Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Manhattan Project: Production Reactor (Pile) Design, Met Lab, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge PRODUCTION REACTOR (PILE) DESIGN Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge PRODUCTION REACTOR (PILE) DESIGN (Met Lab, 1942) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 By 1942, scientists had established that some of the uranium exposed to radioactivity in a reactor (pile) would eventually decay into plutonium, which could then be separated by chemical means from the uranium. Important theoretical research on this was ongoing, but the work was scattered at various universities from coast to coast. In early 1942, Arthur Compton arranged for all pile research to be moved to the Met Lab at the University of Chicago.

2

Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research legacy - Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research legacy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

3

Enhanced in-pile instrumentation at the advanced test reactor  

SciTech Connect

Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper reports results from this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and realtime flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted. (authors)

Rempe, J. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Daw, J. E.; Unruh, T.; Chase, B. M.; Palmer, J.; Condie, K. G.; Davis, K. L. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

From the Chicago Pile 1 to next-generation reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this contribution is that of presenting a simple, elementary description of the nuclear reactor physics, a science which had its beginning more than half a century ago with the Enrico Fermi and his ...

Augusto Gandini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Synergistic smart fuel for in-pile nuclear reactor measurements  

SciTech Connect

The thermo-acoustic fuel rod sensor developed in this research has demonstrated a novel technique for monitoring the temperature within the core of a nuclear reactor or the temperature of the surrounding heat-transfer fluid. It uses the heat from the nuclear fuel to generate sustained acoustic oscillations whose frequency will be indicative of the temperature. Converting a nuclear fuel rod into this type of thermo-acoustic sensor simply requires the insertion of a porous material (stack). This sensor has demonstrated a synergy with the elevated temperatures that exist within the nuclear reactor using materials that have only minimal susceptibility to high-energy particle fluxes. When the sensor is in operation, the sound waves radiated from the fuel rod resonator will propagate through the surrounding cooling fluid. The frequency of these oscillations is directly correlated with an effective temperature within the fuel rod resonator. This device is self-powered and is operational even in case of total loss of power of the reactor.

Smith, J.A.; Kotter, D.K. [Idaho National Laboratories, Idaho Falls (United States); Ali, R.A.; Garrett, S.L. [Penn State University, University Park, State College, PA 16801 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Computer simulations help design new nuclear reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer simulations help design new nuclear reactors Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Reprinted from "Argonne Now" - Spring 2008 Physicist Won-Sik Yang and computer scientist Andrew Siegel hold a fuel rod assembly in front of a model of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II

8

Pile design predictions in sand and gravel using in situ tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1983 Ma]or Sub]ect: Civil Engineering PILE DESIGN PREDICTIONS IN SAND AND GRAVEL USING IN SITU TESTS A Thesis by LINDA GRUBBS HUFF Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle Chairman of Committee syne A. Du lap Member Chri opher C... Committee: Dr. Harry M. Coyle The pressuremeter, cone penetrometer and standard penetration tests are in situ tests which are being performed more frequently in recent years to obtain soil parameters used in the design of pile foundations. New design...

Huff, Linda Grubbs

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect

Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

Schock, Alfred

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Cathodic protection system design for steel pilings of a wharf structure  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion of steel pilings in sea and brackish water is mostly due to the establishment of localized corrosion cells and the effects of the tidal changes. The most frequently used corrosion protection systems are coatings and/or cathodic protection. These protective systems when properly designed, installed and operated are very effective in preventing corrosion problems. The design of a cathodic protection system, in order to be effective and reliable, must take into consideration all technical design criteria, the type of materials used, the geometric shape of the structure, environmental conditions, site restrictions, and any outside interferences. These design considerations, as well as the use of design data and an overall design methodology for a cathodic protection system for pipe and sheet piling used in a wharf structure, are discussed in this paper.

Nikolakakos, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect

During the 1960's and early 70's the author performed extensive design studies, analyses, and tests aimed at thermionic reactor concepts that differed significantly from those pursued by other investigators. Those studies, like most others under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC and DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsorship, were terminated in the early 1970's. Some of this work was previously published, but much of it was never made available in the open literature. U.S. interest in thermionic reactors resumed in the early 80's, and was greatly intensified by reports about Soviet ground and flight tests in the late 80's. This recent interest resulted in renewed U.S. thermionic reactor development programs, primarily under Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. Since most current investigators have not had an opportunity to study all of the author's previous work, a review of the highlights of that work may be of value to them. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling. Where the author's concepts differed from the later Topaz-2 design was in the relative location of the emitter and the collector. Placing the fueled emitter on the outside of the cylindrical diodes permits much higher axial conductances to reduce ohmic losses in the electrodes of full-core-height diodes. Moreover, placing the fuel on the outside of the diode makes possible reactors with much higher fuel volume fractions, which enable power-flattened fast reactors scalable to very low power levels without the need for life-limiting hydride moderators or the use of efficiency-limiting driver fuel. In addition, with the fuel on the outside its swelling does not increase the emitter diameter or reduce the interelectrode gap. This should permit long lifetimes even with closer spacings, which can significantly improve the system efficiences. This was confirmed by coupled neutronic, thermal, thermionic, and electrical system analyses - some of which are presented in this paper - and by subsequent experiments. A companion paper presented next describes the fabrication and testing of full-scale converter elements, both fueled and unfueled, and summarizes the test results obtained. There is a duplicate copy in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Manhattan Project: Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge FINAL REACTOR DESIGN AND X-10 Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge FINAL REACTOR DESIGN AND X-10 (Met Lab and Oak Ridge [Clinton], 1942-1943) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 Before any plutonium could be chemically separated from uranium for a bomb, however, that uranium would first have to be irradiated in a production pile. CP-1 had been a success as a scientific experiment, but the pile was built on such a small scale that recovering any significant amounts of plutonium from it was impractical. In the fall of 1942, scientists of the Met Lab had decided to build a second Fermi pile at Argonne as soon as his experiments on the first were completed and to proceed with the "Mae West" design for a helium-cooled production pile as well. When DuPont engineers assessed the Met Lab's plans in the late fall, they agreed that helium should be given first priority. They placed heavy water second and urged an all-out effort to produce more of this highly effective moderator. Bismuth and water were ranked third and fourth in DuPont's analysis. Priorities began to change when Enrico Fermi's CP-1 calculations demonstrated a higher value for the neutron reproduction factor k (for a theoretical reactor of infinite size) than anyone had anticipated. Met Lab scientists concluded that a water-cooled pile was now feasible. Crawford Greenewalt, head of the DuPont effort, continued, however, to support helium cooling.

13

Design of a novel drilled-and-grouted pile in sand for offshore oil&gas structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract New offshore oil and gas exploration has placed renewed emphasis on developing structures in relatively complex geological conditions. Due to the damaging nature of impact driving, traditional steel piles used to support jacket structures, are not ideally suited to specific soil types, such as carbonate sands. Drilled and grouted piles are commonly used to support structures in these soil conditions. This paper describes a novel drilled pile, which has been developed specifically to provide a cost effective installation process while maintaining the benefits of grouted piles. The installation process negates the need for temporary casing in weak soils and minimizes the number of offshore operations. In this paper, the installation methodology and post-installation performance of a large scale onshore field trial is described. The installation process was successfully demonstrated with a 1.9 m diameter test pile installed in fine sand to 17.7 m depth in under 3 h. The performance of the pile, as measured in a tension static load test, was shown to compare favorably with existing pile design methods.

David Igoe; Giovanni Spagnoli; Paul Doherty; Leonhard Weixler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nuclear Reactor Safety Design Criteria  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes nuclear safety criteria applicable to the design, fabrication, construction, testing, and performance requirements of nuclear reactor facilities and safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) within these facilities. Cancels paragraphs 8a and 8b of DOE 5480.6. Cancels DOE O 5480.6 in part. Certified 11-18-10.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

15

13 - Generation IV reactor designs, operation and fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter looks at Generation IV nuclear reactors, such as the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR), the supercritical water reactor (SCWR), the molten salt reactor (MSR), the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), the lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) and the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR). Reactor designs and fuel cycles are also described.

N. Cerullo; G. Lomonaco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ordered bed modular reactor design proposal  

SciTech Connect

The Ordered Bed Modular Reactor (OBMR) is a design as an advanced modular HTGR in which the annular reactor core is filled with an ordered bed of fuel spheres. This arrangement allows fuel elements to be poured into the core cavity which is shaped so that an ordered bed is formed and to be discharged from the core through the opening holes in the reactor top. These operations can be performed in a shutdown shorter time. The OBMR has the most of advantages from both the pebble bed reactor and block type reactor. Its core has great structural flexibility and stability, which allow increasing reactor output power and outlet gas temperature as well as decreasing core pressure drop. This paper introduces ordered packing bed characteristics, unloading and loading technique of the fuel spheres and predicted design features of the OBMR. (authors)

Tian, J. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing 100084 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Big Pile or Small Pile?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The construction of a voltaic pile (battery) is a simple laboratory activity that commemorates the invention of this important device and is of great help in teaching physics. The voltaic pile is often seen as a scientific toy with the “pile” being constructed from fruit. These toys use some strips of copper and zinc inserted in a piece of fruit to produce a low-intensity electrical current to power a digital device. In a voltaic pile of this type the zinc acts as an anode while the copper acts as a cathode. The reduction reaction [ i . e . 2 H + ( a q ) + 2 e ? H 2 ( g ) ] occurs on the copper (the cathode). The two electrons that are needed for the reduction are taken from the metal (copper) which remains positively charged while the anode is the zinc which is oxidized through the reaction Z n ? ( m ) ? Z n + 2 ( a q ) + 2 e and the two electrons remain on the metal which is negatively charged. If the two pieces of metal are connected by an external conductor electrons flow from the zinc to the copper. The electromotive force of this system is about 0.76 V which is the reduction potential of zinc as can be found in the table of standard reduction potentials. 1

Mario Branca; Rossana G. Quidacciolu; Isabella Soletta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Generic small modular reactor plant design.  

SciTech Connect

This report gives an overview of expected design characteristics, concepts, and procedures for small modular reactors. The purpose of this report is to provide those who are interested in reducing the cost and improving the safety of advanced nuclear power plants with a generic design that possesses enough detail in a non-sensitive manner to give merit to their conclusions. The report is focused on light water reactor technology, but does add details on what could be different in a more advanced design (see Appendix). Numerous reactor and facility concepts were used for inspiration (documented in the bibliography). The final design described here is conceptual and does not reflect any proposed concept or sub-systems, thus any details given here are only relevant within this report. This report does not include any design or engineering calculations.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Baum, Gregory A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report  

SciTech Connect

The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Design options for a bunsen reactor.  

SciTech Connect

This work is being performed for Matt Channon Consulting as part of the Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA). Matt Channon Consulting has requested Sandia's assistance in the design of a chemical Bunsen reactor for the reaction of SO2, I2 and H2O to produce H2SO4 and HI with a SO2 feed rate to the reactor of 50 kg/hour. Based on this value, an assumed reactor efficiency of 33%, and kinetic data from the literature, a plug flow reactor approximately 1%E2%80%9D diameter and and 12 inches long would be needed to meet the specification of the project. Because the Bunsen reaction is exothermic, heat in the amount of approximately 128,000 kJ/hr would need to be removed using a cooling jacket placed around the tubular reactor. The available literature information on Bunsen reactor design and operation, certain support equipment needed for process operation and a design that meet the specification of Matt Channon Consulting are presented.

Moore, Robert Charles

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Argonaut Reactor - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Training Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

22

The behavior of piles in cohesionless soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the load- settlement behavior of single piles in cohesionless soils is addressed. The available data on instrumerted piles load-tested vertically in sands is collected and analyzed to determine the load transfer characteristics of the soil. A... the distribution of residual stresses in the piles, and methods of obtaining residual stresses from load test results are discussed. Correlations with the results of the Standard Penetration Test are presented and are used to develop a new design procedure which...

Tucker, Larry Milton

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Using reactor operating experience to improve the design of a new Broad Application Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Increasing regulatory demands and effects of plant aging are limiting the operation of existing test reactors. Additionally, these reactors have limited capacities and capabilities for supporting future testing missions. A multidisciplinary team of experts developed sets of preliminary safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor design concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). Anticipated missions for the new reactor include fuels and materials irradiation testing, isotope production, space testing, medical research, fusion testing, intense positron research, and transmutation doping. The early BATR design decisions have benefited from operating experiences with existing reactors. This paper discusses these experiences and highlights their significance for the design of a new BATR.

Fletcher, C.D.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Drexler, R.L.; Leyse, C.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

International Effort to Design Nuclear Fusion Reactor Launched  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

International Effort to Design Nuclear Fusion Reactor Launched ... Their mission is to draw up a design concept for a thermonuclear fusion reactor by December 1990. ... The work at Garching is a direct outgrowth of the recently signed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) pact involving the European Community, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the U.S. (C&EN, April 25, page 19). ...

DERMOT A. O'SULLLVAN

1988-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

25

Advanced thermionic reactor systems design code  

SciTech Connect

An overall systems design code is under development to model an advanced in-core thermionic nuclear reactor system for space applications at power levels of 10 to 50 kWe. The design code is written in an object-oriented programming environment that allows the use of a series of design modules, each of which is responsible for the determination of specific system parameters. The code modules include a neutronics and core criticality module, a core thermal hydraulics module, a thermionic fuel element performance module, a radiation shielding module, a module for waste heat transfer and rejection, and modules for power conditioning and control. The neutronics and core criticality module determines critical core size, core lifetime, and shutdown margins using the criticality calculation capability of the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code System (MCNP). The remaining modules utilize results of the MCNP analysis along with FORTRAN programming to predict the overall system performance.

Lewis, B.R.; Pawlowski, R.A.; Greek, K.J.; Klein, A.C. (Department of Nuclear Engineering, Radiation Center, C116, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-5902 (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values.

Vujic, Jasmina L. (Lisle, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Methodology for the Neutronics Design of Space Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A methodology for the neutronics design of space power reactors is presented. This methodology involves balancing the competing requirements of having sufficient excess reactivity for the desired lifetime, keeping the reactor subcritical at launch and during submersion accidents, and providing sufficient control over the lifetime of the reactor. These requirements are addressed by three reactivity values for a given reactor design: the excess reactivity at beginning of mission, the negative reactivity at shutdown, and the negative reactivity margin in submersion accidents. These reactivity values define the control worth and the safety worth in submersion accidents, used for evaluating the merit of a proposed reactor type and design. The Heat Pipe-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters space reactor core design is evaluated and modified based on the proposed methodology. The final reactor core design has sufficient excess reactivity for 10 years of nominal operation at 1.82 MW of fission power and is subcritical at launch and in all water submersion accidents.

King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

28

Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a tool for reactor design optimization, and for design ofdesign tool for reactor design optimization, and for designdesign tool for reactor design optimization, and for design

Scarlat, Raluca Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GA­A23168 TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO by C.P.C. WONG and R.D. STAMBAUGH or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;GA­A23168 TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS JULY 1999 #12;C.P.C. WONG AND R.D. STAMBAUGH TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO

California at Los Angeles, University of

30

Secretary Chu Statement on AP1000 Reactor Design Certification | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Statement on AP1000 Reactor Design Certification Secretary Chu Statement on AP1000 Reactor Design Certification Secretary Chu Statement on AP1000 Reactor Design Certification December 22, 2011 - 3:25pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu issued the following statement today in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) decision to certify Westinghouse Electric's AP1000 nuclear reactor design, a significant step towards constructing a new generation of U.S. nuclear reactors. In February 2010, the Obama Administration announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $8.33 billion loan guarantee for the construction and operation of two AP1000 reactors at Alvin W. Vogtle Electric Generation Plant in Burke, Georgia. "The Administration and the Energy Department are committed to restarting

31

Cost-Shared Development of Innovative Small Modular Reactor Designs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost-Shared Development of Innovative Small Modular Reactor Designs Cost-Shared Development of Innovative Small Modular Reactor Designs Cost-Shared Development of Innovative Small Modular Reactor Designs The Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Licensing Technical Support (LTS) program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), through this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) seeks to facilitate the development of innovative SMR designs that have the potential to address the nation's economic, environmental and energy security goals. Specifically, the Department is soliciting applications for SMR designs that offer unique and innovative solutions for achieving the objectives of enhanced safety, operations, and performance relative to currently certified designs. This FOA focuses on design development and

32

Cost-Shared Development of Innovative Small Modular Reactor Designs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost-Shared Development of Innovative Small Modular Reactor Designs Cost-Shared Development of Innovative Small Modular Reactor Designs Cost-Shared Development of Innovative Small Modular Reactor Designs The Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Licensing Technical Support (LTS) program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), through this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) seeks to facilitate the development of innovative SMR designs that have the potential to address the nation's economic, environmental and energy security goals. Specifically, the Department is soliciting applications for SMR designs that offer unique and innovative solutions for achieving the objectives of enhanced safety, operations, and performance relative to currently certified designs. This FOA focuses on design development and

33

Design of a 25-kWe Surface Reactor System Based on SNAP Reactor Technologies  

SciTech Connect

A Hastelloy-X clad, sodium-potassium (NaK-78) cooled, moderated spectrum reactor using uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH) fuel based on the SNAP program reactors is a promising design for use in surface power systems. This paper presents a 98 kWth reactor for a power system the uses multiple Stirling engines to produce 25 kWe-net for 5 years. The design utilizes a pin type geometry containing UZrHx fuel clad with Hastelloy-X and NaK-78 flowing around the pins as coolant. A compelling feature of this design is its use of 49.9% enriched U, allowing it to be classified as a category III-D attractiveness and reducing facility costs relative to highly-enriched space reactor concepts. Presented below are both the design and an analysis of this reactor's criticality under various safety and operations scenarios.

Dixon, David D. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Hiatt, Matthew T. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Design of chemical reactors of the heat exchanger type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating Profile - Example I 23 , 53 Heat Rate Comparison - Example I Operating Profile - Example 2 Operating Profile - Example 3 Operating Profile - Example 4 Equations (113) and (114) at 790 Reactor Profile - Exan piss 5 and 6 Heat of Reaction.... simple inathematical function of time. While his work was a step forward, it is not directly applicable to the problem of reactor design. Hougen and Watsor. (3), and recently Fair and Rase (4), illustra- ted an exact non-machine method of reactor...

McBeth, Lloyd Theodore

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

DESIGN OF A TOKAMAK FUSION REACTOR FIRST WALL ARMOR AGAINST NEUTRAL BEAM IMPINGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et. a1. , "A Conceptual Tokamak Reactor Design, umtAK-II,"et. al.. "A Non-Circular Tokamak 'Power Reactor Design,"Contt'ol in Near Term Tokamak Reactors," Proceedings of the

Myers, Richard Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

High temperature gas cooled reactor steam-methane reformer design  

SciTech Connect

The concept of the long distance transportation of process heat energy from a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) heat source, based on the steam-methane reforming reaction, is being evaluated by the Department of Energy as an energy source/application for use early in the 21st century. This paper summaries the design of a helium heated steam reformer utilized in conjunction with an intermediate loop, 850/degree/C reactor outlet temperature, HTGR process heat plant concept. This paper also discusses various design considerations leading to the mechanical design features, the thermochemical performance, the materials selection and the structural design analysis. 12 refs.

Impellezzeri, J.R.; Drendel, D.B.; Odegaard, T.K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design for a large, passive, light water reactor has been developed. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated ...

Hejzlar, P.

38

Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor core design 7 Assembly Design and Optimization codePhysics Optimization of Breed and Burn Fast Reactor Systems.OPTIMIZATION CODE (ADOPT) Table 7.4: SWR B&B Reference Reactor

Qvist, Staffan Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) 70th Anniversary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) 70th Anniversary Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) 70th Anniversary About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

40

Generation III reactors safety requirements and the design solutions  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy's public acceptance, and hence its development, depends on its safety. As a reactor designer, we will first briefly remind the basic safety principles of nuclear reactors' design. We will then show how the industry, and in particular Areva with its EPR, made design evolution in the wake of the Three Miles Island accident in 1979. In particular, for this new generation of reactors, severe accidents are taken into account beyond the standard design basis accidents. Today, Areva's EPR meets all so-called 'generation III' safety requirements and was licensed by several nuclear safety authorities in the world. Many innovative solutions are integrated in the EPR, some of which will be introduced here.

Felten, P. [Areva NP (France)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Status of Fusion Reactor Blanket Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Blanket Design and Evaluation / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

D. L. Smith; D.-K. Sze

42

High-resolution coupled physics solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems Vijay S. Mahadevan...analysis of current and future nuclear reactor models is being investigated...in radiation hydrodynamics, nuclear reactor analysis, fluid-structure...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

RAMI Analysis Program Design and Research for CFETR (Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor) Tokamak Machine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) is a test reactor which shall be constructed by National Integration Design Group for Magnetic Confinement Fusion Reactor of China with an ambitious scientific ...

Shijun Qin; Yuntao Song; Damao Yao; Yuanxi Wan; Songtao Wu…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Suggested for Track 7: Advances in Reactor Core Design and In-Core Management _____________________________________________________________________________________ Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency R. Wigeland and K. Hamman Idaho National Laboratory Given the ability of fast reactors to effectively transmute the transuranic elements as are present in spent nuclear fuel, fast reactors are being considered as one element of future nuclear power systems to enable continued use and growth of nuclear power by limiting high-level waste generation. However, a key issue for fast reactors is higher electricity cost relative to other forms of nuclear energy generation. The economics of the fast reactor are affected by the amount of electric power that can be produced from a reactor, i.e., the thermal efficiency for electricity generation. The present study is examining the potential for fast reactor subassembly design changes to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the average coolant outlet temperature without increasing peak temperatures within the subassembly, i.e., to make better use of current technology. Sodium-cooled fast reactors operate at temperatures far below the coolant boiling point, so that the maximum coolant outlet temperature is limited by the acceptable peak temperatures for the reactor fuel and cladding. Fast reactor fuel subassemblies have historically been constructed using a large number of small diameter fuel pins contained within a tube of hexagonal cross-section, or hexcan. Due to this design, there is a larger coolant flow area next to the hexcan wall as compared to flow area in the interior of the subassembly. This results in a higher flow rate near the hexcan wall, overcooling the fuel pins next to the wall, and a non-uniform coolant temperature distribution. It has been recognized for many years that this difference in sodium coolant temperature was detrimental to achieving greater thermal efficiency, since it causes the fuel pins in the center of the subassembly to operate at higher temperatures than those near the hexcan walls, and it is the temperature limit(s) for those fuel pins that limits the average coolant outlet temperature. Fuel subassembly design changes are being investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to quantify the effect that the design changes have on reducing the intra-subassembly coolant flow and temperature distribution. Simulations have been performed for a 19-pin test subassembly geometry using typical fuel pin diameters and wire wrap spacers. The results have shown that it may be possible to increase the average coolant outlet temperature by 20 C or more without changing the peak temperatures within the subassembly. These design changes should also be effective for reactor designs using subassemblies with larger numbers of fuel pins. R. Wigeland, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Mail Stop 3860, Idaho Falls, ID, U.S.A., 83415-3860 email – roald.wigeland@inl.gov fax (U.S.) – 208-526-2930

R. Wigeland; K. Hamman

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

System modeling and reactor design studies of the Advanced Thermionic Initiative space nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

In-core thermionic space reactor design concepts that operate at a nominal power output range of 20 to 50 kW(electric) are described. Details of the neutronic, thermionic, thermal hydraulics, and shielding performance are presented. Because of the strong absorption of thermal neutrons by natural tungsten and the large amount of natural tungsten within the reactor core, two designs are considered. An overall system design code has been developed at Oregon State University to model advanced in-core thermionic energy conversion-based nuclear reactor systems for space applications. The results show that the driverless single-cell Advanced Thermionic Initiative (ATI) configuration, which does not have driver fuel rods, proved to be more efficient than the driven core, which has driver rods. The results also show that the inclusion of the true axial and radial power distribution decrease the overall conversion efficiency. The flattening of the radial power distribution by three different methods would lead to a higher efficiency. The results show that only one TFE works at the optimum emitter temperature; all other TFEs are off the optimum performance and result in a 40% decrease of the efficiency of the overall system. The true axial profile is significantly different as there is a considerable amount of neutron leakage out of the top and bottom of the reactor. The analysis reveals that the axial power profile actually has a chopped cosine shape. For this axial profile, the reactor core overall efficiency for the driverless ATI reactor version is found to be 5.84% with a total electrical power of 21.92 kW(electric). By considering the true axial power profile instead of the uniform power profile, each TFE loses {approximately}80 W(electric).

Lee, H.H.; Abdul-Hamid, S.; Klein, A.C. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Radiation Center] [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Radiation Center

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assigning Seismic Design Category to Large Reactors: A Case Study of the ATR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assigning Seismic Design Category to Large Reactors: A Case Study of the ATR Stuart Jensen October 21, 2014

47

Nuclear Design of the HOMER-15 Mars Surface Fission Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of robotic missions to Mars will most likely require robust power sources in the range of 3 to 20 kWe. Fission systems are well suited to provide safe, reliable, and economic power within this range. The goal of this study is to design a compact, low-mass fission system that meets Mars surface power requirements, while maintaining a high level of safety and reliability at a relatively low cost. The Heat pipe Power System (HPS) is one possible approach for producing near-term, low-cost, space fission power. The goal of the HPS project is to devise an attractive space fission system that can be developed quickly and affordably. The primary ways of doing this are by using existing technology and by designing the system for inexpensive testing. If the system can be designed to allow highly prototypic testing with electrical heating, then an exhaustive test program can be carried out quickly and inexpensively, and thorough testing of the actual flight unit can be performed - which is a major benefit to reliability. Over the past 4 years, three small HPS proof-of-concept technology demonstrations have been conducted, and each has been highly successful. The Heat pipe-Operated Mars Exploration Reactor (HOMER) is a derivative of the HPS designed especially for producing power on the surface of Mars. The HOMER-15 is a 15-kWt reactor that couples with a 3-kWe Stirling engine power system. The reactor contains stainless-steel (SS)-clad uranium nitride (UN) fuel pins that are structurally and thermally bonded to SS/sodium heat pipes. Fission energy is conducted from the fuel pins to the heat pipes, which then carry the heat to the Stirling engine. This paper describes conceptual design and nuclear performance the HOMER-15 reactor. (author)

Poston, David I. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Precipitation of uraninite in chlorite-bearing veins of the hydrothermal alteration zone (argile de pile) of the natural nuclear reactor at Bangombe, Republic of Gabon  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the mineralogy of a phyllosilicate/uraninite/galena-bearing vein located within the hydrothermal alteration halo associated with the Bangombe reactor. Phyllosilicates within the vein include a trioctahedral Al-Mg-Fe chlorite (ripidolite), Al-rich clay (kaolinite and/or donbassite) and illite. Textural relations obtained by backscattered-electron imaging suggest that ripidolite crystallized first among the sheet silicates. Uraninite is spatially associated with ripidolite and probably precipitated at a later time. While energy-dispersive X-ray analyses suggest that the uranium phase is predominantly uraninite, coffinite or other phases may also be present.

Eberly, P.; Ewing, R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Janeczek, J. [Silesian Univ., Sosnowiec (Poland). Dept. of Earth Sciences

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The removal of CO2 from power plants is challenging because existing methods to separate CO2 from the gas mixture requires a significant fraction of the power plant output. Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel technology that utilizes a metal oxide oxygen carrier to transport oxygen to the fuel thereby avoiding direct contact between fuel and air. The use of CLC has the advantages of reducing the energy penalty while

50

OPTIMAL DESIGN OF A HIGH PRESSURE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION REACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMAL DESIGN OF A HIGH PRESSURE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION REACTOR K.J. BACHMANN of computer simulations as an optimal design tool which lessens the costs in time and effort in experimental vapor deposition (HPOMCVD) reactor for use in thin film crystal growth. The advantages of such a reactor

51

Effects of an Advanced Reactor’s Design, Use of Automation, and Mission on Human Operators  

SciTech Connect

The roles, functions, and tasks of the human operator in existing light water nuclear power plants (NPPs) are based on sound nuclear and human factors engineering (HFE) principles, are well defined by the plant’s conduct of operations, and have been validated by years of operating experience. However, advanced NPPs whose engineering designs differ from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) will impose changes on the roles, functions, and tasks of the human operators. The plans to increase the use of automation, reduce staffing levels, and add to the mission of these advanced NPPs will also affect the operator’s roles, functions, and tasks. We assert that these factors, which do not appear to have received a lot of attention by the design engineers of advanced NPPs relative to the attention given to conceptual design of these reactors, can have significant risk implications for the operators and overall plant safety if not mitigated appropriately. This paper presents a high-level analysis of a specific advanced NPP and how its engineered design, its plan to use greater levels of automation, and its expanded mission have risk significant implications on operator performance and overall plant safety.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Johanna H. Oxstrand

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Achievements: Nuclear Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne National Laboratory Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

53

Design, optimization and evaluation of a free-fall biomass fast pyrolysis reactor and its products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this work is a radiatively heated, free-fall, fast pyrolysis reactor. The reactor was designed and constructed for the production of bio-oil from… (more)

Ellens, Cody James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

NRC review of the CANDU-3 reactor design  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) effort to complete an early review of the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU)-3 reactor design prior to formal submittal of an application for standard design certification. The NRC is conducting a review of the CANDU-3 design in support of a request by AECL Technologics, the US sponsor of the design. The purpose of this review is to encourage early interactions by applicants, vendors, and government agencies with the NRC. The CANDU-3 design is being developed by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL), whose CANDU operations are based in Mississauga, Ontario. AECL Technologies, a US subsidiary of AECL, Incorporated, informed the NRC of its intent to seek design certification of the CANDU-3 design under the provisions of 10CFR52 in a letter to the NRC dated May 25, 1989. This paper describes the commission's basis for this type of early review, its purposes and objectives, key elements of the review, the intended product, and the schedule.

