National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reactor neutrino experiment

  1. Constraining Sterile Neutrinos Using Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Girardi; Davide Meloni; Tommy Ohlsson; He Zhang; Shun Zhou

    2014-08-21

    Models of neutrino mixing involving one or more sterile neutrinos have resurrected their importance in the light of recent cosmological data. In this case, reactor antineutrino experiments offer an ideal place to look for signatures of sterile neutrinos due to their impact on neutrino flavor transitions. In this work, we show that the high-precision data of the Daya Bay experi\\-ment constrain the 3+1 neutrino scenario imposing upper bounds on the relevant active-sterile mixing angle $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{14} \\lesssim 0.06$ at 3$\\sigma$ confidence level for the mass-squared difference $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ in the range $(10^{-3},10^{-1}) \\, {\\rm eV^2}$. The latter bound can be improved by six years of running of the JUNO experiment, $\\sin^22\\theta_{14} \\lesssim 0.016$, although in the smaller mass range $ \\Delta m^2_{41} \\in (10^{-4} ,10^{-3}) \\, {\\rm eV}^2$. We have also investigated the impact of sterile neutrinos on precision measurements of the standard neutrino oscillation parameters $\\theta_{13}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{31}$ (at Daya Bay and JUNO), $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ (at JUNO), and most importantly, the neutrino mass hierarchy (at JUNO). We find that, except for the obvious situation where $\\Delta m^2_{41}\\sim \\Delta m^2_{31}$, sterile states do not affect these measurements substantially.

  2. Neutrino Oscillation Experiments at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Gratta

    1999-05-06

    In this paper I give an overview of the status of neutrino oscillation experiments performed using nuclear reactors as sources of neutrinos. I review the present generation of experiments (Chooz and Palo Verde) with baselines of about 1 km as well as the next generation that will search for oscillations with a baseline of about 100 km. While the present detectors provide essential input towards the understanding of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, in the future, the KamLAND reactor experiment represents our best opportunity to study very small mass neutrino mixing in laboratory conditions. In addition KamLAND with its very large fiducial mass and low energy threshold, will also be sensitive to a broad range of different physics.

  3. Reactor Neutrino Experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, J F; Merle, A; Rolinec, M

    2007-01-01

    We discuss several new ideas for reactor neutrino oscillation experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector. We consider two different scenarios for a measurement of the small mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ with a mobile $\\bar{\

  4. Reactor Neutrino Experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Kopp; Manfred Lindner; Alexander Merle; Mark Rolinec

    2007-01-19

    We discuss several new ideas for reactor neutrino oscillation experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector. We consider two different scenarios for a measurement of the small mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ with a mobile $\\bar{\

  5. The Neutrino Mass Hierarchy from Nuclear Reactor Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Xinmin Zhang

    2013-08-14

    10 years from now reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine which neutrino mass eigenstate is the most massive. In this letter we present the results of more than seven million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the mass hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models, geoneutrinos and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that a recently reported spurious dependence of the data analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. We determine the optimal baselines and corresponding detector locations. For most values of the CP-violating, leptonic Dirac phase delta, a degeneracy prevents NOvA and T2K from determining either delta or the hierarchy. We determine the confidence with which a reactor experiment can determine the hierarchy, breaking the degeneracy.

  6. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

    2015-01-02

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

  7. A New Nuclear Reactor Neutrino Experiment to Measure theta 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Anderson

    2004-02-26

    An International Working Group has been meeting to discuss ideas for a new Nuclear Reactor Neutrino Experiment at meetings in May 2003 (Alabama), October 2003 (Munich) and plans for March 2004 (Niigata). This White Paper Report on the Motivation and Feasibility of such an experiment is the result of these meetings. After a discussion of the context and opportunity for such an experiment, there are sections on detector design, calibration, overburden and backgrounds, systematic errors, other physics, tunneling issues, safety and outreach. There are 7 appendices describing specific site opportunities.

  8. Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

    1999-12-22

    The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

  9. Investigation of Neutrino Properties in Experiments at Nuclear Reactors: Present Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Mikaelyan

    2002-10-07

    This paper was submitted in Russian edition of Journal Physics of Atomic Nuclei in 2001. The present status of experiments that are being performed at nuclear reactors in order to seek the neutrino masses, mixing, and magnetic moments, whose discovery would be a signal of the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model, is considered, along with their future prospects.

  10. Evidence for Neutrino Oscillations I: Solar and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. McDonald

    2004-12-06

    This paper discusses evidence for neutrino oscillations obtained from measurements with solar neutrinos and reactor neutrinos.

  11. Modern Status of Neutrino Experiments at the Underground Neutrino Laboratory of Kurchatov Institute Near Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; S. V. Sukhotin; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov

    1998-11-11

    The investigation of antineutrino-deuteron interaction at Krasnoyarsk reactor are discussed. The characteristics of the installation ''Deuteron'', present results and perspectives of Krasnoyarsk neutrino laboratory are presented.

  12. Precision measurement of solar neutrino oscillation parameters by a long-baseline reactor neutrino experiment in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. T. Petcov; T. Schwetz

    2006-07-13

    We consider the determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ and $\\theta_{12}$ by studying oscillations of reactor anti-neutrinos emitted by nuclear power plants (located mainly in France) with a detector installed in the Frejus underground laboratory. The performances of a water Cerenkov detector of 147 kt fiducial mass doped with 0.1% of Gadolinium (MEMPHYS-Gd) and of a 50 kt scale liquid scintillator detector (LENA) are compared. In both cases 3$\\sigma$ uncertainties below 3% on $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ and of about 20% on $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}$ can be obtained after one year of data taking. The Gadolinium doped Super-Kamiokande detector (SK-Gd) in Japan can reach a similar precision if the SK/MEMPHYS fiducial mass ratio of 1 to 7 is compensated by a longer SK-Gd data taking time. Several years of reactor neutrino data collected by MEMPHYS-Gd or LENA would allow a determination of $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}$ with uncertainties of approximately 1% and 10% at 3$\\sigma$, respectively. These accuracies are comparable to those that can be reached in the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters $\\Delta m^2_{31}$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$ in long-baseline superbeam experiments.

  13. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cribier

    2007-04-06

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  14. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cribier, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  15. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Vogel; Liangjian Wen; Chao Zhang

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  16. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Petr; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  17. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle ?13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  18. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Djurcic; J. A. Detwiler; A. Piepke; V. R. Foster Jr.; L. Miller; G. Gratta

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

  19. Strategies for Future Neutrino Experiments: Remarks on Neutrino Sources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Data from atmospheric and solar neutrino experiments Rich follow-up physics at accelerators and reactors. Parameter Atmos. Solar Accel. Reactor Decay M2 23 ID PM 23 ID PM M2 12 ID PM PM Sign(M2 12) ID (neutrino flux) (detector mass). Cost optimization Source cost Detector cost. Cost of 4 MW proton source

  20. Leakage Tests of the Stainless Steel Vessels of the Antineutrino Detectors in the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaohui Chen; Xiaolan Luo; Yuekun Heng; Lingshu Wang; Xiao Tang; Xiaoyan Ma; Honglin Zhuang; Henry Band; Jeff Cherwinka; Qiang Xiao; Karsten M. Heeger

    2012-03-02

    The antineutrino detectors in the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment are liquid scintillator detectors designed to detect low energy particles from antineutrino interactions with high efficiency and low backgrounds. Since the antineutrino detector will be installed in a water Cherenkov cosmic ray veto detector and will run for 3 to 5 years, ensuring water tightness is critical to the successful operation of the antineutrino detectors. We choose a special method to seal the detector. Three leak checking methods have been employed to ensure the seal quality. This paper will describe the sealing method and leak testing results.

  1. SNIF: A Futuristic Neutrino Probe for Undeclared Nuclear Fission Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasserre, Thierry; Mention, Guillaume; Reboulleau, Romain; Cribier, Michel; Letourneau, Alain; Lhuillier, David

    2010-01-01

    Today reactor neutrino experiments are at the cutting edge of fundamental research in particle physics. Understanding the neutrino is far from complete, but thanks to the impressive progress in this field over the last 15 years, a few research groups are seriously considering that neutrinos could be useful for society. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) works with its Member States to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. In a context of international tension and nuclear renaissance, neutrino detectors could help IAEA to enforce the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). In this article we discuss a futuristic neutrino application to detect and localize an undeclared nuclear reactor from across borders. The SNIF (Secret Neutrino Interactions Finder) concept proposes to use a few hundred thousand tons neutrino detectors to unveil clandestine fission reactors. Beyond previous studies we provide estimates of all known background sources as a function of the detecto...

  2. Studying neutrinos and nuclear reactors with PROSPECT!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    discovers the tau neutrino.! #12;Milestones in Neutrino Oscillations! ·Solar neutrino problem is born when Ray Davis Cl experiment in the Homestake mine shows ~1/3 expected solar e flux.! ·Solar neutrinoKamiokande.! ·SNO confirms flavor change in solar neutrinos by measuring CC/NC.! ·KamLAND observes neutrino

  3. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  4. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-08-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical and acoustic properties. The rock strength values range from 23 to 219 MPa and the Poisson's ratio from 0.1 to 0.38. Potential geologic hazards in the Diablo Canyon area were identified and described to provide an overall picture of processes that may affect tunnel construction activities.

  5. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-06-11

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical and acoustic properties. The rock strength values range from 23 to 219 MPa and the Poisson's ratio from 0.1 to 0.38. Potential geologic hazards in the Diablo Canyon area were identified and described to provide an overall picture of processes that may affect tunnel construction activities.

  6. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2009-01-01

    neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors Z. Djurcic 1 , ?emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined fromlarge commercial nuclear reactors are playing an important

  7. Neutrino Physics with Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Fengyi Zhao

    2015-11-15

    Accelerator driven system (ADS) subcritical nuclear reactors are under development around the world. They will be intense sources of free, 30-50 MeV antimuon decay at rest antimuon neutrinos. These ADS reactor neutrinos can provide a robust test of the LSND anomaly and a precise measurement of the leptonic CP-violating phase delta, including sign(cos(delta)). The first phase of many ADS programs includes the construction of a low energy, high intensity proton or deuteron accelerator, which can yield competitive bounds on sterile neutrinos.

