the constraints which had to be overcome (2) A summary of the examination results of the P,K, and L Reactor tanks. (3) A projection of the future enhancements and capabilities presently in development.

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Advanced Reactors...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Advanced Reactors Div Plutonium and Advanced Fuel Labs - PA 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE ADVANCED REACTORS DIV., PLUTONIUM FUEL LABORATORIES, AND THE ADVANCED FUEL...

  2. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, Gregory [NSTec

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  3. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

  4. active site zn: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 30 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  5. active site confers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fee Lodging Giles, C. Lee 29 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  6. active site mutant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 39 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  7. active site mutations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In contrast van Aalten, Daan 57 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  8. active site mutants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 39 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  9. active site tryptic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 18 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  10. active site serine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 33 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  11. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 5: Wind Power Siting and Environment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5: Wind Power Siting and Environmental Effects Summary Slides 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 5: Wind Power Siting and Environmental Effects Summary Slides Environment and siting...

  12. 2013 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, Gregory [NSTec] [NSTec

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2013. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2013 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2013 include the following: • Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2013 • Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis • Development of version 4.115 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2013 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. The conclusion of the annual review is that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates that no significant changes have occurred. The FY 2013 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.115 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2013. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter the CAs results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Yucca Flat Underground Test Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97) source term, is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2015. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (CAU 98) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 Closure Report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the PA, CA, and inventory models for the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS.

  13. 2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

  14. Microchannel Reactor System Design & Demonstration For On-Site H2O2 Production by Controlled H2/O2 Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeniyi Lawal

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We successfully demonstrated an innovative hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production concept which involved the development of flame- and explosion-resistant microchannel reactor system for energy efficient, cost-saving, on-site H2O2 production. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for controlled direct combination of H2 and O2 in all proportions including explosive regime, at a low pressure and a low temperature to produce about 1.5 wt% H2O2 as proposed. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we demonstrated our H2O2 production approach by ‘numbering up’ the channels in a multi-channel microreactor-based pilot plant to produce 1 kg/h of H2O2 at 1.5 wt% as demanded by end-users of the developed technology. To our knowledge, we are the first group to accomplish this significant milestone. We identified the reaction pathways that comprise the process, and implemented rigorous mechanistic kinetic studies to obtain the kinetics of the three main dominant reactions. We are not aware of any such comprehensive kinetic studies for the direct combination process, either in a microreactor or any other reactor system. We showed that the mass transfer parameter in our microreactor system is several orders of magnitude higher than what obtains in the macroreactor, attesting to the superior performance of microreactor. A one-dimensional reactor model incorporating the kinetics information enabled us to clarify certain important aspects of the chemistry of the direct combination process as detailed in section 5 of this report. Also, through mathematical modeling and simulation using sophisticated and robust commercial software packages, we were able to elucidate the hydrodynamics of the complex multiphase flows that take place in the microchannel. In conjunction with the kinetics information, we were able to validate the experimental data. If fully implemented across the whole industry as a result of our technology demonstration, our production concept is expected to save >5 trillion Btu/year of steam usage and >3 trillion Btu/year in electric power consumption. Our analysis also indicates >50 % reduction in waste disposal cost and ~10% reduction in feedstock energy. These savings translate to ~30% reduction in overall production and transportation costs for the $1B annual H2O2 market.

  15. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor under construction.1944.jpg Gallery: B Reactor Title: B Reactor Construction B Reactor Construction Name: B Reactor Construction Keywords: B Reactor, construction Official...

  16. 2012 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G. [National Security Technologies, LLC

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2012. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2012 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2012 include the following: ? Release of a special analysis for the Area 3 RWMS assessing the continuing validity of the PA and CA ? Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2012 ? Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis ? Development of version 4.114 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2012 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. A special analysis using the Area 3 RWMS v2.102 GoldSim PA model was prepared to update the PA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2012. The special analysis concludes that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates no significant changes other than an increase in the inventory disposed. The FY 2012 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.114 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Underground Test Area source term (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97), is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU 97 Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2016. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat CAU 98 results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 closure report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA and inventory models.

  17. 8 Executive Summary Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    8 Executive Summary Executive Summary 1. World Robotics 2012 Industrial Robots 2. World Robotics 2012 Service Robots 1. World Robotics 2012 Industrial Robots 2011: The most successful year for industrial robots since 1961 In 2011, robot sales again increased by 38% to 166,028 units, by far the highest

  18. Executive Summary 11 Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    Executive Summary 11 Executive Summary 1. World Robotics 2014 Industrial Robots 2. World Robotics 2014 Service Robots 1. World Robotics 2014 Industrial Robots 2013: The highest number of industrial recorded for one year. Sales of industrial robots to the automotive, the chemical, and the rubber

  19. 10 Executive Summary Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    10 Executive Summary Executive Summary 1. World Robotics 2013 Industrial Robots 2. World Robotics 2013 Service Robots 1. World Robotics 2013 Industrial Robots 2012: Second highest number of robots sold for the slight sales reduction. Sales of industrial robots to the automotive industry continued to increase

  20. alpine site jungfraujoch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 166 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  1. allosteric site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 69 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  2. affect redd site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 62 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  3. agnostic splice site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 279 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  4. agent dumping site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 357 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  5. Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Built · Site Assembled · On--line Refueling · Modules added to meet demand. · No Reprocessing · High Experiments · Non-Proliferation · Safeguards · Waste Disposal · Reactor Research/ Demonstration Facility

  6. Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of wall saws, both the activated steel liner and the inner reinforcing layer were cut remotely in one process. This allowed for the efficient execution of the following remote concrete removal steps using mining techniques. The electro-hydraulic demolition excavator that was purchased and then modified turned out to be an ideal tool carrier system with rapid-exchange coupling. Due to the high availability, no major delays occurred. This also was a result of the consistently implemented maintenance and repair concept. With the excavator installed in a modifiable scaffolding suspended from a rotating carrier ring, all dismantling areas could be reached and treated in spite of the small space. Thanks to an optimum organization of work-flows, routine change of dismantling work, and maintenance or repair, the iterative radiological measurement campaigns could be integrated in the whole activity without the dismantling work being disturbed significantly. The ventilation system with pressure grading and pre-filtration units ensured a low contamination level in the dismantling area. It was also possible to manage the dust formed by the milling of concrete surfaces. As it was possible to further cut metal parts and crushed concrete later on, residue flows were optimized. The planned overall period for testing, dismantling the bio-shield and removing the equipment was 36 months. The final duration was 39 months. (authors)

  7. P Reactor Grouting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Filling the P Reactor with grout. This seals the radioactive material and reduces the environmental footprint left from the Cold War. Project sponsored by the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site.