Kennedy, J.L. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, Paul R. (Western Springs, IL); McLennan, George A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Early Exploration - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Exploration Early Exploration About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

58

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark August 25, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis DOE to offer regular public tours in 2009 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Deputy Secretary Lynn Scarlett and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Acting Deputy Secretary Jeffrey F. Kupfer today announced the designation of DOE's B Reactor as a National Historic Landmark and unveiled DOE's plan for a new public access program to enable American citizens to visit B Reactor during the 2009 tourist season. The B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State was the world's first industrial-scale nuclear reactor and produced plutonium for the atomic weapon that was dropped on Nagasaki,

59

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark August 25, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis DOE to offer regular public tours in 2009 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Deputy Secretary Lynn Scarlett and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Acting Deputy Secretary Jeffrey F. Kupfer today announced the designation of DOE's B Reactor as a National Historic Landmark and unveiled DOE's plan for a new public access program to enable American citizens to visit B Reactor during the 2009 tourist season. The B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State was the world's first industrial-scale nuclear reactor and produced plutonium for the atomic weapon that was dropped on Nagasaki,

60

Design Windows for a He Cooled Fusion Reactor* Dai-Kai Sze and Ahmed Hassanein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Windows for a He Cooled Fusion Reactor* Dai-Kai Sze and Ahmed Hassanein Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 EQUATIONDERIVATION ABSTRACT A design window concept is developed for a He-cooled fusion reactor blanket and divertor design. This concept allows study

Harilal, S. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Innovative fusion reactor design analysis: Annual performance report, May 15, 1988--January 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics on fusion reactor component design: FLiBe intermediate heat exchanger design analysis; FLiBe properties; design methodology; FLiBe system steam generator freezeup; FLiBe reactor systems studies; tritium breeding ratio control; analysis of original objectives; and budget analysis. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs. (LSP)

Klein, A.C.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) - Reactors designed/built by Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integral Fast Reactor Integral Fast Reactor About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

63

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

instrumentation: Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Developed at: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) Developed...

64

Radiochemical characteristics of tritium to be considered in fusion reactor facility design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of research and development related to radiochemical characteristics of tritium to be considered in a fusion reactor facility design are summarized. Reactions induced by...

S. O’hira; T. Hayashi; W. Shu; T. Yamanishi

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Manhattan Project: Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Enrico Fermi PILES AND PLUTONIUM Enrico Fermi PILES AND PLUTONIUM (1939-1942) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 The Uranium Committee's first report, issued on November 1, 1939, recommended that, despite the uncertainty of success, the government should immediately obtain four tons of graphite and fifty tons of uranium oxide. This recommendation led to the first outlay of government funds -- $6,000 in February 1940 -- and reflected the importance attached to the Fermi-Szilard pile (reactor) experiments already underway at Columbia University. Building upon the Fission chain reaction work performed in 1934 demonstrating the value of moderators in producing slow neutrons, Enrico Fermi thought that a mixture of the right moderator and natural uranium could produce a self-sustaining fission chain reaction. Fermi and Leo Szilard increasingly focused their attention on carbon in the form of graphite. Perhaps graphite could slow down, or moderate, the neutrons coming from the fission reaction, increasing the probability of their causing additional fissions in sustaining the chain reaction. A pile containing a large amount of natural uranium could then produce enough secondary neutrons to keep a reaction going.

67

Small Modular Fast Reactor Design Description Joint Effort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 1, 2005 ANL-SMFR-1 July 1, 2005 ANL-SMFR-1 Small Modular Fast Reactor Design Description Joint Effort by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) Project Leaders Y. I. Chang and C. Grandy, ANL P. Lo Pinto, CEA M. Konomura, JNC Technical Contributors ANL: J. Cahalan, F. Dunn, M. Farmer, S. Kamal, L. Krajtl, A. Moisseytsev, Y. Momozaki, J. Sienicki, Y. Park, Y. Tang, C. Reed, C. Tzanos, S. Wiedmeyer, and W. Yang CEA: P. Allegre, J. Astegiano, F. Baque, L. Cachon, M. S. Chenaud, J-L Courouau, Ph. Dufour, J. C. Klein, C. Latge, C. Thevenot, and F. Varaine JNC: M. Ando, Y. Chikazawa, M. Nagamura, Y. Okano, Y. Sakamoto,

68

Why Nuclear Energy? - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy: Nuclear Energy: Why Nuclear Energy? About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

69

X-10 Graphite Reactor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-10 Graphite Reactor X-10 Graphite Reactor X-10 Graphite Reactor X-10 Graphite Reactor When President Roosevelt in December 1942 authorized the Manhattan Project, the Oak Ridge site in eastern Tennessee had already been obtained and plans laid for an air-cooled experimental pile, a pilot chemical separation plant, and support facilities. The X-10 Graphite Reactor, designed and built in ten months, went into operation on November 4, 1943. The X-10 used neutrons emitted in the fission of uranium-235 to convert uranium-238 into a new element, plutonium-239. The reactor consists of a huge block of graphite, measuring 24 feet on each side, surrounded by several feet of high-density concrete as a radiation shield. The block is pierced by 1,248 horizontal diamond-shaped channels in

70

Prediction of penetration rate of sheet pile installed in sand by vibratory pile driver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A few full scale field tests were conducted on instrumented steel sheet piles under vibro-driving to find out the characteristics of the dynamic behavior of a sheet pile. These sheet piles were tested for situ...

Seung-Hyun Lee; Byoung-Il Kim; Jin-Tae Han

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

High flux isotope reactor cold source preconceptual design study report  

SciTech Connect

In February 1995, the deputy director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. The anticipated cold source will consist of a cryogenic LH{sub 2} moderator plug, a cryogenic pump system, a refrigerator that uses helium gas as a refrigerant, a heat exchanger to interface the refrigerant with the hydrogen loop, liquid hydrogen transfer lines, a gas handling system that includes vacuum lines, and an instrumentation and control system to provide constant system status monitoring and to maintain system stability. The scope of this project includes the development, design, safety analysis, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube. This project will also include those activities necessary to transport the cold neutron beam to the front face of the present HFIR beam room. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and research and development (R and D), (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the preconceptual phase and establishes the concept feasibility. The information presented includes the project scope, the preliminary design requirements, the preliminary cost and schedule, the preliminary performance data, and an outline of the various plans for completing the project.

Selby, D.L.; Bucholz, J.A.; Burnette, S.E. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

High-resolution coupled physics solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...methodology and software interfaces of...often used in radiation hydrodynamics...reactor design and safety analyses. In...enable appropriate software interfaces...Ragusa. 2007 Software design of SHARP...nuclear reactor safety: multi-scale...methods for the radiation-diffusion equations...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

GCRA review and appraisal of HTGR reactor-core-design program. [HTGR-SC, -R, -NHSDR  

SciTech Connect

The reactor-core-design program has as its principal objective and responsibility the design and resolution of major technical issues for the reactor core and core components on a schedule consistent with the plant licensing and construction program. The task covered in this review includes three major design areas: core physics, core thermal and hydraulic performance fuel element design, and in-core fuel performance evaluation.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Basic LEGO Reactor Design for the Provision of Lunar Surface Power  

SciTech Connect

A final design has been established for a basic Lunar Evolutionary Growth-Optimized (LEGO) Reactor using current and near-term technologies. The LEGO Reactor is a modular, fast-fission, heatpipe-cooled, clustered-reactor system for lunar-surface power generation. The reactor is divided into subcritical units that can be safely launched with lunar shipments from Earth, and then emplaced directly into holes drilled into the lunar regolith to form a critical reactor assembly. The regolith would not just provide radiation shielding, but serve as neutron-reflector material as well. The reactor subunits are to be manufactured using proven and tested materials for use in radiation environments, such as uranium-dioxide fuel, stainless-steel cladding and structural support, and liquid-sodium heatpipes. The LEGO Reactor system promotes reliability, safety, and ease of manufacture and testing at the cost of an increase in launch mass per overall rated power level and a reduction in neutron economy when compared to a single-reactor system. A single unshielded LEGO Reactor subunit has an estimated mass of approximately 448 kg and provides approximately 5 kWe. The overall envelope for a single subunit with fully extended radiator panels has a height of 8.77 m and a diameter of 0.50 m. Six subunits could provide sufficient power generation throughout the initial stages of establishing a lunar outpost. Portions of the reactor may be neutronically decoupled to allow for reduced power production during unmanned periods of base operations. During later stages of lunar-base development, additional subunits may be emplaced and coupled into the existing LEGO Reactor network, subject to lunar base power demand. Improvements in reactor control methods, fuel form and matrix, shielding, as well as power conversion and heat rejection techniques can help generate an even more competitive LEGO Reactor design. Further modifications in the design could provide power generative opportunities for use on other extraterrestrial surfaces.

John Darrell Bess

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Investigation of soil damping on full-scale test piles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Pile Discussion of Results CASE STUDIES OF PILES IN CLAY WITH TIPS IN SAND General Victoria Test Pile St. Charles Parish Test Pile Discussion of Results INVESTIGATION OF POINT DAMPING PARAIIETER General I'iethod of Analysis Discussion... TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) Beaumont Test Pile Chocolate Bayou Test Pile Victoria Test Pile St. Charles Parish Test Pile VITA P acae 41 4Z 43 44 45 LIST OF FIGURES Figure ~Pa e Friction Damping Parameter Versus Dynamic Driving Resistance...

Van Reenen, Dirk Andries

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DYNAMIC INTERACTION FACTORS FOR FLOATING PILE GROUPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-numerical formulation for two ideal- ized soil profiles (a homogeneous half-space and a half-space with modulus pro interaction factors for static deformation analysis of pile groups. INTRODUCTION Under static working loads) the sharing among individual piles of the load applied at the pile cap is generally uneven, with the corner

Entekhabi, Dara

78

Parallel Reacting Flow Calculations for Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor Design 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185­1111 (To be published in Proceedings of the International at the synthesis of two important research areas: 3D flow and transport modeling of reactors and the simulationParallel Reacting Flow Calculations for Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor Design 1 Andrew G

Devine, Karen

79

Reactor Design and Decommissioning - An Overview of International Activities in Post Fukushima Era1 - 12396  

SciTech Connect

Accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors as a result of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have not only dampened the nuclear renaissance but have also initiated a re-examination of the design and safety features for the existing and planned nuclear reactors. Even though failures of some of the key site features at Fukushima can be attributed to events that in the past would have been considered as beyond the design basis, the industry as well as the regulatory authorities are analyzing what features, especially passive features, should be designed into the new reactor designs to minimize the potential for catastrophic failures. It is also recognized that since the design of the Fukushima BWR reactors which were commissioned in 1971, many advanced safety features are now a part of the newer reactor designs. As the recovery efforts at the Fukushima site are still underway, decisions with respect to the dismantlement and decommissioning of the damaged reactors and structures have not yet been finalized. As it was with Three Mile Island, it could take several decades for dismantlement, decommissioning and clean up, and the project poses especially tough challenges. Near-term assessments have been issued by several organizations, including the IAEA, the USNRC and others. Results of such investigations will lead to additional improvements in system and site design measures including strengthening of the anti-tsunami defenses, more defense-in-depth features in reactor design, and better response planning and preparation involving reactor sites. The question also arises what would the effect be on the decommissioning scene worldwide, and what would the effect be on the new reactors when they are eventually retired and dismantled. This paper provides an overview of the US and international activities related to recovery and decommissioning including the decommissioning features in the reactor design process and examines these from a new perspective in the post Fukushima -accident era. Accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have slowed down the nuclear renaissance world-wide and may have accelerated decommissioning either because some countries have decided to halt or reduce nuclear, or because the new safety requirements may reduce life-time extensions. Even in countries such as the UK and France that favor nuclear energy production existing nuclear sites are more likely to be chosen as sites for future NPPs. Even as the site recovery efforts continue at Fukushima and any decommissioning decisions are farther into the future, the accidents have focused attention on the reactor designs in general and specifically on the Fukushima type BWRs. The regulatory authorities in many countries have initiated a re-examination of the design of the systems, structures and components and considerations of the capability of the station to cope with beyond-design basis events. Enhancements to SSCs and site features for the existing reactors and the reactors that will be built will also impact the decommissioning phase activities. The newer reactor designs of today not only have enhanced safety features but also take into consideration the features that will facilitate future decommissioning. Lessons learned from past management and operation of reactors as well as the lessons from decommissioning are incorporated into the new designs. However, in the post-Fukushima era, the emphasis on beyond-design-basis capability may lead to significant changes in SSCs, which eventually will also have impact on the decommissioning phase. Additionally, where some countries decide to phase out the nuclear power, many reactors may enter the decommissioning phase in the coming decade. While the formal updating and expanding of existing guidance documents for accident cleanup and decommissioning would benefit by waiting until the Fukushima project has progressed sufficiently for that experience to be reliably interpreted, the development of structured on-li

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Laraia, Michele [private consultant, formerly from IAEA, Kolonitzgasse 10/2, 1030, Vienna (Austria); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris (France); Dinner, Paul [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Developed at: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Conversion of methanol to light olefins on SAPO-34: kinetic modeling and reactor design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design of an MTO reactor, accounting for the strong exothermicity of the process. Multi-bed adiabatic and fluidized bed technologies show good potential for the industrial process for the conversion of methanol into olefins....

Al Wahabi, Saeed M. H.

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

82

Design of Batch Tube Reactor 377 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 9193, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of Batch Tube Reactor 377 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 91­93, 2001 Copyright Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 91­93, 2001 pretreatment represents the most expensive single step

California at Riverside, University of

83

Reactor Design, Cold-Model Experiment and CFD Modeling for Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an efficient, clean and...2...capture, and an interconnected fluidized bed is more appropriate solution for CLC. This paper aims to design a reactor system for CLC, carry out ...

Shaohua Zhang; Jinchen Ma; Xintao Hu…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Conceptual Design of Molten Salt Loop Experiment for MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten salt is a promising coolant candidate for Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) Gen-IV designs. The low neutron absorption, high thermal capacity, chemical inertness, and high boiling point at low pressure of ...

Bean, Malcolm K.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Design, construction and evaluation of a facility for the simulation of fast reactor blankets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A facility has been designed and constructed at the MIT Reactor for the experimental investigation of typical LMFBR breeding blankets. A large converter assembly, consisting of a 20-cm-thick layer of graphite followed by ...

Forbes, Ian Alexander

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Design of Slurry Bubble Column Reactors: Novel Technique for Optimum Catalyst Size Selection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Bubble Column Reactors: Novel Technique Slurry Bubble Column Reactors: Novel Technique for Optimum Catalyst Size Selection Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,619,011 entitled "Design of Slurry Bubble Column Reactors: Novel Technique for Optimum Catalyst Size Selection." Disclosed in this patent is a method to determine the optimum catalyst particle size for application in a fluidized bed reactor, such as a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), to convert synthesis gas into liquid fuels. The reactor can be gas-solid, liquid- solid, or gas-liquid-solid. The method considers the complete granular temperature balance based on the kinetic theory of

88

Inertial Fusion Energy reactor design studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a review of design studies for Inertial Confinement reactor. This second of three volumes discussions is some detail the following: Objectives, requirements, and assumptions; rationale for design option selection; key technical issues and R&D requirements; and conceptual design selection and description.

Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Design and Testing of a Boron Carbide Capsule for Spectral Tailoring in Mixed-Spectrum Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A boron carbide capsule has been designed and used for spectral-tailoring experiments at the TRIGA reactor at Washington State University. Irradiations were conducted in pulsed mode and in continuous operation for up to 4 hours. A cadmium cover was used to reduce thermal heating. The neutron spectrum calculated with MCNP was found to be in good agreement with reactor dosimetry measurements using the STAY'SL computer code. The neutron spectrum resembles that of a fast reactor. Design of a capsule using boron carbide enriched in {sup 10}B shows that it is possible to produce a neutron spectrum similar to {sup 235}U fission.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wittman, Richard S.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Finn, Erin C.; Friese, Judah I.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

11/04/02 G. W. Rubloff AVS 2002 MS MoA5 1 Spatially Programmable Reactor Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimization is constrained by fixed reactor design manufacturing #12;11/04/02 G. W. Rubloff ­ AVS 2002 ­ MS Mo spatial conditions in programmable reactor Uniformity unacceptable Produce high uniformity with optimal11/04/02 G. W. Rubloff ­ AVS 2002 ­ MS MoA5 1 Spatially Programmable Reactor Design: Toward a New

Rubloff, Gary W.

91

Design of a nuclear reactor system for lunar base applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disadvantages. U02 and Pu02 fuels both have extremely poor ther mal conductivities, about 4 W/m K at 500 C, which would normally limit the maximum linear power in the reactor core to unacceptably low levels. For tunately, the ver y high melting temperatur es... conversion, however, high reactor exit temperatures are both necessary and desirable. The efficiency of the power conversion cycle is directly related to the difference between the high and low temperatur es in the system. Since the heat rejection...

Griffith, Richard Odell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors worldwide Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors worldwide The High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands READY TO CONVERT - The High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands, has

93

Seismic design technology for Breeder Reactor structures. Volume 3: special topics in reactor structures  

SciTech Connect

This volume is divided into six chapters: analysis techniques, equivalent damping values, probabilistic design factors, design verifications, equivalent response cycles for fatigue analysis, and seismic isolation. (JDB)

Reddy, D.P. (ed)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Resistance factors calibration and its application using static load test data for driven steel pipe piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the reliability-based resistance factor calibration of driven steel pipe piles and the implementation of Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) on ... framework based on reliability theory u...

Jae Hyun Park; Jungwon Huh; Kyung Jun Kim…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant design duty cycle. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document defines the Plant Design Duty Cycle (PCDC) for the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The duty cycle is a set of events and their design number of occurrences over the life of the plant for which the MHTGR plant shall be designed to ensure that the plant meets all the top-level requirements. The duty cycle is representative of the types of events to be expected in multiple reactor module-turbine plant configurations of the MHTGR. A synopsis of each PDDC event is presented to provide an overview of the plant response and consequence. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Chan, T.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC&A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC&A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC&A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR [Pty] and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC&A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR&D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present work summarized in this report, namely the development of guidance to support the consideration of MC&A in the design of both pebble-bed and prismatic-fueled HTGRs. The objective is to identify and incorporate design features into the facility design that will cost effectively aid in making MC&A more effective and efficient, with minimum impact on operations. The theft of nuclear material is addressed through both MC&A and physical protection, while the threat of sabotage is addressed principally through physical protection.

Trond Bjornard; John Hockert

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Use of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in reactor design verification Part II: Flux measurement analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As for any new reactor design, the ACR-1000® design has to go through a comprehensive design verification process. One of the activities for supporting the ACR physics design calculations using the ACR physics code toolset, namely WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP, is to compare the flux distributions resulting from the calculation using this toolset at various power calibration monitor (PCM) detector locations against the flux measurement data from the Japanese Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR) FUGEN. The discussion of this particular design verification exercise will be presented in a two-part paper. The usage of data from the FUGEN reactor qualifies this exercise as design verification by alternate analysis. In order to have meaningful results at the end of the design verification process, the similarity between the ACR-1000 and FUGEN reactors has to be demonstrated. It is accomplished through the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using the TSUNAMI (Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation) methodology. The results from the similarity comparison have been presented in Part I of the paper. In Part II, results from flux distribution comparison will be presented. Favourable results from this design verification exercise give a high level of confidence that using the same physics toolset in calculating the flux distribution for ACR-1000 reactor will produce results with acceptable fidelity. In addition, the results will also give an indication of expected margins in the design calculations, not only at the locations of the PCM detectors but also at the derived bundle and channel powers obtained through the flux mapping calculation.

Doddy Kastanya; Mohamed Dahmani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant  

SciTech Connect

Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the U.S.

McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant  

SciTech Connect

Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the US.

McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft Word - 3b - Basis for Reactor Design comments 081710...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the demonstration power plant core design developed earlier by PBMR (Ltd) of South Africa, includes a direct Brayton cycle gas turbine for electricity production. The...

102

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Recommended practices in elevated temperature design: A compendium of breeder reactor experiences (1970-1986): An overview  

SciTech Connect

Significant experiences have been accumulated in the establishment of design methods and criteria applicable to the design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) components. The Subcommittee of the Elevated Temperature Design under the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) has undertaken to collect, on an international basis, design experience gained, and the lessons learned, to provide guidelines for next generation advanced reactor designs. This paper shall present an overview and describe the highlights of the work.

Wei, B.C.; Cooper, W.L. Jr.; Dhalla, A.K.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Initial Design of a Dual Fluidized Bed Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluidized bed gaisifers (CFB) (Figure 1.6) 1.3.1. Bubblingbed gasifiers (BFB and CFB) have great features for SH.employed for the SHR design. CFB enables a circulation of

Yun, Minyoung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modularity in design of the MIT Pebble Bed Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The future of new nuclear power plant construction will depend in large part on the ability of designers to reduce capital, operations, and maintenance costs. One of the methods proposed, is to enhance the modularity of ...

Berte, Marc Vincent, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Design and Status of RERTR Irradiation Tests in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation testing of U-Mo based fuels is the central component of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program fuel qualification plan. Several RERTR tests have recently been completed or are planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, ID. Four mini-plate experiments in various stages of completion are described in detail, including the irradiation test design, objectives, and irradiation conditions. Observations made during and after the in-reactor RERTR-7A experiment breach are summarized. The irradiation experiment design and planned irradiation conditions for full-size plate test are described. Progress toward element testing will be reviewed.

Daniel M. Wachs; Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray Chang; Mitchell K. Meyer

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Shielding design aspects of thermionic space nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

It has been well documented that nuclear power sources will be required for the future exploration of space. Higher power levels (>10 kW (electric)) will be enabling, if not absolutely necessary, for the continued expansion of a human presence in the solar system and beyond. Space missions that will directly benefit continued life on Earth, including the monitoring for climate change and global warming, high-capacity communication satellites, and large, space-based radar systems to monitor the flow of airline traffic, will require progressively larger amounts of electrical power. Military applications, even with the ending of the Cold War, will continue to be needed for treaty verification activities. A thermionic energy conversion-based nuclear reactor system is one of the many different technologies proposed for the utilization of nuclear energy in space. How the energy conversion is accomplished and the equipment requiring shielding have a profound effect on the overall shielding requirements for the system. There exist two configurations of this technology that can be exploited and will have a significant effect on shielding needs. The paper discusses in-core thermionic conversion and out-of-core conversion concepts.

Klein, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

High-temperature gas-cooled-reactor steam-methane reformer design  

SciTech Connect

The concept of the long distance transportation of process heat energy from a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) heat source, based on the steam reforming reaction, is currently being evaluated as an energy source/application for use early in the 21st century. The steam-methane reforming reaction is an endothermic reaction at temperatures approximately 700/sup 0/C and higher, which produces hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The heat of the reaction products can then be released, after being pumped to industrial site users, in a methanation process producing superheated steam and methane which is then returned to the reactor plant site. In this application the steam reforming reaction temperatures are produced by the heat energy from the core of the HTGR through forced convection of the primary or secondary helium circuit to the catalytic chemical reactor (steam reformer). This paper summarizes the design of a helium heated steam reformer utilized in conjunction with a 1170 MW(t) intermediate loop, 850/sup 0/C reactor outlet temperature, HTGR process heat plant concept. This paper also discusses various design considerations leading to the mechanical design features, the thermochemical performance, materials selection and the structural design analysis.

Impellezzeri, J.R.; Drendel, D.B.; Odegaard, T.K.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Design Aspects of Hybrid Adsorbent?Membrane Reactors for Hydrogen Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design Aspects of Hybrid Adsorbent?Membrane Reactors for Hydrogen Production ... For hydrogen to replace fossil fuels as the fuel of choice for mobile applications, it will require the creation of a production and delivery infrastructure equivalent to those that currently exist for fossil fuels. ...

Babak Fayyaz; Aadesh Harale; Byoung-Gi Park; Paul K. T. Liu; Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2005-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

110

Spring design for use in the core of a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spring design particularly suitable for use in the core of a nuclear reactor includes one surface having a first material oriented in a longitudinal direction, and another surface having a second material oriented in a transverse direction. The respective surfaces exhibit different amounts of irraditation induced strain.

Willard, Jr., H. James (Bethel Park, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Plasma engineering design of a compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR)  

SciTech Connect

The rationale for and the characteristics of the high-power-density Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to key plasma engineering aspects of the conceptual design, including plasma operations, current drive, and impurity/ash control by means of pumped limiters or magnetic divertors. A brief description of the Fusion-Power-Core integration is given.

Bathke, C.G.; Embrechts, M.J.; Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

11/04/02 G. W. Rubloff AVS 2002 MS MoA5 1 Spatially Programmable Reactor Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) reactor design · Process change impacts (often degrades) uniformity · Process optimization is constrained11/04/02 G. W. Rubloff ­ AVS 2002 ­ MS MoA5 1 Spatially Programmable Reactor Design: Toward a New recipe logic and timingProcess optimization requiresProcess optimization requires tradeoffs between

Rubloff, Gary W.

113

NEET In-Pile Ultrasonic Sensor Enablement-FY 2012 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Several Department Of Energy-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development, Advanced Reactor Concepts, Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Plant programs, are investigating new fuels and materials for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials when irradiated. The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) in-pile instrumentation development activities are focused upon addressing cross-cutting needs for DOE-NE irradiation testing by providing higher fidelity, real-time data, with increased accuracy and resolution from smaller, compact sensors that are less intrusive. Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential to measure a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes, under harsh irradiation test conditions. There are two primary issues associated with in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors. The first is transducer survivability. The ability of ultrasonic transducer materials to maintain their useful properties during an irradiation must be demonstrated. The second issue is signal processing. Ultrasonic testing is typically performed in a lab or field environment, where the sensor and sample are accessible. Due to the harsh nature of in-pile testing, and the range of measurements that are desired, an enhanced signal processing capability is needed to make in-pile ultrasonic sensors viable. This project addresses these technology deployment issues.

JE Daw; JL Rempe; BR Tittmann; B Reinhardt; P Ramuhalli; R Montgomery; HT Chien

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Documents Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Documents Feasibility Study (PDF) Proposed Remedial Action Plan (PDF) Record of Decision (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the BGRR Pile (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the Bioshield (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the BGRR Cap (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Explanation of Significant Differences (PDF) (4/12) NYSDEC Approval Letter for BGRR ESD (PDF) (5/12) USEPA Approval Letter for BGRR ESD (PDF) (6/12) DOE BGRR ESD Transmittal Letter (PDF) (7/12) Remedial Design Implementation Report (PDF) (12/11) Completion Reports Removal of the Above-Ground Ducts and Preparation of the Instrument House (708) for Removal (PDF) - April 2002 Below-Ground Duct Outlet Air Coolers, Filters and Primary Liner Removal (PDF) - April 2005 Canal and Deep Soil Pockets Excavation and Removal (PDF) - August

115

Assessment of molten debris freezing in a severe RIA in-pile test. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

An understanding of the freezing of molten debris on cold core structures following a hypothetical core meltdown accident in a light water reactor (LWR) is of importance to reactor safety analysis. The purpose of the present investigation was to analyze the transient freezing of the molten debris produced in a severe reactivity initiated accident (RIA) scoping test, designated RIA-ST-4, which was performed in the Power Burst Facility and simulated a BWR control rod drop accident. In the RIA-ST-4 experiment, a single, unirradiated, 20 wt % enriched, UO/sub 2/ fuel rod contained within a Zircaloy flow shroud was subjected to a single power burst which deposited a total energy of about 700 cal/g UO/sub 2/. This energy deposition is well above what is possible in a commercial LWR during a hypothetical control rod drop (BWR) or ejection (PWR) accident. However, the performance of such an in-pile test has provided important information regarding molten debris movement, relocation, and freezing on cold walls.

El-Genk, M.S.; Moore, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Space power reactor in-core thermionic multicell evolutionary (S-prime) design  

SciTech Connect

A 5- to 40-kWe moderated in-core thermionic space nuclear power system (TI-SNPS) concept was developed to address the TI-SNPS program requirements. The 40-kWe baseline design uses multicell Thermionic Fuel Elements (TFEs) in a zirconium hydride moderated reactor to achieve a specific mass of 18.2 We/kg and a net end-of-mission (EOM) efficiency of 8.2%. The reactor is cooled with a single NaK-78 pumped loop, which rejects the heat through a 24 m[sup 2] heat pipe space radiator.

Determan, W.R. (Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, anoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States)); Van Hagan, T.H. (General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-9784 (United States))

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Secondary heat exchanger design and comparison for advanced high temperature reactor  

SciTech Connect

Next generation nuclear reactors such as the advanced high temperature reactor (AHTR) are designed to increase energy efficiency in the production of electricity and provide high temperature heat for industrial processes. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process heat transport system. This study considers two different types of heat exchangers - helical coiled heat exchanger and printed circuit heat exchanger - as possible options for the AHTR secondary heat exchangers with distributed load analysis and comparison. Comparison is provided for all different cases along with challenges and recommendations. (authors)

Sabharwall, P. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Kim, E. S. [Seoul National Univ., P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Siahpush, A.; McKellar, M.; Patterson, M. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fuel performance models for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design  

SciTech Connect

Mechanistic fuel performance models are used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design and licensing to predict failure and fission product release. Fuel particles manufactured with defective or missing SiC, IPyC, or fuel dispersion in the buffer fail at a level of less than 5 x 10/sup -4/ fraction. These failed particles primarily release metallic fission products because the OPyC remains intact on 90% of the particles and retains gaseous isotopes. The predicted failure of particles using performance models appears to be conservative relative to operating reactor experience.