  8. Neutrino Physics with Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciuffoli, Emilio; Zhao, Fengyi

    2015-01-01

    Accelerator driven system (ADS) subcritical nuclear reactors are under development around the world. They will be intense sources of free, 30-50 MeV antimuon decay at rest antimuon neutrinos. These ADS reactor neutrinos can provide a robust test of the LSND anomaly and a precise measurement of the leptonic CP-violating phase delta, including sign(cos(delta)). The first phase of many ADS programs includes the construction of a low energy, high intensity proton or deuteron accelerator, which can yield competitive bounds on sterile neutrinos.

  9. SNIF: A Futuristic Neutrino Probe for Undeclared Nuclear Fission Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Lasserre; Maximilien Fechner; Guillaume Mention; Romain Reboulleau; Michel Cribier; Alain Letourneau; David Lhuillier

    2010-11-16

    Today reactor neutrino experiments are at the cutting edge of fundamental research in particle physics. Understanding the neutrino is far from complete, but thanks to the impressive progress in this field over the last 15 years, a few research groups are seriously considering that neutrinos could be useful for society. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) works with its Member States to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. In a context of international tension and nuclear renaissance, neutrino detectors could help IAEA to enforce the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). In this article we discuss a futuristic neutrino application to detect and localize an undeclared nuclear reactor from across borders. The SNIF (Secret Neutrino Interactions Finder) concept proposes to use a few hundred thousand tons neutrino detectors to unveil clandestine fission reactors. Beyond previous studies we provide estimates of all known background sources as a function of the detector's longitude, latitude and depth, and we discuss how they impact the detectability.

  10. Investigating the Spectral Anomaly with Different Reactor Antineutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Buck; Antoine P. Collin; Julia Haser; Manfred Lindner

    2015-12-21

    The spectral shape of reactor antineutrinos measured in recent experiments shows anomalies in the neutrino flux predictions. New precision measurements of the reactor neutrino spectra as well as more complete input in nuclear data bases are needed to resolve the observed discrepancies between flux models and experimental results. We combine experiments at reactors which are highly enriched in ${}^{235}$U with commercial reactors with typically lower enrichment to gain new insights into the origin of the anomalous neutrino spectrum. As an example, we discuss the option of a direct comparison of the measured shape in the currently running Double Chooz near detector and the upcoming Stereo experiment.

  11. Electromagnetic neutrinos in terrestrial experiments and astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Konstantin A. Kouzakov; Yu-Feng Li; Alexey V. Lokhov; Alexander I. Studenikin; Shun Zhou

    2015-06-17

    An overview of neutrino electromagnetic properties, which open a door to the new physics beyond the Standard Model, is given. The effects of neutrino electromagnetic interactions both in terrestrial experiments and in astrophysical environments are discussed. The experimental bounds on neutrino electromagnetic characteristics are summarized. Future astrophysical probes of electromagnetic neutrinos are outlined.

  12. Sensitivity of neutrino mass experiments to the cosmic neutrino background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    The KATRIN neutrino experiment is a next-generation tritium beta decay experiment aimed at measuring the mass of the electron neutrino to better than 200 meV at 90% C.L. Because of its intense tritium source, KATRIN can ...

  13. Physics Potential of Solar Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin; H. Yuksel

    2003-12-19

    We discuss the physics potential of the solar neutrino experiments i) To explore the parameter space of neutrino mass and mixings; ii) To probe the physics of the Sun; iii) To explore nuclear physics of the neutrino-target interactions. Examples are given for these three classes.

  14. Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDaniel ShechtmanDepartmentSecurityDavid1 atDaya

  15. On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

    2005-12-08

    We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

  16. Future precision neutrino experiments and their theoretical implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Winter

    2007-09-19

    Future neutrino oscillation measurement focus, at first priority, on the discovery of sin^2(2 theta_13) describing the coupling between solar and atmospheric oscillations. In this talk, we briefly discuss the prospects to measure sin^2(2 theta_13) by future reactor and beam experiments, and we illustrate the usefulness of these measurements (and their precision) from the theoretical point of view with an example.

  17. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore »regime (« less

  18. Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Boehm; J. Busenitz; B. Cook; G. Gratta; H. Henrikson; J. Kornis; D. Lawrence; K. B. Lee; K. McKinny; L. Miller; V. Novikov; A. Piepke; B. Ritchie; D. Tracy; P. Vogel; Y-F. Wang; J. Wolf

    1999-12-22

    We report on the initial results from a measurement of the anti-neutrino flux and spectrum at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium-loaded scintillation detector. We find that the anti-neutrino flux agrees with that predicted in the absence of oscillations to better than 5%, excluding at 90% CL $\\rm\\bar\

  19. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qiuguang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  20. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  1. The Origin and Implications of the Shoulder in Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, A C; Garvey, G T; Ibeling, Duligur; Jungman, Gerard; Kawano, T; Mills, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    We analyze within a nuclear database framework the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra in current reactor experiments. We find that the ENDF/B-VII.1 database predicts that the antineutrino shoulder arises from an analogous shoulder in the aggregate fission beta spectra. In contrast, the JEFF-3.1.1 database does not predict a shoulder. We consider several possible origins of the shoulder, and find possible explanations. For example, there could be a problem with the measured aggregate beta spectra, or the harder neutron spectrum at a light-water power reactor could affect the distribution of beta-decaying isotopes. In addition to the fissile actinides, we find that $^{238}$U could also play a significant role in distorting the total antineutrino spectrum. Distinguishing these and quantifying whether there is an anomaly associated with measured reactor neutrino signals will require new short-baseline experiments, both at thermal reactors and at reactors with a sizable epithermal neutron component.

  2. The Possible Origin and Implications of the Shoulder in Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Hayes; J. L. Friar; G. T. Garvey; Duligur Ibeling; Gerard Jungman; T. Kawano; Robert W. Mills

    2015-07-31

    We analyze within a nuclear database framework the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra in current reactor experiments. We find that the ENDF/B-VII.1 database predicts that the antineutrino shoulder arises from an analogous shoulder in the aggregate fission beta spectra. In contrast, the JEFF-3.1.1 database does not predict a shoulder for two out of three of the modern reactor neutrino experiments, and the shoulder that is predicted by JEFF-3.1.1 arises from $^{238}$U. We consider several possible origins of the shoulder, and find possible explanations. For example, there could be a problem with the measured aggregate beta spectra, or the harder neutron spectrum at a light-water power reactor could affect the distribution of beta-decaying isotopes. In addition to the fissile actinides, we find that $^{238}$U could also play a significant role in distorting the total antineutrino spectrum. Distinguishing these and quantifying whether there is an anomaly associated with measured reactor neutrino signals will require new short-baseline experiments, both at thermal reactors and at reactors with a sizable epithermal neutron component.

  3. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic(MillionNature and Origin WhatNetworks,BeamNeutrinoN u F a

  4. New bounds on neutrino electric millicharge from GEMMA experiment on neutrino magnetic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor B. Brudanin; Dmitry V. Medvedev; Alexander S. Starostin; Alexander I. Studenikin

    2014-11-09

    Using the new limit on the neutrino anomalous magnetic moment recently obtained by GEMMA experiment we get an order-of-magnitude estimation for possible new direct upper bound on the neutrino electric millicharge $\\mid q_{\

  5. Ortho-positronium observation in the Double Chooz Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Abe; J. C. dos Anjos; J. C. Barriere; E. Baussan; I. Bekman; M. Bergevin; T. J. C. Bezerra; L. Bezrukov; E. Blucher; C. Buck; J. Busenitz; A. Cabrera; E. Caden; L. Camilleri; R. Carr; M. Cerrada; P. -J. Chang; E. Chauveau; P. Chimenti; A. P. Collin; E. Conover; J. M. Conrad; J. I. Crespo-Anadon; K. Crum; A. S. Cucoanes; E. Damon; J. V. Dawson; J. Dhooghe; D. Dietrich; Z. Djurcic; M. Dracos; M. Elnimr; A. Etenko; M. Fallot; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Felde; S. M. Fernandes; V. Fischer; D. Franco; M. Franke; H. Furuta; I. Gil-Botella; L. Giot; M. Goger-Neff; L. F. G. Gonzalez; L. Goodenough; M. C. Goodman; C. Grant; N. Haag; T. Hara; J. Haser; M. Hofmann; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Hourlier; M. Ishitsuka; J. Jochum; C. Jollet; F. Kaether; L. N. Kalousis; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; T. Kawasaki; E. Kemp; H. de Kerret; D. Kryn; M. Kuze; T. Lachenmaier; C. E. Lane; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; H. P. Lima Jr; M. Lindner; J. M. Lopez-Castano; J. M. LoSecco; B. Lubsandorzhiev; S. Lucht; J. Maeda; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; J. Martino; T. Matsubara; G. Mention; A. Meregaglia; T. Miletic; R. Milincic; A. Minotti; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nikitenko; P. Novella; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; A. Onillon; A. Osborn; C. Palomares; I. M. Pepe; S. Perasso; P. Pfahler; A. Porta; G. Pronost; J. Reichenbacher; B. Reinhold; M. Rohling; R. Roncin; S. Roth; B. Rybolt; Y. Sakamoto; R. Santorelli; A. C. Schilithz; S. Schonert; S. Schoppmann; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Sharankova; S. Shimojima; D. Shrestha; V. Sibille; V. Sinev; M. Skorokhvatov; E. Smith; J. Spitz; A. Stahl; I. Stancu; L. F. F. Stokes; M. Strait; A. Stuken; F. Suekane; S. Sukhotin; T. Sumiyoshi; Y. Sun; R. Svoboda; K. Terao; A. Tonazzo; H. H. Trinh Thi; G. Valdiviesso; N. Vassilopoulos; C. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Wagner; N. Walsh; H. Watanabe; C. Wiebusch; L. Winslow; M. Wurm; G. Yang; F. Yermia; V. Zimmer

    2014-10-07

    The Double Chooz experiment measures the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by detecting reactor $\\bar{\

  6. Solar neutrinos radiative corrections in neutrino-electron scattering experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, J N; Sirlin, A; Bahcall, John N; Kamionkowski, Marc; Sirlin, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    Radiative corrections to the electron recoil-energy spectra and to total cross sections are computed for neutrino-electron scattering by solar neutrinos. Radiative corrections change monotonically the electron recoil spectrum for incident \\b8 neutrinos, with the relative probability of observing recoil electrons being reduced by about 4 \\% at the highest electron energies. For p-p and \\be7 neutrinos, the recoil spectra are not affected significantly. Total cross sections for solar neutrino-electron scattering are reduced by about 2 \\% compared to previously computed values. We also calculate the recoil spectra from ^{13}N and ^{15}O neutrinos including radiative corrections.