  8. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P. M.

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

  9. airlift reactors influence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    some success in R. F. Gimpel 13 The Thorium Molten Salt Reactor Moving on from the MSBR CERN Preprints Summary: A re-evaluation of the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor concept has...

  10. atucha-2 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  11. atucha-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  12. acpr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  13. atlantic-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  14. arbus reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  15. akm reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 9 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  16. argonaut reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 14 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  17. argonaut lemont reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 15 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  18. arkansas-2 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  19. apra reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 7 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  20. apsara reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  1. asco-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  2. atlantic-2 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  3. akr-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  4. akm muehleberg reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 9 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  5. arsi reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 12 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  6. aipfr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  7. asco-2 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  8. argonauta rien-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  9. ahfr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  10. almaraz-2 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  11. aarr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  12. almaraz-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  13. arkansas-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  14. akw1 rheinsberg reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  15. aguirre-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 11 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  16. arbi reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 7 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  17. agesta reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  18. acrr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  19. affri reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  20. afsr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  1. atsr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 7 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  2. alrr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  3. alcohol membrane reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The design and operation of a differential Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is described. The fuel cell design is based on coupled Stirred Tank Reactors...

  4. argonne heavy water reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas Shea 2014-03-27 2 Antineutrino monitoring for the Iranian heavy water reactor CERN Preprints Summary: In this note we discuss the potential application of antineutrino...

  5. argentine reactor ra-0: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  6. argentine reactor ra-8: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  7. atr reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  8. argentine reactor ra-4: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  9. argentine reactor ra-1: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  10. argentine reactor ra-3: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  11. argentine reactor ra-5: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  12. argonaut bilbao reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  13. argentine reactor ra-2: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  14. astra reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  15. affecting reactor accident: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    METEOROLOGY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; P CODES; PWR TYPE REACTORS; RADIATION 2 Does Daylight Savings Time Affect Traffic Accidents? Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: This...

  16. anaerobic reactor systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems CiteSeer Summary: This paper contains two parts: (I) A...

  17. arsenal production reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to total production in India V. Dinesh Kumar 42 TRANSP simulations of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor plasmas Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary:...

  18. advanced converter reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a thermonuclear fusion experiment designed to provide long deuterium tritium burning...

  19. annular reactor system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems CiteSeer Summary: This paper contains two parts: (I) A...

  20. aplicacion al reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these...

  1. argonne research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the MIT Research Reactor : Fiscal year 1968 MIT - DSpace Summary: A report of research and educational activities which utilized the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,...

  2. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    05.jpg Gallery: N Reactor Media Event Title: N Reactor Before Cocooning N Reactor Before Cocooning Name: N Reactor Before Cocooning Document Date: 01012005 Keywords: N Reactor,...

  3. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  4. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  5. Erosion Potential of a Burn Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Interim Summary of One Year of Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Etyemezian, D. Shafer, J. Miller, I. Kavouras, S. Campbell, D. DuBois, J. King, G. Nikolich, and S. Zitzer

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in deserts in the Southwest U.S. is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. This increase in fires has implications for management of Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site office (NNSA/NSO) has responsibility. A series of studies has been initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn over to understand technical and perceived risk they might pose to site workers and public receptors in communities around the NTS, TTR, and NTTR; and to develop recommendations for stabilization and restoration after a fire. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob fire, a lightning-caused fire approximately 12 kilometers north of Hiko, Nevada, that burned approximately 200 ha between August 6-8, 2008, and is representative of a transition zone on the NTS between the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, where the largest number of Soil Sub-Project CAUs/CASs are located.

  6. Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    218: Develop a Fact Sheet on Site Transition at On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy...

  7. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  8. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area in WWII.P7833.crop.jpg Gallery: B Reactor Title: B Reactor B Reactor Name: B Reactor Keywords: B Reactor, World War II Official Building Numbers: B Reactor Area: 100BC...

  9. Site characterization summary report for Waste Area Grouping 10 Wells at the Old Hydrofracture Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems). As part of its DOE mission, ORNL has pioneered waste disposal technologies throughout the years of site operations since World War II. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to develop a permanent disposal alternative to the surface impoundments at ORNL at the request of the National Academy of Sciences. One such technology, the hydrofracture process, involved forming fractures in an underlying geologic host formation (a low-permeability shale) at depths of up to 1000 ft and subsequently injecting a grout slurry containing low-level liquid waste, cement, and other additives at an injection pressure of about 2000 psi. The objective of the effort was to develop a grout slurry that could be injected as a liquid but would solidify after injection, thereby immobilizing the radioisotopes contained in the low-level liquid waste. The scope of this site characterization was the access, sampling, logging, and evaluation of observation wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) in preparation for plugging, recompletion, or other final disposition of the wells.

  10. Animal Investigation Program (AIP), A.I.P. summary report on and around the Nevada Test Site from 1982--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, K.R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Animal Investigation Program conducted from 1982--1995 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory (R and IE), formerly Radiation Sciences Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site. The surveillance program was designed to measure levels and trends of radionuclides in animals on and around the Nevada Test Site to ascertain whether world-wide fallout, current radiation levels, and associated doses, to the general public were in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally had the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well-being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results indicated that no significant amounts of biological radionuclides had been detected in the near offsite areas or on the NTS, except in animals drinking water that drains from tunnels in Area 12.