Stansfield, O.M.; Simon, W.A.; Baxter, A.M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Thermal analysis and design of a passive reflux condenser for the simplified boiling water reactor  

SciTech Connect

At present, the advanced light water reactors (ALWRS) in the United States are being designed to remove reactor decay heat for a period of 72 h following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The water in the pools external to the containment is evaporated or boiled off to remove the decay heat. It is presumed that the water in the pools can be replenished within 72 h through operator actions or outside assistance. Some countries in Europe require that the plant be designed to remove the reactor decay heat for a much longer duration than 72 h without external assistance. This paper presents an analysis and design of a passive heat exchanger called a reflux condenser (RC), which was considered for an ALWR-the 600-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor. The RC is required to condense the steam formed when the water in the pool in which the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) is immersed boils following a LOCA. The RCs are nuclear non-safety related. This paper presents steady-state performance of an RC at various outdoor air dry-bulb temperatures under still air conditions.

Bijlani, C.; Patti, F. (Burns Roe Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States)); Prasad, V. (SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

SCW Pressure-Channel Nuclear Reactors: Some Design Features and Concepts  

SciTech Connect

Concepts of nuclear reactors cooled with water at supercritical pressures were studied as early as the 1950's and 1960's in the USA and Russia. After a 30-year break, the idea of developing nuclear reactors cooled with supercritical water (SCW) became attractive again as the ultimate development path for water-cooling. The main objectives of using SCW in nuclear reactors are 1) to increase the thermal efficiency of modern nuclear power plants (NPPs) from 33 -- 35% to about 40 -- 45%, and 2) to decrease capital and operational costs and hence decrease electrical energy costs ({approx}$ 1000 US/kW). SCW NPPs will have much higher operating parameters compared to modern NPPs (pressure about 25 MPa and outlet temperature up to 625 deg. C), and a simplified flow circuit, in which steam generators, steam dryers, steam separators, etc., can be eliminated. Also, higher SCW temperatures allow direct thermo-chemical production of hydrogen at low cost, due to increased reaction rates. Pressure-channel SCW nuclear reactor concepts are being developed in Canada and Russia. Design features related to both channels and fuel bundles are discussed in this paper. Also, Russian experience with operating supercritical steam heaters at NPP is presented. The main conclusion is that development of SCW pressure-channel nuclear reactors is feasible and significant benefits can be expected over other thermal energy systems. (authors)

Duffey, R.B.; Pioro, I.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. (Canada); Gabaraev, B.A.; Kuznetsov, Yu. N. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, ul.M. Krasnoselskaya, 2/8 Moscow, Moscow 107140 (Russian Federation)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wave equation prediction of pile bearing capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the number of blows required by the pile driving hammer to produce a unit penetration of the pile into the soil. The more common nomenclature is driving resistance or blow count, and these terms will be used interchangeably throughout 10 this work.... The units most often used are blows per inch or blows per foot. In general, the relationship between static soil resistance and dynamic driving resistance is nonlinear. Of the many factors which govern this relationship, those which are considered...

Bartoskewitz, Richard Edward

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

ORIGEN-ARP Cross-Section Libraries for Magnox, Advanced Gas-Cooled, and VVER Reactor Designs  

SciTech Connect

Cross-section libraries for the ORIGEN-ARP system were extended to include four non-U.S. reactor types: the Magnox reactor, the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor, the VVER-440, and the VVER-1000. Typical design and operational parameters for these four reactor types were determined by an examination of a variety of published information sources. Burnup simulation models of the reactors were then developed using the SAS2H sequence from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory SCALE code system. In turn, these models were used to prepare the burnup-dependent cross-section libraries suitable for use with ORIGEN-ARP. The reactor designs together with the development of the SAS2H models are described, and a small number of validation results using spent-fuel assay data are reported.

Murphy, BD

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

Chapter 1 - Reactor configurations and design parameters for thermochemical conversion of biomass into fuels, energy, and chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter describes reactors for thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuels, energy, and chemicals. The chapter covers basic definitions and concepts involved in biofuels and thermochemical conversion of biomass, and it also includes more advanced topics such as the main reactor configurations currently in use for thermochemical technologies, important parameters for reactor design, discussion of how parameters affect reactor performance, and several examples and case studies. The focus is on fast pyrolysis and gasification systems. The topics discussed include energy and carbon efficiencies, convenience of operation and scale-up, and several other parameters related to reactor design. After reading this chapter, the reader will understand the main characteristics of reactors for thermochemical conversion of biomass, their strengths, and their weaknesses for specific applications.

Fernando L.P. Resende

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN radio Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN radio Uranium dendrites These tiny branches, or "dendrites," of pure uranium form when engineers

125

Design and operation of a rotating drum radio frequency plasma reactor for the modification of free nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

A rotating drum rf plasma reactor was designed to functionalize the surface of nanoparticles and other unusually shaped substrates through plasma polymerization and surface modification. This proof-of-concept reactor design utilizes plasma polymerized allyl alcohol to add OH functionality to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The reactor design is adaptable to current plasma hardware, eliminating the need for an independent reactor setup. Plasma polymerization performed on Si wafers, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles supported on Si wafers, and freely rotating Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles demonstrated the utility of the reactor for a multitude of processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface of the substrates prior to and after plasma deposition, and scanning electron microscopy was used to verify that no extensive change in the size or shape of the nanoparticles occurred because of the rotating motion of the reactor. The reactor design was also extended to a non-depositing NH{sub 3} plasma modification system to demonstrate the reactor design is effective for multiple plasma processes.

Shearer, Jeffrey C.; Fisher, Ellen R. [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

DESIGN OF A TOKAMAK FUSION REACTOR FIRST WALL ARMOR AGAINST NEUTRAL BEAM IMPINGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hoffman, et. a1. , "Fusion Reactor First Wall Cooling forTheir Signif- icance in Fusion Reactors," Fifth ConferenceProb- lems in Toroidal Fusion Reactors," Fifth Conference

Myers, Richard Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Modular HTGR systems design and cost summary. [Methane reforming; steam cycle-cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary description of the preconceptual design and energy product costs of the modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The reactor system was studied for two applications: (1) reforming of methane to produce synthesis gas and (2) steam cycle/cogeneration to produce process steam and electricity.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants  

SciTech Connect

Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed.

McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The technique and preliminary results of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel testing in the MIR reactor  

SciTech Connect

In March 2007 in-pile testing of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel elements was started in the MIR reactor. Four prototype fuel elements for Uzbekistan WWR SM reactor are being tested simultaneously - two of tube type design and two of pin type design. The dismountable irradiation devices were constructed for intermediate reloading and inspection of fuel elements during reactor testing. The objective of the test is to obtain the experimental results for determination of more reliable design and licensing fuel elements for conversion of the WWR SM reactor. The heat power of fuel elements is measured on-line by thermal balance method. The distribution of fission density and burn-up of uranium in the volume of elements are calculated by using the MIR reactor MCU code (Monte-Carlo) model. In this paper the design of fuel elements, the technique, main parameters and preliminary results are described. (author)

Izhutov, A.L.; Starkov, V.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Fedoseev, V.Ye. [Research Reactor Complex, RIAR, 433510, Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk Region (Russian Federation); Dobrikova, I.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Suprun, V.B. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, P. O. Box 369, 123060, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kartashov, Ye.F.; Lukichev, V.A. [Research and Development Institute of Nuclear Energy and Industry, P. O. Box 788, 107014, Moscow (Russian Federation); Troyanov, V.M.; Enin, A.A.; Tkachev, A.A. [OAO 'TVEL' 119017, ul. B. Ordinka 24/26, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Study of Fast Reactor Fuel Transmutation in a Candidate Dispersion Fuel Design  

SciTech Connect

Dispersion fuels represent a significant departure from typical ceramic fuels to address swelling and radiation damage in high burnup fuel. Such fuels use a manufacturing process in which fuel particles are encapsulated within a non-fuel matrix. Dispersion fuels have been studied since 1997 as part of an international effort to develop and test very high density fuel types for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program.[1] The Idaho National Laboratory is performing research in the development of an innovative dispersion fuel concept that will meet the challenges of transuranic (TRU) transmutation by providing an integral fission gas plenum within the fuel itself, to eliminate the swelling that accompanies the irradiation of TRU. In this process, a metal TRU vector produced in a separations process is atomized into solid microspheres. The dispersion fuel process overcoats the microspheres with a mixture of resin and hollow carbon microspheres to create a TRUC. The foam may then be heated and mixed with a metal power (e.g., Zr, Ti, or Si) and resin to form a matrix metal carbide, that may be compacted and extruded into fuel elements. In this paper, we perform reactor physics calculations for a core loaded with the conceptual fuel design. We will assume a “typical” TRU vector and a reference matrix density. We will employ a fuel and core design based on the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design.[2] Using the CSAS6 and TRITON modules of the SCALE system [3] for preliminary scoping studies, we will demonstrate the feasibility of reactor operations. This paper will describe the results of these analyses.

Mark DeHart; Hongbin Zhang; Eric Shaber; Matthew Jesse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Manhattan Project: More Piles and Plutonium, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. MORE PILES AND PLUTONIUM "Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. MORE PILES AND PLUTONIUM (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 At the University of Chicago, meanwhile, Arthur Compton had consolidated most fission research at his new Metallurgical Laboratory(Met Lab). Compton decided to combine all pile research by stages. He continued to fund Enrico Fermi's pile research at Columbia University, while Fermi began preparations to move his work to Chicago. Funding continued as well for the theoretical work of Eugene Wigner at Princeton and of J. Robert Oppenheimer at the University of California, Berkeley. Compton also appointed Leo Szilard head of materials acquisition and arranged for Glenn T. Seaborg to move his plutonium work from Berkeley to Chicago in April 1942.

132

Analysis of Reference Design for Nuclear-Assisted Hydrogen Production at 750°C Reactor Outlet Temperature  

SciTech Connect

The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This report describes the resulting new INL reference design coupled to two alternative HTGR power conversion systems, a Steam Rankine Cycle and a Combined Cycle (a Helium Brayton Cycle with a Steam Rankine Bottoming Cycle). Results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions when coupled to the two different power cycles are also presented. A 600 MWt high temperature gas reactor coupled with a Rankine steam power cycle at a thermal efficiency of 44.4% can produce 1.85 kg/s of hydrogen and 14.6 kg/s of oxygen. The same capacity reactor coupled with a combined cycle at a thermal efficiency of 42.5% can produce 1.78 kg/s of hydrogen and 14.0 kg/s of oxygen.

Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Design and analysis of megawatt-class heat-pipe reactor concepts  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in finding an alternative to diesel-powered systems at locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. One promising option is a 1- to 10-MW mobile reactor system, that could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term ({>=} 5 years) power in any environment. The reactor and required infrastructure could be transported to any location within one or a few standard transport containers. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than 'traditional' reactors that rely on pumped coolant through the core. This paper examines a heat pipe reactor that is fabricated and shipped as six identical core segments. Each core segment includes a heat-pipe-to-gas heat exchanger that is coupled to the condenser end of the heat pipes. The reference power conversion system is a CO{sub 2}-Brayton system. The segments by themselves are deeply subcritical during transport, and they would be locked into an operating configuration (with control inserted) at the final destination. Two design options are considered: a near-term option and an advanced option. The near-term option is a 5-MWt concept that uses uranium-dioxide fuel, a stainless-steel structure, and potassium as the heat-pipe working fluid. The advanced option is a 15-MWt concept that uses uranium-nitride fuel, a molybdenum/TZM structure, and sodium as the heat-pipe working fluid. The materials used in the advanced option allow for higher temperatures and power densities, and enhanced power throughput in the heat pipes. Higher powers can be obtained from both concepts by increasing the core size and the number of heat pipes. (authors)

Poston, D.; Kapernick, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS C921, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Conceptual design of fast-ignition laser fusion reactor FALCON-D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new conceptual design of the laser fusion power plant FALCON-D (Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept with a Dry wall chamber) has been proposed. The fast-ignition method can achieve sufficient fusion gain for a commercial operation (~100) with about 10 times smaller fusion yield than the conventional central ignition method. FALCON-D makes full use of this property and aims at designing with a compact dry wall chamber (5–6?m radius). 1D/2D simulations by hydrodynamic codes showed a possibility of achieving sufficient gain with a laser energy of 400?kJ, i.e. a 40?MJ target yield. The design feasibility of the compact dry wall chamber and the solid breeder blanket system was shown through thermomechanical analysis of the dry wall and neutronics analysis of the blanket system. Moderate electric output (~400?MWe) can be achieved with a high repetition (30?Hz) laser. This dry wall reactor concept not only reduces several difficulties associated with a liquid wall system but also enables a simple cask maintenance method for the replacement of the blanket system, which can shorten the maintenance period. The basic idea of the maintenance method for the final optics system has also been proposed. Some critical R&D issues required for this design are also discussed.

T. Goto; Y. Someya; Y. Ogawa; R. Hiwatari; Y. Asaoka; K Okano; A. Sunahara; T. Johzaki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Field tests of a small instrumented pile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

made simultaneously. A mal. hematical model which describes thc &a&ion of a pilc- soil system during pile driving is examined. I. oad t&. -!. data is to evaluate soil damping constants in accordance with thc mathcc&ati- cal model. The load test data... made simultaneously. A mal. hematical model which describes thc &a&ion of a pilc- soil system during pile driving is examined. I. oad t&. -!. data is to evaluate soil damping constants in accordance with thc mathcc&ati- cal model. The load test data...

Korb, Kenneth Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Variability of Natural Dust Erosion from a Coal Pile  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of fugitive dust emissions from a pile of crushed coal revealed that, in addition to emitting dust to the atmosphere during periods of pile management (human) activity, dust is also emitted during periods without human activity. This “...

Stephen F. Mueller; Jonathan W. Mallard; Qi Mao; Stephanie L. Shaw

138

Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor balance of plant and supporting systems design  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the second in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. It focuses, in particular, upon the supporting systems and the balance of plant (BOP) designs of the Westinghouse SMR. Several Westinghouse SMR systems are classified as safety, and are critical to the safe operation of the Westinghouse SMR. These include the protection and monitoring system (PMS), the passive core cooling system (PXS), and the spent fuel cooling system (SFS) including pools, valves, and piping. The Westinghouse SMR safety related systems include the instrumentation and controls (I and C) as well as redundant and physically separated safety trains with batteries, electrical systems, and switch gears. Several other incorporated systems are non-safety related, but provide functions for plant operations including defense-in-depth functions. These include the chemical volume control system (CVS), heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems, component cooling water system (CCS), normal residual heat removal system (RNS) and service water system (SWS). The integrated performance of the safety-related and non-safety related systems ensures the safe and efficient operation of the Westinghouse SMR through various conditions and transients. The turbine island consists of the turbine, electric generator, feedwater and steam systems, moisture separation systems, and the condensers. The BOP is designed to minimize assembly time, shipping challenges, and on-site testing requirements for all structures, systems, and components. (authors)

Memmott, M. J.; Stansbury, C.; Taylor, C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Core and System Design of Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features  

SciTech Connect

In order to ensure the sustainable energy supply in Japan, research and developments of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) have been performed. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as high burn-up, long operation cycle, multiple recycling of plutonium and effective utilization of uranium resources, based on the matured LWR technologies. MOX fuel assemblies in the tight-lattice fuel rod arrangement are used to reduce the moderation of neutron, and hence, to increase the conversion ratio. The conceptual design has been accomplished for the small 330 MWe RMWR core with the discharge burn-up of 60 GWd/t and the operation cycle of 24 months, under the natural circulation cooling of the core. A breeding ratio of 1.01 and the negative void reactivity coefficient are simultaneously realized in the design. In the plant system design, the passive safety features are intended to be utilized mainly to improve the economy. At present, a hybrid one under the combination of the passive and the active components, and a fully passive one are proposed. The former has been evaluated to reduce the cost for the reactor components. (authors)

Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Yonomoto, Taisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Takeda, Renzo; Moriya, Kumiaki [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan); Kanno, Minoru [The Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Ultracold neutron source at the PULSTAR reactor: Engineering design and cryogenic testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Construction is completed and commissioning is in progress for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University. The source utilizes two stages of neutron moderation, one in heavy water at room temperature and the other in solid methane at ~ 40 K , followed by a converter stage, solid deuterium at 5 K, that allows a single down scattering of cold neutrons to provide UCN. The UCN source rolls into the thermal column enclosure of the PULSTAR reactor, where neutrons will be delivered from a bare face of the reactor core by streaming through a graphite-lined assembly. The source infrastructure, i.e., graphite-lined assembly, heavy-water system, gas handling system, and helium liquefier cooling system, has been tested and all systems operate as predicted. The research program being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source includes the physics of UCN production, fundamental particle physics, and material surface studies of nanolayers containing hydrogen. In the present paper we report details of the engineering and cryogenic design of the facility as well as results of critical commissioning tests without neutrons.

E. Korobkina; G. Medlin; B. Wehring; A.I. Hawari; P.R. Huffman; A.R. Young; B. Beaumont; G. Palmquist

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Steady state temperature profiles in two simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies with identical design specifications  

SciTech Connect

Temperature data from steady state tests in two parallel, simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies with identical design specifications have been compared to determine the extent to which they agree. In general, good agreement was found in data at low flows and in bundle-center data at higher flows. Discrepancies in the data wre noted near the bundle edges at higher flows. An analysis of bundle thermal boundary conditions showed that the possible eccentric placement of one bundle within the housing could account for these discrepancies.

Levin, A.E.; Carbajo, J.J.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Rose, S.D.; Wantland, J.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The applicability of the Ras Tanajib pile capacity method to long offshore piles  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of the Ras Tanajib pile capacity method to piles driven to penetrations greater than 30 m in the very dense sands of the Safaniya Field of the Arabian Gulf is investigated. Comparisons of observed and predicted blow counts, and measured and computed soil resistances to driving are presented. Blow counts are predicted using procedures recommended by Stevens, Wiltsie, and Turton (1982). The measured soil resistance to driving is the Case-Goble bearing capacity computed using a damping coefficient of 0.20. The computed soil resistance to driving is the lower and upper bound values computed for a plugged pile. CAPWAP analyses are performed at final penetration to confirm pile capacities computed using the Ras Tanajib method.

Stevens, R.F.; Al-Shafei, K.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energy Piles in Cooling Dominated Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this be true in hot, cooling dominated climates? To achieve the ultimate goal and answer the above question, this study considered the different elements of a full SGES, namely: soil, climate, energy pile, and ground source heat pump. First, The need for a new...

Akrouch, Ghassan

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Study of design parameters for minimizing the cost of electricity of tokamak fusion power reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of the design parameters on the cost of electricity (COE) is studied through a parameter survey in order to minimize the COE. Three kinds of operating modes are considered; first stability (FS), second stability (SS) and reversed shear (RS). The COE is calculated by a coupled physics-engineering-cost computer system code. Deuterium-tritium type, 1000 MW(e) at electric bus bar, steady state tokamak reactors with aspect ratios A from 3 to 4.5 are assumed. Several criteria are used for the parameter survey; for example, (a) the thermal to electrical conversion efficiency is assumed to be 34.5% using water as a coolant; (b) the average neutron wall load must not exceed 5 MW/m2 for plasma major radius Rp > 5 m; (c) a 2 MeV neutral beam injector (NBI) is applied. It is found that the RS operating mode most minimizes the COE among the three operating modes by reducing the cost of the current drive and the coils and structures. The cost-minimized RS reactor can attain high fbs, high ?N and low q95 at the same time, which results in a short Rp of 5.1 m, a low Bmax of the maximum magnetic toroidal field (TF) of the TF coils of 13 T and a low A of 3.0. It can be concluded that this cost-minimized RS reactor is the most cost-minimized within the frameworks of this study. This cost-minimized RS reactor has two advantages: one is that a Bmax = 13 T TF coil can be made by use of ITER coil technology and the other is that the same cooling technology as that of ITER (water cooling) can be used.

K. Tokimatsu; K. Okano; T. Yoshida; K. Yamaji; M. Katsurai

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis CAPABILITIES Overview Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Nuclear Systems Technologies Risk and Safety Assessments Nonproliferation and National Security Materials Testing Engineering Computation & Design Engineering Experimentation Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis We have played a major role in the design and analysis of most existing and past reactor types and of many

150

Safeguards-by-Design: Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Pebble Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The following is a guidance document from a series prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to assist facility designers and operators in implementing international Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). SBD has two main objectives: (1) to avoid costly and time consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear fuel cycle facilities and (2) to make the implementation of international safeguards more effective and efficient at such facilities. In the long term, the attainment of these goals would save industry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) time, money, and resources and be mutually beneficial. This particular safeguards guidance document focuses on pebble fuel high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). The purpose of the IAEA safeguards system is to provide credible assurance to the international community that nuclear material and other specified items are not diverted from peaceful nuclear uses. The safeguards system consists of the IAEA’s statutory authority to establish safeguards; safeguards rights and obligations in safeguards agreements and additional protocols; and technical measures implemented pursuant to those agreements. Of foremost importance is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to a 1992 IAEA Board of Governors decision, countries must: notify the IAEA of a decision to construct a new nuclear facility as soon as such decision is taken; provide design information on such facilities as the designs develop; and provide detailed design information based on construction plans at least 180 days prior to the start of construction, and on "as-built" designs at least 180 days before the first receipt of nuclear material. Ultimately, the design information will be captured in an IAEA Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ), prepared by the facility operator, typically with the support of the facility designer. The IAEA will verify design information over the life of the project. This design information is an important IAEA safeguards tool. Since the main interlocutor with the IAEA in each country is the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC (or Regional Regulatory Authority, e.g. EURATOM), the responsibility for conveying this design information to the IAEA falls to the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC.

Philip Casey Durst; Mark Schanfein

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The effect of reactor design on the sustainability of grass biomethane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grass biomethane is a sustainable transport biofuel. It can meet the 60% greenhouse gas saving requirements (as compared to the replaced fossil fuel) specified in the EU Renewable Energy Directive, if allowance is made for carbon sequestration, green electricity is used and the vehicle is optimized for gaseous biomethane. The issue in this paper is the effect of the digester type on the overall emissions savings. Examining three digestion configurations; dry continuous (DCAD), wet continuous (WCAD), and a two phase system (SLBR-UASB), it was found that the reactor type can result in a variation of 15% in emissions savings. The system that as modeled produced most biogas, and fuelled a vehicle most distance, the two phase system (SLBR-UASB), was the least sustainable due to biogas losses in the dry batch step. The system as modeled which produced the least biogas (DCAD) was the most sustainable as the parasitic demands on the system were least. Optimal reactor design for sustainability criteria should maximize biogas production, while minimizing biogas losses and parasitic demands.

Anoop Singh; Abdul-Sattar Nizami; Nicholas E. Korres; Jerry D. Murphy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Design, development, and applications of a low-cost, dynamic neutron radiography system utilizing the TAMU NSC TRIGA reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SC'IENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT. AND APPLICATIONS OF A LOW ? COST, DYNAMIC NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY SYSTEM UTILIZING THE TAMU NSC TRIGA REACTOR A...DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT. AND APPLICATIONS OF A LOW ? COST, DYNAMIC NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY SYSTEM UTILIZING THE TAMU NSC TRIGA REACTOR A Thesis SC'OTT PATRIC'If ItIIDGETT Submitted to the Ofhce of Graduate Studies of Texas AklVI I!niversity rn...

Midgett, Scott Patrick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Conceptual design of a passively safe thorium breeder Pebble Bed Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract More sustainable nuclear power generation might be achieved by combining the passive safety and high temperature applications of the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) design with the resource availability and favourable waste characteristics of the thorium fuel cycle. It has already been known that breeding can be achieved with the thorium fuel cycle inside a Pebble Bed Reactor if reprocessing is performed. This is also demonstrated in this work for a cylindrical core with a central driver zone, with 3 g heavy metal pebbles for enhanced fission, surrounded by a breeder zone containing 30 g thorium pebbles, for enhanced conversion. The main question of the present work is whether it is also possible to combine passive safety and breeding, within a practical operating regime, inside a thorium Pebble Bed Reactor. Therefore, the influence of several fuel design, core design and operational parameters upon the conversion ratio and passive safety is evaluated. A Depressurized Loss of Forced Cooling (DLOFC) is considered the worst safety scenario that can occur within a PBR. So, the response to a DLOFC with and without scram is evaluated for several breeder PBR designs using a coupled DALTON/THERMIX code scheme. With scram it is purely a heat transfer problem (THERMIX) demonstrating the decay heat removal capability of the design. In case control rods cannot be inserted, the temperature feedback of the core should also be able to counterbalance the reactivity insertion by the decaying xenon without fuel temperatures exceeding 1600 °C. Results show that high conversion ratios (CR  > 0.96) and passive safety can be combined in a thorium PBR within a practical operating regime, which means a thermal power of 100 MW or higher, 1000 days total residence time of the breeder pebbles and fuel pebble handling times longer than 14.5 s, like in the HTR-PM. With an increased U-233 content of the fresh driver pebbles (18 w%), breeding (CR = 1.0135) can already be achieved for a 220 cm core and 80 cm driver zone radius. While the decay heat removal is sufficient in this design, the temperature feedback of the undermoderated driver pebbles is too weak to compensate the reactivity insertion due to the xenon decay during a DLOFC without scram. With a lower U-233 content per driver pebble (10 w%) it was found possible to combine breeding (CR = 1.0036) and passive safety for a 300 cm core and 100 cm driver zone radius, but this does require more than a doubling of the pebble handling speed and a high reprocessing rate of the fuel pebbles. The maximum fuel temperature during a DLOFC without scram was simulated to be 1481 °C for this design, still quite a bit below the TRISO failure temperature. The maximum reactivity insertion due to an ingress of water vapour is also limited with a value of +1497 pcm.

F.J. Wols; J.L. Kloosterman; D. Lathouwers; T.H.J.J. van der Hagen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Comparison of the Performance of Compact Neutrino Detector Designs for Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been an increasing interest in the monitoring of nuclear fuel for power reactors by detecting the anti-neutrinos produced during operation. Small liquid scintillator detectors have already demonstrated sensitivity to operational power levels, but more sensitive monitoring requires improvements in the efficiency and uniformity of these detectors. In this work, we use a montecarlo simulation to investigate the detector performance of four different detector configurations. Based on the analysis of neutron detection efficiency and positron energy response, we find that the optimal detector design will depend on the goals and restrictions of the specific installation or application. We have attempted to present the relevant information so that future detector development can proceed in a profitable direction.

McKeown, R W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Stress Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel in the Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Reactor Design  

SciTech Connect

High fuel temperatures and resulting fuel particle coating stresses can be expected in a Pu and minor actinide fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (400 MWth) design as compared to the ’standard’ UO2 fueled core. The high discharge burnup aimed for in this Deep-Burn design results in increased power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed near the inner and outer reflector. Furthermore, the pebble power in a multi-pass in-core pebble recycling scheme is relatively high for pebbles that make their first core pass. This might result in an increase of the mechanical failure of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the PBMR design. To investigate the integrity of the particle fuel coatings as a function of the irradiation time (i.e. burnup), core position and during a Loss Of Forced Cooling (LOFC) incident the PArticle STress Analysis code (PASTA) has been coupled to the PEBBED code for neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and depletion analysis of the core. Two deep burn fuel types (Pu with or without initial MA fuel content) have been investigated with the new code system for normal and transient conditions including the effect of the statistical variation of thickness of the coating layers.

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

An autonomous long-term fast reactor system and the principal design limitations of the concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Actinides MOX Mixed OXide MSR Molten-Salt Reactors NERI Nuclear Energy Research Initiative vii PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RGPu Reactor-Grade Plutonium SCNES Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System STAR Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor... of LWR?s, the drastic increase of Am and Cm inventories are observed after uranium fuel irradiation and the second recycling of MOX fuel.1 Therefore, partitioning and transmutation of the recovered MA?s could significantly reduce the long...