  7. Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Steidl

    2009-06-02

    Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

  8. Exotic Solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem and Some Implications for Low Energy Solar Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Nunokawa

    2001-05-03

    In this talk, I review, from the phenomenological point of view, solutions to the solar neutrino problem, which are not provided by the conventional neutrino oscillation induced by mass and flavor mixing, and show that they can provide a good fit to the observed data. I also consider some simple implications for low energy solar neutrino experiments.

  9. Online Monitoring of the Osiris Reactor with the Nucifer Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Boireau; L. Bouvet; A. P. Collin; G. Coulloux; M. Cribier; H. Deschamp; V. Durand; M. Fechner; V. Fischer; J. Gaffiot; N. Gerard Castaing; R. Granelli; Y. Kato; T. Lasserre; L. Latron; P. Legou; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; G. Mention; T. Mueller; T-A. Nghiem; N. Pedrol; J. Pelzer; M. Pequignot; Y. Piret; G. Prono; L. Scola; P. Starzinski; M. Vivier; E. Dumonteil; C. Varignon; C. Buck; M. Lindner; J. Bazoma; S. Bouvier; V. M. Bui; V. Communeau; A. Cucoanes; M. Fallot; M. Gautier; L. Giot; G. Guilloux; M. Lenoir; J. Martino; G. Mercier; T. Milleto; N. Peuvrel; A. Porta; N. Le Quere; C. Renard; L. M. Rigalleau; D. Roy; T. Vilajosana; F. Yermia

    2015-09-24

    The detection of electron antineutrinos emitted in the decay chains of the fission products in nuclear reactors, combined with reactor core simulations, provides an efficient tool to assess both the thermal power and the fissile content of the whole nuclear core. This new information could be used by the International Agency for Atomic Energy (IAEA) to enhance the Safeguards of civil nuclear reactors. We report the first results of the Nucifer experiment demonstrating the concept of "neutrinometry" at the pre-industrialized stage. A novel detector has been designed to meet requirements discussed with the IAEA for the last ten years as well as international nuclear safety standards. Nucifer has been deployed at only 7.2m away from the Osiris research reactor core (70 MW) operating at the Saclay research center of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). We describe the performances of the 1 m3 detector remotely operating at a shallow depth equivalent to 12m of water and under intense background radiation conditions due to the very short baseline. We present the first physics results, based on 145 (106) days of data with reactor ON (OFF), leading to the detection of 40760 electron antineutrino candidates. The mean number of detected antineutrinos is 281 (7) neutrino/day, to be compared with the prediction 272 (23) neutrino/day. As a first societal application we quantify, on the basis of our data, how antineutrinos could be used for the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement.

  10. Online Monitoring of the Osiris Reactor with the Nucifer Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Boireau; L. Bouvet; A. P. Collin; G. Coulloux; M. Cribier; H. Deschamp; V. Durand; M. Fechner; V. Fischer; J. Gaffiot; N. Gerard Castaing; R. Granelli; Y. Kato; T. Lasserre; L. Latron; P. Legou; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; G. Mention; T. Mueller; T-A. Nghiem; N. Pedrol; J. Pelzer; M. Pequignot; Y. Piret; G. Prono; L. Scola; P. Starzinski; M. Vivier; E. Dumonteil; C. Varignon; C. Buck; M. Lindner; J. Bazoma; S. Bouvier; V. M. Bui; V. Communeau; A. Cucoanes; M. Fallot; M. Gautier; L. Giot; G. Guilloux; M. Lenoir; J. Martino; G. Mercier; T. Milleto; N. Peuvrel; A. Porta; N. Le Quere; C. Renard; L. M. Rigalleau; D. Roy; T. Vilajosana; F. Yermia

    2015-09-18

    The detection of electron antineutrinos emitted in the decay chains of the fission products in nuclear reactors, combined with reactor core simulations, provides an efficient tool to assess both the thermal power and the fissile content of the whole nuclear core. This new information could be used by the International Agency for Atomic Energy (IAEA) to enhance the Safeguards of civil nuclear reactors. We report the first results of the Nucifer experiment demonstrating the concept of "neutrinometry" at the pre-industrialized stage. A novel detector has been designed to meet requirements discussed with the IAEA for the last ten years as well as international nuclear safety standards. Nucifer has been deployed at only 7.2m away from the Osiris research reactor core (70 MW) operating at the Saclay research center of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). We describe the performances of the 1 m3 detector remotely operating at a shallow depth equivalent to 12m of water and under intense background radiation conditions due to the very short baseline. We present the first physics results, based on 145 (106) days of data with reactor ON (OFF), leading to the detection of 40760 electron antineutrino candidates. The mean number of detected antineutrinos is 281 (7) neutrino/day, to be compared with the prediction 272 (23) neutrino/day. As a first societal application we quantify, on the basis of our data, how antineutrinos could be used for the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement.

  11. Pebble Flow Experiments For Pebble Bed Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pebble Flow Experiments For Pebble Bed Reactors Andrew C. Kadak1 Department of Nuclear Engineering of Technology 2nd International Topical Meeting on High Temperature Reactor Technology Institute of Nuclear was that the draining of the pebbles in such a reactor would conform to granular flow theory which suggested rapid

  12. A Lithium Experiment in the Program of Solar Neutrino Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kopylov; I. Orekhov; V. Petukhov; A. Solomatin

    2006-01-12

    The experiments sensitive to pp-neutrinos from the Sun are very perspective for the precise measurement of a mixing angle $\\theta_{12}$. A $\

  13. Probing CP violation at LBNE with reactor experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debajyoti Dutta; Kalpana Bora

    2014-09-30

    In this work, we have explored the possibilities of improving CP violation discovery potential of newly planned Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), U.S.A., by combining with data from reactors. The third mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ is now very precisely measured and this precise measurenent of $\\theta_{13}$ helps in measurement of CP violation. Here, CP violation is studied with and without data from reactors. Impact of placing a ND is also studied. It is found that CPV discovery potential of LBNE with ND increases when combined with data from reactors. With a far detector of 35 kt, it is possible to obtain 5$\\sigma$ sensitivity of CPV when run for 5 years in $\

  14. SAGE: Solar Neutrino Data from SAGE, the Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SAGE Collaboration

    SAGE is a solar neutrino experiment based on the reaction 71Ga + n goes to 71Ge + e-. The 71Ge atoms are chemically extracted from a 50-metric ton target of Ga metal and concentrated in a sample of germane gas mixed with xenon. The atoms are then individually counted by observing their decay back to 71Ga in a small proportional counter. The distinguishing feature of the experiment is its ability to detect the low-energy neutrinos from proton-proton fusion. These neutrinos, which are made in the primary reaction that provides the Sun's energy, are the major component of the solar neutrino flux and have not been observed in any other way. To shield the experiment from cosmic rays, it is located deep underground in a specially built facility at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the northern Caucasus mountains of Russia. Nearly 100 measurements of the solar neutrino flux have been made during 1990-2000, and their combined result is a neutrino capture rate that is well below the prediction of the Standard Solar Model. The significant suppression of the solar neutrino flux that SAGE and other solar neutrino experiments have observed gives a strong indication for the existence of neutrino oscillations. [copied from the SAGE homepage at http://ewi.npl.washington.edu/SAGE/SAGE.html

  15. A PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRINO MIXING ANGLE THETA (SUB 13) USING REACTOR ANTINEUTRINOS AT DAYA BAY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETTELL, S.; ET AL.

    2006-10-16

    This document describes the design of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. Recent discoveries in neutrino physics have shown that the Standard Model of particle physics is incomplete. The observation of neutrino oscillations has unequivocally demonstrated that the masses of neutrinos are nonzero. The smallness of the neutrino masses (<2 eV) and the two surprisingly large mixing angles measured have thus far provided important clues and constraints to extensions of the Standard Model. The third mixing angle, {delta}{sub 13}, is small and has not yet been determined; the current experimental bound is sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.17 at 90% confidence level (from Chooz) for {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. It is important to measure this angle to provide further insight on how to extend the Standard Model. A precision measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} using nuclear reactors has been recommended by the 2004 APS Multi-divisional Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics as well as a recent Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NUSAG) report. We propose to perform a precision measurement of this mixing angle by searching for the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from the nuclear reactor complex in Daya Bay, China. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will be vital in resolving the neutrino-mass hierarchy and future measurements of CP violation in the lepton sector because this technique cleanly separates {theta}{sub 13} from CP violation and effects of neutrino propagation in the earth. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will provide important, complementary information to that from long-baseline, accelerator-based experiments. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 0.01 or better in sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} at 90% confidence level.