  11. Summary of comments received at workshop on use of a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) to facilitate public participation in decommissioning cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caplin, J.; Padge, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for the decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. As part of this rulemaking, On August 20, 1994 the NRC published a proposed rule for public comment. Paragraph 20.1406(b) of the proposed rule would require that the licensee convene a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) if the licensee proposed release of the site for restricted use after decommissioning. To encourage comment the NRC held a workshop on the subject of $SABs on December 6, 7, and 8, 1994. This report summarizes the 567 comments categorized from the transcript of the workshop. The commenters at the workshop generally supported public participation in decommissioning cases. Many participants favored promulgating requirements in the NRC`s rules. Some industry participants favored relying on voluntary exchanges between the public and the licensees. Many participants indicated that a SSAB or something functionally equivalent is needed in controversial decommissioning cases, but that some lesser undertaking can achieve meaningful public participation in other cases. No analysis or response to the comments is included in this report.

  12. PROJECT SUMMARY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverviewEfficiencyofHSSPIAProperty Management PlanPROJECT SUMMARY 1

  13. Chair Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCerium OxideChair Summaries from the

  14. EIS-0259: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class and Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants, Hanford Site, Richland (adopted from Navy)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the alternate ways for disposing of decommissioned, defieled reactor compliments from U.S. Navy nuclear-powered cruisers, (Bainbridge, Truxtun, Long Beach, California Class and Virginia Class) and Los Angeles Class, and Ohio Class submarines.

  15. Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Program - Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221-HET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. This heterogeneous debris transuranic waste stream was generated after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration, equipment, process operations and waste management practices. Information contained in this report was obtained from numerous sources including: facility safety basis documentation, historical document archives, generator and storage facility waste records and documents, and interviews with cognizant personnel.

  16. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.jpg Gallery: Cocooning K East Reactor Title: K East Reactor Cocooning Preparations K East Reactor Cocooning Preparations Name: K East Reactor Cocooning Preparations Keywords: K...

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DWFRS105KEreactorprep111412108.JPG Gallery: Cocooning K East Reactor Title: K East Reactor Cocooning Preparations K East Reactor Cocooning Preparations Name: K East Reactor...

  19. Annual Site EnvironmentalAnnual Site Environmental ReportReport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) .................................................8 3.1.3 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA#12;Annual Site EnvironmentalAnnual Site Environmental ReportReport for Calendar Year1997 ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Table of Contents Page 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  20. Reactor operation environmental information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. activity-dependent polyadenylation site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 37 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  2. allosteric citalopram-binding site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 69 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  3. atp-binding site lesions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 107 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  4. adenine dinucleotide-binding site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 43 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  5. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  6. Progress Update: P&R Reactor Stacks Demolition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    October 2010 progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The demolition of nuclear reactor stacks and filling the reactors with grout to reduce the site footprint.

  7. Progress Update: P&R Reactor Stacks Demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October 2010 progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The demolition of nuclear reactor stacks and filling the reactors with grout to reduce the site footprint.

  8. SNAP and AI Fuel Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lords, R.E.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SNAP and AI Fuel Summary Report provides a detailed overview of treatment and storage of these fuels from fabrication through current storage including design parameters and reactor history. Chemical and physical characteristics are described, and potential indicators of as-stored fuel conditions are emphasized.

  9. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  10. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control room desk.excellent.1.07.jpg Gallery: B Reactor Title: B Reactor Control Room B Reactor Control Room Name: B Reactor Control Room Keywords: B Reactor, control room, chair...

  11. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12Done.jpg Gallery: N Reactor Media Event Title: N Reactor in 2012 N Reactor in 2012 Name: N Reactor in 2012 Document Date: 01012012 Keywords: N Reactor, cocooning, aerial Area:...

  12. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  13. Progress Update: P-Reactor Grout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A progress update, the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The new phase of work on the permanent closure of two cold war nuclear reactors.

  14. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  15. Progress Update: P-Reactor Grout

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A progress update, the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The new phase of work on the permanent closure of two cold war nuclear reactors.

  16. active site mismatches: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ayman U. (Ayman Umar) 2001-01-01 38 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  17. active site conformational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D 2005 Elsevier B Hong, Mei 56 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  18. active site metal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mainly due to: a) their moderate 49 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  19. active site conformation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D 2005 Elsevier B Hong, Mei 56 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  20. active site entrance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edwards, Fred Huntley 2012-06-07 51 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  1. active site probe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  2. active site constrained: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne high flux reactor Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: argonne high flux reactor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Summary: Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor...

  4. aeg-pr-10 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  5. ao-phai-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  6. alma-ata wwr-k reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  7. are-rr-1 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  8. ai-l-77 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  9. airos-2a space-independent reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 6 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  10. adsorbent-membrane reactor hamr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 10 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  11. agesta-r3 reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  12. almaty wwr-k reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flux calculation and recent progresses. Jun Cao 2012-03-08 5 Inexpensive Mini Thermonuclear Reactor CiteSeer Summary: This proposed design for a mini thermonuclear reactor...

  13. austrian triga-mark-ii reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation of non-steady state neutron kinetics of the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna CERN Preprints Summary: This paper presents an algorithm for numerical simulations of...

  14. advanced gas cooled graphite moderated reactor: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperatures during normal (more) Moore, Eugene James Thomas 2006-01-01 2 THORIUM FUEL CYCLES: A GRAPHITE-MODERATED MOLTEN SALT REACTOR Physics Websites Summary: ,...

  15. air-cooled graphite reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an estimated 1,282 cubic yards of contaminated steel and filter elements from 4 THORIUM FUEL CYCLES: A GRAPHITE-MODERATED MOLTEN SALT REACTOR Physics Websites Summary: ,...

  16. aerated fed-batch reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  17. acidogenic fixed-bed reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: field has been known for long time. Low powered and low- pressure electrodeless lamps were utilized in an original photochemical reactor consisting of MWL...

  18. aries-rs fusion reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: FF (1984) Introduction to plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Plenum, New York If cheaper fusion reactors were developed, such as...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic reactors chaines Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to join round-the-world computer network ring. 28.01.2004, 21.08 Summary: thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) project have an opportunity to offer technical...