Tsvetkova, Galina Valeryevna

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Design and testing of a boron carbide capsule for spectral-tailoring in mixed-spectrum reactors  

SciTech Connect

A boron carbide capsule has been designed and used for spectral-tailoring experiments at the TRIGA reactor at Washington State Univ.. Irradiations were conducted in pulsed mode and in continuous operation for up to 4 h. A cadmium cover was used to reduce thermal heating. The neutron spectrum calculated with the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code was found to be in good agreement with reactor dosimetry measurements using the STAY'SL computer code. The neutron spectrum resembles that of a fast reactor. The design of a capsule using boron carbide fully enriched in {sup 10}B shows that it is possible to produce a neutron spectrum similar to that of {sup 235}U fission. (authors)

Greenwood, L.R.; Wittman, R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pierson, B.P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Metz, L.A.; Payne, R.; Finn, E.C.; Friese, J.I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

In-Pile SCC Growth Behavior of Type 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature Water at JMTR  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is one of the critical concerns when stainless steel components have been in service in light water reactors (LWRs) for a long period. In general, IASCC can be reproduced on the materials irradiated over a certain threshold fluence level of fast neutron by the post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). It is, however, considered that the reproduced IASCC by PIEs must be carefully compared with the actual IASCC in nuclear power plants, because the actual IASCC occurs in the core under simultaneous effects of radiation, stress and high temperature water environment. In the research field of IASCC, mainly PIEs for irradiated materials have been carried out, because there are many difficulties on SCC tests under neutron irradiation. Hence as a part of the key techniques for in-pile SCC tests, we have embarked on a development of the test technique to obtain information concerning effects of applied stress level, water chemistry, irradiation conditions, etc. A high temperature water loop facility was installed at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) to carry out the in-pile IASCC testing under a framework of cooperative research program between JAERI and the JAPC. In-pile IASCC growth tests have been successfully carried out using the compact tension (CT) type specimens of type 304 stainless steel that had been pre-irradiated up to a neutron fluence level around 1 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} before the in-pile testing since 2004. The tests were carried out in pure water simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) coolant condition. In the paper, results of the in-pile SCC growth tests will be discussed comparing with the result obtained by PIEs from a viewpoint of the synergistic effects on IASCC. (authors)

Yoshiyuki Kaji; Hirokazu Ugachi; Takashi Tsukada; Yoshinori Matsui; Masao Ohmi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Nobuaki Nagata; Koji Dozaki; Hideki Takiguchi [Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Safeguards-by-Design:Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Prismatic Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Introduction and Purpose The following is a guidance document from a series prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to assist facility designers and operators in implementing international Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). SBD has two main objectives: (1) to avoid costly and time consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear fuel cycle facilities and (2) to make the implementation of international safeguards more effective and efficient at such facilities. In the long term, the attainment of these goals would save industry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) time, money, and resources and be mutually beneficial. This particular safeguards guidance document focuses on prismatic fuel high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). The purpose of the IAEA safeguards system is to provide credible assurance to the international community that nuclear material and other specified items are not diverted from peaceful nuclear uses. The safeguards system consists of the IAEA’s statutory authority to establish safeguards; safeguards rights and obligations in safeguards agreements and additional protocols; and technical measures implemented pursuant to those agreements. Of foremost importance is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to a 1992 IAEA Board of Governors decision, countries must: notify the IAEA of a decision to construct a new nuclear facility as soon as such decision is taken; provide design information on such facilities as the designs develop; and provide detailed design information based on construction plans at least 180 days prior to the start of construction, and on "as-built" designs at least 180 days before the first receipt of nuclear material. Ultimately, the design information will be captured in an IAEA Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ), prepared by the facility operator, typically with the support of the facility designer. The IAEA will verify design information over the life of the project. This design information is an important IAEA safeguards tool. Since the main interlocutor with the IAEA in each country is the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC (or Regional Regulatory Authority, e.g. EURATOM), the responsibility for conveying this design information to the IAEA falls to the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC. For the nuclear industry to reap the benefits of SBD (i.e. avoid cost overruns and construction schedule slippages), nuclear facility designers and operators should work closely with the State Regulatory Authority and IAEA as soon as a decision is taken to build a new nuclear facility. Ideally, this interaction should begin during the conceptual design phase and continue throughout construction and start-up of a nuclear facility. Such early coordination and planning could influence decisions on the design of the nuclear material processing flow-sheet, material storage and handling arrangements, and facility layout (including safeguards equipment), etc.

Mark Schanfein; Casey Durst

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Preliminary neutronics design of china lead-alloy cooled demonstration reactor (CLEAR-III) for nuclear waste transmutation  

SciTech Connect

China Lead-Alloy cooled Demonstration Reactor (CLEAR-III), which is the concept of lead-bismuth cooled accelerator driven sub-critical reactor for nuclear waste transmutation, was proposed and designed by FDS team in China. In this study, preliminary neutronics design studies have primarily focused on three important performance parameters including Transmutation Support Ratio (TSR), effective multiplication factor and blanket thermal power. The constraint parameters, such as power peaking factor and initial TRU loading, were also considered. In the specific design, uranium-free metallic dispersion fuel of (TRU-Zr)-Zr was used as one of the CLEAR-III fuel types and the ratio between MA and Pu was adjusted to maximize transmutation ratio. In addition, three different fuel zones differing in the TRU fraction of the fuel were respectively employed for this subcritical reactor, and the zone sizes and TRU fractions were determined such that the linear powers of these zones were close to each other. The neutronics calculations and analyses were performed by using Multi-Functional 4D Neutronics Simulation System named VisualBUS and nuclear data library HENDL (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library). In the preliminary design, the maximum TSRLLMA was {approx}11 and the blanket thermal power was {approx}1000 MW when the effective multiplication factor was 0.98. The results showed that good performance of transmutation could be achieved based on the subcritical reactor loaded with uranium-free fuel. (authors)

Chen, Z. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Southwest Science and Technology Univ., No.350 Shushanhu Road, Shushan District, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chen, Y.; Bai, Y.; Wang, W.; Chen, Z.; Hu, L.; Long, P. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

TOKOPS: Tokamak Reactor Operations Study: The influence of reactor operations on the design and performance of tokamaks with solid-breeder blankets: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reactor system operation and procedures have a profound impact on the conception and design of power plants. These issues are studied here using a model tokamak system employing a solid-breeder blanket. The model blanket is one which has evolved from the STARFIRE and BCSS studies. The reactor parameters are similar to those characterizing near-term fusion engineering reactors such as INTOR or NET (Next European Tokamak). Plasma startup, burn analysis, and methods for operation at various levels of output power are studied. A critical, and complicating, element is found to be the self-consistent electromagnetic response of the system, including the presence of the blanket and the resulting forces and loadings. Fractional power operation, and the strategy for burn control, is found to vary depending on the scaling law for energy confinement, and an extensive study is reported. Full-power reactor operation is at a neutron wall loading pf 5 MW/m/sup 2/ and a surface heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. The blanket is a pressurized steel module with bare beryllium rods and low-activation HT-9-(9-C-) clad LiAlO/sub 2/ rods. The helium coolant pressure is 5 MPa, entering the module at 297/sup 0/C and exiting at 550/sup 0/C. The system power output is rated at 1000 MW(e). In this report, we present our findings on various operational scenarios and their impact on system design. We first start with the salient aspects of operational physics. Time-dependent analyses of the blanket and balance of plant are then presented. Separate abstracts are included for each chapter.

Conn, R.W.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Firestone, M.A. (eds.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Conceptual design of the bimodal nuclear power system based on the ‘‘Romashka’’ type reactor with thermionic energy conversion system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents conceptual design of the bimodal space nuclear power system (NPS) based on the high?temperature reactor of ROMASHKA type with thermoninic energy conversion system. At the heart of the design is an employment of close?spaced thermionic diodes operating in a quasi?vacuum mode. The paper gives preliminary estimates of the NPS neutron?physical electric thermophysical and mass?dimensional parameters for the reactor electric power of 25 kW and propulsive thrust of about 80 N. Discussed are peculiarities of the combined mode wherein electric power is generated along with propulsive thrust. The paper contains results of the design studies performed by the Small Business ‘‘NP Energotech’’ under the Agreement with Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division and according to the Rocketdyne Division provided Design Requirements. Involved in the work was the team of specialists of RRC ‘‘Kurchatov Institute’’ ‘‘Red Star’’ State Enterprise and Research Institute of SPA ‘‘Luch’’

Nikolai N. Ponmarev?Stepnoi; Veniamin A. Usov; Yuri V. Nikolaev; Stanislav A. Yeriemin; Yevgeny Ye. Zhabotinski; Anatoly Ya. Galkin; Yevgeny D. Avdoshyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Offshore pile driving noise—Prediction through comprehensive model development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore wind energy is one of the most potent among renewables and thus the worldwide number of offshore wind turbines increases rapidly. The foundations of the wind turbines are typically fastened to the seabed by impact pile driving which comes along with a significant amount of waterborne noise. To protect the marine biosphere the use of noise mitigation systems like bubble curtains or cofferdams may become necessary. In this context the model-based prediction of underwater sound pressure levels as well as the design and optimization of effective sound mitigation measures by using numerical models is one of today’s challenges. The current work presents a modeling approach that consists of a near field finite element model and a far field propagation model. Furthermore it has been found necessary to generate a benchmark to allow for a qualitative and quantitative comparison between the manifold modeling approaches that are currently developed at various institutes and companies.

Marcel Ruhnau; Stephan Lippert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Computer analyses for the design, operation and safety of new isotope production reactors: A technology status review  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented on the currently available technologies for nuclear reactor analyses by computer. The important distinction is made between traditional computer calculation and advanced computer simulation. Simulation needs are defined to support the design, operation, maintenance and safety of isotope production reactors. Existing methods of computer analyses are categorized in accordance with the type of computer involved in their execution: micro, mini, mainframe and supercomputers. Both general and special-purpose computers are discussed. Major computer codes are described, with regard for their use in analyzing isotope production reactors. It has been determined in this review that conventional systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5, RETRAN, etc.) cannot meet four essential conditions for viable reactor simulation: simulation fidelity, on-line interactive operation with convenient graphics, high simulation speed, and at low cost. These conditions can be met by special-purpose computers (such as the AD100 of ADI), which are specifically designed for high-speed simulation of complex systems. The greatest shortcoming of existing systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5) is their mismatch between very high computational efforts and low simulation fidelity. The drift flux formulation (HIPA) is the viable alternative to the complicated two-fluid model. No existing computer code has the capability of accommodating all important processes in the core geometry of isotope production reactors. Experiments are needed (heat transfer measurements) to provide necessary correlations. It is important for the nuclear community, both in government, industry and universities, to begin to take advantage of modern simulation technologies and equipment. 41 refs.

Wulff, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

UNIT NUMBER SWMU 175 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

75 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside Security Fence, East of C-360 Building in KPDES Outfall Ditch 002. APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 400 ft...

169

Measured and predicted response for 100 piles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)CH N BACKI Le. BUTT DIAOI6 7 ER WEIGHT I SIZE NO OF F BLOttS 0 21 22 23 24 NO. I' F BI DIOS NO OF BLOWS 61 62 63 ltO. OF BLOIYS C cl Ibf b. LJ J G W Cb Cb Cb t IAATERIAL LLASTIC PHU FRTIE) CONDITION AT ENO OF ORIVINC...Donald (Head of Department) December 1985 ABSTRACT Measured and Predicted Response for 100 Piles. (Dec. 1985) Joseph Stephen Andeson, B. S. , Texas AAM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jean-Louis Briaud This report deals with the prediction...

Anderson, Joseph Stephen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are similar to those obtained with the traditional UO2 nuclear fuel.

Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dr. Hussein Khalil at Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technologies Subcommittee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue Blue ribbon presentation by Dr. Hussein Khalil Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Blue ribbon presentation by Hussein Khalil Hussein Khalil Dr. Hussein Khalil during the panel discussion Oct. 21, 2010 On October 12 Hussein Khalil, director of Argonne's Nuclear Engineering Division, participated in a Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technologies

172

Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Handling of Beyond Design Basis Events for Nuclear Power Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presenter: Bill Reckley, Chief, Policy and Support Branch, Japan Lessons-Learned Project Directorate, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

174

Design and development of a special purpose SAFT system for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear reactor vessels and piping components  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design details of a special purpose system for real-time nondestructive evaluation of reactor vessels and piping components. The system consists of several components and the report presents the results of the research aimed at the design of each component and recommendations based on the results. One major component of the NDE system, namely the real-time SAFT processor, was designed with sufficient details to enable the fabrications of a prototype by GARD Inc. under a subcontract from The University of Michigan and the report includes their results and conclusions.

Ganapathy, S.; Schmult, B.; Wu, W.S.; Dennehy, T.G.; Moayeri, N.; Kelly, P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Status of axial heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core design studies and research and development  

SciTech Connect

The current status of axial heterogeneous core (AHC) design development in Japan, which consists of an AHC core design in a pool-type demonstration fast breeder reactor (DFBR) and research and development activities supporting AHC core design, is presented. The DFBR core design objectives developed by The Japan Atomic Power Company include (a) favorable core seismic response, (b) core compactness, (c) high availability, and (d) lower fuel cycle cost. The AHC concept was selected as a reference pool-type DFBR core because it met these objectives more suitably than the homogeneous core (HOC). The AHC core layouts were optimized emphasizing the reduction of the burnup reactivity swing, peak fast fluence, and power peaking. The key performance parameters resulting from the AHC, such as flat axial power/flux distribution, lower peak fast fluence, lower burnup reactivity swing, etc., were evaluated in comparison with the HOC. The critical experiments at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute's Fast Critical Assembly facility demonstrate the key AHC performance characteristics. The large AHC engineering benchmark experiments using the zero-power plutonium reactor and the AHC fuel pin irradiation test program using the JOYO reactor are also presented.

Nakagawa, H.; Inagaki, T.; Yoshimi, H.; Shirakata, K.; Watari, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Inoue, K.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile comprises soaking the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution and distributing an oxygen-containing gas throughout the coal refuse pile for a time period sufficient to effect oxidation of coal contained in the coal refuse pile. The method further comprises leaching the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution to solubilize and extract the oxidized coal as alkali salts of humic acids and collecting the resulting solution containing the alkali salts of humic acids. Calcium hydroxide may be added to the solution of alkali salts of humic acid to form precipitated humates useable as a low-ash, low-sulfur solid fuel.

Yavorsky, Paul M. (Monongahela, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Current status of the development of high density LEU fuel for Russian research reactors  

SciTech Connect

One of the main directions of the Russian RERTR program is to develop U-Mo fuel and fuel elements/FA with this fuel. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. Many organizations in Russia, i.e. 'TVEL', RDIPE, RIAR, IRM, NPCC participate in the work. Two fuels are under development: dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel, as well two types of FA to use the dispersion U-Mo fuel: with tubular type fuel elements and with pin type fuel elements. The first stage of works was successfully completed. This stage included out-pile, in-pile and post irradiation examinations of U-Mo dispersion fuel in experimental tubular and pin fuel elements under parameters similar to operation conditions of Russian design pool-type research reactors. The results received both in Russia and abroad enabled to go on to the next stage of development which includes irradiation tests both of full-scale IRT pin-type and tube-type fuel assemblies with U-Mo dispersion fuel and of mini-fuel elements with modified U-Mo dispersion fuel and monolithic fuel. The paper gives a generalized review of the results of U-Mo fuel development accomplished by now. (author)

Vatulin, A.; Dobrikova, I.; Suprun, V.; Trifonov, Y. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise, A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), 123060 Rogov 5a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kartashev, E.; Lukichev, V. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise RDIPE, 101000 P.O. Box 788, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Advanced Test Reactor Safety Basis Upgrade Lessons Learned Relative to Design Basis Verification and Safety Basis Management  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The reactor also provides other irradiation services such as radioisotope production. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). An audit conducted by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (DOE OA) raised concerns that design conditions at the ATR were not adequately analyzed in the safety analysis and that legacy design basis management practices had the potential to further impact safe operation of the facility.1 The concerns identified by the audit team, and issues raised during additional reviews performed by ATR safety analysts, were evaluated through the unreviewed safety question process resulting in shutdown of the ATR for more than three months while these concerns were resolved. Past management of the ATR safety basis, relative to facility design basis management and change control, led to concerns that discrepancies in the safety basis may have developed. Although not required by DOE orders or regulations, not performing design basis verification in conjunction with development of the 10 CFR 830 Subpart B upgraded safety basis allowed these potential weaknesses to be carried forward. Configuration management and a clear definition of the existing facility design basis have a direct relation to developing and maintaining a high quality safety basis which properly identifies and mitigates all hazards and postulated accident conditions. These relations and the impact of past safety basis management practices have been reviewed in order to identify lessons learned from the safety basis upgrade process and appropriate actions to resolve possible concerns with respect to the current ATR safety basis. The need for a design basis reconstitution program for the ATR has been identified along with the use of sound configuration management principles in order to support safe and efficient facility operation.

G. L. Sharp; R. T. McCracken

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Design of a continuous-flow reactor for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy of solids in supercritical fluids  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the design and performance of a novel high-temperature and high-pressure continuous-flow reactor, which allows for x-ray absorption spectroscopy or diffraction in supercritical water and other fluids under high pressure and temperature. The in situ cell consists of a tube of sintered, polycrystalline aluminum nitride, which is tolerant to corrosive chemical media, and was designed to be stable at temperatures up to 500 deg. C and pressures up to 30 MPa. The performance of the reactor is demonstrated by the measurement of extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of a carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst during the continuous hydrothermal gasification of ethanol in supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 24 MPa.

Dreher, M.; De Boni, E.; Nachtegaal, M.; Wambach, J.; Vogel, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Design, construction, commissioning and use of a new cadmium-lined in-core irradiation tube for the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor  

SciTech Connect

As a result of several requests from reactor users, it was recently decided to install a new cadmium-lined in-core irradiation tube (CLICIT) in the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR). As the title implies, this paper will describe the complete sequence of this process, from the design, and design constraints through manufacture to the actual use of the tube. The design is such that it offers a significant degree of flexibility in use, while still strictly adhering to ALARA concepts. In order to keep costs down, the facility was designed, installed and commissioned by the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) staff and fabricated locally. As this facility is relatively cheap (about $2,000), and will fit all non-conversion TRIGAs other reactor owners may be interested in copying the OSTR tube design. (author)

Dodd, B.; Anderson, T.V

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optimal control of xenon concentration by observer design under reactor model uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

The state feedback in control theory enjoys many advantages, such as stabilization and improved transient response, which could be beneficially used for control of the xenon oscillation in a power reactor. It is, however, not possible in nuclear reactors to measure the state variables, such as xenon and iodine concentrations. For implementation of the optimal state feedback control law, it is thus necessary to estimate the unmeasurable state variables. This paper uses the Luenberger observer to estimate the xenon and iodine concentrations to be used in a linear quadratic problem with state feedback. To overcome the stiffness problem in reactor kinetics, a singular perturbation method is used.

Cho, Nam Z.; Yang, Chae Y.; Woo, Hae S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide the status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1995 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Optimized core design of a supercritical carbon dioxide-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spurred by the renewed interest in nuclear power, Gas-cooled Fast Reactors (GFRs) have received increasing attention in the past decade. Motivated by the goals of the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF), a GFR cooled ...

Handwerk, Christopher S. (Christopher Stanley), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Stability analysis of the boiling water reactor : methods and advanced designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) are known to be possible when a coolant undergoes considerable density reduction while passing through a heated channel. In the development of boiling water reactors (BWRs), there has been ...

Hu, Rui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

IoT-Based Maintenance Process Design for Fusion Reactor Remote Handling System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion is one of the most important ways ... to risk of ionizing radiation, the nuclear fusion reactor will relay on remote handling maintenance to ... the maintenance efficiency. The basic structure of fusion

Ruonan Zhang; Xinbao Liu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

An inverted pressurized water reactor design with twisted-tape swirl promoters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Inverted Fuel Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) concept was previously investigated and developed by Paolo Ferroni at MIT with the effort to improve the power density and capacity of current PWRs by modifying the core ...

Nguyen, Nghia T. (Nghia Tat)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Design and optimization of the heat rejection system for a liquid cooled thermionic space nuclear reactor power system  

SciTech Connect

The heat transport subsystem for a liquid metal cooled thermionic space nuclear power system was modelled using algorithms developed in support of previous nuclear power system study programs, which date back to the SNAP-10A flight system. The model was used to define the optimum dimensions of the various components in the heat transport subsystem subjected to the constraints of minimizing mass and achieving a launchable package that did not require radiator deployment. The resulting design provides for the safe and reliable cooling of the nuclear reactor in a proven lightweight design.

Moriarty, M.P. (Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International Corporation, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

Yoder, G.L.

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pebble bed reactor,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol.the AVR reactor,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol. 121,Operating Experience,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol.

Laufer, Michael Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UPTON, N.Y. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act UPTON, N.Y. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers are in the final stage of decommissioning a nuclear reactor after they recently removed thick steel shields once used to absorb neutrons produced for research. The Brookhaven National Laboratory is using $39 million from the Recovery Act to decommission the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, the world's first reactor built solely for peaceful research purposes. The decommissioning is slated for completion later this year and will end Office of Environmental Management legacy cleanup activities at the Lab. The neutron shields were located on the north and south sides of a 700-ton graphite pile. The three-inch-thick shields absorbed neutrons that escaped from the graphite pile. The shields also limited movement of the pile when the reactor was in opera-

192

Design change management in regulation of nuclear fleets: World nuclear association's working groups on Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing (CORDEL)  

SciTech Connect

The 60 year life of a reactor means that a plant will undergo change during its life. To ensure continuing safety, changes must be made with a full understanding of the design intent. With this aim, regulators require that each operating organisation should have a formally designated entity responsible for complete design knowledge in regard to plant safety. INSAG-19 calls such an entity 'Design Authority'. This requirement is difficult to achieve, especially as the number of countries and utilities operating plants increases. Some of these operating organisations will be new, and some will be small. For Gen III plants sold on a turnkey basis, it is even more challenging for the operating company to develop and retain the full knowledge needed for this role. CORDEL's Task Force entitled 'Design Change Management' is investigating options for effective design change management with the aim to support design standardization throughout a fleet's lifetime by means of enhanced international cooperation within industry and regulators. This paper starts with considering the causes of design change and identifies reasons for the increased beneficial involvement of the plant's original vendor in the design change process. A key central theme running through the paper is the definition of responsibilities for design change. Various existing mechanisms of vendor-operator interfaces over design change and how they are managed in different organisational and regulatory environments around the world are considered, with the functionality of Owners Groups and Design Authority being central. The roles played in the design change process by vendors, utilities, regulators, owners' groups and other organisations such as WANO are considered The aerospace industry approach to Design Authority has been assessed to consider what lessons might be learned. (authors)

Swinburn, R. [CORDEL DCM Task Force, Rolls-Royce Plc (United Kingdom); Borysova, I. [CORDEL, WNA, 22a St.James Sq., London SW1Y 4JH (United Kingdom); Waddington, J. [CORDEL Group (United Kingdom); Head, J. G. [CORDEL Group, GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy (United Kingdom); Raidis, Z. [CORDEL Group, Candu Energy (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Design of an Actinide-Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low-Cost Electricity  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) University Research Consortium (URC) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, material compatibility, plant engineering, and coolant activation. In the area of core neutronic design, the reactivity vs. burnup and discharge isotopics of both non-fertile and fertile fuels were evaluated. An innovative core for pure actinide burning that uses streaming, fertile-free fuel assemblies was studied in depth. This particular core exhibits excellent reactivity performance upon coolant voiding, even for voids that occur in the core center, and has a transuranic (TRU) destruction rate that is comparable to the proposed accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) facility. These studies suggest that a core can be designed to achieve a long life while maintaining safety and minimizing waste. In the area of material compatibility studies, an experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials has been designed and built at the INEEL. The INEEL forced-convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The corrosion cell is being used to test steel that is commercially available in the United States to temperatures above 650°C. Progress in plant engineering was made for two reactor concepts, one utilizing an indirect cycle with heat exchangers and the other utilizing a direct-contact steam cycle. The evaluation of the indirect cycle designs has investigated the effects of various parameters to increase electric production at full power. For the direct-contact reactor, major issues related to the direct-contact heat transfer rate and entrainment and carryover of liquid lead-bismuth to the turbine have been identified and analyzed. An economic analysis approach was also developed to determine the cost of electricity production in the lead-bismuth reactor. The approach will be formulated into a model and applied to develop scientific cost estimates for the different reactor designs and thus aid in the selection of the most economic option. In the area of lead-bismuth coolant activation, the radiological hazard was evaluated with particular emphasis on the direct-contact reactor. In this system, the lack of a physical barrier between the primary and secondary coolant favors the release of the alpha-emitter Po?210 and its transport throughout the plant. Modeling undertaken on the basis of the scarce information available in the literature confirmed the importance of this issue, as well as the need for experimental work to reduce the uncertainties on the basic characteristics of volatile polonium chemical forms.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Davis, Cliff Bybee; MIT folks

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Implementation of the SAM-CE Monte Carlo benchmark analysis capability for validating nuclear data and reactor design codes  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Data Center is continuing its program to improve the nuclear data base used as input for commercial reactor analysis and design. In the most recent phase of this project the Monte Carlo program SAM-CE, developed by the Mathematical Applications Group, Inc. (MAGI), was made operational at BNL. This program was implemented on the BNL-CDC-7600 Computer, and also on the PDP-10 in-house computer. The NNDC made operational and developed techniques for processing ENDF/B-V cross sections for SAM-CE. A limited ENDF/B-V based library was produced. Use of the SAM-CE program in thermal reactor problems was validated using detailed comparisons of results with other Monte Carlo codes such as RECAP, RCP01 and VIM as well as with experimental data.

Beer, M.; Rose, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Coal Pile Basin Project (4595), 5/31/2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Pile Basin Project (4595) Coal Pile Basin Project (4595) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: Submit by E-mail The proposed action is provide demolish and deactivate the coal pile basin to grade where practical and backfill below grade portion of basin; the remaining underground portion of the stock out conveyor structure, both entrances and backfill pit; and remove universal waste, conveyor belt, asbestos; and, miscellaneous shed type structure at the south entrance to the coal pile. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 81.29- Disposal facilities for construction and demolition waste For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each

196

Parametric study and dynamic analysis of compliant piled towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARAMETRIC STUDY AND DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF COMPLIANT PILED TOWERS A Thesis by KARL HEINZ MOOG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree ol' MASTER OF SCIENCE... May f990 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering PARAMETRIC STUDY AND DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF COMPLIANT PILED TOWERS A Thesis by KARL HEINZ MOOG Approved as to style and content by: Jack Lou (Chair of Committee) Ala. n slazzolo (Member) Robert Randall...

Moog, Karl Heinz

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

197

Scour around a circular pile due to oscillatory wave motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCOUR AROUND A CIRCULAR PILE DUE TO OSCILLATORY WAVE MOTION A Thesis by DONALD RAYMOND WELLS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January... 1970 Major Subject: Civil Engineering SCOUR AROUND A CIRCULAR PILE DUE TO OSCILLATORY WAVE MOTION A Thesis by DONALD RAYMOND WELLS Approved as to style and content by: hairman of Committee) (Head of Department) ember) . (Member) (Member...

Wells, Donald Raymond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

A lattice gas model of avalanches in a granular pile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A granular media lattice gas (GMLG) model is used to study avalanches in a two-dimensional granular pile. We demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm by showing that several features of the non-critical behaviour of real sandpile surfaces, such as the bounded outflow statistics or the finite-size effect of the time evolution of the pile mass, can be reproduced by this simulation approach.

Antal Karolyi; Janos Kertesz

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Reliable-linac design for accelerator-driven subcritical reactor systems.  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator reliability corresponding to a very low frequency of beam interrupts is an important new accelerator requirement for accelerator-driven subcritical reactor systems. In this paper we review typical accelerator-reliability requirements and discuss possible methods for meeting these goals with superconducting proton-linac technology.

Wangler, Thomas P.,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Analyses in support of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and ICF commercial reactor designs  

SciTech Connect

Our work on this contract was divided into two major categories; two thirds of the total effort was in support of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), and one third of the effort was in support of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) commercial reactors. This final report includes copies of the formal reports, memoranda, and viewgraph presentations that were completed under this contract.

Meier, W.R.; Monsler, M.J.

1988-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor Design and Feasibility Problem Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Rosen, M. A.; Coburn, D. B.; Flynn, T....

202

Conceptual design of thorium-fuelled Mitrailleuse accelerator-driven subcritical reactor using D-Be neutron source  

SciTech Connect

A distributed accelerator is a charged-particle accelerator that uses a new acceleration method based on repeated electrostatic acceleration. This method offers outstanding benefits not possible with the conventional radio-frequency acceleration method, including: (1) high acceleration efficiency, (2) large acceleration current, and (3) lower failure rate made possible by a fully solid-state acceleration field generation circuit. A 'Mitrailleuse Accelerator' is a product we have conceived to optimize this distributed accelerator technology for use with a high-strength neutron source. We have completed the conceptual design of a Mitrailleuse Accelerator and of a thorium-fuelled subcritical reactor driven by a Mitrailleuse Accelerator. This paper presents the conceptual design details and approach to implementing the subcritical reactor core. We will spend the next year or so on detailed design work, and then will start work on developing a prototype for demonstration. If there are no obstacles in setting up a development organization, we expect to finish verifying the prototype's performance by the third quarter of 2015. (authors)

Kokubo, Y. [Quan Japan Company Limited, 3-9-15 Sannomiya-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0021 (Japan); Kamei, T. [Research Inst. for Applied Sciences, 49 Tanaka Ohicho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto, 606-8202 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Design and Testing of a 10B4C Capsule for Spectral-Tailoring in Mixed-Spectrum Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A boron carbide capsule highly enriched in 10B has been designed and used for spectral-tailoring experiments at the TRIGA reactor at Washington State University. New experiments show that enriching the boron to 96% B-10 results in additional absorption of neutrons in the resonance region thereby producing a neutron spectrum that is much closer to a pure 235U fission spectrum. A cadmium outer cover was used to reduce thermal heating. The neutron spectrum calculated with MCNP was found to be in very good agreement with measured activation rates from neutron fluence monitors.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wittman, Richard S.; Metz, Lori A.; Finn, Erin C.; Friese, Judah I.

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

204

Conceptual design analysis of an MHD power conversion system for droplet-vapor core reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator system is proposed for the space nuclear applications of few hundreds of megawatts. The MHD generator is coupled to a vapor-droplet core reactor that delivers partially ionized fissioning plasma at temperatures in range of 3,000 to 4,000 K. A detailed MHD model is developed to analyze the basic electrodynamics phenomena and to perform the design analysis of the nuclear driven MHD generator. An incompressible quasi one dimensional model is also developed to perform parametric analyses.