  16. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  17. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adams; J. R. Alonso; A. M. Ankowski; J. A. Asaadi; J. Ashenfelter; S. N. Axani; K. Babu; C. Backhouse; H. R. Band; P. S. Barbeau; N. Barros; A. Bernstein; M. Betancourt; M. Bishai; E. Blucher; J. Bouffard; N. Bowden; S. Brice; C. Bryan; L. Camilleri; J. Cao; J. Carlson; R. E. Carr; A. Chatterjee; M. Chen; S. Chen; M. Chiu; E. D. Church; J. I. Collar; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; M. R. Convery; R. L. Cooper; D. Cowen; H. Davoudiasl; A. De Gouvea; D. J. Dean; G. Deichert; F. Descamps; T. DeYoung; M. V. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; B. Donnelly; D. A. Dwyer; S. Dytman; Y. Efremenko; L. L. Everett; A. Fava; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; B. Fleming; A. Friedland; B. K. Fujikawa; T. K. Gaisser; M. Galeazzi; D. C. Galehouse; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. T. Garvey; S. Gautam; K. E. Gilje; M. Gonzalez-Garcia; M. C. Goodman; H. Gordon; E. Gramellini; M. P. Green; A. Guglielmi; R. W. Hackenburg; A. Hackenburg; F. Halzen; K. Han; S. Hans; D. Harris; K. M. Heeger; M. Herman; R. Hill; A. Holin; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; R. A. Johnson; J. Joshi; G. Karagiorgi; L. J. Kaufman; B. Kayser; S. H. Kettell; B. J. Kirby; J. R. Klein; Yu. G. Kolomensky; R. M. Kriske; C. E. Lane; T. J. Langford; A. Lankford; K. Lau; J. G. Learned; J. Ling; J. M. Link; D. Lissauer; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; S. Lockwitz; M. Lokajicek; W. C. Louis; K. Luk; J. Lykken; W. J. Marciano; J. Maricic; D. M. Markoff; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. Mauger; K. Mavrokoridis; E. McCluskey; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; G. Mills; I. Mocioiu; B. Monreal; M. R. Mooney; J. G. Morfin; P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; R. Neilson; J. K. Nelson; M. Nessi; D. Norcini; F. Nova; D. R. Nygren; G. D. Orebi Gann; O. Palamara; Z. Parsa; R. Patterson; P. Paul; A. Pocar; X. Qian; J. L. Raaf; R. Rameika; G. Ranucci; H. Ray; D. Reyna; G. C. Rich; P. Rodrigues; E. Romero Romero; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; B. Rybolt; M. C. Sanchez; G. Santucci; D. Schmitz; K. Scholberg; D. Seckel; M. Shaevitz; R. Shrock; M. B. Smy; M. Soderberg; A. Sonzogni; A. B. Sousa; J. Spitz; J. M. St. John; J. Stewart; J. B. Strait; G. Sullivan; R. Svoboda; A. M. Szelc; R. Tayloe; M. A. Thomson; M. Toups; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; R. G. Van de Water; R. B. Vogelaar; M. Weber; W. Weng; M. Wetstein; C. White; B. R. White; L. Whitehead; D. W. Whittington; M. J. Wilking; R. J. Wilson; P. Wilson; D. Winklehner; D. R. Winn; E. Worcester; L. Yang; M. Yeh; Z. W. Yokley; J. Yoo; B. Yu; J. Yu; C. Zhang

    2015-04-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  18. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, R D

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  19. Scientific Opportunities with the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, C.; et al.,

    2013-07-28

    In this document, we describe the wealth of science opportunities and capabilities of LBNE, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. LBNE has been developed to provide a unique and compelling program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of particle physics. Chief among the discovery opportunities are observation of CP symmetry violation in neutrino mixing, resolution of the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination of maximal or near-maximal mixing in neutrinos, searches for nucleon decay signatures, and detailed studies of neutrino bursts from galactic supernovae. To fulfill these and other goals as a world-class facility, LBNE is conceived around four central components: (1) a new, intense wide-band neutrino source at Fermilab, (2) a fine-grained `near' neutrino detector just downstream of the source, (3) the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota at an optimal distance (~1300 km) from the neutrino source, and (4) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) deployed there as a 'far' detector. The facilities envisioned are expected to enable many other science opportunities due to the high event rates and excellent detector resolution from beam neutrinos in the near detector and atmospheric neutrinos in the far detector. This is a mature, well developed, world class experiment whose relevance, importance, and probability of unearthing critical and exciting physics has increased with time.

  20. Pebble Flow Experiments For Pebble Bed Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    of Technology 2nd International Topical Meeting on High Temperature Reactor Technology Institute of NuclearPebble Flow Experiments For Pebble Bed Reactors Andrew C. Kadak1 Department of Nuclear Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Martin Z. Bazant Department of Mathematics Massachusetts Institute

  1. Neutrino Oscillation Physics Potential of the T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Abe; J. Adam; H. Aihara; T. Akiri; C. Andreopoulos; S. Aoki; A. Ariga; S. Assylbekov; D. Autiero; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; P. Bartet-Friburg; M. Bass; M. Batkiewicz; F. Bay; V. Berardi; B. E. Berger; S. Berkman; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; C. Bojechko; S. Bordoni; S. B. Boyd; D. Brailsford; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; N. Buchanan; R. G. Calland; J. Caravaca Rodr'iguez; S. L. Cartwright; R. Castillo; M. G. Catanesi; A. Cervera; D. Cherdack; G. Christodoulou; A. Clifton; J. Coleman; S. J. Coleman; G. Collazuol; K. Connolly; L. Cremonesi; A. Dabrowska; I. Danko; R. Das; S. Davis; P. de Perio; G. De Rosa; T. Dealtry; S. R. Dennis; C. Densham; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; T. Duboyski; K. Duffy; J. Dumarchez; S. Dytman; M. Dziewiecki; S. Emery-Schrenk; A. Ereditato; L. Escudero; T. Feusels; A. J. Finch; G. A. Fiorentini; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; A. P. Furmanski; V. Galymov; A. Garcia; S. Giffin; C. Giganti; K. Gilje; D. Goeldi; T. Golan; M. Gonin; N. Grant; D. Gudin; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; M. D. Haigh; P. Hamilton; D. Hansen; T. Hara; M. Hartz; T. Hasegawa; N. C. Hastings; T. Hayashino; Y. Hayato; C. Hearty; R. L. Helmer; M. Hierholzer; J. Hignight; A. Hillairet; A. Himmel; T. Hiraki; S. Hirota; J. Holeczek; S. Horikawa; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; K. Ieki; M. Ieva; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; J. Insler; T. J. Irvine; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; E. Iwai; K. Iwamoto; K. Iyogi; A. Izmaylov; A. Jacob; B. Jamieson; R. A. Johnson; S. Johnson; J. H. Jo; P. Jonsson; C. K. Jung; M. Kabirnezhad; A. C. Kaboth; T. Kajita; H. Kakuno; J. Kameda; Y. Kanazawa; D. Karlen; I. Karpikov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; D. Kielczewska; T. Kikawa; A. Kilinski; J. Kim; S. King; J. Kisiel; P. Kitching; T. Kobayashi; L. Koch; T. Koga; A. Kolaceke; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. Kropp; H. Kubo; Y. Kudenko; R. Kurjata; T. Kutter; J. Lagoda; K. Laihem; I. Lamont; E. Larkin; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; M. Lazos; T. Lindner; C. Lister; R. P. Litchfield; A. Longhin; J. P. Lopez; L. Ludovici; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; S. Manly; A. D. Marino; J. Marteau; J. F. Martin; P. Martins; S. Martynenko; T. Maruyama; V. Matveev; K. Mavrokoridis; E. Mazzucato; M. McCarthy; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; A. Mefodiev; C. Metelko; M. Mezzetto; P. Mijakowski; C. A. Miller; A. Minamino; O. Mineev; A. Missert; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; Th. A. Mueller; A. Murakami; M. Murdoch; S. Murphy; J. Myslik; T. Nakadaira; M. Nakahata; K. G. Nakamura; K. Nakamura; S. Nakayama; T. Nakaya; K. Nakayoshi; C. Nantais; C. Nielsen; M. Nirkko; K. Nishikawa; Y. Nishimura; J. Nowak; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. Ohta; K. Okumura; T. Okusawa; W. Oryszczak; S. M. Oser; T. Ovsyannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; Y. Petrov; L. Pickard; E. S. Pinzon Guerra; C. Pistillo; P. Plonski; E. Poplawska; B. Popov; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; P. Przewlocki; B. Quilain; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. M. Rayner; A. Redij; M. Reeves; E. Reinherz-Aronis; C. Riccio; P. A. Rodrigues; P. Rojas; E. Rondio; S. Roth; A. Rubbia; D. Ruterbories; R. Sacco; K. Sakashita; F. S'anchez; F. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; S. Schoppmann; J. Schwehr; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; D. Sgalaberna; R. Shah; F. Shaker; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; Y. Shustrov; P. Sinclair; B. Smith; M. Smy; J. T. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Sorel; L. Southwell; P. Stamoulis; J. Steinmann; B. Still; Y. Suda; A. Suzuki; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Y. Suzuki; R. Tacik; M. Tada; S. Takahashi; A. Takeda; Y. Takeuchi; H. K. Tanaka; H. A. Tanaka; M. M. Tanaka; D. Terhorst; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; A. Thorley; S. Tobayama; W. Toki; T. Tomura; Y. Totsuka; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; G. Vasseur; T. Wachala; A. V. Waldron; K. Wakamatsu; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; W. Warzycha; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; C. Wilkinson; Z. Williamson; J. R. Wilson; R. J. Wilson; T. Wongjirad; Y. Yamada; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; K. Yoshida; T. Yuan; M. Yu; A. Zalewska; J. Zalipska; L. Zambelli; K. Zaremba; M. Ziembicki; E. D. Zimmerman; M. Zito; J. Zmuda

    2015-02-10

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal $\\sin^22\\theta_{23}$, the octant of $\\theta_{23}$, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of $\\delta_{CP}$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$, and $\\Delta m^2_{32}$, for various combinations of $\

  2. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill;

    2014-05-30

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  3. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 17 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 APRIL 2000 Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G. Gratta,4 H. Henrikson,3 J the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium.30.Pt Nuclear reactors have been used as intense sources of ¯ne in experiments searching for neutrino

  4. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Stephen James; /William-Mary Coll.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = (2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and the mixing angle sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 32}) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2{sigma} and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0{sigma}.