  20. Savannah River Site Patented Technologies Summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.E.

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This information represents SRS`s contribution of the DOE technology information network, an internet service coordinated out of Los Alamos. The information provided is strictly DOE-SR-titled and-issued patented technologies including environmental remediation, robotics, sensors, materials science, biomedical applications, hydrogen, and consumer products.

  1. 2008 Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and monitoring programs through December 31, 2008. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste...

  2. CSMRI SITE PROJECT SUMMARY November 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the source, nature and extent of contamination that is resulting in elevated levels of uranium in ground to be below the high water level for creek-influenced ground water the fill is a rock and soil mix from a local quarry. Clean topsoil from the School's campus is being used above the rock and soil mix

  3. River and Plateau Committee Summaries - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources Resources About1 SignG.5Hanford Advisory Board

  4. Committee Meeting Summaries and Presentations - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIESCommittee Meeting Information Hanford

  5. 2008 Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with6, 2014,7MayOctober8 Wed,Annual

  6. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4

  7. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4K1)

  8. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4K1)

  9. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4K1)

  10. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4K1)FORM (1)

  11. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4K1)FORM (1)

  12. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4K1)FORM

  13. Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents

  14. Summary of Weldon Spring Site Focus Area

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o fof

  15. Tank Waste Committee Summaries - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails TakingR Vi4800TankHanford

  16. abasic site intermediate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Long Wavelength Intermediate Array (LWIA): Choosing the First Four Station Sites Engineering Websites Summary: have been done on over 30 possible station sites throughout...

  17. asc site review: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The on-site assessment under review may be a regularly scheduled assessment 8 Metabolic Engineering 3, 98 99 (2001) WEB SITE REVIEW Biotechnology Websites Summary: Metabolic...

  18. alcatraz disposal site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Radium-226 are the predominant radioactive contaminents on Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Plan (FUSRAP) sites. Engineering Websites Summary: by the nearby disposal...

  19. F Reactor Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

  20. F Reactor Inspection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

  1. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  2. University Research Summaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Idaho National Laboratory published the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office 2001 University Research Summaries

  3. advanced light reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light-to-surface distances overwhelm Gordon, Scott 11 Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor MIT - DSpace Summary: A design for a large,...

  4. application research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuen-Ting 2008-01-01 18 Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm MIT - DSpace Summary: In response to increasing demands...

  5. anaerobic reactor star: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Introduction About the Next Three Sets of Class Notes Prestwich, Ken 6 Stars as thermonuclear reactors: their fuels and ashes Nuclear Theory (arXiv) Summary: Atomic nuclei are...

  6. argonne fast source reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2014-01-01 10 Fast Neutron Detector for Fusion Reactor KSTAR Using Stilbene Scintillator Nuclear Experiment (arXiv) Summary: Various...

  7. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003 MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 20 U.S. Department of the Interior U MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GALE A. NORTON, Secretary For sale;CONTENTS Page General: Growth Rates of Leading and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' was prepared by Bechtel Nevada (BN) to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2004''. It was produced this year to provide a more cost-effective and wider distribution of a hardcopy summary of the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' to interested DOE stakeholders.

  9. Site Environmental Report for 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Site Environmental Report for 2001 Volume I August 2002 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley ..............................................................................................2-1 3 Environmental Program Summary Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) prepares an integrated report on its environmental

  10. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marica Baldoncini; Ivan Callegari; Giovanni Fiorentini; Fabio Mantovani; Barbara Ricci; Virginia Strati; Gerti Xhixha

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillated event rate in the geoneutrino energy window due to the storage of spent nuclear fuels in the cooling pools. We predict that the research reactors contribute to less than 0.2% to the commercial reactor signal in the investigated 14 sites. We perform a multitemporal analysis of the expected reactor signal over a time lapse of 10 years using reactor operational records collected in a comprehensive database published at www.fe.infn.it/antineutrino.

  11. SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    @ E A R T H L I N K . N E T SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES Categorization of Natural Hazard Phenomenon...

  12. Essential Services Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary of proceedings report focuses on an end-of-grant meeting at which grantees for Project Area 5 were convened.

  13. Summary of papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    David Ben McReynolds. Last updated on 9-04-2009. Summary of papers. Published papers. (1) Peripheral separability and cusps of arithmetic hyperbolic ...

  14. 1994 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  15. Small Reactor for Deep Space Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965, and an experiment demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and then harvest the heat to power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site's Device Assembly Facility confirms basic nuclear reactor physics and heat transfer for a simple, reliable space power system.

  16. Small Reactor for Deep Space Exploration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965, and an experiment demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and then harvest the heat to power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site's Device Assembly Facility confirms basic nuclear reactor physics and heat transfer for a simple, reliable space power system.

  17. Advanced Instrumentation and Control Methods for Small and Medium Reactors with IRIS Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Wesley Hines; Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Michael Doster; Robert M. Edwards; Kenneth D. Lewis; Paul Turinsky; Jamie Coble