Anghaie, S.; Saraph, G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both. 7 figs.

Crawford, D.C.; Porter, D.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Hill, R.N.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both.

Crawford, Douglas C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Porter, Douglas L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hayes, Steven L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hill, Robert N. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Nuclear design of the burst power ultrahigh temperature UF4 vapor core reactor system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Static and dynamic neutronic analyses are being performed as part of an integrated series of studies on an innovative burst power UF4 Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor (UTVR)/Disk Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator for space nuclear power applications. This novel reactor concept operates on a direct closed Rankine cycle in the burst power mode (hundreds of MWe for thousands of seconds). The fuel/working fluid is a mixture of UF4 and metal fluoride. Preliminary calculations indicate high overall system efficiencies (?20%) small radiator size (?5 m2/MWe) and high specific power (?5 kWe/kg). Neutronic analysis has revealed a number of attractive features for this novel reactor concept. These include some unique and very effective inherent negative reactivity control mechanisms such as the vapor?fuel density power coefficient of reactivity the direct neutronic coupling among the multiple fissioning core regions (the central vapor core and the surrounding boiler columns) and the mass flow coupling feedback between the fissioning cores.

Samer D. Kahook; Edward T. Dugan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Design of a Receding Horizon Control System for Nuclear Reactor Power Distribution  

SciTech Connect

A receding horizon control method is applied to the axial power distribution control in a pressurized water reactor. The basic concept of receding horizon control is to solve on-line, at each sampling instant, an optimization problem for a finite future and to implement the first optimal control input as the current control input. Thus, it is a suitable control strategy for time-varying systems. The reactor model used for computer simulations is a two-point xenon oscillation model based on the nonlinear xenon and iodine balance equations and a one-group, one-dimensional, neutron diffusion equation with nonlinear power reactivity feedback that adequately describes axial oscillations and treats the nonlinearities explicitly. The reactor core is axially divided into two regions, and each region has one input and one output and is coupled with the other region. Through numerical simulations, it is shown that the proposed control algorithm exhibits very fast tracking responses due to the step and ramp changes of axial target shape and also works well in a time-varying parameter condition.

Na, Man Gyun [Chosun University (Korea, Republic of)

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a complex atomic apparatus used to obtain energy from nuclear fission chain reaction. Used to produce nuclear energy, radioactive isotopes, and artificial elements.... atomic pile ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Design data needs modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Design Data Needs (DDNs) provide summary statements for program management, of the designer`s need for experimental data to confirm or validate assumptions made in the design. These assumptions were developed using the Integrated Approach and are tabulated in the Functional Analysis Report. These assumptions were also necessary in the analyses or trade studies (A/TS) to develop selections of hardware design or design requirements. Each DDN includes statements providing traceability to the function and the associated assumption that requires the need.

NONE

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) Design: Safety, Neutronics, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Mechanics, Fuel, Core, and Plant Design  

SciTech Connect

The idea of developing fast spectrum reactors with molten lead (or lead alloy) as a coolant is not a new one. Although initially considered in the West in the 1950s, such technology was not pursued to completion because of anticipated difficulties associated with the corrosive nature of these coolant materials. However, in the Soviet Union, such technology was actively pursued during the same time frame (1950s through the 1980s) for the specialized role of submarine propulsion. More recently, there has been a renewal of interest in the West for such technology, both for critical systems as well as for Accelerator Driven Subcritical (ADS) systems. Meanwhile, interest in the former Soviet Union, primarily Russia, has remained strong and has expanded well beyond the original limited mission of submarine propulsion. This section reviews the past and current status of LFR development.

Smith, C

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels -- Final Report under the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this INERI project was to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated-particle fuels and to explore improved coated-particle fuel designs that could be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in gas-cooled fast reactors. Project participants included the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), Centre Étude Atomique (CEA), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). To accomplish the project objectives, work was organized into five tasks.

David Petti; Philippe Martin; Mayeul Phélip; Ronald Ballinger; Petti does not have NT account

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Design of central irradiation facilities for the MITR-II research reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design analysis studies have been made for various in-core irradiation facility designs which are presently used, or proposed for future use in the MITR-II. The information obtained includes reactivity effects, core flux ...

Meagher, Paul Christopher

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Crazy heart: kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the structure and internal kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545 - a low surface brightness structure lying in the center of the cluster.We have obtained deep long-slit spectroscopy of the star pile using VLT/FORS2 and Gemini/GMOS, which is analyzed in conjunction with deep multiband CFHT/MEGACAM imaging. As presented in a previous study the star pile has a flat luminosity profile and its color is consistent with the outer parts of elliptical galaxies. Its velocity map is irregular, with parts being seemingly associated with an embedded nucleus, and others which have significant velocity offsets to the cluster systemic velocity with no clear kinematical connection to any of the surrounding galaxies. This would make the star pile a dynamically defined stellar intra-cluster component. The complicated pattern in velocity and velocity dispersions casts doubts on the adequacy of using the whole star pile as a dynamical test for the innermost dark matter profile of the cluster. This status is fulfille...

Salinas, Ricardo; West, Michael J; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Lloyd-Davies, Ed; Schuberth, Ylva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Portfolio for fast reactor collaboration  

SciTech Connect

The development of the LMFBR type reactor in the United Kingdom is reviewed. Design characteristics of a commercial demonstration fast reactor are presented and compared with the Super Phenix reactor.

Rippon, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Secondary Heat Exchanger Design and Comparison for Advanced High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The goals of next generation nuclear reactors, such as the high temperature gas-cooled reactor and advance high temperature reactor (AHTR), are to increase energy efficiency in the production of electricity and provide high temperature heat for industrial processes. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process heat transport system. The need for efficiency, compactness, and safety challenge the boundaries of existing heat exchanger technology, giving rise to the following study. Various studies have been performed in attempts to update the secondary heat exchanger that is downstream of the primary heat exchanger, mostly because its performance is strongly tied to the ability to employ more efficient conversion cycles, such as the Rankine super critical and subcritical cycles. This study considers two different types of heat exchangers—helical coiled heat exchanger and printed circuit heat exchanger—as possible options for the AHTR secondary heat exchangers with the following three different options: (1) A single heat exchanger transfers all the heat (3,400 MW(t)) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants; (2) Two heat exchangers share heat to transfer total heat of 3,400 MW(t) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants, each exchanger transfers 1,700 MW(t) with a parallel configuration; and (3) Three heat exchangers share heat to transfer total heat of 3,400 MW(t) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants. Each heat exchanger transfers 1,130 MW(t) with a parallel configuration. A preliminary cost comparison will be provided for all different cases along with challenges and recommendations.

Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush; Michael McKellar; Michael Patterson; Eung Soo Kim

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Reactor design for uniform chemical vapor deposition-grown films without substrate rotation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quartz reactor vessel for growth of uniform semiconductor films includes a vertical, cylindrical reaction chamber in which a substrate-supporting pedestal provides a horizontal substrate-supporting surface spaced on its perimeter from the chamber wall. A cylindrical confinement chamber of smaller diameter is disposed coaxially above the reaction chamber and receives reaction gas injected at a tangent to the inside chamber wall, forming a helical gas stream that descends into the reaction chamber. In the reaction chamber, the edge of the substrate-supporting pedestal is a separation point for the helical flow, diverting part of the flow over the horizontal surface of the substrate in an inwardly spiraling vortex.

Wanlass, Mark (Golden, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Reactor design for uniform chemical vapor deposition-grown films without substrate rotation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quartz reactor vessel for growth of uniform semiconductor films includes a vertical, cylindrical reaction chamber in which a substrate-supporting pedestal provides a horizontal substrate-supporting surface spaced on its perimeter from the chamber wall. A cylindrical confinement chamber of smaller diameter is disposed coaxially above the reaction chamber and receives reaction gas injected at a tangent to the inside chamber wall, forming a helical gas stream that descends into the reaction chamber. In the reaction chamber, the edge of the substrate-supporting pedestal is a separation point for the helical flow, diverting part of the flow over the horizontal surface of the substrate in an inwardly spiraling vortex.

Wanlass, M.

1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Incorporating reliability analysis into the design of passive cooling systems with an application to a gas-cooled reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A time-dependent reliability evaluation of a two-loop passive decay heat removal (DHR) system was performed as part of the iterative design process for a helium-cooled fast reactor. The system was modeled using RELAP5-3D. The uncertainties in input parameters were assessed and were propagated through the model using Latin hypercube sampling. An important finding was the discovery that the smaller pressure loss through the DHR heat exchanger than through the core would make the flow to bypass the core through one DHR loop, if two loops operated in parallel. This finding is a warning against modeling only one lumped DHR loop and assuming that n of them will remove n times the decay power. Sensitivity analyses revealed that there are values of some input parameters for which failures are very unlikely. The calculated conditional (i.e., given the LOCA) failure probability was deemed to be too high leading to the identification of several design changes to improve system reliability. This study is an example of the kinds of insights that can be obtained by including a reliability assessment in the design process. It is different from the usual use of PSA in design, which compares different system configurations, because it focuses on the thermal–hydraulic performance of a safety function.

Francisco J. Mackay; George E. Apostolakis; Pavel Hejzlar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Influence of loading rate on axially loaded piles in clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Haas and Saxe Yong and Japp. Arulanandan and Shen 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 5 5 6 6 13 13 21 21 22 22 23 23 24 24 Ladd, Hi11iams, Connell and Edgars Berre and Bjerrum. Stevenson. King Vaid and Campanella. Lacasse. Rigqins. CHAPTER V... of the Gain in Strength versus Shearing Rate Plots 4. Select Regression, PI, LI, W, SO(REF) 76 Cases for 152 Laboratory Tests 5. Collected Data for Pile Load Test Results. 6. Data Set References for Pile Load Tests. Page 14 36 54 61 7. Semi...

Garland Ponce, Enrique Eduardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Integrity testing methods for drilled and grouted piles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) in diameter and 40 ft (12. 2 m) in length, with a 5 in. (127 mm) diameter, 3/8 in. (9. 5 mm) wall thickness insert casing. One of the two 8 in. (20. 3 mm) diameter piles was constructed with prepared defects while the other one was constructed without... of neutron scattering and ther- malization 6. 2. 3 Fast neutrons . 108 108 108 109 111 6. 3 Neutron Tools . 6. 4 Neutron Log Interpretation 7. ALTERNATIVE INTEGRITY TESTING METHODS 115 119 128 7. 1 Alternative Pile Logging Methods 7. 2 Gamma...

Dupin, Richard Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design of an annular microchannel reactor (AMR) for hydrogen and/or syngas production via methane steam reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A bench-scale annular microchannel reactor (AMR) prototype with microchannel width of 0.3 mm and total catalyst length of 9.53 × 10?2 m active for the endothermic steam reforming of methane is presented. Experimental results at a steam to methane feed molar ratio of 3.3:1, reactor temperature of 1023 K, and pressure of 11 bar confirm catalyst power densities upwards of 1380 W per cm3 of catalyst at hydrogen yields >98% of thermodynamic equilibrium. A two-dimensional steady-state computational fluid dynamic model of the AMR prototype was validated using experimental data and subsequently employed to identify suitable operating conditions for an envisioned mass-production AMR design with 0.3 mm annular channel width and a single catalyst length of 254 mm. Thermal efficiencies, defined based upon methane and product hydrogen higher heating values (HHVs), of 72.7–57.7% were obtained from simulations for methane capacities of 0.5–2S LPM (space velocities of 195,000–782,000 h?1) at hydrogen yields corresponding to 99%–75% of equilibrium values. Under these conditions, analysis of local composition, temperature and pressure indicated that catalyst deactivation via coke formation or Nickel oxidation is not thermodynamically favorable. Lastly, initial analysis of an envisioned 10 kW autothermal reformer combining 19 parallel \\{AMRs\\} within a single methane-air combustion chamber, based upon existing manufacturing capabilities within Power & Energy, Inc., is presented.

Holly Butcher; Casey J.E. Quenzel; Luis Breziner; Jacques Mettes; Benjamin A. Wilhite; Peter Bossard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dynamic characteristics of a jacket type offshore structure considering non-linear behavior of pile foundations  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic characteristics of a typical six legged jacket type platform in Persian Gulf have been studied. An equivalent linearized pile stub has been used to model the pile-soil system. The properties of pile stub have been calculated for different levels of the pile-head deformations resulting from the action of different waves. Natural frequencies and mode shapes of resulting linear models have been determined and compared to each other.

Aaghaakouchak, A.A.; Asgarian, B. [Tarbiat Modarress Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Contribution of Clinch River Breeder Reactor plant design and development to the LMFBR fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how the CRBRP development and CRBRP focus of the LMFBR base technology program have led to advances in the state of the art in physics, thermal-hydraulics, structural analysis, core restraint, seismic analysis, and analysis of hypothetical core-disruptive accident energetics, all of which have been incorporated through disciplined engineering into the final CRBRP design. The total development in the US of fuels and materials, the analytical advances made on CRBRP design, and the incorporation of the latest experimental results into that design have put the US technology in general and the CRBRP design in particular at the forefront of technology. This has placed the US in a position to develop the most favorable LMFBR fuel cycle.

Riley, D.R.; Dickson, P.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Preventing fuel failure for a beyond design basis accident in a fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) combines high-temperature coated-particle fuel with a high-temperature salt coolant for a reactor with unique market and safety characteristics. This combination can ...

Minck, Matthew J. (Matthew Joseph)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Science Mission Directorate Policy Meeting the 70% JCL Requirement in PI-led Missions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Science Mission Directorate Policy Meeting the 70% JCL Requirement in PI-led Missions SMD consistent with the program's joint confidence level. (b) SMD's competitively-selected, PI-led missions a cost cap for competitively-selected, PI-led mission proposals. The cost cap is restated, if necessary

Christian, Eric

228

Airborne sound propagation over sea during offshore wind farm piling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore piling for wind farm construction has attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to the extremely high noise emission levels associated with such operations. While underwater noise levels were shown to be harmful for the marine biology the propagation of airborne piling noise over sea has not been studied in detail before. In this study detailed numerical calculations have been performed with the Green's Function Parabolic Equation (GFPE) method to estimate noise levels up to a distance of 10?km. Measured noise emission levels during piling of pinpiles for a jacket-foundation wind turbine were assessed and used together with combinations of the sea surface state and idealized vertical sound speed profiles (downwind sound propagation). Effective impedances were found and used to represent non-flat sea surfaces at low-wind sea states 2 3 and 4. Calculations show that scattering by a rough sea surface which decreases sound pressure levels exceeds refractive effects which increase sound pressure levels under downwind conditions. This suggests that the presence of wind even when blowing downwind to potential receivers is beneficial to increase the attenuation of piling sound over the sea. A fully flat sea surface therefore represents a worst-case scenario.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles ... The process uses a heavy liquid to separate marketable high-ash coal from nonburnable waste rock. ... Nearly 500 mountains of coal refuse, waste material from coal cleaning operations, are burning uncontrollably in 15 states in the U.S., according to a Bureau of Mines survey. ...

1965-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance.

Monado, Fiber, E-mail: fiber.monado@gmail.com [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia and Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University (Indonesia); Ariani, Menik [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung (Indonesia); Aziz, Ferhat [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [CRINES, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okoyama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

231

Reactor design for uniform chemical vapor deposition-grown films without substrate rotation  

SciTech Connect

A reactor vessel is described for chemical vapor deposition of a uniform semiconductor film on a substrate, comprising: a generally cylindrical reaction chamber for receiving a substrate and a flow of reaction gas capable of depositing a film on the substrate under the conditions of the chamber, the chamber having upper and lower portion and being oriented about a vertical axis; a supporting means having a substrate support surface generally perpendicular to the vertical axis for carrying the substrate within the lower portion of the reaction chamber in a predetermined relative position with respect to the upper portion of the reaction chamber, the upper portion including a cylindrically shaped confinement chamber. The confinement chamber has a smaller diameter than the lower portion of the reaction chamber and is positioned above the substrate support surface; and a means for introducing a reaction gas into the confinement chamber in a nonaxial direction so as to direct the reaction gas into the lower portion of the reaction chamber with a non-axial flow having a rotational component with respect to the vertical axis. In this way the reaction gas defines an inward vortex flow pattern with respect to the substrate surface.

Wanlass, M.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

Conceptual design for a fast neutron ionization chamber for fusion reactor plasma diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design for a radiation-hard ``pointing`` fast neutron ionization chamber that is capable of delivering a 1 MHz countrate of T(D,n) events at ITER is given. The detector will use a {approximately}1 cm{sup 3} volume of CO{sub 2} fill gas at 0.1 bar pressure in a 500 V/cm electric field. The pulse widths will be {approximately}10 ns, enabling it to operate in a flux of {approximately} 6 {times} 10{sup 13} DT n/cm{sup 2}/sec. A special collimator design is used, giving an estimated angular resolution of 4.5 degrees HWHM.

Sailor, W.C.; Barnes, C.W.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Estimation of the recycled power associated with the cryogenic refrigeration power of a fusion reactor based on TORE SUPRA experiment and ITER design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The refrigeration power associated with the superconducting magnets and cryopumps of a steady-state fusion reactor is not negligible. The power has to be minimized because it plays a role in the power station global efficiency and in the required amplification factor Q. On the one hand, the long plasma discharges obtained in December 2003 on TORE SUPRA give an insight of the cryogenic losses that might be expected for a steady-state fusion reactor equipped with superconducting magnets. The superfluid bath of the windings in TORE SUPRA allows a simple calorimetric estimation of the cryogenic losses through the temperature evolution of the bath during the long discharge. The different kinds of losses in TORE SUPRA are estimated, discussed and explained. Not all of them will be present in a real reactor. On the other hand, in the framework of ITER preparation, the magnet system and the associated refrigerator have been dimensioned taking into account again all kinds of cold losses. This exercise is important because ITER, by its size, could be relevant to the steady-state reactor situation regarding refrigeration. Based on TORE SUPRA experiment and ITER design it is, therefore, possible to propose for the first time a preliminary figure for the cryoplant power of a steady-state reactor. The order of magnitude of the cryoplant power is ten times lower than that of the fusion reactor recycled power which can be considered acceptable.

J.L. Duchateau; J.Y. Journeaux; F. Millet

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fusion reactor theory and conceptual design. January 1982-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1982-May 1990  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical and conceptual aspects of fusion reactor physics and designs. Conceptual design studies for a wide variety of fusion reactors are covered. Some experimental and demonstrational results of studies are considered. (This updated bibliography contains 290 citations, 189 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 1. Special topics in earthquake ground motion  

SciTech Connect

This report is divided into twelve chapters: seismic hazard analysis procedures, statistical and probabilistic considerations, vertical ground motion characteristics, vertical ground response spectrum shapes, effects of inclined rock strata on site response, correlation of ground response spectra with intensity, intensity attenuation relationships, peak ground acceleration in the very mean field, statistical analysis of response spectral amplitudes, contributions of body and surface waves, evaluation of ground motion characteristics, and design earthquake motions. (DLC)

Reddy, D.P.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels (I-NERI Annual Report)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this INERI project is to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated particle fuels and to develop improved coated-particle fuel designs that can be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in fast gas-cooled reactors. Thermomechanical, thermophysical, and physiochemical material properties data were compiled by both the US and the French and preliminary assessments conducted. Comparison between U.S. and European data revealed many similarities and a few important differences. In all cases, the data needed for accurate fuel performance modeling of coated particle fuel at high burnup were lacking. The development of the INEEL fuel performance model, PARFUME, continued from earlier efforts. The statistical model being used to simulate the detailed finite element calculations is being upgraded and improved to allow for changes in fuel design attributes (e.g. thickness of layers, dimensions of kernel) as well as changes in important material properties to increase the flexibility of the code. In addition, modeling of other potentially important failure modes such as debonding and asphericity was started. A paper on the status of the model was presented at the HTR-2002 meeting in Petten, Netherlands in April 2002, and a paper on the statistical method was submitted to the Journal of Nuclear Material in September 2002. Benchmarking of the model against Japanese and an older DRAGON irradiation are planned. Preliminary calculations of the stresses in a coated particle have been calculated by the CEA using the ATLAS finite element model. This model and the material properties and constitutive relationships will be incorporated into a more general software platform termed Pleiades. Pleiades will be able to analyze different fuel forms at different scales (from particle to fuel body) and also handle the statistical variability in coated particle fuel. Diffusion couple experiments to study Ag and Pd transport through SiC were conducted. Analysis and characterization of the samples continues. Two active transport mechanisms are proposed: diffusion in SiC and release through SiC cracks or another, as yet undetermined, path. Silver concentration profiles determined by XPS analysis suggest diffusion within the SiC layer, most likely dominated by grain boundary diffusion. However, diffusion coefficients calculated from mass loss measurements suggest a much faster release path, postulated as small cracks or flaws that provide open paths with little resistance to silver migration. Work is ongoing to identify and characterize this path. Work on Pd behavior has begun and will continue next year.

Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Languille, Alain; Martin, Philippe; Ballinger, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety. The Accident at TEPCO’s Fukushima Nuclear Power2: Accident and Thermal Fluids Analysis PIRTs. (Nuclearmolten nuclear reactor core debris following accidents such

Scarlat, Raluca Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Design Study of Pb-Bi-Cooled and NaK-Cooled Small Reactors: PBWFR and DSFR  

SciTech Connect

The liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (Pb-Bi) has good compatibility with water, which is different from sodium. It is expected that the Pb-Bi could be used as a coolant of the deep sea fast reactor (DSFR) and the Pb-Bi- cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR). Physics analysis of the Pb-Bi-cooled small reactor cores with and without inner control rods was performed using the computer program of General Purpose Neutronics Code System (SRAC95) developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The coolant of Pb-Bi seems to be good as well as NaK for small reactors. (authors)

Otsubo, Akira; Takahashi, Minoru [N1-18, Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear Reactor (atomic reactor)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor splits Uranium or Plutonium nuclei, and the...235 is fissionable but more than 99% of the naturally occurring Uranium is U238 that makes enrichment mandatory. In some reactors U238 and Thorium23...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

NEET In-Pile Ultrasonic Sensor Enablement-Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential to measure a range of parameters during irradiation of fuels and materials, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes under harsh irradiation test conditions. There are two primary issues that currently limit in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors. The first is transducer survivability. The ability of ultrasonic transducer materials to maintain their useful properties during an irradiation must be demonstrated. The second issue is signal processing. Ultrasonic testing is typically performed in a lab or field environment, where the sensor and sample are accessible. The harsh nature of in-pile testing and the variety of desired measurements demand that an enhanced signal processing capability be developed to make in-pile ultrasonic sensors viable. To address these issues, the NEET ASI program funded a three year Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation and Signal Processing Enhancements project, which is a collaborative effort between the Idaho National Laboratory, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory, and the Pennsylvania State University. The objective of this report is to document the objectives and accomplishments from this three year project. As summarized within this document, significant work has been accomplished during this three year project.

J. Daw; J. Rempe; J. Palmer; P. Ramuhalli; R. Montgomery; H.T. Chien; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; P. Keller

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Fast-spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility FASTEF: Main design achievements (part 2: Reactor building design and plant layout) within the FP7-CDT collaborative project of the European Commission  

SciTech Connect

MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator-driven system (ADS) in development at SCK-CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. SCK-CEN in association with 17 European partners from industry, research centres and academia, responded to the FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) call from the European Commission to establish a Central Design Team (CDT) for the design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) able to demonstrate efficient transmutation and associated technology through a system working in subcritical and/or critical mode. The project has started on April 01, 2009 for a period of three years. In this paper, we present the latest concept of the reactor building and the plant layout. The FASTEF facility has evolved quite a lot since the intermediate reporting done at the ICAPP'10 and ICAPP'11 conferences 1,2. Many iterations have been performed to take into account the safety requirements. The present configuration enables an easy operation and maintenance of the facility, including the possibility to change large components of the reactor. In a companion paper 3, we present the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system. (authors)

De Bruyn, D.; Engelen, J. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Ortega, A.; Aguado, M. P. [Empresarios Agrupados A.I.E., Magallanes 3, 28015 Madrid (Spain)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Designing an enzymatic oscillator: Bistability and feedback controlled oscillations with glucose oxidase in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxidase in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor Vladimir K. Vanag,a David G. Míguez,b and Irving R as the flow rate is varied in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor. Oscillations in pH can be obtained

Epstein, Irving R.

245

Investigations of release phenomenon of volatile organic compounds and particulates from residual storage chip piles  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines the method for estimating Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from wood handling and storage operations at a pulp mill. Fugitive particulate matter emissions from wood handling and storage operations are due to material load/dropout operations, wind erosion from storage piles and vehicular traffic on paved roads. The particulate matter emissions are a function of a number of variables like windspeed, surface moisture content, material silt content, and number of days of precipitation. Literature review attributes VOC emissions to biological, microbiological, chemical, and physical processes occurring in wood material storage pile. The VOC emissions are from the surface of these piles and the VOC released during retrieval of chips from the pile. VOC emissions are based on the chip throughput, number of turnovers, moisture content and surface area of the pile. The emission factors with the requisite calculation methodology to be utilized for quantifying VOC emissions from chip piles has been discussed in this paper.

Mohan, S.; Nagarkatti, M. [Trinity Consultants, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Radiation Shielding Design and Orientation Considerations for a 1 kWe Heat Pipe Cooled Reactor Utilized to Bore Through the Ice Caps of Mars  

SciTech Connect

The goal in designing any space power system is to develop a system able to meet the mission requirements for success while minimizing the overall costs. The mission requirements for the this study was to develop a reactor (with Stirling engine power conversion) and shielding configuration able to fit, along with all the other necessary science equipment, in a Cryobot 3 m high with {approx}0.5 m diameter hull, produce 1 kWe for 5yrs, and not adversely affect the mission science by keeping the total integrated dose to the science equipment below 150 krad. Since in most space power missions the overall system mass dictates the mission cost, the shielding designs in this study incorporated Martian water extracted at the startup site in order to minimize the tungsten and LiH mass loading at launch. Different reliability and mass minimization concerns led to three design configuration evolutions. With the help of implementing Martian water and configuring the reactor as far from the science equipment as possible, the needed tungsten and LiH shield mass was minimized. This study further characterizes the startup dose and the necessary mission requirements in order to ensure integrity of the surface equipment during reactor startup phase.

Fensin, Michael L. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Elliott, John O. [Jet Propulsion Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, Ca 91109 (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Poston, David I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Numerical analysis of the laterally loaded piles in the Kuwait offshore environment  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made to present an automated analysis of laterally loaded piles using subgrade reaction theory and the P-delta curves governing the soil properties. The finite difference method is applied in establishing the governing equations. The pile response is obtained using the boundary conditions improved by Newtonian method. Results obtained are forces, moments, deflections and soil reactions for various depths of strata in which such piles exist. Based on these results future recommendations are made.

Al-Obaid, Y.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effect of surface compaction on the moisture content of piled green hardwood chips  

SciTech Connect

Simulators of chip piles were used to evaluate the effect of surface compaction on the amount of water retained by green hardwood whole stem chips exposed to incident rainfall. Pile surfaces compacted with heavy chip handling equipment will absorb water at an approximate 18% slower rate than those without surface compaction providing there is sufficient slope in the pile surfaces to facilitate rain water runoff.

White, M.S.; Vodak, M.C.; Cupp, D.C.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thermal hydraulic design of a 2400 MW t?h? direct supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) has received new attention as one of the basic concepts selected by the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) for further investigation. Currently, the reference GFR is a helium-cooled ...

Pope, Michael A. (Michael Alexander)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Experimental restoration treatments for burn pile fire scars in conifer forests of the Front Range, Colorado.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Drastic changes in soil physical, chemical, and biotic properties following slash pile burning and their lasting effects on vegetation cover have been well documented in… (more)

Shanklin, Amber

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - asteroids rubble piles Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

asteroids (28... of collisional events, and much of its interior may have an unconsolidated rubble-pile structure. The main... Radar Observations of Asteroid 216 Kleopatra...

252

Application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft DG-1108 to evolutionary and advanced reactor designs  

SciTech Connect

For the seismic design of evolutionary and advanced nuclear reactor power plants, there are definite financial advantages in the application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108. NUREG/CR-6661, 'Benchmark Program for the Evaluation of Methods to Analyze Non-Classically Damped Coupled Systems', was by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the USNRC, and Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is the proposed revision to the current Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.92, Revision 1, 'Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is available at http://members.cox.net/apolloconsulting, which also provides a link to the USNRC ADAMS site to search for NUREG/CR-6661 in text file or image file. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 removes unnecessary conservatism in the modal combinations for closely spaced modes in seismic response spectrum analysis. Its application will be very helpful in coupled seismic analysis for structures and heavy equipment to reduce seismic responses and in piping system seismic design. In the NUREG/CR-6661 benchmark program, which investigated coupled seismic analysis of structures and equipment or piping systems with different damping values, three of the four participants applied the complex mode solution method to handle different damping values for structures, equipment, and piping systems. The fourth participant applied the classical normal mode method with equivalent weighted damping values to handle differences in structural, equipment, and piping system damping values. Coupled analysis will reduce the equipment responses when equipment, or piping system and structure are in or close to resonance. However, this reduction in responses occurs only if the realistic DG-1108 modal response combination method is applied, because closely spaced modes will be produced when structure and equipment or piping systems are in or close to resonance. Otherwise, the conservatism in the current Regulatory Guide 1.92, Revision 1, will overshadow the advantage of coupled analysis. All four participants applied the realistic modal combination method of DG-1108. Consequently, more realistic and reduced responses were obtained. (authors)

Chang 'Apollo', Chen [Apollo Consulting, Inc., Surprise, AZ 85374-4605 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Utilization of Refractory Metals and Alloys in Fusion Reactor Structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In design of fusion reactors, structural material selection is very crucial to improve reactor’s performance. Different types of materials have been proposed for use in fusion reactor structures. Among these mate...