  5. Neutrino oscillations and electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Potzel

    2015-01-20

    Oscillations in the electron-capture (EC) decay rate observed in storage-ring experiments are reconsidered in connection with the neutrino mass difference. Taking into account that - according to Relativity Theory - time is slowed down in the reference frame of the orbiting charged particles as compared to the neutral particles (neutrinos) moving on a rectilinear path after the EC decay, we derive a value of $\\Delta m^{2}_{21}=(0.768\\pm0.012)\\cdot10^{-4} eV^{2}$ for the neutrino mass-squared difference which fully agrees with that observed in other neutrino-oscillation experiments. To further check the connection between EC-decay oscillations and $\\Delta m^{2}_{21}$ we suggest experiments with different orbital speeds, i.e., different values of the Lorentz factor.

  6. Neutrino oscillations and electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potzel, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations in the electron-capture (EC) decay rate observed in storage-ring experiments are reconsidered in connection with the neutrino mass difference. Taking into account that - according to Relativity Theory - time is slowed down in the reference frame of the orbiting charged particles as compared to the neutral particles (neutrinos) moving on a rectilinear path after the EC decay, we derive a value of $\\Delta m^{2}_{21}=(0.768\\pm0.012)\\cdot10^{-4} eV^{2}$ for the neutrino mass-squared difference which fully agrees with that observed in other neutrino-oscillation experiments. To further check the connection between EC-decay oscillations and $\\Delta m^{2}_{21}$ we suggest experiments with different orbital speeds, i.e., different values of the Lorentz factor.

  7. Optimization of neutrino fluxes for future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Calviani; S. Di Luise; V. Galymov; P. Velten

    2014-11-10

    One of the main goals of the Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation experiment (LBNO) experiment is to study the L/E behaviour of the electron neutrino appearance probability in order to determine the unknown phase $\\delta_{CP}$. In the standard neutrino 3-flavour mixing paradigm, this parameter encapsulates a possibility of a CP violation in the lepton sector that in turn could help explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. In LBNO, the measurement of $\\delta_{CP}$ would rely on the observation of the electron appearance probability in a broad energy range covering the 1$^{st}$ and 2$^{nd}$ maxima of the oscillation probability. An optimization of the energy spectrum of the neutrino beam is necessary to find the best coverage of the neutrino energies of interest. This in general is a complex task that requires exploring a large parameter space describing hadron target and beamline focusing elements. In this paper we will present a numerical approach of finding a solution to this difficult optimization problem often encountered in design of modern neutrino beamlines and we will show the improved LBNO sensitivity to the presence of the leptonic CP violation attained after the neutrino beam optimization.

  8. A Sterile-Neutrino Search with the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, Philip; /Oxford U.

    2010-09-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the the NuMI beamline at Fermilab, USA. Using a near detector at 1 km distance from the neutrino production target, and a far detector at 735 km from the target, it is designed primarily to measure the disappearance of muon neutrinos. This thesis presents an analysis using MINOS data of the possibility of oscil- lation of the neutrinos in the NuMI beam to a hypothetical sterile flavour, which would have no Standard Model couplings. Such oscillations would result in a deficit in the neutral current interaction rate in the MINOS far detector relative to the expectation derived from the near detector data. The method used to identify neutral current and charged current events in the MINOS detectors is described and a new method of predicting and fitting the far detector spectrum presented, along with the effects of systematic uncertainties on the sterile neutrino oscillation analysis. Using this analysis, the fraction f{sub s} of the disappearing neutrinos that go to steriles is constrained to be below 0.15 at the 90% confidence level in the absence of electron neutrino appearance in the NuMI beam. With electron appearance at the CHOOZ limit, f{sub s} < 0.41 at 90% C.L.

  9. The BAIKAL neutrino experiment - physics results and perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wischnewski, R

    2008-01-01

    We review the status of the Lake Baikal Neutrino Experiment. The Neutrino Telescope NT200 has been operating since 1998 and has been upgraded to the 10 Mton detector NT200+ in 2005. We present selected astroparticle physics results from long-term operation of NT200. Also discussed are activities towards acoustic detection of UHE-energy neutrinos, and results of associated science activities. Preparation towards a km3-scale (Gigaton volume) detector in Lake Baikal is currently a central activity. As an important milestone, a km3-prototype string, based on completely new technology, has been installed and is operating together with NT200+ since April, 2008.

  10. KATRIN: an experiment to measure the neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson; for the KATRIN Collaboration

    2007-12-23

    KATRIN is a very large scale tritium-beta-decay experiment to determine the mass of the neutrino. It is presently under construction at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, and makes use of the Tritium Laboratory built there for the ITER project. The combination of a very large retarding-potential electrostatic-magnetic spectrometer and an intense gaseous molecular tritium source makes possible a sensitivity to neutrino mass of 0.2 eV, about an order of magnitude below present laboratory limits. The measurement is kinematic and independent of whether the neutrino is Dirac or Majorana. The status of the project is summarized briefly in this report.

  11. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  12. Small entries of neutrino mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov

    1999-09-15

    We consider phenomenologically allowed structures of the neutrino mass matrix in the case of three light neutrino species. Constraints from the solar, atmospheric and reactor neutrino experiments as well as those from the neutrinoless double beta decay are taken into account. Both hierarchical and quasi-degenerate neutrino mass cases are studied. Assuming maximal $\

  13. A Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyper-Kamiokande Working Group; :; K. Abe; H. Aihara; C. Andreopoulos; I. Anghel; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; R. Asfandiyarov; M. Askins; J. J. Back; P. Ballett; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; F. Bay; P. Beltrame; V. Berardi; M. Bergevin; S. Berkman; T. Berry; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; F. S. Cafagna; G. Carminati; S. L. Cartwright; M. G. Catanesi; K. Choi; J. H. Choi; G. Collazuol; G. Cowan; L. Cremonesi; G. Davies; G. De Rosa; C. Densham; J. Detwiler; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; S. Emery; A. Ereditato; P. Fernandez; T. Feusels; A. Finch; M. Fitton; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; D. Fukuda; V. Galymov; K. Ganezer; M. Gonin; P. Gumplinger; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; Y. Haga; B. Hartfiel; M. Hartz; Y. Hayato; M. Hierholzer; J. Hill; A. Himmel; S. Hirota; S. Horiuchi; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; T. Iijima; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; K. Inoue; J. Insler; R. A. Intonti; T. Irvine; T. Ishida; H. Ishino; M. Ishitsuka; Y. Itow; A. Izmaylov; B. Jamieson; H. I. Jang; M. Jiang; K. K. Joo; C. K. Jung; A. Kaboth; T. Kajita; J. Kameda; Y. Karadhzov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; J. Y. Kim; S. B. Kim; Y. Kishimoto; T. Kobayashi; M. Koga; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. R. Kropp; Y. Kudenko; T. Kutter; M. Kuze; L. Labarga; J. Lagoda; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; J. G. Learned; I. T. Lim; T. Lindner; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; W. Ma; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; C. Mariani; L. Marti; J. F. Martin; C. Martin; P. P. J. Martins; E. Mazzucato; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; M. Mezzetto; H. Minakata; A. Minamino; S. Mine; O. Mineev; M. Miura; J. Monroe; T. Mori; S. Moriyama; T. Mueller; F. Muheim; M. Nakahata; K. Nakamura; T. Nakaya; S. Nakayama; M. Needham; T. Nicholls; M. Nirkko; Y. Nishimura; E. Noah; J. Nowak; H. Nunokawa; H. M. O'Keeffe; Y. Okajima; K. Okumura; S. M. Oser; E. O'Sullivan; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; J. Perez; M. Y. Pac; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; C. Pistillo; S. Playfer; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; B. Quilain; M. Quinto; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; A. Redij; F. Retiere; C. Riccio; E. Richard; E. Rondio; H. J. Rose; M. Ross-Lonergan; C. Rott; S. D. Rountree; A. Rubbia; R. Sacco; M. Sakuda; M. C. Sanchez; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; A. Shaikhiev; I. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; G. Sinnis; M. B. Smy; J. Sobczyk; H. W. Sobel; T. Stewart; J. L. Stone; Y. Suda; Y. Suzuki; A. T. Suzuki; R. Svoboda; R. Tacik; A. Takeda; A. Taketa; Y. Takeuchi; H. A. Tanaka; H. K. M. Tanaka; H. Tanaka; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; M. Thorpe; S. Tobayama; N. Tolich; T. Tomura; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; M. R. Vagins; G. Vasseur; R. B. Vogelaar; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; J. R. Wilson; T. Xin; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; M. Zito

    2015-01-18

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this document, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis has been updated from the previous Letter of Intent [K. Abe et al., arXiv:1109.3262 [hep-ex

  14. Solar neutrinos and neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Maltoni; Alexei Yu. Smirnov

    2015-08-11

    Solar neutrino studies triggered and largely motivated the major developments in neutrino physics in the last 50 years. Theory of neutrino propagation in different media with matter and fields has been elaborated. It includes oscillations in vacuum and matter, resonance flavor conversion and resonance oscillations, spin and spin-flavor precession, etc. LMA MSW has been established as the true solution of the solar neutrino problem. Parameters theta12 and Delta_m21^2 have been measured; theta13 extracted from the solar data is in agreement with results from reactor experiments. Solar neutrino studies provide a sensitive way to test theory of neutrino oscillations and conversion. Characterized by long baseline, huge fluxes and low energies they are a powerful set-up to search for new physics beyond the standard 3nu paradigm: new neutrino states, sterile neutrinos, non-standard neutrino interactions, effects of violation of fundamental symmetries, new dynamics of neutrino propagation, probes of space and time. These searches allow us to get stringent, and in some cases unique bounds on new physics. We summarize the results on physics of propagation, neutrino properties and physics beyond the standard model obtained from studies of solar neutrinos.