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and deployment of small-scale nuclear power reactors and their maintenance, monitoring, and control are part of the mission under the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) program. The objectives of this NERI-consortium research project are to investigate, develop, and validate advanced methods for sensing, controlling, monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis of these reactors, and to demonstrate the methods with application to one of the proposed integral pressurized water reactors (IPWR). For this project, the IPWR design by Westinghouse, the International Reactor Secure and Innovative (IRIS), has been used to demonstrate the techniques developed under this project. The research focuses on three topical areas with the following objectives. Objective 1 - Develop and apply simulation capabilities and sensitivity/uncertainty analysis methods to address sensor deployment analysis and small grid stability issues. Objective 2 - Develop and test an autonomous and fault-tolerant control architecture and apply to the IRIS system and an experimental flow control loop, with extensions to multiple reactor modules, nuclear desalination, and optimal sensor placement strategy. Objective 3 - Develop and test an integrated monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis system for SMRs using the IRIS as a test platform, and integrate process and equipment monitoring (PEM) and process and equipment prognostics (PEP) toolboxes. The research tasks are focused on meeting the unique needs of reactors that may be deployed to remote locations or to developing countries with limited support infrastructure. These applications will require smaller, robust reactor designs with advanced technologies for sensors, instrumentation, and control. An excellent overview of SMRs is described in an article by Ingersoll (2009). The article refers to these as deliberately small reactors. Most of these have modular characteristics, with multiple units deployed at the same plant site. Additionally, the topics focus on meeting two of the eight needs outlined in the recently published 'Technology Roadmap on Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs' which was created 'to provide a systematic path forward for the integration of new ICHMI technologies in both near-term and future nuclear power plants and the reinvigoration of the U.S. nuclear ICHMI community and capabilities.' The research consortium is led by The University of Tennessee (UT) and is focused on three interrelated topics: Topic 1 (simulator development and measurement sensitivity analysis) is led by Dr. Mike Doster with Dr. Paul Turinsky of North Carolina State University (NCSU). Topic 2 (multivariate autonomous control of modular reactors) is led by Dr. Belle Upadhyaya of the University of Tennessee (UT) and Dr. Robert Edwards of Penn State University (PSU). Topic 3 (monitoring, diagnostics, and prognostics system development) is led by Dr. Wes Hines of UT. Additionally, South Carolina State University (SCSU, Dr. Ken Lewis) participated in this research through summer interns, visiting faculty, and on-campus research projects identified throughout the grant period. Lastly, Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (Dr. Mario Carelli) was a no-cost collaborator and provided design information related to the IRIS demonstration platform and defining needs that may be common to other SMR designs. The results of this research are reported in a six-volume Final Report (including the Executive Summary, Volume 1). Volumes 2 through 6 of the report describe in detail the research and development under the topical areas. This volume serves to introduce the overall NERI-C project and to summarize the key results. Section 2 provides a summary of the significant contributions of this project. A list of all the publications under this project is also given in Section 2. Section 3 provides a brief summary of each of the five volumes (2-6) of the report. The contributions of SCSU are described in Section 4, including a summary of undergraduate research exper

  18. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapters are presented concerning energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; diffusion and slowing-down of neutrons; principles of reactor analysis; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; energy removal; non-fuel reactor materials; the reactor fuel system; radiation protection and environmental effects; nuclear reactor shielding; nuclear reactor safety; and power reactor systems.

  19. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002 MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002 U.S. Department of the Interior U for Mineral Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Role of Nonfuel Minerals in the U.S. Economy . . . 4 2001 U.S. Net Import Reliance for Selected Nonfuel Mineral Materials

  20. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2014 #12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey MINERAL contained within this report. Suggested citation: U.S. Geological Survey, 2014, Mineral commodity summaries and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products......................................................... 4 The Role

  1. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2012 #12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey MINERAL contained within this report. Suggested citation: U.S. Geological Survey, 2012, Mineral commodity summaries and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products......................................................... 4 The Role

  2. CSMRI Site Proposed Plan Proposed Plan for CSMRI Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    also includes summaries of other alternatives that were evaluated for use at the Site. This document participation responsibilities under the Section 300.430(f)(2) of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances on the Site that were removed in the mid-1990s. A settling pond, located between the building complex

  3. 1993 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Blackburn, C.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kaae, P.S.; Armacost, L.L.; Garrett, S.M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, which updates WHC-EP-0567, 1992 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary, (WHC 1992) forecasts the volumes of solid wastes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site during the 30-year period from FY 1993 through FY 2022. The data used in this document were collected from Westinghouse Hanford Company forecasts as well as from surveys of waste generators at other US Department of Energy sites who are now shipping or plan to ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site for disposal. These wastes include low-level and low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and nonradioactive hazardous waste.

  4. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2003 was prepared by Bechtel Nevada to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy and the information needs of the public. This report is meant to be useful to members of the public, public officials, regulators, and Nevada Test Site contractors. The Executive Summary strives to present in a concise format the purpose of the document, the NTS mission and major programs, a summary of radiological releases and doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, and an overview of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Management System. The Executive Summary, combined with the following Compliance Summary, are written to meet all the objectives of the report and to be stand-alone sections for those who choose not to read the entire document.

  5. Transactions of the nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 19th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 28--30, 1991. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, USNRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from the governments and industry in Europe and Japan are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting, and are given in the order of their presentation in each session. The individual summaries have been cataloged separately.

  6. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 and Site Description (Volume 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2006 produced to be a more cost-effective means of distributing information contained in the NTSER to interested DOE stakeholders.

  7. R- AND P- REACTOR BUILDING IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING VISUALIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobbitt, J.; Vrettos, N.; Howard, M.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the early 1950s, five production reactor facilities were built at the Savannah River Site. These facilities were built to produce materials to support the building of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile in response to the Cold War. R-Reactor and P-Reactor were the first two facilities completed in 1953 and 1954.

  8. Japan Denies Report It Dropped Proposal to Host Fusion Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Print Japan Denies Report It Dropped Proposal to Host Fusion Reactor June 22 (Bloomberg) -- Japan fusion reactor, a decision that would end a standoff with France to site the 4.6 billion-euro ($5 the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor in return for assurances it will manage the project in France

  9. Bioconversion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarty, Perry L. (Stanford, CA); Bachmann, Andre (Palo Alto, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  10. Catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  11. Biofuels: Project summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE, through the Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is addressing the issues surrounding US vulnerability to petroleum supply. The BSD goal is to develop technologies that are competitive with fossil fuels, in both cost and environmental performance, by the end of the decade. This document contains summaries of ongoing research sponsored by the DOE BSD. A summary sheet is presented for each project funded or in existence during FY 1993. Each summary sheet contains and account of project funding, objectives, accomplishments and current status, and significant publications.

  12. 3D Modeling Engine Representation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Timothy Yang

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This summary report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a 3D modeling engine to represent risk analysis simulation for advanced small modular reactor structures and components. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  13. arctic spring site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siciliano 2010-01-01 116 UC EAP Application Deadlines Remaining Programs for Spring 15 Engineering Websites Summary: -SITE: ITALYSPAIN (MadridRome, European Transformations)...