Mustafa Übeyli; ?enay Yalç?n

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Method and apparatus for analog pulse pile-up rejection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for pulse pile-up rejection are disclosed. The apparatus comprises a delay value application constituent configured to receive a threshold-crossing time value, and provide an adjustable value according to a delay value and the threshold-crossing time value; and a comparison constituent configured to receive a peak-occurrence time value and the adjustable value, compare the peak-occurrence time value with the adjustable value, indicate pulse acceptance if the peak-occurrence time value is less than or equal to the adjustable value, and indicate pulse rejection if the peak-occurrence time value is greater than the adjustable value.

De Geronimo, Gianluigi

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Power Reactor Progress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Argonne kicks off EBWR; Allis-Chalmers plans power reactor using both nuclear and conventional fuels ... NUCLEAR POWER took two giant steps last week. ... Just as the first nuclear power system in the U. S. designed and built solely for the generation of electric power went into full operation at Argonne, Allis-Chalmers came up with a new twist in power reactors—a controlled recirculation boiling reactor (CRBR) using both nuclear and conventional fuels (C&EN, Feb. 18, page 7). ...

1957-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

B Reactor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » B Reactor B Reactor B Reactor Completed in September 1944, the B Reactor was the world's first large-scale plutonium production reactor. As at Oak Ridge, the need for labor turned Hanford into an atomic boomtown, with the population reaching 50,000 by summer 1944. Similar to the X-10 Graphite Reactor at Oak Ridge in terms of loading and unloading fuel, the B Reactor was built on a much larger scale and used water rather than air as a coolant. Whereas the X-10 had an initial design output of 1,000 kilowatts, the B Reactor was designed to operate at 250,000 kilowatts. Consisting of a 28- by 36-foot, 1,200-ton graphite cylinder lying on its side, the reactor was penetrated through its

257

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

An Inverted-Pile Incinerator for Waste Disposal and Energy Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inverted-pile burning of waste wood, in which new fuel is added to the bottom of the burning pile, is efficient, smokeless, and low...x and N0x...emissions. A coincinerator/cogenerator based on this principle is ...

Jay Z. James

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluating the Behavior of Laterally Loaded Piles under a Scoured Condition by Model Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the scour widths were 0 and 667 mm. Two-way loading was the method of applying repeated loads and a safety factor of 2.0 was applied for the ultimate lateral load capacities of the piles calculated using Broms' method. Pile failure was defined when...

Ismael, Omar Khaleel

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Seismic Earth Pressure Development in Sheet Pile Retaining Walls: A Numerical Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of retaining walls requires the complete knowledge of the earth pressure distribution behind the wall. Due to the complex soil-structure effect, the estimation of earth pressure is not an easy task; even in the static case. The problem becomes even more complex for the dynamic (i.e., seismic) analysis and design of retaining walls. Several earth pressure models have been developed over the years to integrate the dynamic earth pressure with the static earth pressure and to improve the design of retaining wall in seismic regions. Among all the models, MononobeOkabe (M-O) method is commonly used to estimate the magnitude of seismic earth pressures in retaining walls and is adopted in design practices around the world (e.g., EuroCode and Australian Standards). However, the M-O method has several drawbacks and does not provide reliable estimate of the earth pressure in many instances. This study investigates the accuracy of the M-O method to predict the dynamic earth pressure in sheet pile wall. A 2D pl...

Rajeev, P; Sivakugan, N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Application of RCC-MR for the structural design of tube sheet of intermediate heat exchanger for a sodium cooled fast reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The structural mechanics behavior of tube sheets of a sodium to sodium heat exchanger for a fast reactor, with circular tube holes pattern, less addressed subject in the literature, is investigated in detail. The tube sheet design rules recommended in the French design code RCC-MR-2007 and the associated solid mechanics basis are explained. A finite element analysis of tube sheets of intermediate heat exchanger of a typical 500 MWe pool type fast reactor is presented to study the effects of some specific parameters viz., (i) small solid rim portion with connecting shell and (ii) grooves on rim area. For the analysis, the distribution of holes on the last row is assumed to be symmetric and axial stiffening of tubes on tube sheet is included toward realistic estimation of stresses in the tube sheets. The effects are studied on the primary and secondary stresses induced along the interface between solid to perforated region. The aspects covered include linearization of radial and circumferential stress components, thereby deriving primary membrane and bending stress intensities along the radial directions with particular focus at the interfaces between solid portions and perforated portions including the effect of filet radius at the junction of tube sheet and shell. These investigations thus help to optimize the design of IHX tube sheets with high confidence. The analysis has been carried out by CAST3M, a structure analysis software granted by CEA, France.

Suman Gupta; P. Chellapandi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

New fast-reactor approach. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

The design parameters for a 1000 MW LMFBR type reactor are presented. The design requires the multiple primary coolant pumps and heat exchangers to be located around the core within the reactor vessel.

Folkrod, J.R.; Kann, W.J.; Klocksieben, R.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Steam generator sludge pile model boiler testing: sludge characterization. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to understand the thermal and hydraulic transport process that can lead to chemical concentration in sludge piles on the tubesheet in a steam generator, the chemical composition and physical properties of eight sludges and several simulants were determined. Analyses performed by emission and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that most of the sludges were mainly composed of iron oxides, copper, and other elements at trace levels. X-ray diffraction measurements identified iron to exist in the form of magnetite and copper to exist in the form of a metal. The densities, porosity, particle size, surface area, pore size distribution, and hydrodynamic permeabilities were determined on all plant sludges and selected simulants. Wide variations were observed in the physical measurements of the different plant sludges.

Becker, L.F. Jr.; Esposito, J.N.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Reactor operation safety information document  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Self-powered Thermoacoustic Sensor for In-pile Nuclear Reactor Monitoring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inspired by the unfortunate events of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan, 2011, the Pennsylvania State University began a collaboration with Idaho National Laboratories… (more)

Ali, Randall

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The preceding paper described designs and analyses of thermionic reactors employing full-core-length single-cell converters with their heated emitters located on the outside of their internally cooled collectors, and it presented results of detailed parametric analyses which illustrate the benefits of this unconventional design. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypical converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests. The unfueled converter tests demonstrated the practicality of operating such long converters without shorting across a 0.3-mm interelectrode gap. They produced a measured peak output of 751 watts(e) from a single diode and a peak efficiency of 15.4%. The fueled converter tests measured the parametric performance of prototypic UO(subscript 2)-fueled converters designed for subsequent in-pile testing. They employed revolver-shaped tungsten elements with a central emitter hole surrounded by six fuel chambers. The full-length converters were heated by a water-cooled RF-induction coil inside an ion-pumped vacuum chamber. This required development of high-vacuum coaxial RF feedthroughs. In-pile test rules required multiple containment of the UO (subscript 2)-fuel, which complicated the fabrication of the test article and required successful development of techniques for welding tungsten and other refractory components. The test measured a peak power output of 530 watts(e) or 7.1 watts/cm (superscript 2) at an efficiency of 11.5%. There are three copies in the file. Cross-Reference a copy FSC-ESD-217-94-529 in the ESD files with a CID #8574.

Schock, Alfred

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radiation physics and shielding codes and analyses applied to design-assist and safety analyses of CANDU{sup R} and ACR{sup TM} reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the radiation physics and shielding codes and analyses applied in the design of CANDU and ACR reactors. The focus is on the types of analyses undertaken rather than the inputs supplied to the engineering disciplines. Nevertheless, the discussion does show how these analyses contribute to the engineering design. Analyses in radiation physics and shielding can be categorized as either design-assist or safety and licensing (accident) analyses. Many of the analyses undertaken are designated 'design-assist' where the analyses are used to generate recommendations that directly influence plant design. These recommendations are directed at mitigating or reducing the radiation hazard of the nuclear power plant with engineered systems and components. Thus the analyses serve a primary safety function by ensuring the plant can be operated with acceptable radiation hazards to the workers and public. In addition to this role of design assist, radiation physics and shielding codes are also deployed in safety and licensing assessments of the consequences of radioactive releases of gaseous and liquid effluents during normal operation and gaseous effluents following accidents. In the latter category, the final consequences of accident sequences, expressed in terms of radiation dose to members of the public, and inputs to accident analysis, e.g., decay heat in fuel following a loss-of-coolant accident, are also calculated. Another role of the analyses is to demonstrate that the design of the plant satisfies the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) radiation doses. This principle is applied throughout the design process to minimize worker and public doses. The principle of ALARA is an inherent part of all design-assist recommendations and safety and licensing assessments. The main focus of an ALARA exercise at the design stage is to minimize the radiation hazards at the source. This exploits material selection and impurity specifications and relies heavily on experience and engineering judgement, consistent with the ALARA philosophy. Special care is taken to ensure that the best estimate dose rates are used to the extent possible when applying ALARA. Provisions for safeguards equipment are made throughout the fuel-handling route in CANDU and ACR reactors. For example, the fuel bundle counters rely on the decay gammas from the fission products in spent-fuel bundles to record the number of fuel movements. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards system for CANDU and ACR reactors is based on item (fuel bundle) accounting. It involves a combination of IAEA inspection with containment and surveillance, and continuous unattended monitoring. The spent fuel bundle counter monitors spent fuel bundles as they are transferred from the fuelling machine to the spent fuel bay. The shielding and dose-rate analysis need to be carried out so that the bundle counter functions properly. This paper includes two codes used in criticality safety analyses. Criticality safety is a unique phenomenon and codes that address criticality issues will demand specific validations. However, it is recognised that some of the codes used in radiation physics will also be used in criticality safety assessments. (authors)

Aydogdu, K.; Boss, C. R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Sheridan Science and Technology Park, Mississauga, Ont. L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Use of phenomena identification and ranking (PIRT) process in research related to design certification of the AP600 advanced passive light water reactor (LWR)  

SciTech Connect

The AP600 LWR is a new advanced passive design that has been submitted to the USNRC for design certification. Within the certification process the USNRC will perform selected system thermal hydraulic response audit studies to help confirm parts of the vendor`s safety analysis submittal. Because of certain innovative design features of the safety systems, new experimental data and related advances in the system thermal hydraulic analysis computer code are being developed by the USNRC. The PIRT process is being used to focus the experimental and analytical work to obtain a sufficient and cost effective research effort. The objective of this paper is to describe the application and most significant results of the PIRT process, including several innovative features needed in the application to accommodate the short design certification schedule. The short design certification schedule has required that many aspects of the USNRC experimental and analytical research be performed in parallel, rather than in series as was normal for currently operating LWRS. This has required development and use of management techniques that focus and integrate the various diverse parts of the research. The original PIRTs were based on inexact knowledge of an evolving reactor design, and concentrated on the new passive features of the design. Subsequently, the PIRTs have evolved in two more stages as the design became more firm and experimental and analytical data became available. A fourth and final stage is planned and in progress to complete the PIRT development. The PIRTs existing at the end of each development stage have been used to guide the experimental program, scaling analyses and code development supporting the audit studies.

Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Eltawila, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support the growth of nuclear science and technology in the United States (US). By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this initial review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR, and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program’s strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. Since 2009, annual reports have been issued to provide updates on the program strategy and the progress made on implementing the strategy. This report provides an update reflecting progress as of January 2014.

J. Rempe; D. Knudson; J. Daw; T. Unruh; B. Chase; R. Schley; J. Palmer; K. Condie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Examples of the use of PSA in the design process and to support modifications at two research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Many, if not most, of the world`s commercial nuclear power plants have been the subject of plant-specific probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). A growing number of other nuclear facilities as well as other types of industrial installations have been the focus of plant-specific PSAs. Such studies have provided valuable information concerning the nature of the risk of the individual facility and have been used to identify opportunities to manage that risk. This paper explores the risk management activities associated with two research reactors in the United States as a demonstration of the versatility of the use of PSA to support risk-related decision making.

Johnson, D.H.; Bley, D.C.; Lin, J.C. [PLG, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Ramsey, C.T.; Linn, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Six Sigma in Design Engineering - A Case Study and Implementation of Typical Pile Cap Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..............................................................................11-4 11.4 Project Charter ..................................................................................11-5 11.5 Examples of tools used (CTQ tree, FMEA, CTQ Prioritization) .........11-6 11.6 ?As is? process map...

Hoog, Reggie

2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone June 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO - One quarter of the uranium mill tailings pile located in Moab, Utah, has been relocated to the Crescent Junction, Utah, site for permanent disposal. Four million tons of the 16 million tons total has been relocated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A little over 2 years ago, Remedial Action Contractor EnergySolutions began

274

Ground penetrating radar characterization of wood piles and the water table in Back Bay, Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are performed to determine the depth to the water table and the tops of wood piles beneath a residential structure at 122 Beacon Street in Back Bay, Boston. The area of Boston known ...

LeFrançois, Suzanne O'Neil, 1980-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Calculation of limiting horizontal load on piles-columns based on cone-penetration data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of field tests confirming the correlation relation between the limiting load on a pile-column and the specific resistance of the soil beneath the cone of the probe are presented. A formula is proposed ...

B. V. Goncharov; O. V. Galimnurova…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - anchored sheet pile Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methodology is demonstrated on anchored sheet pile walls in a flood defence system in the Thames... process 12;507 Figure 3. ... Source: van Gelder, Pieter - Faculty of Civil...

277

Scour about a cylindrical pile due to steady and oscillatory motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCOUR ABOUT A CYLINDRICAL PILE DUE TO STEADY AND OSCILLATORY MOTION A Thesis by SCDTT FRANKLYN ARMBRUST Subm'itted to the Graduate College of Texas AtLM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1982 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering SCOUR ABOUT A CYLINDRICAL PILE DUE TO STEADY AND OSCILLATORY MOTION A Thesis by SCOTT FRANICLYN ARMBRUST Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department) Member ember...

Armbrust, Scott Franklyn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fuel Pond Sludge - Lessons Learned from Initial De-sludging of Sellafield's Pile Fuel Storage Pond - 12066  

SciTech Connect

The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) at Sellafield was built and commissioned between the late 1940's and early 1950's as a storage and cooling facility for irradiated fuel and isotopes from the two Windscale Pile reactors. The pond was linked via submerged water ducts to each reactor, where fuel and isotopes were discharged into skips for transfer along the duct to the pond. In the pond the fuel was cooled then de-canned underwater prior to export for reprocessing. The plant operated successfully until it was taken out of operation in 1962 when the First Magnox Fuel Storage Pond took over fuel storage and de-canning operations on the site. The pond was then used for storage of miscellaneous Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and fuel from the UK's Nuclear Programme for which no defined disposal route was available. By the mid 1970's the import of waste ceased and the plant, with its inventory, was placed into a passive care and maintenance regime. By the mid 1990s, driven by the age of the facility and concern over the potential challenge to dispose of the various wastes and fuels being stored, the plant operator initiated a programme of work to remediate the facility. This programme is split into a number of key phases targeted at sustained reduction in the hazard associated with the pond, these include: - Pond Preparation: Before any remediation work could start the condition of the pond had to be transformed from a passive store to a plant capable of complex retrieval operations. This work included plant and equipment upgrades, removal of redundant structures and the provision of a effluent treatment plant for removing particulate and dissolved activity from the pond water. - Canned Fuel Retrieval: Removal of canned fuel, including oxide and carbide fuels, is the highest priority within the programme. Handling and export equipment required to remove the canned fuel from the pond has been provided and treatment routes developed utilising existing site facilities to allow the fuel to be reprocessed or conditioned for long term storage. - Sludge Retrieval: In excess of 300 m{sup 3} of sludge has accumulated in the pond over many years and is made up of debris arising from fuel and metallic corrosion, wind blown debris and bio-organic materials. The Sludge Retrieval Project has provided the equipment necessary to retrieve the sludge, including skip washer and tipper machines for clearing sludge from the pond skips, equipment for clearing sludge from the pond floor and bays, along with an 'in pond' corral for interim storage of retrieved sludge. Two further projects are providing new plant processing routes, which will initially store and eventually passivate the sludge. - Metal Fuel Retrieval: Metal Fuel from early Windscale Pile operations and various other sources is stored within the pond; the fuel varies considerably in both form and condition. A retrieval project is planned which will provide fuel handling, conditioning, sentencing and export equipment required to remove the metal fuel from the pond for export to on site facilities for interim storage and disposal. - Solid Waste Retrieval: A final retrieval project will provide methods for handling, retrieval, packaging and export of the remaining solid Intermediate Level Waste within the pond. This includes residual metal fuel pieces, fuel cladding (Magnox, aluminium and zircaloy), isotope cartridges, reactor furniture, and miscellaneous activated and contaminated items. Each of the waste streams requires conditioning to allow it to be and disposed of via one of the site treatment plants. - Pond Dewatering and Dismantling: Delivery of the above projects will allow operations to progressively remove the radiological inventory, thereby reducing the hazard/risk posed by the plant. This will then allow subsequent dewatering of the pond and dismantling of the structure. (authors)

Carlisle, Derek; Adamson, Kate [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Plant Design and Cost Assessment of Forced Circulation Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor with Conventional Power Conversion Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of electricity is the key factor that determines competitiveness of a power plant. Thus the proper selection, design and optimization of the electric power generating cycle is of main importance. This report makes an ...

Dostal, Vaclav

280

Conceptual design study FY 1981: synfuels from fusion - using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

This report represents the second year's effort of a scoping and conceptual design study being conducted for the express purpose of evaluating the engineering potential of producing hydrogen by thermochemical cycles using a tandem mirror fusion driver. The hydrogen thus produced may then be used as a feedstock to produce fuels such as methane, methanol, or gasoline. The main objective of this second year's study has been to obtain some approximate cost figures for hydrogen production through a conceptual design study.

Krikorian, O.H. (ed.)

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H{sup -} accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

Singh, M. J. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); De Esch, H. P. L. [CEA-Cadarache, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of the economic simplified boiling water reactor human reliability analysis using the SHARP framework .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??General Electric plans to complete a design certification document for the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor to have the new reactor design certified by the… (more)

Dawson, Phillip Eng

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Simulated Performance of the Integrated PNAR and SINRD Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurements at the Fugen Reactor in Japan  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to investigate the use of Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to quantify fissile content in FUGEN spent fuel assemblies (FAs). Methodology used is: (1) Detector was designed using fission chambers (FCs); (2) Optimized design via MCNPX simulations; and (3) Plan to build and field test instrument in FY13. Significance was to improve safeguards verification of spent fuel assemblies in water and increase sensitivity to partial defects. MCNPX simulations were performed to optimize the design of the SINRD+PNAR detector. PNAR ratio was less sensitive to FA positioning than SINRD and SINRD ratio was more sensitive to Pu fissile mass than PNAR. Significance was that the integration of these techniques can be used to improve verification of spent fuel assemblies in water.

Lafleur, Adrienne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulrich, Timothy J. II [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seya, Michio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Bolind, Alan M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006  

SciTech Connect

Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, “continuously graded” fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 ?m is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457?m. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

Primm, R. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Ellis, R. J. [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, J. C. [ORNL] [ORNL; Clarno, K. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, K. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Moses, D. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Validation of nuclear design method by measured data obtained in the physics test at a small fast reactor  

SciTech Connect

The present paper discusses applicability of the measured data of Joyo cores from a view point of integral validation for the 4S nuclear design methodology. Through the evaluation of isothermal reactivity coefficients and reactivity losses due to burnup, the results confirm that those MK-I and MK-II database are effective in order to increase the dataset for uncertainty estimation for the prediction. Discussions on the 4S design method validation are also done through the analyses of criticality, power distributions and reactivity loss due to burn-up. The C/E values for criticality and reaction rate distributions are confirmed to be consistent with those obtained from the physics benchmark experiments. Through an analysis of burnup coefficient of the MK-I core by the detailed Monte Carlo calculations, the C/E value is 1.1, which is close to 1.06 obtained by the deterministic transport analysis. (authors)

Nagata, A.; Tsuboi, Y. [Advanced Energy Design and Engineering Dep., Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Moriki, Y. [Power and Industrial Systems Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Kawashima, M. [Nuclear Technology Application Dept., Toshiba Nuclear Engineering Services Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Prediction of underwater noise and far field propagation due to pile driving for offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind energy plays a key role towards a greener and more sustainable energy generation. Due to limited onshore areas and possible negative effects on human living space offshore wind parks become increasingly popular. However during construction by pile driving high levels of underwater sound emission are observed. To avoid negative effects on marine mammals and other sea life different approaches are currently investigated to cut down the sound pressure levels like e.g. bubble curtains or cofferdams. In order to predict the expected underwater noise both with and without sound damping measures numerical simulation models are needed to avoid complex and costly offshore tests. Within this contribution possible modelling strategies for the prediction of underwater noise due to pile driving are discussed. Different approaches are shown for the direct adjacencies of the pile and for the far field sound propagation. The effectivity of potential noise mitigation measures is investigated using a detailed finite element model of the surroundings of the pile. Far field propagation in the kHz range at distances of several kilometres from the pile on the other hand is computed by a model based on wavenumber integration. Finally the model validation with corresponding offshore tests is addressed.

Stephan Lippert; Tristan Lippert; Kristof Heitmann; Otto Von Estorff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Prediction of underwater noise and far field propagation due to pile driving for offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind energy plays a key role toward a greener and more sustainable energy generation. Due to limited onshore areas and possible negative effects on human living space offshore wind parks become increasingly popular. During construction by pile driving however high levels of underwater sound emission are observed. To avoid negative effects on marine mammals and other sea life different approaches like e.g. bubble curtains or cofferdams are currently investigated to cut down the sound pressure levels. In order to predict the expected underwater noise both with and without sound damping measures numerical simulation models are needed to avoid complex and costly offshore tests. Within this contribution possible modeling strategies for the prediction of underwater noise due to pile driving are discussed. Different approaches are shown for the direct adjacencies of the pile and for the far field sound propagation. The effectivity of potential noise mitigation measures is investigated using a detailed finite element model of the surroundings of the pile. The far field propagation in the kilohertz range at distances of several kilometer from the pile on the other hand is computed by a model based on wavenumber integration. Finally the model validation with corresponding offshore tests is addressed.

Stephan Lippert; Tristan Lippert; Kristof Heitmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Behavioral reactions of cod and sole to playback of pile driving sound.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of anthropogenic underwater sound on fish has become an important environmental issue. Pile?driving noise during construction is of particular concern as the very high sound pressure levels could potentially prevent fish from reaching breeding or spawning sites finding food and acoustically locating mates. This could result in long?term effects on reproduction and populationparameters. Additionally avoidance reactions might result in displacement away from potential fishing grounds and lead to reduced catches. However reaction thresholds and therefore the impacts of pile driving on the behavior of fish are completely unknown. Pile?driving noise was played back to cod and sole held in two large (40 m) net pens located in a quiet bay. Movements of the fish were analyzed using a novel acoustic tracking system. Received sound pressure level and particle motion were measured during the experiments. The results show significant movement responses to the pile?driving stimulus in both species at relatively low received sound pressure levels. This might indicate a rather large area of avoidance during real pile?driving operations. The results of the study have important implications on regulatory advice and the implementation of mitigation measures in the construction of offshore wind farms.

Christina Mueller?Blenkle; Andrew B. Gill; Peter K. McGregor; Julian Metcalfe; Victoria Bendall; Daniel Wood; Mathias H. Andersson; Peter Sigray; Frank Thomsen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reactor hot spot analysis  

SciTech Connect

The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Vilim, R.B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Novel, fiber optic, hybrid pressure and temperature sensor designed for high-temperature gen-IV reactor applications  

SciTech Connect

A novel, fiber optic, hybrid pressure-temperature sensor is presented. The sensor is designed for reliable operation up to 1050 C, and is based on the high-temperature fiber optic sensors already demonstrated during previous work. The novelty of the sensors presented here lies in the fact that pressure and temperature are measured simultaneously with a single fiber and a single transducer. This hybrid approach will enable highly accurate active temperature compensation and sensor self-diagnostics not possible with other platforms. Hybrid pressure and temperature sensors were calibrated by varying both pressure and temperature. Implementing active temperature compensation resulted in a ten-fold reduction in the temperature-dependence of the pressure measurement. Sensors were also tested for operability in a relatively high neutron radiation environment up to 6.9x10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}. In addition to harsh environment survivability, fiber optic sensors offer a number of intrinsic advantages for nuclear power applications including small size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, self diagnostics / prognostics, and smart sensor capability. Deploying fiber optic sensors on future nuclear power plant designs would provide a substantial improvement in system health monitoring and safety instrumentation. Additional development is needed, however, before these advantages can be realized. This paper will highlight recent demonstrations of fiber optic sensors in environments relevant to emerging nuclear power plants. Successes and lessons learned will be highlighted. (authors)

Palmer, M. E.; Fielder, R. S.; Davis, M. A. [Luna Innovations, Incorporated, 2851 Commerce St., Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Radon flux measurements on Gardinier and Royster phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida  

SciTech Connect

As part of the planned Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon flux monitoring program for the Florida phosphogypsum piles, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the EPA, constructed 50 large-area passive radon collection devices and demonstrated their use at two phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida. The passive devices were also compared to the PNL large-area flow-through system. The main objectives of the field tests were to demonstrate the use of the large-area passive radon collection devices to EPA and PEI personnel and to determine the number of radon flux measurement locations needed to estimate the average radon flux from a phosphogypsum pile. This report presents the results of the field test, provides recommendations for long-term monitoring, and includes a procedure for making the radon flux measurements.

Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

NEW OPTIMIZATION-BASED APPROACH TO CHEMICAL REACTOR SYNTHESIS TOWARDS THE FULL INTEGRATION OF REACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEW OPTIMIZATION-BASED APPROACH TO CHEMICAL REACTOR SYNTHESIS ­ TOWARDS THE FULL INTEGRATION solutions. However, it does not provide optimal reactor design from both economical and environmental and methods for reactor design. It also explores the possibilities for actuation improvement for the optimal

Van den Hof, Paul

295

Thermomechanical simulation of the DIAMINO irradiation experiment using the LICOS fuel design code  

SciTech Connect

Two separate-effect experiments in the HFR and OSIRIS Material Test Reactors (MTRs) are currently under Post- Irradiation Examinations (MARIOS) and under preparation (DIAMINO) respectively. The main goal of these experiments is to investigate gaseous release and swelling of Am-bearing UO2-x fuels as a function of temperature, fuel microstructure and gas production rate. First, a brief description of the MARIOS and DIAMINO irradiations is provided. Then, the innovative experimental in-pile device specifically developed for the DIAMINO experiment is described. Eventually, the thermo-mechanical computations performed using the LICOS code are presented. These simulations support the DIAMINO experimental design and highlight some of the capabilities of the code. (authors)

Bejaoui, S.; Helfer, T.; Brunon, E.; Lambert, T. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - CEA, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bendotti, S.; Neyroud, C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - CEA, Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Scour around a group of circular piles caused by waves and currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCOUR AROUND A GROUP OF CIRCULAR PILES CAUSED BY WAVES AND CURRENTS A Thesis by TA-YANG LEE Submitted to the graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983... Major Subject: Ocean Engineering SCOUR AROUND A GROUP OF CIRCULAR PILES CAUSED BY WAVES AND CURRENTS A Thesis by TA-YANG LEE Approved as to style and content by: John B. Herbich (Chairman of Committee) Robert O. Reid (Member) Gi lio V...

Lee, Ta-Yang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Scour around a group of piles due to oscillatory wave motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCOUR AROUND A GROUP OF PILES DUE TO OSCILLATORY WAVE MOTION A The is by WEI-YIH CHOW Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering SCOUR AROUND A GROUP OF PILES DUE 0 OSCILLATORY NAVE MOTION A Thesis by WEI-YIH CHOW Approved as to style and content by: e ( z. rman of Commj. ttee) &Head of Departmen Me er Membe May 1977 441626 ABSTRACT Scour...

Chow, Wei-Yih

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Analysis of the behavior of 5 axially loaded single piles in sand at Hunter's Point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF THE BEHAVIOR OF 5 AXIALLY LOADED SINGLE PILES IN SAND AT HUNTER'S POINT A Thesis by CHER MIN RON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject; Civil Engineering ANALYSIS OF THE BEHAVIOR OF 5 AXIALLY LOADED SINGLE PILES IN SAND AT HUNTER'S POINT A Thesis by GHEE MIN RON Approved as to style and content by: Jean-Louis Briaud Chairman of Committee...

Kon, Chee Min

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain… (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ssessment methodology for proliferation resistant fast breeder reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to perceived proliferation risks, current US fast reactor designs have avoided the use of uranium blankets. While reducing the amount of plutonium produced, this omission also restrains the reactor design space and has ...

Singh, Mohit, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Interfacial effects in fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of increased resonance capture rates near zone interfaces in fast reactor media has been examined both theoretically and experimentally. An interface traversing assembly was designed, constructed and employed ...

Saidi, Mohammad Said

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna  

SciTech Connect

ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517–520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20?MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45?kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF properties of the antenna if they are in the ICRF operating range. The effect on the wave propagation along the wall structure, which is acting as a spatially periodic (toroidally and poloidally) corrugated structure, and hence constitutes a slow wave structure modifying the wall boundary condition, is examined.