  15. Light sterile neutrinos, spin flavour precession and the solar neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Das; Joao Pulido; Marco Picariello

    2009-04-01

    We generalize to three active flavours a previous two flavour model for the resonant spin flavour conversion of solar neutrinos to sterile ones, a mechanism which is added to the well known LMA one. The transition magnetic moments from the muon and tau neutrinos to the sterile play the dominant role in fixing the amount of active flavour suppression. We also show, through numerical integration of the evolution equations, that the data from all solar neutrino experiments except Borexino exhibit a clear preference for a sizable magnetic field either in the convection zone or in the core and radiation zone. This is possibly related to the fact that the data from the first set are average ones taken during a period of mostly intense solar activity, whereas in contrast Borexino data were taken during a period of quiet sun. We argue that the solar neutrino experiments are capable of tracing the possible modulation of the solar magnetic field. Those monitoring the high energy neutrinos, namely the $^8 B$ flux, appear to be sensitive to a field modulation either in the convection zone or in the core and radiation zone. Those monitoring the low energy fluxes will be sensitive to the second type of solar field profiles only. In this way Borexino alone may play an essential role, since it examines both energy sectors, although experimental redundance from other experiments will be most important.

  16. Sodium Reactor Experiment decommissioning. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, J.W.; Conners, C.C.; Harris, J.M.; Marzec, J.M.; Ureda, B.F.

    1983-08-15

    The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) located at the Rockwell International Field Laboratories northwest of Los Angeles was developed to demonstrate a sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor for civilian use. The reactor reached full power in May 1958 and provided 37 GWh to the Southern California Edison Company grid before it was shut down in 1967. Decommissioning of the SRE began in 1974 with the objective of removing all significant radioactivity from the site and releasing the facility for unrestricted use. Planning documentation was prepared to describe in detail the equipment and techniques development and the decommissioning work scope. A plasma-arc manipulator was developed for remotely dissecting the highly radioactive reactor vessels. Other important developments included techniques for using explosives to cut reactor vessel internal piping, clamps, and brackets; decontaminating porous concrete surfaces; and disposing of massive equipment and structures. The documentation defined the decommissioning in an SRE dismantling plan, in activity requirements for elements of the decommissioning work scope, and in detailed procedures for each major task.

  17. Supernova Neutrinos Detection On Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

    2009-05-12

    In this paper, we first discuss the detection of supernova neutrino on Earth. Then we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$ by detecting the ratio of the event numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos. Such an sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

  18. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiali [Physics department, Kunming University, Kunming, 650214 (China); Tiedt, Douglas [Physics department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD, 57701-3995 (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  19. A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    856 A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS David Cline University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wl 53706 David Neuffer Fermilab,* Batavia, IL 60510 ABSTRACT · + decay in a ~- Storage Ring can as a possible first ~ storage ring. INTRODUCTION Recent experimental reports 1'2 of a non-zero ~ mass and of e

  20. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2009-01-01

    CALCULATIONS During the power cycle of a nuclear reactor,depleted. At the end of the power cycle, some frac- tion offuel throughout the power cycle is of interest to reactor

  1. Accelerator-based Short-baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollapinni, Sowjanya

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several experiments have reported anomalous results that could be hinting at the exciting possibility of sterile neutrino states in the $eV^{2}$ mass scale. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are a particularly promising technology to explore this physics due to their fine-grained tracking and exceptional calorimetric capabilities. The MicroBooNE experiment, a 170 ton LArTPC scheduled to start taking data very soon with Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), will combine LArTPC development with the main physics goal of understanding the low-energy electromagnetic anomaly seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Looking towards the future, MicroBooNE will become a part of the \\textit{short-baseline neutrino} program which expands the physics capabilities of the BNB in many important ways by adding additional LArTPC detectors to search for light sterile neutrinos and bring a definitive resolution to the set of existing experimental anomalies. This paper will give an overview of...

  2. Neutrinos and Non-proliferation in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cribier

    2007-04-04

    Triggered by the demand of the IAEA, neutrino physicists in Europe involved with the Double Chooz experiment are studying the potential of neutrino detection to monitor nuclear reactors. In particular a new set of experiments at the ILL is planned to improve the knowledge of the neutrino spectrum emitted in the fission of 235U and 239Pu.

  3. A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Lane; S. M. Usman; J. Blackmon; C. Rasco; H. P. Mumm; D. Markoff; G. R. Jocher; R. Dorrill; M. Duvall; J. G. Learned; V. Li; J. Maricic; S. Matsuno; R. Milincic; S. Negrashov; M. Sakai; M. Rosen; G. Varner; P. Huber; M. L. Pitt; S. D. Rountree; R. B. Vogelaar; T. Wright; Z. Yokley

    2015-01-27

    We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity and project status.

  4. A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, C; Blackmon, J; Rasco, C; Mumm, H P; Markoff, D; Jocher, G R; Dorrill, R; Duvall, M; Learned, J G; Li, V; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Negrashov, S; Sakai, M; Rosen, M; Varner, G; Huber, P; Pitt, M L; Rountree, S D; Vogelaar, R B; Wright, T; Yokley, Z

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity an...

  5. PROSPECT - A Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment at Short Baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ashenfelter; A. B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; G. Barclay; C. Bass; N. S. Bowden; C. D. Bryan; J. J. Cherwinka; R. Chu; T. Classen; D. Davee; D. Dean; G. Deichert; M. Diwan; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; D. A. Dwyer; Y. Efremenko; S. Fan; A. Galindo-Uribarri; K. Gilje; A. Glenn; M. Green; K. Han; S. Hans; K. M. Heeger; B. Heffron; L. Hu; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; Y. Kamyshkov; S. Kettell; C. Lane; T. J. Langford; B. R. Littlejohn; D. Martinez; R. D. McKeown; M. P. Mendenhall; S. Morrell; P. Mueller; H. P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; J. S. Nico; D. Norcini; D. Pushin; X. Qian; E. Romero; R. Rosero; B. S. Seilhan; R. Sharma; P. T. Surukuchi; S. J. Thompson; R. L. Varner; B. Viren; W. Wang; B. White; C. White; J. Wilhelmi; C. Williams; R. E. Williams; T. Wise; H. Yao; M. Yeh; N. Zaitseva; C. Zhang; X. Zhang

    2015-01-27

    Current models of antineutrino production in nuclear reactors predict detection rates and spectra at odds with the existing body of direct reactor antineutrino measurements. High-resolution antineutrino detectors operated close to compact research reactor cores can produce new precision measurements useful in testing explanations for these observed discrepancies involving underlying nuclear or new physics. Absolute measurement of the 235U-produced antineutrino spectrum can provide additional constraints for evaluating the accuracy of current and future reactor models, while relative measurements of spectral distortion between differing baselines can be used to search for oscillations arising from the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Such a measurement can be performed in the United States at several highly-enriched uranium fueled research reactors using near-surface segmented liquid scintillator detectors. We describe here the conceptual design and physics potential of the PROSPECT experiment, a U.S.-based, multi-phase experiment with reactor-detector baselines of 7-20 meters capable of addressing these and other physics and detector development goals. Current R&D status and future plans for PROSPECT detector deployment and data-taking at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be discussed.

  6. Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham Gal

    2015-05-26

    Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions in two-body decays. Whereas parent-ion decay rates cannot exhibit modulation with the several-second period reported in these experiments, the time evolution of the detected daughter ions is shown to produce oscillations that under certain conditions may provide resolution of the `GSI Oscillations' puzzle. New dedicated storage-ring or trap experiments could look up for these oscillations.

  7. A search for sterile neutrinos at the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pittam, Robert Neil; /Oxford U.

    2010-08-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, USA. The experiment was designed to study neutrino oscillation phenomena. The {nu}{sub {mu}} beam produced by the NuMI beam facility at FNAL is used along with two functionally identical detectors. The Near Detector at FNAL and a Far Detector 735 km away in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. Comparison of the observed spectra of neutrinos at the two detectors provides the evidence for neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents work on the postulated phenomena of sterile neutrinos. Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos will lead to a deficit in the expected rate of measured Neutral Current interactions at the Far Detector. A technique for selecting Neutral Current events utilizing an Artificial Neural Network is presented with resulting overall efficiency of 91.1% and purity of 66.0%. A method of predicting the expected Charged and Neutral Current energy spectra at the Far Detector given the data recorded at the Near Detector is presented. A model to search for oscillations between sterile and active neutrinos is developed. Sources of systematic uncertainty that can effect the results of the analysis are discussed. The analysis developed is applied to a Standard Model 3 flavour oscillation model as a cross check under the scenarios with and without {nu}{sub e} appearance. The oscillation parameters measured by this model are {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} = (2.39{sub -0.15}{sup +0.23}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and {theta}{sub 23} = 0.727{sub -0.11}{sup +0.22} for the no {nu}{sub e} appearance result. An analysis of the resulting prediction reveals no evidence for active neutrino disappearance. The analysis is then performed using the 4 flavour neutrino oscillation model developed. Again this is done under the 2 scenarios of {nu}{sub e} appearance and no {nu}{sub e} appearance. The results of this analysis are {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.44{sub -0.14}{sup +0.23} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, {theta}{sub 23} = 0.755{sub -0.12}{sup +0.19} and {theta}{sub 34} = 0.00{sup +0.35} for no {nu}{sub e} appearance and {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = (2.46{sub -0.14}{sup +0.21}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, {theta}{sub 23} = 0.849{sub -0.19}{sup +0.12} and {theta}{sub 34} = 0.00{sup +0.60} for {nu}{sub e} appearance. This is consistent with no oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos.