  14. abasic sites induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When applied Knyazev, Andrew 9 1. INTRODUCTION The following caution from the web site "Induced Engineering Websites Summary: 1. INTRODUCTION The following caution from the...

  15. acetylcholinesterase target site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Theoretical and Computational Modeling of Target-Site Search Kinetics In Vitro and In Vivo Elena F Engineering Department, Stanford...

  16. autour du site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annoncez dans POLY Rejoignez plus de 27 000 ingnieurs diplms de Polytechnique Montral Engineering Websites Summary: site Web li une publicit (source : The Future of...

  17. approaching site closure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Cloudy sky shortwave radiative closure for a Baseline Surface Radiation Network site Ping Wang,1 2011; published 16 April 2011. 1 A shortwave radiative closure analysis...

  18. aureus surgical site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surgical Imaging Austin Reiter, Alexandros Sigaras, Dennis Fowler and Peter K. Allen Engineering Websites Summary: surrounding the surgical site. To address the lack of depth...

  19. active site mapping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Summit for Decision Calyam, Prasad 19 Thursday, May 17, 2007 Contact Us | Site Map | Search PARTICIPATION Engineering Websites Summary: , a library services...

  20. active site prediction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shieber, Stuart 20 FUSION OF CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELD AND SIGNALP FOR PROTEIN CLEAVAGE SITE PREDICTION Engineering Websites Summary: FUSION OF CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELD AND...

  1. act proposed site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this chapter are listed unknown authors 12 PROPOSED PLAN FOR THE ST. LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: , Compensation, and Liability Act CFR Code of Federal...

  2. anatomic site based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keniston, Kenneth 45 CITI Web-Based Training Curriculum For Registered Users of the CITI site. Engineering Websites Summary: CITI Web-Based Training Curriculum For Registered...

  3. application sites groundwater: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site CiteSeer Summary: plays a role in both natural attenuation and...

  4. acid sites evolving: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photosystem II: The O2-Evolving Enzyme Lacking the Redox-Active Tyrosine D Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Thermosynechococcus elongatus...

  5. active site structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matrix 76 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  6. area hanford site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED...

  7. areas hanford site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED...

  8. Neutronic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wende, Charles W. J. (Augusta, GA); Babcock, Dale F. (Wilmington, DE); Menegus, Robert L. (Wilmington, DE)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  9. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  10. STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  11. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the M2 milestone M2FT-13PN0912022, “Stranded Sites De-Inventorying Report.” In January 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013). Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses (BRC 2012). Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the nuclear power reactors have been shut down and the site has been decommissioned or is undergoing decommissioning. In this report, a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel from 12 shutdown sites was conducted. The shutdown sites were Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. These sites have no other operating nuclear power reactors at their sites and have also notified the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that their reactors have permanently ceased power operations and that nuclear fuel has been permanently removed from their reactor vessels. Shutdown reactors at sites having other operating reactors are not included in this evaluation.

  12. Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? . -. .-HEMORANDUHHEN-

  13. Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +NewAugust 4,P

  14. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  15. MANHATTAN PROJECT B REACTOR HANFORD WASHINGTON [HANFORD'S HISTORIC B REACTOR (12-PAGE BOOKLET)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER MS

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site began as part of the United States Manhattan Project to research, test and build atomic weapons during World War II. The original 670-square mile Hanford Site, then known as the Hanford Engineer Works, was the last of three top-secret sites constructed in order to produce enriched uranium and plutonium for the world's first nuclear weapons. B Reactor, located about 45 miles northwest of Richland, Washington, is the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor. Not only was B Reactor a first-of-a-kind engineering structure, it was built and fully functional in just 11 months. Eventually, the shoreline of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State held nine nuclear reactors at the height of Hanford's nuclear defense production during the Cold War era. The B Reactor was shut down in 1968. During the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy began removing B Reactor's support facilities. The reactor building, the river pumphouse and the reactor stack are the only facilities that remain. Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office offers escorted public access to B Reactor along a designated tour route. The National Park Service (NPS) is studying preservation and interpretation options for sites associated with the Manhattan Project. A draft is expected in summer 2009. A final report will recommend whether the B Reactor, along with other Manhattan Project facilities, should be preserved, and if so, what roles the DOE, the NPS and community partners will play in preservation and public education. In August 2008, the DOE announced plans to open B Reactor for additional public tours. Potential hazards still exist within the building. However, the approved tour route is safe for visitors and workers. DOE may open additional areas once it can assure public safety by mitigating hazards.

  16. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Field activities and well summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four hydrofracture sites at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were used for development, demonstration, and disposal from 1959 to 1984. More than 10 million gal of waste grout mix was disposed of via hydrofracture. Various types of wells were installed to monitor the hydrofracture operations. The primary goal of this remedial investigation was to gather information about the wells in order to recommend the type and best method of final disposition for the wells. Evaluations were performed to determine the integrity of well castings, confirm construction details for each well, evaluate the extent of contamination, assist in planning for future activities, and determine the suitability of the wells for future temporary site monitoring.

  17. Savannah River Site's H Canyon Work Ensures Future Missions for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    process at MOX, which is now under construction, will eventually create fuel pellets for U.S. commercial reactor fuel assemblies. Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins...

  18. Conference Summary: The Cosmic Agitator - Magnetic Fields in the Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. H. Troland; C. Heiles; A. P. Sarma; G. J. Ferland; R. M. Crutcher; C. L. Brogan

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a summary of the conference "The Cosmic Agitator: Magnetic Fields in the Galaxy" held in Lexington KY in 2008 Mar 26-29. The presentation draws primarily from material in the slides prepared for the Conference Summary by one of us (Carl Heiles). Interested readers may navigate to the conference web site given in the paper to view the posted presentations in detail.

  19. EM Issues Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Site * Completion of SNF Transfer results in: * Elimination of the entire SNF inventory at SRS * Reduction in the number of shipments of SNF from DOE Sites to the...