Durodié, F., E-mail: frederic.durodie@rma.ac.be; Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Huygen, S.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels (Belgium); Bamber, R.; Hancock, D.; Lockley, D.; Nightingale, M. P. S.; Shannon, M.; Tigwell, P.; Wilson, D. [EURATOM/CCFE Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Politechnico di Torino (Italy); Winkler, K. [IPP-MPI, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Rigid pile response to ice plate and current loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, sea ice scouring, earthquake analysis, and geotechnical considerations in Arctic designs. Arctic offshore engineering research suddenly incr eased during the mid-seventies when the oil industry began exploration for oil in the Beaufort Sea..., sea ice scouring, earthquake analysis, and geotechnical considerations in Arctic designs. Arctic offshore engineering research suddenly incr eased during the mid-seventies when the oil industry began exploration for oil in the Beaufort Sea...

Nolte, John George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

naval reactors  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

After operating for 34 years and training over 14,000 sailors, the Department of Energy S1C Prototype Reactor Site in Windsor, Connecticut, was returned to "green field"...

306

Lessons Learned From Gen I Carbon Dioxide Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a review of early gas cooled reactors including the Magnox reactors originating in the United Kingdom and the subsequent development of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). These early gas cooled reactors shared a common coolant medium, namely carbon dioxide (CO2). A framework of information is provided about these early reactors and identifies unique problems/opportunities associated with use of CO2 as a coolant. Reactor designers successfully rose to these challenges. After years of successful use of the CO2 gas cooled reactors in Europe, the succeeding generation of reactors, called the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR), were designed with Helium gas as the coolant. Again, in the 21st century, with the latest reactor designs under investigation in Generation IV, there is a revived interest in developing Gas Cooled Fast Reactors that use CO2 as the reactor coolant. This paper provides a historical perspective on the 52 CO2 reactors and the reactor programs that developed them. The Magnox and AGR design features and safety characteristics were reviewed, as well as the technologies associated with fuel storage, reprocessing, and disposal. Lessons-learned from these programs are noted to benefit the designs of future generations of gas cooled nuclear reactors.

David E. Shropshire

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced fast reactor Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANNULAR FAST REACTOR (3000 MWth) Fuel... and NRE Design Class., "Advances in the Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor Concept", Nucl... Cooled, Fast, ... Source:...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactors coupled Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANNULAR FAST REACTOR (3000 MWth) Fuel... and NRE Design Class., "Advances in the Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor Concept", Nucl... Cooled, Fast, Subcritical...

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactor analyses Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANNULAR FAST REACTOR (3000 MWth) Fuel... and NRE Design Class., "Advances in the Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor Concept", Nucl... Cooled, Fast, Subcritical...

310

A Controllability Study of TRUMOX Fuel for Load Following Operation in a CANDU-900 Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The CANDU-900 reactor design is an improvement on the current CANDU-6 reactor in the areas of economics, safety of operation and fuel cycle flexibility.… (more)

Trudell, David A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

PROTEUS - Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Toolset for Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis PROTEUS Faster and more accurate neutronics calculations enable optimum reactor design... Argonne National Laboratory's powerful reactor physics toolset, PROTEUS, empowers users to create optimal reactor designs quickly, reliably and accurately. ...Reducing costs for designers of fast spectrum reactors. PROTEUS' long history of validation provides confidence in predictive simulations Argonne's simulation tools have more than 30 years of validation history against numerous experiments and measurements. The tools within PROTEUS work together, using the same interface files for easier integration of calculations. Multi-group Fast Reactor Cross Section Processing: MC 2 -3 No other fast spectrum multigroup generation tool

312

Transport reactor development status  

SciTech Connect

This project is part of METC`s Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located at Wilsonville, Alabama. The primary objective of the Advanced Gasifier module is to produce vitiated gases for intermediate-term testing of Particulate Control Devices (PCDs). The Transport reactor potentially allows particle size distribution, solids loading, and particulate characteristics in the off-gas stream to be varied in a number of ways. Particulates in the hot gases from the Transport reactor will be removed in the PCDs. Two PCDs will be initially installed in the module; one a ceramic candle filter, the other a granular bed filter. After testing of the initial PCDs they will be removed and replaced with PCDs supplied by other vendors. A secondary objective is to verify the performance of a Transport reactor for use in advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IG-FC), and Pressurized Combustion Combined Cycle (PCCC) power generation units. This paper discusses the development of the Transport reactor design from bench-scale testing through pilot-scale testing to design of the Process Development Unit (PDU-scale) facility at Wilsonville.

Rush, R.E.; Fankhanel, M.O.; Campbell, W.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

314

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) ; Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned low enriched uranium conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part… (more)

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Effects of pile-driving on harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) at the first offshore wind farm in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first offshore wind farm 'alpha ventus' in the German North Sea was constructed north east of Borkum Reef Ground approximately 45 km north off the German coast in 2008 and 2009 using percussive piling for the foundations of 12 wind turbines. Visual monitoring of harbour porpoises was conducted prior to as well as during construction and operation by means of 15 aerial line transect distance sampling surveys, from 2008 to 2010. Static acoustic monitoring (SAM) with echolocation click loggers at 12 positions was performed additionally from 2008 to 2011. SAM devices were deployed between 1 and 50 km from the centre of the wind farm. During aerial surveys, 18?600 km of transect lines were covered in two survey areas (10?934 and 11?824 km2) and 1392 harbour porpoise sightings were recorded. Lowest densities were documented during the construction period in 2009. The spatial distribution pattern recorded on two aerial surveys three weeks before and exactly during pile-driving points towards a strong avoidance response within 20 km distance of the noise source. Generalized additive modelling of SAM data showed a negative impact of pile-driving on relative porpoise detection rates at eight positions at distances less than 10.8 km. Increased detection rates were found at two positions at 25 and 50 km distance suggesting that porpoises were displaced towards these positions. A pile-driving related behavioural reaction could thus be detected using SAM at a much larger distance than a pure avoidance radius would suggest. The first waiting time (interval between porpoise detections of at least 10 min), after piling started, increased with longer piling durations. A gradient in avoidance, a gradual fading of the avoidance reaction with increasing distance from the piling site, is hence most probably a product of an incomplete displacement during shorter piling events.

Michael Dähne; Anita Gilles; Klaus Lucke; Verena Peschko; Sven Adler; Kathrin Krügel; Janne Sundermeyer; Ursula Siebert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Unique features of space reactors  

SciTech Connect

Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Buden, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Was the BGRR Decommissioned? Why Was the BGRR Decommissioned? BGRR The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was decommissioned to ensure the complex is in a safe and stable condition and to reduce sources of groundwater contamination. The BGRR contained over 8,000 Curies of radioactive contaminants from past operations consisting of primarily nuclear activation products such as hydrogen-3 (tritium) and carbon-14 and fission products cesium-137 and strontium-90. The nature and extent of contamination varied by location depending on historic uses of the systems and components and releases, however, the majority of the contamination (over 99 percent) was bound within the graphite pile and biological shield. Radioactive contamination was identified in the fuel handling system deep

318

Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development > Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Overview Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Generation IV Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Advanced Reactor Development and Technology Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Bookmark and Share STAR-LM: Simplified, Modular, Small Reactor Featuring Flow-thru Fuel Cartridge STAR-LM: Simplified, Modular, Small Reactor Featuring Flow-thru Fuel Cartridge. Click on image to view larger image. Argonne has traditionally been the foremost institute in the US for

319

An Innovative Three-Dimensional Heterogeneous Coarse-Mesh Transport Method for Advanced and Generation IV Reactor Core Analysis and Design  

SciTech Connect

This project has resulted in a highly efficient method that has been shown to provide accurate solutions to a variety of 2D and 3D reactor problems. The goal of this project was to develop (1) an accurate and efficient three-dimensional whole-core neutronics method with the following features: based sollely on transport theory, does not require the use of cross-section homogenization, contains a highly accurate and self-consistent global flux reconstruction procedure, and is applicable to large, heterogeneous reactor models, and to (2) create new numerical benchmark problems for code cross-comparison.

Farzad Rahnema

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories pulse nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has designed, constructed and operated bare metal Godiva-type and pool-type pulse reactors since 1961. The reactor facilities were designed to support a wide spectrum of research, development, and testing activities associated with weapon and reactor systems.

Schmidt, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reuscher, J.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Experimental and Computational Study of a Scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) is one of the next generation nuclear reactors designed to achieve high temperatures to support industrial applications and power generation. The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is a passive...

Vaghetto, Rodolfo

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

322

ANALYSIS OF SEPCTRUM CHOICES FOR SMALL MODULAR REACTORS-PERFORMANCE AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The research mainly focused on producing a small modular reactor (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor) design to analyze the fuel depletion and plutonium and minor actinide accumulation with varying power densities. The reactors running at low power densities were found...

Kafle, Nischal

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Pile-up recovery in gamma-ray detection  

SciTech Connect

Count rates in gamma-ray detectors are fundamentally limited at the high end by the physics of the detection process but should not be limited further by the design of read-out. Using intense stimuli, such as the ELI, it is desirable to extract the full wealth of information flow that sensors can deliver. We discuss the photon-statistical limitations of scintillation systems and charge-collection issues of solid-state detectors. With high-speed digitizing in particular, two promising approach architectures are those of posterior list mode corrections and of time-domain adaptive filters, introducing a 'rich list mode with uncertainties' and thus a somewhat different look at experimental spectra. Real-time performance is also considered.

Vencelj, Matjaz; Likar, Andrej; Loeher, Bastian; Miklavec, Mojca; Novak, Roman; Pietralla, Norbert; Savran, Deniz [Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia and FMF, Univ. of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Jozef Stefan Instute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); IKP, TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Design of a Multithreaded Barnes-Hut Algorithm for Multicore Clusters Technical Report Junchao Zhang and Babak Behzad Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign {jczhang, bbehza2}@illinois.edu Marc Snir Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and MCS Division, Argonne National Laboratory snir@anl.gov Abstract We describe in this paper an implementation of the Barnes-Hut al- gorithm on multicore clusters. Based on a partitioned global ad- dress space (PGAS) library, the design integrates intranode mul- tithreading and internode one-sided communication, exemplifying a PGAS + X programming style. Within a node, the computation is decomposed into tasks (subtasks), and multitasking is used to hide network latency. We study the tradeoffs between locality in private caches and locality in shared caches

325

Burning of coal waste piles from Douro Coalfield (Portugal): Petrological, geochemical and mineralogical characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Douro Coalfield anthracites were exploited for decades (1795–1994). Besides many small mines Douro Coalfield had two principal mining areas (S. Pedro da Cova and Pejão). Coal mining activities cause several impacts on the environment, one of which is the amount of discard or waste which was disposed of all over Douro Coalfield resulting in one of the most significant and severe impacts on the environment. Over 20 waste piles exist in the old mining areas, geographically dispersed, and three of them are presently burning. Their ignition was caused by forest fires during the summer of 2005. Samples from the burning and unburned zones of the waste piles were studied as were the gas from vents and the minerals resulting after combustion. Geochemical processes and mineralogical transformations in the burning coal waste pile were investigated. Microscopic analyses of the samples identified some particular aspects related with combustion: oxidation of pyrite, the presence of iron oxides, organic particles with cracks and rims with lowered (suppressed) Rr, devolatilization vacuoles and some char structures. The occurrence of vitreous (glassy) material as well as Fe–Al spinels in the burning coal waste provide evidences that the combustion temperature could have reached values above 1000 °C. Due to combustion, and as expected, the samples studied reported high ash yields. Samples taken from the burning zones reported an increase of As, Cr, Li, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr and LREE concentrations and a decrease in Zr and HREE concentrations. Enrichment in Cs, Li and Rb was noted when comparing with the geochemical composition of black shales and world coals composition that is related with the contribution of granitic rocks in the sediments that originated the main lithologies of the Douro Coalfield (carbonaceous shale and lithic arenites). Cluster analyses (R-type and Q-type) were performed to understand the trend between the unburned and burning samples and it seems that some chemical variations are responsible for this separation. Elemental sulphur and salammoniac (ammonium salt) are the coal fire gas minerals neoformed on the surface of piles, near the burning zones. They were identified by different techniques, mainly SEM-EDX, XRD and FTIR. Relatively high concentrations of several aromatic compounds were detected in the gas collected at the studied areas, as well as aliphatic hydrocarbons. The highest concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in gas samples from S. Pedro da Cova waste pile. The exposure to hazardous compounds present in the gas is a serious risk to human health and the environment.

J. Ribeiro; E. Ferreira da Silva; D. Flores

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Sliding mode observer design for a PWR to estimate the xenon concentration & delayed neutrons precursor density based on the two point nuclear reactor model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the important operations in nuclear power plants is load-following in which imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation considered to be a constraint for the load-following operation. In other hands, precursors produce delayed neutrons which are most important in control of nuclear reactor, but xenon concentration & precursor density cannot be measured directly. In this paper, non-linear sliding mode observer which has the robust characteristics facing the parameters uncertainties and disturbances is proposed based on the two point nuclear reactor model to estimate the xenon concentration & delayed neutron precursor density of the Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor (PWR) using reactor power measurement. The stability analysis is given by means Lyapunov approach, thus the system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications. This estimation is done taking into account the effects of reactivity feedback due to temperature and xenon concentration. Simulation results clearly show that the sliding mode observer follows the actual system variables accurately and is satisfactory in the presence of the parameters uncertainties & disturbances.

G.R. Ansarifar; M.H. Esteki; M. Arghand

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Observations of the boiling process from a downward-facing torispherical surface: Confirmatory testing of the heavy water new production reactor flooded cavity design  

SciTech Connect

Reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiments were performed in the CYBL facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The boiling flow pattern outside the RPV bottom head shows a center pulsating region and an outer steady two-phase boundary layer region. The local heat transfer data can be correlated in terms of a modified Rohsenow correlation.

Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Simpson, R.B.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Cross section generation strategy for high conversion light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High conversion water reactors (HCWR), such as the Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR), are being designed with axial heterogeneity of alternating fissile and blanket zones to achieve a conversion ratio of ...

Herman, Bryan R. (Bryan Robert)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

High voltage dry-type air-core shunt reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry-type air-core shunt reactors are now being ... systems to limit overvoltages. Recently, high voltage dry-type air-core shunt reactors have been designed, ... transient overvoltages and electrical and magnetic...

Klaus Papp; Michael R. Sharp…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D-{sup 3}He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Physics of nuclear reactor safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Provides a concise review of the physical aspects of safety of nuclear fission reactors. It covers the developments of roughly the last decade. The introductory chapter contains an analysis of the changes in safety philosophy that are characteristic of the last decade and that have given rise to an increased importance of physical aspects because of the emphasis on passive or natural safety. The second chapter focuses on the basics of reactor safety, identifying the main risk sources and the main principles for a safe design. The third chapter concerns a systematic treatment of the physical processes that are fundamental for the properties of fission chain reacting processes and the control of those processes. Because of the rather specialized nature of the field of reactor physics, each paragraph contains a very concise description of the theory of the phenomenon under consideration, before presenting a review of the developments. Chapter 4 contains a short review of the thermal aspects of reactor safety, restricted to those aspects that are characteristic of the nuclear reactor field, because thermal hydraulics of fission reactors is not principally different from that of other physical systems. In chapter 5 the consequences of the physics treated in the preceding chapters for the dynamics and safety of actual reactors are reviewed. The systematics of the treatment is mainly based on a division of reactors into three categories according to the type of coolant, which to a large extent determines the safety properties of the reactors. The last chapter contains a physical analysis of the Chernobyl accident that occurred in 1986. The reason for an attempt to give a review of this accident, as complete as possible within the space limits set by the editors, is twofold: the Chernobyl accident is the most severe accident in history and physical properties of the reactor played a decisive role, thereby serving as an illustration of the material of the preceding chapters.

H van Dam

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Influence of reactor configuration on reliability of activated sludge process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of uncertainty in system parameters and the accuracy of the mathematical model used on the design and reliability of the activated sludge process is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations indicate that the coefficient of variation for a reactor volume varies from 0.56 for a single mixed tank reactor to 0.44 for a plug flow reactor. The coefficient of variation for effluent for reactors designed on nominal values was found to be 0.56 for a mixed-tank reactor, 1.28 for two reactors in series, 1.56 for three reactors in series and 1.6 for a plug flow reactor. Significant contributing parameters to the reliability of the process are established. Reactor volumes for desired reliability levels are also calculated.

Puneet Sarna; Sanjeev Chaudhari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

335

Modular Inspection System for a Complete IN-Service Examination of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel, Including Beltline Region  

SciTech Connect

Final Report for a DOE Phase II Contract Describing the design and fabrication of a reactor inspection modular rover prototype for reactor vessel inspection.

David H. Bothell

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Measurement of the underwater noise levels generated from marine piling associated with the installation of offshore wind turbines.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine piling is the most commonly used method for the installation of offshore wind turbines in the shallow coastal waters in the UK and consists of steel mono?piles being driven into the seabed using powerful hydraulic hammers. This is a source of impulsive sound of potentially high level that can travel a considerable distance in the water column and has the potential for impact on marine life. This presentation describes methodologies developed for measurement of marine piling and for the estimation of the energy source level. Measurements are presented for piles of typically 5 m in diameter driven by hammers with typical strike energies of 1000 kJ. Data were recorded as a function of range from the source using vessel?deployed hydrophones and using fixed acoustic buoys that recorded the entire piling sequence including soft start. The methodology of measurement is described along with the method of estimation of the energy source level. Limitations and knowledge gaps are discussed.

Pete D. Theobald; Stephen P. Robinson; Michael A. Ainslie; Christ A. F. de Jong; Paul A. Lepper

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki [Nuclear Professional School / Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokaimura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Mori, Hideo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University (Japan); Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); GOTO, Shoji [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Soil parameters required to simulate the dynamic lateral response of model piles in sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Eq. (3) becomes invalid since it does not account for plastic behavior of the soil. A method of considering plastic soil behavior by modifying Eq. (3) is discussed in detail in a later section. The soil damping factor, J, has been investigated..., a distribution of kh with depth was obtained. It should be noted that each kh value, as evaluated in the above manner, is a soil property independent of the pile diameter but dependent on depth. This of course does not account for any...

Wright, David Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Statistical and risk analysis for the measured and predicted axial response of 100 piles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Committee) cu. Har y M. Coyl (Member) J rey D. Hart (Member) Donald McDonald (Head of Department) May 1986 ABSTRACT Statistical and Risk Analysis for the Measured and Predicted Axial Response of 100 Piles (December 1985) Dario Perdomo, B. S... encouragement and financial support. Sincere thanks are expressed to Dr. Jean-Louis Briaud and Nr. Larry Tucker i'or their guidance and advice throughout the course of this research. The assistance of Dr. Harry Coyle and Dr. Jeffrey Hart are also...

Perdomo, Dario

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Assessment of torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R[sub 0] = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B[sup 0] = 4.8-7.5 T, B[sub max] (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

Lyon, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Painter, S.L. (Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)) [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Assessment of torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R{sub 0} = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B{sup 0} = 4.8-7.5 T, B{sub max} (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

Lyon, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Painter, S.L. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

Dr. Benoit Forget; Michael Pope; Piet, Steven J.; Michael Driscoll

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

SAFETY AND RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A survey of the various aspects of safety and reliability analysis of nuclear reactors is presented with particular emphasis on the interrelation between structural reliability and systems reliability. In reactor design this interrelation is of overriding importance since it is the task of the control, protective and containment systems to protect the mechanical system and the structure from accidental overloading.

T.A. JAEGER

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Chemical Reactor Analysis and Optimal Digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J 310 Chemical Reactor Analysis and Optimal Digestion An optimal digestion theory can be readily derived from basic principles o f chemical reactor analysis and design Deborah L. Penry and Peter for formulating and solving optimization problems (Bellman 1957), the entire process is optimized only

Jumars, Pete

345

Tanden Mirror Reactor Systems Code (TMRSC)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a computer code developed to model a tandem mirror reactor. This is the first tandem mirror reactor model to couple the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are included in this paper. These studies are designed (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

Reid, R.L.; Rothe, K.E.; Barrett, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

347

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in burning and non-burning coal waste piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coal waste material that results from Douro Coalfield exploitation was analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC–MS) for the identification and quantification of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), defined as priority pollutants. It is expected that the organic fraction of the coal waste material contains \\{PAHs\\} from petrogenic origin, and also from pyrolytic origin in burning coal waste piles. The results demonstrate some similarity in the studied samples, being phenanthrene the most abundant PAH followed by fluoranthene and pyrene. A petrogenic contribution of \\{PAHs\\} in unburned samples and a mixture of \\{PAHs\\} from petrogenic and pyrolytic sources in the burning/burnt samples were identified. The lowest values of the sum of the 16 priority \\{PAHs\\} found in burning/burnt samples and the depletion LMW \\{PAHs\\} and greater abundance of HMW \\{PAHs\\} from the unburned coal waste material relatively to the burning/burnt material demonstrate the thermal transformation attributed to the burning process. The potential environmental impact associated with the coal waste piles are related with the release of petrogenic and pyrolytic \\{PAHs\\} in particulate and gaseous forms to soils, sediments, groundwater, surface water, and biodiversity.

Joana Ribeiro; Tais Silva; Joao Graciano Mendonca Filho; Deolinda Flores

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A model for noise radiated by submerged piles and towers in littoral environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pile driving in shallow water during the construction of bridges and other structures can produce transient broadband noise of sufficient intensity to kill fish and disturb marine mammals. Sustained tonal noise radiated by towers supporting offshore wind turbines contains energy in frequency bands that may inhibit detection of coastal activities via passive sonar and seismic sensors. Understanding the generation and propagation of underwater noise due to pile driving and wind farms is important for determining the best strategies for mitigating the environmental impact of these noisesources. An analytic model based on a Green's function approach is presented for the sound radiated in the water column by a submerged cylindrical structure embedded in horizontally stratified layers of sediment. The sediment layers are modeled as viscoelastic media and the Green's function is derived via angular spectrum decomposition. Noise radiation due to both vibration of the structure and impulses delivered to the sediment is considered. Contributions to the pressure field in the water column due to radiation directly into the water radiation from the sediment into the water and Scholte waves propagating along the sediment-water interface will be discussed. [Work supported by the ARL:UT IR&D program.

Todd A. Hay; Yurii A. Ilinskii; Evgenia A. Zabolotskaya; Preston S. Wilson; Mark F. Hamilton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Critical assessment of thorium reactor technology .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thorium-based fuels for nuclear reactors are being considered for use with current and future designs in both large and small-scale energy production. Thorium-232 is as… (more)

Drenkhahn, Robert (Robert A.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Dust Divertor for a Tokamak Fusion Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conventional tokamak fusion reactor deploys a magnetic divertor design which channels...1], or covered by flowing liquid metals [2...]. A typical estimate for the plasma heat flux to the divertor for a tokama...

X. Z. Tang; G. L. Delzanno

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiation Damage and Tritium Breeding Study in a Fusion Reactor Using a Liquid Wall of Various Thorium Molten Salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new magnetic fusion reactor design, called APEX uses a liquid wall between fusion plasma and solid first wall to reach ... replacement of the first wall structure during the reactor’s operation due to the radia...

Mustafa Übeyli

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has designed and operated 52 test reactors, including EBR-1, the world's first nuclear power plant Key Contributions System safety analysis Multiscale fuel performance...

353

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the better understanding of the system uncertainties and sensitivities afforded by the virtual reactor will identify improvements in both the operation and design of the fuel...

354

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons Design, Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

355

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A study of the principal factors contributing to the load supporting capacity of straight shaft cast-in-place concrete piles in clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Field test data ................................. .............. 133 1. Pressure cell installed at base of pile ....... ....... 133 2. Analysis of pile load test results ............. ....... 138 B. Laboratory test data... ...................... .......... ........ 144 1. Pressure cell d a t a ............................... ....... 144 C. Summary of distribution of load between skin friction and bearing ............................ ....... 146 X. CONCLUSIONS...

Dubose, Lawrence A.

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

357

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Advance Test Reactor Class Waiver  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Test Reactor Class Waiver Advance Test Reactor Class Waiver W(C)-2008-004 The Advanced Test Reactor (A TR) is a pressurized water test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that operates at low pressure and temperature. The ATR was originally designed to study the effects of intense radiation on reactor material and fuels . It has a "Four Leaf Clover" design that allows a diverse array of testing locations. The unique design allows for different flux in various locations and specialized systems also allow for certain experiments to be run at their own temperature and pressure. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation will allow the ATR to

358

Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Daya Bay is an international neutrino-oscillation experiment designed to determine the last unknown neutrino mixing angle θ13 using anti-neutrinos produced by the Daya Bay and Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plant reactors. The experiment is being built by blasting three kilometers of tunnel through the granite rock under the mountains where the power plants are located. Data collection is now scheduled to start in in 2011. On the PDSF cluster at NERSC, Daya Bay performs simulations of the detectors, reactors, and surrounding mountains to help design and anticipate detector properties and behavior. Once real data are available, Daya Bay will be using NERSC to analyze data and NERSC HPSS will be the central U.S. repository for all raw

359

CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR is an interdisciplinary center for developing an innovative, next-generation nuclear reactor analysis tool that both utilizes and guides the development of exascale computing platforms. Existing reactor analysis codes are highly tuned and calibrated for commercial light-water reactors, but they lack the physics fidelity to seamlessly carry over to new classes of reactors with significantly different design characteristics-as, for example, innovative concepts such as TerraPower's Traveling Wave reactor and Small Modular Reactor concepts. Without vastly improved modeling capabilities, the economic and safety characteristics of these and other novel systems will require tremendous

360

GEN-IV Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation-IV reactors are a set of nuclear reactors currently being developed under international collaborations targeting ... economics, proliferation resistance, and physical protection of nuclear energy. Nuclear

Taek K. Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Netherlands Reactor Centre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Two illustrated brochures in English have recently J. been issued by the Netherlands Reactor Centre ( ... Centre (Reactor Centrum Nederland). The first* gives a general survey of the ...

S. WEINTROUB

1964-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

SHARP: Reactor Performance and Safety Simulation Suite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARP SHARP Argonne National Laboratory's Reactor Performance and Safety Simulation Suite SHARP could save millions in nuclear reactor design and development... The Simulation-based High-efficiency Advanced Reactor Prototyping (SHARP) suite of codes enables virtual design and engineering of nuclear plant behavior that would be impractical from a traditional experimental approach. ...by leveraging the computational power of one of the world's most powerful supercomputers. Exploiting the power of Argonne Leadership Computing Facility's near-petascale computers, researchers have developed a set of simulation tools that provide a highly detailed description of the reactor core and the nuclear plant behavior. This enables the efficient and precise design of tomorrow's safe and clean nuclear energy sources.

363

In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 °C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Preliminary characterization of the F-Area Railroad Crosstie Pile at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Historical information about the F-Area Railroad Crosstie Pile is limited. The unit is believed to have been a borrow area for earth fill that began receiving railroad crossties during the 1960s. The number of crossties at the unit began to increase significantly in 1984 when major repair of the SRS rail system was initiated. An estimated 100,000 used railroad crossties have accumulated at the unit since 1984. In an effort to determine the impact of the railroad crossties on the environment a total of 28 soil samples were collected from four test borings in March of 1991. Sample depths ranged from ground surface to 21.5 feet. Three of the borings were extended to the water table and groundwater samples were collected, one in an upgradient background'' area, and two downgradient from the unit. Few analytes were reported above detection limits. Test results are summarized in Section 4.0 and analytes not detected are summarized in Appendix A to this report. In three soil samples collected from depths between 10 and 21.5 feet, copper occurred at levels slightly above background. These copper values were detected in the sidegradient test boring and in the two downgradient test borings. Three organic analytes, acetone, pyridine, and Toluene, were reported above detection limits but well below drinking water standards (DWS) in all test borings, including the upgradient boring. Radionuclide activities were reported above background in both soil and water samples from all test borings. There do not appear to be any statistically significant trends in radionuclide activities with depth, or between upgradient or downgradient borings. The analytes detected in the test borings downgradient from the unit cannot be attributed to the railroad crosstie pile as they are not significantly different than the values reported for the upgradient, background test boring.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Business Opportunities for Small Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the market potential and identifies a number of potential paths for developing the small nuclear reactor business. There are several potential opportunities identified and evaluated. Selecting a specific approach for the business development requires additional information related to a specific market and sources of capital to support the investment. If and how a market for small nuclear plants may develop is difficult to predict because of the complexity of the economic and institutional factors that will influence such development. Key factors are; economics, safety, proliferation resistance and investment risk. The economic and political interest of any of the identified markets is also dependent on successful demonstration of the safety and reliability of small nuclear reactor. Obtaining a US-NRC Standard Design approval would be an important development step toward establishing a market for small reactors. (authors)

Minato, Akio; Nishimura, Satoshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry - CRIEPI, 2-11-1 Iwado-Kita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Brown, Neil W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - LLNL, PO Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

A review of decommissioning considerations for new reactors  

SciTech Connect

At a time of 'nuclear renaissance' when the focus is on advanced reactor designs and construction, it is easy to overlook the decommissioning considerations because such a stage in the life of the new reactors will be some sixty years down the road. Yet, one of the lessons learned from major decommissioning projects has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Hence, the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account is right from the design stage with regular updates of the decommissioning strategy and plans throughout the life cycle of the reactor. Designing D and D into the new reactor designs is necessary to ensure that the tail end costs of the nuclear power are manageable. Such considerations during the design stage will facilitate a more cost-effective, safe and timely decommissioning of the facility when a reactor is eventually retired. This paper examines the current regulatory and industry design guidance for the new reactors with respect to the decommissioning issues and provides a review of the design considerations that can help optimize the reactor designs for the eventual decommissioning. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.Ph.D. [Manager Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

Johnson, Roland (Muons, Inc.) [Muons, Inc.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

Multiobjective Dynamic Optimization of an Industrial Nylon 6 Semibatch Reactor Using Genetic Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiobjective Dynamic Optimization of an Industrial Nylon 6 Semibatch Reactor Using Genetic optimization, nylon 6, genetic algorithm, polymer reactor, polymerization, Pareto sets trial nylon 6 reactor for use in the optimal design and operation of these reactors. Some stud- ies4­9 have already been

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

371

Optimal Homogenization of Perfusion Flows in Microfluidic Bio-Reactors: A Numerical Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Homogenization of Perfusion Flows in Microfluidic Bio-Reactors: A Numerical Study Fridolin of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark Abstract In recent years, the interest in small-scale bio-reactors microfluidic bio-reactors, we develop a general design of a continually feed bio- reactor with uniform

372

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs.