  8. The Detector System of The Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. P. An; J. Z. Bai; A. B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; D. Beavis; W. Beriguete; M. Bishai; S. Blyth; R. L. Brown; I. Butorov; D. Cao; G. F. Cao; J. Cao; R. Carr; W. R. Cen; W. T. Chan; Y. L. Chan; J. F. Chang; L. C. Chang; Y. Chang; C. Chasman; H. Y. Chen; H. S. Chen; M. J. Chen; Q. Y. Chen; S. J. Chen; S. M. Chen; X. C. Chen; X. H. Chen; X. S. Chen; Y. X. Chen; Y. Chen; J. H. Cheng; J. Cheng; Y. P. Cheng; J. J. Cherwinka; S. Chidzik; K. Chow; M. C. Chu; J. P. Cummings; J. de Arcos; Z. Y. Deng; X. F. Ding; Y. Y. Ding; M. V. Diwan; L. Dong; J. Dove; E. Draeger; X. F. Du; D. A. Dwyer; W. R. Edwards; S. R. Ely; S. D. Fang; J. Y. Fu; Z. W. Fu; L. Q. Ge; V. Ghazikhanian; R. Gill; J. Goett; M. Gonchar; G. H. Gong; H. Gong; Y. A. Gornushkin; M. Grassi; L. S. Greenler; W. Q. Gu; M. Y. Guan; R. P. Guo; X. H. Guo; R. W. Hackenburg; R. L. Hahn; R. Han; S. Hans; M. He; Q. He; W. S. He; K. M. Heeger; Y. K. Heng; A. Higuera; P. Hinrichs; T. H. Ho; M. Hoff; Y. K. Hor; Y. B. Hsiung; B. Z. Hu; L. M. Hu; L. J. Hu; T. Hu; W. Hu; E. C. Huang; H. Z. Huang; H. X. Huang; P. W. Huang; X. Huang; X. T. Huang; P. Huber; G. Hussain; Z. Isvan; D. E. Jaffe; P. Jaffke; K. L. Jen; S. Jetter; X. P. Ji; X. L. Ji; H. J. Jiang; W. Q. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; R. A. Johnson; J. Joseph; L. Kang; S. H. Kettell; S. Kohn; M. Kramer; K. K. Kwan; M. W. Kwok; T. Kwok; C. Y. Lai; W. C. Lai; W. H. Lai; T. J. Langford; K. Lau; L. Lebanowski; J. Lee; M. K. P. Lee; R. T. Lei; R. Leitner; J. K. C. Leung; K. Y. Leung; C. A. Lewis; B. Li; C. Li; D. J. Li; F. Li; G. S. Li; J. Li; N. Y. Li; Q. J. Li; S. F. Li; S. C. Li; W. D. Li; X. B. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. Li; Y. F. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; J. Liang; C. J. Lin; G. L. Lin; P. Y. Lin; S. X. Lin; S. K. Lin; Y. C. Lin; J. J. Ling; J. M. Link; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; B. J. Liu; C. Liu; D. W. Liu; H. Liu; J. L. Liu; J. C. Liu; S. Liu; S. S. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; C. Lu; H. Q. Lu; J. S. Lu; A. Luk; K. B. Luk; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; L. H. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. Y. Ma; X. B. Ma; Y. Q. Ma; B. Mayes; K. T. McDonald; M. C. McFarlane; R. D. McKeown; Y. Meng; I. Mitchell; D. Mohapatra; J. Monari Kebwaro; J. E. Morgan; Y. Nakajima; J. Napolitano; D. Naumov; E. Naumova; C. Newsom; H. Y. Ngai; W. K. Ngai; Y. B. Nie; Z. Ning; J. P. Ochoa-Ricoux; A. Olshevskiy; A. Pagac; H. -R. Pan; S. Patton; C. Pearson; V. Pec; J. C. Peng; L. E. Piilonen; L. Pinsky; C. S. J. Pun; F. Z. Qi; M. Qi; X. Qian; N. Raper; B. Ren; J. Ren; R. Rosero; B. Roskovec; X. C. Ruan; W. R. Sands III; B. Seilhan; B. B. Shao; K. Shih; W. Y. Song; H. Steiner; P. Stoler; M. Stuart; G. X. Sun; J. L. Sun; N. Tagg; Y. H. Tam; H. K. Tanaka; W. Tang; X. Tang; D. Taychenachev; H. Themann; Y. Torun; S. Trentalange; O. Tsai; K. V. Tsang; R. H. M. Tsang; C. E. Tull; Y. C. Tung; N. Viaux; B. Viren; S. Virostek; V. Vorobel; C. H. Wang; L. S. Wang; L. Y. Wang; L. Z. Wang; M. Wang; N. Y. Wang; R. G. Wang; T. Wang; W. Wang; W. W. Wang; X. T. Wang; X. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. M. Wang; D. M. Webber; H. Y. Wei; Y. D. Wei; L. J. Wen; D. L. Wenman; K. Whisnant; C. G. White; L. Whitehead; C. A. Whitten Jr.; J. Wilhelmi; T. Wise; H. C. Wong; H. L. H. Wong; J. Wong; S. C. F. Wong; E. Worcester; F. F. Wu; Q. Wu; D. M. Xia; J. K. Xia; S. T. Xiang; Q. Xiao; Z. Z. Xing; G. Xu; J. Y. Xu; J. L. Xu; J. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; T. Xue; J. Yan; C. G. Yang; L. Yang; M. S. Yang; M. T. Yang; M. Ye; M. Yeh; Y. S. Yeh; K. Yip; B. L. Young; G. Y. Yu; Z. Y. Yu; S. Zeng; L. Zhan; C. Zhang; F. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; K. Zhang; Q. X. Zhang; Q. M. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. T. Zhang; Y. C. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. M. Zhang; Y. X. Zhang; Y. M. Zhang; Z. J. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; Y. F. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; L. Zheng; W. L. Zhong; L. Zhou; N. Zhou; Z. Y. Zhou; H. L. Zhuang; S. Zimmerman; J. H. Zou

    2015-08-17

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of $\\bar{\

  9. The Detector System of The Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, F P; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Beavis, D; Beriguete, W; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Brown, R L; Butorov, I; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Carr, R; Cen, W R; Chan, W T; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chasman, C; Chen, H Y; Chen, H S; Chen, M J; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S J; Chen, S M; Chen, X C; Chen, X H; Chen, X S; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cherwinka, J J; Chidzik, S; Chow, K; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dong, L; Dove, J; Draeger, E; Du, X F; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Fang, S D; Fu, J Y; Fu, Z W; Ge, L Q; Ghazikhanian, V; Gill, R; Goett, J; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Gornushkin, Y A; Grassi, M; Greenler, L S; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, R P; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Hahn, R L; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; He, Q; He, W S; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hinrichs, P; Ho, T H; Hoff, M; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, L M; Hu, L J; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H Z; Huang, H X; Huang, P W; Huang, X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Hussain, G; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiang, H J; Jiang, W Q; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Joseph, J; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lai, C Y; Lai, W C; Lai, W H; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, M K P; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lewis, C A; Li, B; Li, C; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, J; Li, N Y; Li, Q J; Li, S F; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X B; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, J; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, P Y; Lin, S X; Lin, S K; Lin, Y C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, B J; Liu, C; Liu, D W; Liu, H; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Liu, S; Liu, S S; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, A; Luk, K B; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Ma, L H; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Mayes, B; McDonald, K T; McFarlane, M C; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mitchell, I; Mohapatra, D; Kebwaro, J Monari; Morgan, J E; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Newsom, C; Ngai, H Y; Ngai, W K; Nie, Y B; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevskiy, A; Pagac, A; Pan, H -R; Patton, S; Pearson, C; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, B; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Sands, W R; Seilhan, B; Shao, B B; Shih, K; Song, W Y; Steiner, H; Stoler, P; Stuart, M; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tagg, N; Tam, Y H; Tanaka, H K; Tang, W; Tang, X; Taychenachev, D; Themann, H; Torun, Y; Trentalange, S; Tsai, O; Tsang, K V; Tsang, R H M; Tull, C E; Tung, Y C; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Virostek, S; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, L S; Wang, L Y; Wang, L Z; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, T; Wang, W; Wang, W W; Wang, X T; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Webber, D M; Wei, H Y; Wei, Y D; Wen, L J; Wenman, D L; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Whitten, C A; Wilhelmi, J; Wise, T; Wong, H C; Wong, H L H; Wong, J; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, F F; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xiang, S T; Xiao, Q; Xing, Z Z; Xu, G; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, J; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yan, J; Yang, C G; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Yeh, Y S; Yip, K; Young, B L; Yu, G Y; Yu, Z Y; Zeng, S; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, F H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, K; Zhang, Q X; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X T; Zhang, Y C; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y F; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhou, Z Y; Zhuang, H L; Zimmerman, S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of $\\bar{\

  10. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro; /Caltech

    2009-10-01

    We perform a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of {nu}{sub e} charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in {theta}{sub 13}. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  11. Neutrino oscillations: Current status and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2005-10-25

    I summarize the status of neutrino oscillations from world neutrino oscillation data with date of October 2005. The results of a global analysis within the three-flavour framework are presented. Furthermore, a prospect on where we could stand in neutrino oscillations in ten years from now is given, based on a simulation of upcoming long-baseline accelerator and reactor experiments.

  12. Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bouchiat

    2003-04-27

    After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

  13. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) Conceptual Design Report (CDR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LBNE Collaboration

    2012-04-10

    Conceptual Design Report developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment.

  14. Neuntrino opportunities at Jinping Jinping neutrino program working group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yayu

    spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.1.6 Detector response model.3.2 Reactor ¯e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.3.3 Fast reactor neutrino flux is an ideal site to do low background experiments. In this note, we estimated

  15. Reactor accelerator coupling experiments: a feasability study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woddi Venkat Krishna, Taraknath

    2006-08-16

    ) ______________________________ William E. Burchill (Head of Department) ______________________________ Marvin L. Adams (Member) ______________________________ Ronald J. Ellis (Member) May 2005 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering iii ABSTRACT Reactor... (Commissariat ? l??nergie Atomique), EDF (Electricit? de France), and FRAMATOME. This experimental program takes place at the research reactor MASURCA (MAquette de SURg?n?rateur ? CAdarache) of the CEA Nuclear Center of Cadarache. It is devoted to the study...