  20. Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor Closed reactor Active Zone -- chemical quasi- equilibria, similarity principles and macroscopic kinetics", in: Lectures on Plasma Physics

  1. Integral fast reactor safety features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents.

  2. Report Summary January 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and market drivers (e.g., natural gas prices and impact of efficiency standards/codes) · ScenariosReport Summary January 2013 The Future of U.S. Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs Electricity Markets and Policy Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory This work was supported

  3. Research Summary Carbon Additionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of muchResearch Summary Carbon Additionality Additionality is widely considered to be a core aspect controversy in national carbon accounting, international regulatory frameworks and carbon markets. A review

  4. RICAP-07: Summary comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roma International Conference on Astroparticle Physics covered gamma-ray astronomy, air shower experiments and neutrino astronomy on three successive days. I organize my brief summary comments into four topics that cut across these three techniques. They are detector calibration, galactic sources, extra-galactic sources and cosmology.

  5. Geothermal Energy Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Renner

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following is complete draft.Geothermal Summary for AAPG Explorer J. L. Renner, Idaho National Laboratory Geothermal energy is used to produce electricity in 24 countries. The United States has the largest capacity (2,544 MWe) followed by Philippines (1,931 MWe), Mexico (953 MWe), Indonesia (797 MWe), and Italy (791 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). When Chevron Corporation purchased Unocal Corporation they became the leading producer of geothermal energy worldwide with projects in Indonesia and the Philippines. The U. S. geothermal industry is booming thanks to increasing energy prices, renewable portfolio standards, and a production tax credit. California (2,244 MWe) is the leading producer, followed by Nevada (243 MWe), Utah (26 MWe) and Hawaii (30 MWe) and Alaska (0.4 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). Alaska joined the producing states with two 0.4 KWe power plants placed on line at Chena Hot Springs during 2006. The plant uses 30 liters per second of 75°C water from shallow wells. Power production is assisted by the availability of gravity fed, 7°C cooling water (http://www.yourownpower.com/) A 13 MWe binary power plant is expected to begin production in the fall of 2007 at Raft River in southeastern Idaho. Idaho also is a leader in direct use of geothermal energy with the state capital building and several other state and Boise City buildings as well as commercial and residential space heated using fluids from several, interconnected geothermal systems. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 modified leasing provisions and royalty rates for both geothermal electrical production and direct use. Pursuant to the legislation the Bureau of Land management and Minerals Management Service published final regulations for continued geothermal leasing, operations and royalty collection in the Federal Register (Vol. 72, No. 84 Wednesday May 2, 2007, BLM p. 24358-24446, MMS p. 24448-24469). Existing U. S. plants focus on high-grade geothermal systems located in the west. However, interest in non-traditional geothermal development is increasing. A comprehensive new MIT-led study of the potential for geothermal energy within the United States predicts that mining the huge amounts of stored thermal energy in the Earth’s crust not associated with hydrothermal systems, could supply a substantial portion of U.S. electricity with minimal environmental impact (Tester, et al., 2006, available at http://geothermal.inl.gov). There is also renewed interest in geothermal production from other non-traditional sources such as the overpressured zones in the Gulf Coast and warm water co-produced with oil and gas. Ormat Technologies, Inc., a major geothermal company, recently acquired geothermal leases in the offshore overpressured zone of Texas. Ormat and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center recently announced plans to jointly produce geothermal power from co-produced water from the Teapot Dome oilfield (Casper Star-Tribune, March 2, 2007). RMOTC estimates that 300 KWe capacity is available from the 40,000 BWPD of 88°C water associated with oil production from the Tensleep Sandstone (Milliken, 2007). The U. S. Department of Energy is seeking industry partners to develop electrical generation at other operating oil and gas fields (for more information see: https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/50D3734745055A73852572CA006665B1?OpenDocument). Several web sites offer periodically updated information related to the geothermal industry and th

  6. 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report November 2013 summary report for the 2013 Biological Hydrogen...

  7. Light-water reactor safety analysis codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.F.; Ransom, V.H.; Ybarrondo, L.J.; Liles, D.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the evolution of light-water reactor safety analysis codes is presented. Included is a summary comparison of the technical capabilities of major system codes. Three recent codes are described in more detail to serve as examples of currently used techniques. Example comparisons between calculated results using these codes and experimental data are given. Finally, a brief evaluation of current code capability and future development trends is presented.

  8. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  9. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Naval Reactors | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE) | Department1The ongoing andDepartment ofNaval

  10. Evaluation of the need, feasibility, and siting of the MRS in Tennessee. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colglazier, E.W. Jr. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1985-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary report outlines the results of an independent assessment of the need, feasibility, and siting of the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The detailed reports of this assessment are included as appendices to the summary report. The Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that the MRS is not absolutely necessary, but preferred, in order to manage and move spent fuel from reactors to a repository. The team has attemped to assess ``need`` by comparing to advantages and disadvantages of various systems, with and without the MRS. ``Feasibility has been assessed by comparing the technical and economic advantages and disadvantages. The team was not asked to recommend a preferred system. That choice will depend on the importance that are used to compare alternatives. The five key criteria selected by the team for comparing alternate systems were: economic cost, radiological risk, non-radiological transportation impacts, the likelihood of successful implementation and operation of the system, and the likelihood of meeting the schedule in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The team compared twelve different systems and modeled the transportation impacts and risks with three repository sites and two MRS sites.

  11. Evaluation of the need, feasibility, and siting of the MRS in Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colglazier, E.W. Jr. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1985-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary report outlines the results of an independent assessment of the need, feasibility, and siting of the proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The detailed reports of this assessment are included as appendices to the summary report. The Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that the MRS is not absolutely necessary, but preferred, in order to manage and move spent fuel from reactors to a repository. The team has attemped to assess need'' by comparing to advantages and disadvantages of various systems, with and without the MRS. Feasibility has been assessed by comparing the technical and economic advantages and disadvantages. The team was not asked to recommend a preferred system. That choice will depend on the importance that are used to compare alternatives. The five key criteria selected by the team for comparing alternate systems were: economic cost, radiological risk, non-radiological transportation impacts, the likelihood of successful implementation and operation of the system, and the likelihood of meeting the schedule in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The team compared twelve different systems and modeled the transportation impacts and risks with three repository sites and two MRS sites.