Modro, S.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Rapid starting methanol reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding DOE-STD-1195-2011, Design of Safety Significant Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding DOE-STD-1195-2011 which provides requirements and guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of safety instrumented systems (SIS) that may be used at Department of Energy (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety significant (SS) functions.

376

An evaluation of the fast-mixed spectrum reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An independent evaluation of the neutronic characteristics of a gas-cooled fast-mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR) core design has been performed. A benchmark core configuration for an early FMSR design was provided by Brookhaven ...

Loh, Wee Tee

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options  

SciTech Connect

During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor physics and fuel cycle analysis is a core competency of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division. The Division has played a major role in the design and analysis of advanced reactors, particularly liquid-metal-cooled reactors. NE researchers have concentrated on developing computer codes for

379

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Safe new reactor for radionuclide production  

SciTech Connect

In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible.

Gray, P.L.

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fusion Reactors as Future Energy Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Other conceptual Tokamak reactors have been designed in the United States by grotups at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) (2) and the University of Wisconsin (3). In these designs, in order to main-tain a low level of 4He in the plasma and...

R. F. Post; F. L. Ribe

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Status of fast-breeder-reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

The current state of knowledge of fast breeder reactors is reviewed. The primary focus on the analysis of postulated accident sequences and the implications to fast-reactor design. The accidents considered include loss-of-collant flow and transient overpower, both with a postulated failure to scram. The associated accident phenomena considered largely relate to the potential for energetic disassembly and include fuel, clad, and coolant motions during the accident sequence, fuel-coolant thermal interactions, and potential recriticality phenomena.

Avery, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Upgraded D[O] calorimeter electronics for short Tevatron bunch space and the effect of pile-up on the W mass measurement  

SciTech Connect

The high luminosity and short bunch spacing time of the upgraded Tevatron force the calorimeter to replace a significant part of the present electronics. The W mass measurement was used to study the pile-up effects.

Lokos, S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors.  

SciTech Connect

Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self - correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the syste m's design to manage the accident. While inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety , thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayes ian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author s would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of E nergy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR - 14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at A rgonne N ational L aborator y , O ak R idge N ational L aborator y , and I daho N ational L aborator y for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

Denman, Matthew R; Groth, Katrina; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Wheeler, Timothy A.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Work Breakdown Structure and Plant/Equipment Designation System Numbering Scheme for the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)  

SciTech Connect

This white paper investigates the potential integration of the CTC work breakdown structure numbering scheme with a plant/equipment numbering system (PNS), or alternatively referred to in industry as a reference designation system (RDS). Ideally, the goal of such integration would be a single, common referencing system for the life cycle of the CTC that supports all the various processes (e.g., information, execution, and control) that necessitate plant and equipment numbers be assigned. This white paper focuses on discovering the full scope of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) processes to which this goal might be applied as well as the factors likely to affect decisions about implementation. Later, a procedure for assigning these numbers will be developed using this white paper as a starting point and that reflects the resolved scope and outcome of associated decisions.

Jeffrey D Bryan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

Elementary Reactor Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THERE are few subjects which have developed at the rate at which reactor physics and ... physics and reactor theory have done. This, of course, is largely due to the circumstances in ...

J. F. HILL

1962-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker–Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are ... the rec...

Norman Rostoker; Artan Qerushi; Michl Binderbauer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Chapter 5 - Mineralogy of Burning-Coal Waste Piles in Collieries of the Czech Republic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to long-lasting tradition of coal mining and industrial history on the territory of Czech Republic, significant amount of waste piles of various ages and scales occur. Many of them, along with scarce occurrences of naturally burned coal measures, spontaneously ignited and subsequently, served as a source of diverse assemblage of newly formed minerals – products of pyrometamorphism, alteration, and sublimation. Several new minerals associated with combustion metamorphism were first described from the Czech Republic: tschermigite (1853), rosickýite (1931), letovicite (1932), kratochvílite (1937), kladnoite (1942), koktaite (1948), and rostite (1979). This chapter mainly focuses on two most famous localities, both situated to the Carboniferous sedimentary basins: Kladno Coal District in Central Bohemia near the capital Prague and Radvanice at Trutnov in Eastern Bohemia, close to border with Poland. These two localities, which were studied in detail, provided nearly 100 recently formed minerals and unnamed compounds. Sulfur and As–S efflorescence nucleated around a high-temperature coal-fire gas vent in Radvanice, Czech Republic. Photo by Vladimír Žá?ek, 1994.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The significance of parameter uncertainties for the prediction of offshore pile driving noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the construction of offshore wind farms and its potential effect on marine wildlife the numerical prediction of pile driving noise over long ranges has recently gained importance. In this contribution a coupled finite element/wavenumber integration model for noise prediction is presented and validated by measurements. The ocean environment especially the sea bottom can only be characterized with limited accuracy in terms of input parameters for the numerical model at hand. Therefore the effect of these parameter uncertainties on the prediction of sound pressure levels (SPLs) in the water column is investigated by a probabilistic approach. In fact a variation of the bottom material parameters by means of Monte-Carlo simulations shows significant effects on the predicted SPLs. A sensitivity analysis of the model with respect to the single quantities is performed as well as a global variation. Based on the latter the probability distribution of the SPLs at an exemplary receiver position is evaluated and compared to measurements. The aim of this procedure is to develop a model to reliably predict an interval for the SPLs by quantifying the degree of uncertainty of the SPLs with the MC simulations.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid immunoaffinity reactor Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, and J.F. Stubbins4) Title: Final Report on In-reactor Creep-fatigue Deformation... , Finland 3) Reactor Technology Design Department, SCKCEN, 200 Boeretang, B-2400 Mol,...

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced space reactor Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, and J.F. Stubbins4) Title: Final Report on In-reactor Creep-fatigue Deformation... , Finland 3) Reactor Technology Design Department, SCKCEN, 200 Boeretang, B-2400 Mol,...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced gas reactor Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, and J.F. Stubbins4) Title: Final Report on In-reactor Creep-fatigue Deformation... , Finland 3) Reactor Technology Design Department, SCKCEN, 200 Boeretang, B-2400 Mol,...

395

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustment 100-k reactors Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, and J.F. Stubbins4) Title: Final Report on In-reactor Creep-fatigue Deformation... , Finland 3) Reactor Technology Design Department, SCKCEN, 200 Boeretang, B-2400 Mol,...

396

Emulsion polymerization of ethylene-vinyl acetate-branched vinyl ester using a pressure reactor system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new pressure reactor system was designed to synthesize a novel branched ester-ethylene-vinyl acetate (BEEVA) emulsion polymer. The reactor system was capable of handling pressure… (more)

Tan, Chee Boon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Prospects for spheromak fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactor study of Hagenson and Krakowski demonstrated the attractiveness of the spheromak as a compact fusion reactor, based on...

T. K. Fowler; D. D. Hua

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Conceptual design and testing strategy of a dual functional lithium–lead test blanket module in ITER and EAST  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dual functional lithium–lead (DFLL) test blanket module (TBM) concept has been proposed for testing in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in China to demonstrate the technologies of the liquid lithium–lead breeder blankets with emphasis on the balance between the risks and the potential attractiveness of blanket technology development. The design of DFLL-TBM concept has the flexibility of testing both the helium-cooled quasi-static lithium–lead (SLL) blanket concept and the He/PbLi dual-cooled lithium–lead (DLL) blanket concept. This paper presents an effective testing strategy proposed to achieve the testing target of SLL and DLL DEMO blankets relevant conditions, which includes three parts: materials R&D and small-scale out-of-pile mockups testing in loops, middle-scale TBMs pre-testing in EAST and full-scale consecutive TBMs testing corresponding to different operation phases of ITER during the first 10 years. The design of the DFLL-TBM concept and the testing strategy ability to test TBMs for both blanket concepts in sequence and or in parallel for both ITER and EAST are discussed.

Y. Wu; the FDS Team

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

The ARIES tokamak reactor study  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Anisotropic biaxial creep of textured zircaloy: Application to in-reactor life prediction  

SciTech Connect

Zirconium alloys are commonly used in light water reactors as thin-walled tubings to prevent coolant-fuel contact and to retain fission gases. These alloys have hexagonal close-packed crystal structure with low c/a ratio at and below the reactor operating temperatures and exhibit preferred orientations or textures. The anisotropic mechanical properties in turn affect their in-service behavior such as in-pile creep-down of the cladding tubes. Creep anisotropy was characterized using biaxial creep tests and the creep-loci constructed at constant energy dissipation deviated from isotropy. The anisotropy parameters derived from the loci agreed with those obtained from the strain-rate ratios at varied stress ratios. Effects of cold work were clearly revealed in that the relatively strong hoop direction for the recrystallized (R{sub x}) material became far weaker.

Murty, K.L. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Corrosion Minimization for Research Reactor Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Existing university research reactors are being converted to use low-enriched uranium fue to eliminate the use of highly-enriched uranium. These conversions require increases in fuel loading that will result in the use of elements with more fuel plates, resulting in a net decrease in the water annulus between fuel plates. The proposed decrease in the water annulus raises questions about the requirements and stability of the surface hydroxide on the aluminum fuel cladding and the potential for runaway corrosion resulting in fuel over-temperature incidents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as regulator for these university reactors, must ensure that proposed fuel modifications will not result in any increased risk or hazard to the reactor operators or the public. This document reviews the characteristics and behavior of aluminum hydroxides, analyzes the drivers for fuel plate corrosion, reviews relevant historical incidents, and provides recommendations on fuel design, surface treatment, and reactor operational practices to avoid corrosion issues.

Eric Shaber; Gerard Hofman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Tokamak fusion reactors with less than full tritium breeding  

SciTech Connect

A study of commercial, tokamak fusion reactors with tritium concentrations and tritium breeding ratios ranging from full deuterium-tritium operation to operation with no tritium breeding is presented. The design basis for these reactors is similar to those of STARFIRE and WILDCAT. Optimum operating temperatures, sizes, toroidal field strengths, and blanket/shield configurations are determined for a sequence of reactor designs spanning the range of tritium breeding, each having the same values of beta, thermal power, and first-wall heat load. Additional reactor parameters, tritium inventories and throughputs, and detailed costs are calculated for each reactor design. The disadvantages, advantages, implications, and ramifications of tritium-depleted operation are presented and discussed.

Evans, K. Jr.; Gilligan, J.G.; Jung, J.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test...

412

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

413

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

414

Analysis of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System for Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is an important heat removal system in case of accidents...

Frisani, Angelo

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors ... Project Sherwood, as the study program is called, began in 1951-52 soon after the first successful thermonuclear explosion in the Pacific. ...

1955-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Flow Simulation and Optimization of Plasma Reactors for Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports a 3-d numerical simulation system to analyze the complicated flow in plasma reactors for coal gasification, which involve complex chemical reaction, two-phase flow and plasma effect. On the basis of analytic results, the distribution of the density, temperature and components' concentration are obtained and a different plasma reactor configuration is proposed to optimize the flow parameters. The numerical simulation results show an improved conversion ratio of the coal gasification. Different kinds of chemical reaction models are used to simulate the complex flow inside the reactor. It can be concluded that the numerical simulation system can be very useful for the design and optimization of the plasma reactor.

Ji Chunjun; Zhang Yingzi; Ma Tengcai

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish reactor safety program requirements assure that the safety of each Department of Energy-owned (DOE-owned) reactor is properly analyzed, evaluated, documented, and approved by DOE; and reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate protection for health and safety and will be in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. Cancels Chap. 6 of DOE O 5480.1A. Paragraphs 7b(3), 7e(3) & 8c canceled by DOE O 5480.23 & canceled by DOE N 251.4 of 9-29-95.

1986-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

Binford, F.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Relocation of on-site spoils pile materials at the Linde Fusrap Site  

SciTech Connect

During the 1940's, the Linde Division of Union Carbide used portions of their property in Tonawanda, New York for processing uranium ores under Federal Manhattan Engineering District (MED) contracts. These activities resulted in radiological contamination on portions of the property. The radionuclides of concern at the site are Radium, Thorium, and Uranium. The site is currently owned and operated by Praxair Inc., an industrial gas company. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) issued a Record of Decision to remediate the radiologically-contaminated materials associated with MED activities in March 2000 under the authority of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The selected remedy is fully protective of human health and the environment and complies with Federal and State requirements that are legally applicable or relevant and appropriate and meets community commitments. The USACE - Buffalo District has been executing remedial activities at the site and has successfully addressed many challenges in a safe and cost effective manner through effective coordination, project management, and partnering with stakeholders. These efforts supported the successful relocation of approximately 29,000 cubic yards of stockpiled material (soils, concrete, steel, asphalt and miscellaneous non-soil) that had been generated by the property owner as a result of ongoing development of the facility. Relocation of the material was necessary to allow safe access to the surface and subsurface soils beneath the pile for sampling and analysis. During relocation operations, materials were evaluated for the presence of radiological contamination. The vast majority of material was relocated onsite and remained the property owner's responsibility. A small portion of the material required off-site disposal at a permitted disposal facility due to radiological contamination that exceeded site criteria. This paper presents details associated with the successful resolution of responsibility concerns associated with a large stockpile of materials accumulated over many years by the property owner. A cost effective approach and partnership was developed to allow for real time radiological characterization and material dispositions by the government and satisfying chemical concerns presented by State regulators. These actions resulted in onsite relocation and responsible transfer of the materials to the property owner for beneficial reuse resulting in significant project cost savings. (authors)

Schwippert, M.T. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc., New York (United States); Boyle, J.D.; Bousquet, S.M. [US Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, New York (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Solar solids reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

Yudow, Bernard D. (Chicago, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Solar solids reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

Yudow, B.D.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

423

The CANDU Reactor System: An Appropriate Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...apparent. The devel-opment of Zircaloy-2 by the U.S. Bettis Laboratory in Pittsburgh, made this con-cept practicable...necessary to base a reactor de-sign on Zircaloy-2 had not Bettis work-ers been testing the material in NRX as part of a collaborative...

J. A. L. Robertson

1978-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

A NOVEL MICROMEGAS DETECTOR FOR IN-CORE NUCLEAR REACTOR NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A NOVEL MICROMEGAS DETECTOR FOR IN-CORE NUCLEAR REACTOR NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENTS S. ANDRIAMONJE Talence Cedex, France Future fast nuclear reactors designed for energy production and transmutation to neutron detection inside nuclear reactor is given. The advantage of this detector over conventional

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

425

CAD of Microwave Chemistry Reactors with Energy Efficiency Optimized for Multiple Reactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAD of Microwave Chemistry Reactors with Energy Efficiency Optimized for Multiple Reactants Ethan K for additional practically important condition requiring the reactor's optimal design for different reactants reactor for 3 different materials: with 1/5 liter reactants, seven-parameter optimization yields the best

Yakovlev, Vadim

426

Reduced Order Based Compensator Control of Thin Film Growth in a CVD Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the reactor so that control and sensing are a basic component of the optimal design e#orts for the reactor. WeReduced Order Based Compensator Control of Thin Film Growth in a CVD Reactor H.T. Banks and H processing approaches with ad­ vanced mathematical modeling, optimization, and control theory to guide

427

Reduced Order Based Compensator Control of Thin Film Growth in a CVD Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the reactor so that control and sensing are a basic component of the optimal design efforts for the reactorReduced Order Based Compensator Control of Thin Film Growth in a CVD Reactor H.T. Banks and H processing approaches with ad- vanced mathematical modeling, optimization, and control theory to guide

428

Progress and status of the integral fast reactor (IFR) development program  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, in which the entire reactor system - reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. Detailed discussions on the present status of the IFR technology development activities in the areas of fuels, pyroprocessing, safety, core design, and fuel cycle demonstration are also presented.

Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to ... longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful developme...

I. Chant; K. L. Murty

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of the parfait blanket concept for fast breeder reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An evaluation of the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, mechanical and economic characteristics of fast breeder reactor configurations containing an internal blanket has been performed. This design, called the parfait blanket ...

Ducat, Glenn Alexander

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Measurement Of Flow Induced Vibration Of Reactor Component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of flow-induced vibration on class I components in the reactor is a very important design factor for its qualifications worthy of loading inside the core. In this regard, a clear definition of the f...

N. Dharmaraju; K. K. Meher; A. Rama Rao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

Ehud Greenspan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

U.S. domestic reactor conversion program  

SciTech Connect

The RERTR U.S. Domestic Conversion program continues in its support of the Global Treat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) to convert seven U.S reactors to low enriched uranium (LEU) by 2010. These reactors are located at the University of Florida, Texas A and M University, Purdue University, Washington State University, Oregon State University, the University of Wisconsin, and the Idaho National Laboratory. The reactors located at the University of Florida and Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center were successfully converted to LEU in September of 2006 through an integrated and collaborative effort involving INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (headquarters and the field office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the universities, and the contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipping and disposition. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, a meeting was established to engage the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to document the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts could be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. The lessons learned from completing the University of Florida and Texas A and M conversions, the Purdue reactor conversion status, and an overview of the upcoming reactor conversions will be presented at the meeting. (author)

Meyer, Dana M.; Woolstenhulme, Eric C. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - army gas-cooled reactor Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENABLING SUSTAINABLE NUCLEAR POWER Summary: and NRE Design Class., "Advances in the Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor Concept", Nucl... . Tedder, J. Lackey, J....

435

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide burner reactors Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Design 85 (2010) 14881491 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Summary: subcritical advanced burner reactor, Nuclear technology 162 (2008). 9 M. Kotschenreuther,...

436

Fuel Performance Code Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Light Water Reactor Modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fuel performance codes are used in the design and safety analysis of light water reactors. The differences in the physical models and the numerics of… (more)

Blyth, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The development of a remote monitoring system for the Nuclear Science Center reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With funding provided by Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), design of Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactors (STAR) to aid countries with insufficient energy supplies is underway.… (more)

Jiltchenkov, Dmitri Victorovich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Laser Fusion Experimental Reactor LIFT Based on Fast Ignition and the Issue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We organized a design committee for the laser fusion experimental reactor to show the feasibility to construct it with existing materials and improved technologies. The ...

Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Kozaki, Yasuji; Shiraga, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hisanori; Okano, Kunihiko; Azech, Hiroshi

439

Development of 3-D Neutronic Kinetic Model and Control for CANDU Reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of a three dimensional (3-D) neutronic kinetic modeling process aiming at control system design for CANadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors is carried out… (more)

Xia, Lingzhi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Probabilistic risk assessment of N Reactor using NUREG-1150 methods  

SciTech Connect

A Level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) Category A production reactor. The main contractor is Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The PRA methodology developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the NUREG-1150 (Reference 1) effort were used for this analysis. N Reactor is a graphite-moderated pressurized water reactor designed by General Electric. The dual-purpose 4000 MWt nuclear plant is located within the Hanford Site in the south-central part of the State of Washington. In addition to producing special materials for the DOE, N Reactor generates 860 MWe for the Washington Public Power Supply System. The reactor has been operated successfully and safely since 1963, and was put into standby status in 1988 due to the changing need in special nuclear material. 3 refs., 4 tabs.

Wang, O.S.; Baxter, J.T.; Coles, G.A.; Powers, T.B.; Zentner, M.D.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor pile design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Small Modular Reactors (468th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect

With good reason, much more media attention has focused on nuclear power plants than solar farms, wind farms, or hydroelectric plants during the past month and a half. But as nations around the world demand more energy to power everything from cell phone batteries to drinking water pumps to foundries, nuclear plants are the only non-greenhouse-gas producing option that can be built to operate almost anywhere, and can continue to generate power during droughts, after the sun sets, and when winds die down. To supply this demand for power, designers around the world are competing to develop more affordable nuclear reactors of the future: small modular reactors. Brookhaven Lab is working with DOE to ensure that these reactors are designed to be safe for workers, members of surrounding communities, and the environment and to ensure that the radioactive materials and technology will only be used for peaceful purposes, not weapons. In his talk, Bari will discuss the advantages and challenges of small modular reactors and what drives both international and domestic interest in them. He will also explain how Brookhaven Lab and DOE are working to address the challenges and provide a framework for small modular reactors to be commercialized.

Bari, Robert

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

442

Handbook of Reactor Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THIS handbook is one volume in a series sponsored by the United States Atomic Energy Commission with ... data and reference information in the field of reactors. The volume is devoted to reactor physics and radiation shielding, the latter subject occupying approximately a quarter of the book.

PETER W. MUMMERY

1956-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Fast reactor safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR, - In his article on fast reactor safety (26 July, page 270) Norman Dombey claims to introduce to non-specialists ... , page 270) Norman Dombey claims to introduce to non-specialists some features of fast reactors that are not available outside the technical literature. The non-specialist would do well ...

R.D. SMITH

1979-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

444

Instrumentation of Nuclear Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... s Lecture Theatre on January 8, a symposium of papers on the instrumentation of nuclear reactors was organized, at which about five hundred members and visitors attended, including guests from ... the Institution, took the chair and introduced Sir John Cockcroft, whose lecture on "Nuclear Reactors and their Applications" provided a general background for the three specialized papers which followed. ...

1953-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

Nuclear Research Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... their countries for the advent of nuclear power. A few countries had built large research reactors for the production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but ... production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but the small training reactor had not been developed. Since then, research ...

T. E. ALLIBONE

1963-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) was selected as one of the promising candidates in Generation IV reactors for its prominent advantages; those are the high thermal efficiency, the system simplification, the R&D cost minimization and the flexibility for core design. As the demand for advanced nuclear system increases, Japanese R&D project started in 1999 aiming to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through three sub-themes of 1. Plant conceptual design, 2. Thermal-hydraulics, and 3. Material. Although the material development is critical issue of SCWR development, previous studies were limited for the screening tests on commercial alloys

447

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

448

Canadian university research reactors  

SciTech Connect

In Canada there are seven university research reactors: one medium-power (2-MW) swimming pool reactor at McMaster University and six low-power (20-kW) SLOWPOKE reactors at Dalhousie University, Ecole Polytechnique, the Royal Military College, the University of Toronto, the University of Saskatchewan, and the University of Alberta. This paper describes primarily the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR), which operates on a wider scale than the SLOWPOKE reactors. The MNR has over a hundred user groups and is a very broad-based tool. The main applications are in the following areas: (1) neutron activation analysis (NAA); (2) isotope production; (3) neutron beam research; (4) nuclear engineering; (5) neutron radiography; and (6) nuclear physics.

Ernst, P.C.; Collins, M.F.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Screening and comparison of remedial alternatives for the South Field and flyash piles at the Fernald site  

SciTech Connect

The South Field, the Inactive Flyash Pile, and the Active Flyash Pile are in close proximity to each other and are part of Operable Unit 2 (OU2) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The baseline risk assessment indicated that the exposure pathways which pose the most significant risk are external radiation from radionuclides in surface soils and use of uranium contaminated groundwater. This paper presents screening and comparison of various remedial alternatives considered to mitigate risks from the groundwater pathway. Eight remedial alternatives were developed which consisted of consolidation and capping, excavation and off-site disposal with or without treatment, excavation and on-site disposal with or without treatment and combinations of these. Risk-based source (soil) preliminary remediation levels (PRLs) and waste acceptance criteria (WACs) were developed for consolidation and capping, excavation, and on-site disposal cell. The PRLs and WACs were developed using an integrated modeling tool consisting of an infiltration model, a surface water model, a vadose zone model, and a three-dimensional contaminant migration model in saturated media. The PRLs and WACs were then used to determine need for soil treatment, determine excavation volumes, and screen remedial alternatives. The selected remedial alternative consisted of excavation and on-site disposal with off-site disposal of the fraction exceeding the WAC.

Bumb, A.C. [Fluor Daniel Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Jones, G.N. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Warner, R.D. [Dept. of Energy, Fernald, OH (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications...

451

Critical Heat Flux -CHF in Liquid Metal in Presence of a Magnetic Field with Particular Reference to Fusion Reactor Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge of the critical heat flux q??crit is a cornerstone of reactor design fission, but as will demonstrate also in fusion reactors. This quantity cannot be deduced directly,...

F. J. Arias

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Investigation on tritium breeding capability of solid-liquid breeders in a (DT) fusion driven hybrid reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In design of deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion driven hybrid reactors, maintaining tritium self-sufficiency is very important ... to decrease operational costs. A (DT) fusion driven hybrid reactor must produce its ow...

M. Übeyli

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Relap5-3d model validation and benchmark exercises for advanced gas cooled reactor application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HTTR High Temperature engineering Test Reactor INET Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology LWR Light Water Reactor OKBM Test Design Bureau for Machine Building ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory RCCS Reactor Cavity Cooling System... to be at right angles to each other, ignoring an angular distribution of radiant heat.7 MORECA, used by ORNL, simulates accident scenarios for certain gas-cooled reactor types.7 INET conducts their analysis using Thermix, which performs two...

Moore, Eugene James Thomas

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core using MCNPX.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a reactor design with a burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core that was evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). The current trend in advanced reactor design is the concept of a small modular reactor (SMR). However, very few of the SMR designs attempt to substantially increase the lifetime of a reactor core, especially without zone loading, fuel reshuffling, or other artificial mechanisms in the core that %E2%80%9Cflatten%E2%80%9D the power profile, including non-uniform cooling, non-uniform moderation, or strategic poison placement. Historically, the limitations of computing capabilities have prevented acceptable margins in the temporal component of the spatial excess reactivity in a reactor design, due primarily to the error in burnup calculations. This research was performed as an initial scoping analysis into the concept of a long-life fast reactor. It can be shown that a long-life fast reactor concept can be modeled using MCNPX to predict burnup and neutronics behavior. The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs. For the purpose of this study, a single core design was investigated: a relatively small reactor core, yielding a medium amount of power (~200 to 400 MWth). The results of this scoping analysis were successful in providing a preliminary reactor design involving metal U-235/U-238 fuel with HT-9 fuel cladding and sodium coolant at a 20% volume fraction.

Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Parma, Edward J.,

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Compound cryopump for fusion reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

Kovari, M; Shephard, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Radiation Effects in Fission and Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the prediction of “Wigner disease” [1...] and the subsequent observation of anisotropic growth of the graphite used in the Chicago Pile, the effects of radiation on materials has been an important technolog...

G. Robert Odette; Brian D. Wirth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Refueling Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR), also called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR), is a new reactor concept that combines in a novel way four established technologies: (1) coated-particle graphite-matrix nuclear fuels, (2) Brayton power cycles, (3) passive safety systems and plant designs previously developed for liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors, and (4) low-pressure liquid-salt coolants. Depending upon goals, the peak coolant operating temperatures are between 700 and 1000 deg. C, with reactor outputs between 2400 and 4000 MW(t). Several fluoride salt coolants that are being evaluated have melting points between 350 and 500 deg. C, values that imply minimum refueling temperatures between 400 and 550 deg. C. At operating conditions, the liquid salts are transparent and have physical properties similar to those of water. A series of refueling studies have been initiated to (1) confirm the viability of refueling, (2) define methods for safe rapid refueling, and (3) aid the selection of the preferred AHTR design. Three reactor cores with different fuel element designs (prismatic, pebble bed, and pin-type fuel assembly) are being evaluated. Each is a liquid-salt-cooled variant of a graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor. The refueling studies examined applicable refueling experience from high-temperature reactors (similar fuel element designs) and sodium-cooled fast reactors (similar plant design with liquid coolant, high temperatures, and low pressures). The findings indicate that refueling is viable, and several approaches have been identified. The study results are described in this paper. (authors)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Peterson, Per F. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California at Berkeley, 6124a Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cahalan, James E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Enneking, Jeffrey A. [Areva NP (United States); Phil MacDonald [Consultant, Cedar Hill, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

An Overview of the Safety Case for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Several small modular reactor (SMR) designs emerged in the late 1970s and early 1980s in response to lessons learned from the many technical and operational challenges of the large Generation II light-water reactors. After the accident at the Three Mile Island plant in 1979, an ensuing reactor redesign effort spawned the term inherently safe designs, which later evolved into passively safe terminology. Several new designs were engineered to be deliberately small in order to fully exploit the benefits of passive safety. Today, new SMR designs are emerging with a similar philosophy of offering highly robust and resilient designs with increased safety margins. Additionally, because these contemporary designs are being developed subsequent to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack, they incorporate a number of intrinsic design features to further strengthen their safety and security. Several SMR designs are being developed in the United States spanning the full spectrum of reactor technologies, including water-, gas-, and liquid-metal-cooled ones. Despite a number of design differences, most of these designs share a common set of design principles to enhance plant safety and robustness, such as eliminating plant design vulnerabilities where possible, reducing accident probabilities, and mitigating accident consequences. An important consequence of the added resilience provided