  12. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A book is reviewed which emphasizes topics directly related to the light water reactor power plant and the fast reactor power system. Current real-world problems are addressed throughout the text, and a chapter on safety includes much of the postThree Mile Island impact on operating systems. Topics covered include Doppler broadening, neutron resonances, multigroup diffusion theory, reactor kinetics, reactor control, energy removal, nonfuel materials, reactor fuel, radiation protection, environmental effects, and reactor safety.

  13. Business Model Guide Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Business Model Guide Executive Summary by the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  14. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Drilling All Galleries 284 East Explosive Demolition Settlers B Reactor 100DX Groundwater Treatment Facility 100HX Groundwater Treatment Facility 200 West Groundwater...

  15. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Ines Triay Visit August 2010 B Reactor 2011 BC Control Area Remediation Blue Ribbon Commission Visit Cocooning K East...

  16. Fission reactor experiments for solid breeder blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gierszewski, P.J.; Abdou, M.A.; Puigh, R.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The testing needs for solid breeder blanket development are different from those for liquid breeder blankets. In particular, a reasonable number of moderate volume test sites in a neutron environment are needed. Existing fission reactors are shown to be able to provide this environment with reasonable simulation of many important blanket conditions. Three major additional fission reactor tests are identified beyond those presently underway. These are thermal behavior, advanced in-situ tritium recovery and nuclear submodule experiments.

  17. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

  18. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  19. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Evaluation, interpretation, and data summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Lockheed Martin Energy System (Energy Systems). ORNL has pioneered waste disposal technologies since World War II as part of its DOE mission. In the late 1950s, at the request of the National Academy of Sciences, efforts were made to develop a permanent disposal alternative to the surface and tanks at ORNL. One such technology, the hydrofracture process, involved inducing fractures in a geologic host formation (a low-permeability shale) at depths of up to 1100 ft and injecting a radioactive grout slurry containing low-level liquid or tank sludge waste, cement, and other additives at an injection pressure of 2000 to 8500 psi. The objective of the effort was to develop a grout dig could be injected as a slurry and would solidify after injection, thereby entombing the radioisotopes contained in the low-level liquid or tank sludge waste. Four sites at ORNL were used: two experimental (HF-1 and HF-2); one developmental, later converted to batch process [Old Hydrofracture Facility (BF-3)]; and one production facility [New Hydrofracture Facility (BF-4)]. This document provides the environmental, restoration program with information about the the results of an evaluation of WAG 10 wells associated with the New Hydrofracture Facility at ORNL.

  20. Presentation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) Summary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Presentation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) Summary of Reported Data Presentation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) Summary of Reported Data...

  1. Reactor safety method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

    1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  2. Quarterly environmental data summary for first quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the first quarter of 1999 is enclosed. The data presented in this constitute the QEDS. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and merged into the database during the first quarter of 1999. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during first quarter 1999 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  3. A reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldoncini, Marica; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara; Strati, Virginia; Xhixha, Gerti

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillate...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactor technology Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Op-ed Letters... to iron out their differences over the site of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor... . Russia sticks to its guns, backs France for fusion...

  5. Issues and test requirements in radiation shielding of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, M.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation shield issues for fusion reactors have been investigated and the experiments and facilities required to resolve the issues have been identified and characterized as part of the FINESSE program. This paper summarizes the recommended approach to fusion shield research and development, provides a summary of the necessary experiments and facilities, and presents the results of technical analyses involved.

  6. Issues and test requirements in radiation shielding of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, M.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation shield issues for fusion reactors have been investigated and the experiments and facilities required to resolve the issues have been identified and characterized as part of the FINESSE program. This paper summarizes the recommended approach to fusion shield R and D, provides a summary of the necessary experiments and facilities, and presents the results of technical analyses involved.

  7. Materials Test-2 LOCA Simulation in the NRU Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; King, I. L.; Marshall, R. K.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Russcher, G. E.; Webb, B. J.; Wildung, N. J.; Wilson, C. L.; Wismer, M. D.; Mohr, C. L.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This third experiment of the program produced fuel cladding temperatures exceeding 1033 K (1400°F) for 155 s and resulted in eight ruptured fuel rods. Experiment data and initial results are presented in the form of photographs and graphical summaries.

  8. Site environmental report for 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status, with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1996 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. 37 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

  10. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  11. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  12. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  13. TOP 2014: Experimental Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Schwanenberger

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of the experimental results of the TOP2014 International Workshop in Cannes, France, is presented. This inspiring conference clearly showed the richness and diversity of top-quark physics research. Results cover a very broad spectrum of analyses involving studies of the strong and electroweak interactions of the top quark, high-precision measurements of intrinsic top-quark properties, developments of new tools in top-quark analyses, observations of new Standard Model processes, the interaction between the top quark and the Higgs boson and sensitive searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  14. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  15. Summary Max Total Units

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -Blueprint | DepartmentExcellenceGuidanceS EM Pr ETR R UnSummary

  16. The MAP3S precipitation chemistry network: Eighth periodic summary report (1984)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana, M.T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary report, the eighth in the series, contains complete field and chemical data from the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network for the year 1984. Sections cover Quality Assurance/Quality Control, network site information, and a brief statistical summary of the 1984 data.

  17. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulseSimulation,Site Index

  18. Summary Report of the Energy Issues Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Agency Annual Energy Outlook 1999. #12;Fusion Power Plant Attractiveness, Technical RiskSummary Report of the Energy Issues Working Group Organizer: Farrokh Najmabadi Covenors: Jeffrey Sauthoff 1999 Fusion Summer Study July 12-23, 1999, Snowmass, CO Energy Working Group Web Site: http

  19. TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS TL; MENDOZA RE

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

  20. TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETREIVAL AND PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS TL

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.