  16. Direct measurement of backgrounds using reactor-off data in Double Chooz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Janet

    Double Chooz is unique among modern reactor-based neutrino experiments studying ?¯e disappearance in that data can be collected with all reactors off. In this paper, we present data from 7.53 days of reactor-off running. ...

  17. Photon Detection System Designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Denver

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  18. Energy reconstruction in the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich Mosel; Olga Lalakulich; Kai Gallmeister

    2014-04-24

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment aims at measuring fundamental physical parameters to high precision and exploring physics beyond the standard model. Nuclear targets introduce complications towards that aim. We investigate the uncertainties in the energy reconstruction, based on quasielastic scattering relations, due to nuclear effects. The reconstructed event distributions as a function of energy tend to be smeared out and shifted by several 100 MeV in their oscillatory structure if standard event selection is used. We show that a more restrictive experimental event selection offers the possibility to reach the accuracy needed for a determination of the mass ordering and the $CP$-violating phase. Quasielastic-based energy reconstruction could thus be a viable alternative to the calorimetric reconstruction also at higher energies.

  19. Measurements of neutrino oscillation in appearance and disappearance channels by the T2K experiment with 6.6E20 protons on target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T2K Collaboration; K. Abe; J. Adam; H. Aihara; T. Akiri; C. Andreopoulos; S. Aoki; A. Ariga; S. Assylbekov; D. Autiero; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; P. Bartet-Friburg; M. Bass; M. Batkiewicz; F. Bay; V. Berardi; B. E. Berger; S. Berkman; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; S. Bordoni; S. B. Boyd; D. Brailsford; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; N. Buchanan; R. G. Calland; J. Caravaca Rodríguez; S. L. Cartwright; R. Castillo; M. G. Catanesi; A. Cervera; D. Cherdack; N. Chikuma; G. Christodoulou; A. Clifton; J. Coleman; S. J. Coleman; G. Collazuol; K. Connolly; L. Cremonesi; A. Dabrowska; I. Danko; R. Das; S. Davis; P. de Perio; G. De Rosa; T. Dealtry; S. R. Dennis; C. Densham; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; S. Dolan; O. Drapier; T. Duboyski; K. Duffy; J. Dumarchez; S. Dytman; M. Dziewiecki; S. Emery-Schrenk; A. Ereditato; L. Escudero; T. Feusels; A. J. Finch; G. A. Fiorentini; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; A. P. Furmanski; V. Galymov; A. Garcia; S. Giffin; C. Giganti; K. Gilje; D. Goeldi; T. Golan; M. Gonin; N. Grant; D. Gudin; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; M. D. Haigh; P. Hamilton; D. Hansen; T. Hara; M. Hartz; T. Hasegawa; N. C. Hastings; T. Hayashino; Y. Hayato; C. Hearty; R. L. Helmer; M. Hierholzer; J. Hignight; A. Hillairet; A. Himmel; T. Hiraki; S. Hirota; J. Holeczek; S. Horikawa; F. Hosomi; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; K. Ieki; M. Ieva; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; J. Insler; T. J. Irvine; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; E. Iwai; K. Iwamoto; K. Iyogi; A. Izmaylov; A. Jacob; B. Jamieson; M. Jiang; S. Johnson; J. H. Jo; P. Jonsson; C. K. Jung; M. Kabirnezhad; A. C. Kaboth; T. Kajita; H. Kakuno; J. Kameda; Y. Kanazawa; D. Karlen; I. Karpikov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; D. Kielczewska; T. Kikawa; A. Kilinski; J. Kim; S. King; J. Kisiel; P. Kitching; T. Kobayashi; L. Koch; T. Koga; A. Kolaceke; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. Kropp; H. Kubo; Y. Kudenko; R. Kurjata; T. Kutter; J. Lagoda; I. Lamont; E. Larkin; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; M. Lazos; T. Lindner; C. Lister; R. P. Litchfield; A. Longhin; J. P. Lopez; L. Ludovici; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; S. Manly; A. D. Marino; J. Marteau; J. F. Martin; P. Martins; S. Martynenko; T. Maruyama; V. Matveev; K. Mavrokoridis; E. Mazzucato; M. McCarthy; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; A. Mefodiev; C. Metelko; M. Mezzetto; P. Mijakowski; C. A. Miller; A. Minamino; O. Mineev; A. Missert; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; Th. A. Mueller; A. Murakami; M. Murdoch; S. Murphy; J. Myslik; T. Nakadaira; M. Nakahata; K. G. Nakamura; K. Nakamura; S. Nakayama; T. Nakaya; K. Nakayoshi; C. Nantais; C. Nielsen; M. Nirkko; K. Nishikawa; Y. Nishimura; J. Nowak; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. Ohta; K. Okumura; T. Okusawa; W. Oryszczak; S. M. Oser; T. Ovsyannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; Y. Petrov; L. Pickard; E. S. Pinzon Guerra; C. Pistillo; P. Plonski; E. Poplawska; B. Popov; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; P. Przewlocki; B. Quilain; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. M. Rayner; A. Redij; M. Reeves; E. Reinherz-Aronis; C. Riccio; P. A. Rodrigues; P. Rojas; E. Rondio; S. Roth; A. Rubbia; D. Ruterbories; A. Rychter; R. Sacco; K. Sakashita; F. Sánchez; F. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; S. Schoppmann; J. Schwehr; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; D. Sgalaberna; R. Shah; F. Shaker; D. Shaw; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; Y. Shustrov; P. Sinclair; B. Smith; M. Smy; J. T. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Sorel; L. Southwell; P. Stamoulis; J. Steinmann; B. Still; Y. Suda; A. Suzuki; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Y. Suzuki; R. Tacik; M. Tada; S. Takahashi; A. Takeda; Y. Takeuchi; H. K. Tanaka; H. A. Tanaka; M. M. Tanaka; D. Terhorst; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; A. Thorley; S. Tobayama; W. Toki; T. Tomura; Y. Totsuka; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; G. Vasseur; T. Wachala; K. Wakamatsu; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; W. Warzycha; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; C. Wilkinson; Z. Williamson; J. R. Wilson; R. J. Wilson; T. Wongjirad; Y. Yamada; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; K. Yoshida; T. Yuan; M. Yu; A. Zalewska; J. Zalipska; L. Zambelli; K. Zaremba; M. Ziembicki; E. D. Zimmerman; M. Zito; J. ?muda

    2015-03-30

    We report on measurements of neutrino oscillation using data from the T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment collected between 2010 and 2013. In an analysis of muon neutrino disappearance alone, we find the following estimates and 68% confidence intervals for the two possible mass hierarchies: Normal Hierarchy: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.514^{+0.055}_{-0.056}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{32}=(2.51\\pm0.10)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$ Inverted Hierarchy: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.511\\pm0.055$ and $\\Delta m^2_{13}=(2.48\\pm0.10)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$ The analysis accounts for multi-nucleon mechanisms in neutrino interactions which were found to introduce negligible bias. We describe our first analyses that combine measurements of muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance to estimate four oscillation parameters and the mass hierarchy. Frequentist and Bayesian intervals are presented for combinations of these parameters, with and without including recent reactor measurements. At 90% confidence level and including reactor measurements, we exclude the region: $\\delta_{CP}=[0.15,0.83]\\pi$ for normal hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=[-0.08,1.09]\\pi$ for inverted hierarchy. The T2K and reactor data weakly favor the normal hierarchy with a Bayes Factor of 2.2. The most probable values and 68% 1D credible intervals for the other oscillation parameters, when reactor data are included, are: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.528^{+0.055}_{-0.038}$ and $|\\Delta m^2_{32}|=(2.51\\pm0.11)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$.

  20. The search for Majorana neutrinos with neutrinoless double beta decays: From CUORICINO to LUCIFER experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma I-00185 (Italy) and INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma I-00185 (Italy)

    2012-11-20

    The study of neutrino properties is one of the fundamental challenges in particle physics nowadays. Fifty years of investigations established that neutrinos are massive but the absolute mass scale has not yet been measured. Moreover its true nature is still unknown. Is the neutrino its own antiparticle (thus violating the lepton number) as proposed by Majorana in 1937? The only way to probe the neutrino nature is through the observation of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}), a very rare spontaneous nuclear transition which emits two electrons and no neutrinos. In this paper, after a brief introduction to the theoretical framework of Majorana's neutrino, a presentation of experimental challenges posed by 0{nu}{beta}{beta} search will be given as well as an overview of present status and future perpectives of experiments.

  1. Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Anghel, I; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Asfandiyarov, R; Askins, M; Back, J J; Ballett, P; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bay, F; Beltrame, P; Berardi, V; Bergevin, M; Berkman, S; Berry, T; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Cafagna, F S; Carminati, G; Cartwright, S L; Catanesi, M G; Choi, K; Choi, J H; Collazuol, G; Cowan, G; Cremonesi, L; Davies, G; De Rosa, G; Densham, C; Detwiler, J; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Fernández, P; Feusels, T; Finch, A; Fitton, M; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Fukuda, D; Galymov, V; Ganezer, K; Gonin, M; Gumplinger, P; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haga, Y; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Hayato, Y; Hierholzer, M; Hill, J; Himmel, A; Hirota, S; Horiuchi, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Iijima, T; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Inoue, K; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T; Ishida, T; Ishino, H; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jang, H I; Jiang, M; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Karadhzov, Y; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koga, M; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W R; Kudenko, Y; Kutter, T; Kuze, M; Labarga, L; Lagoda, J; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Learned, J G; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Ma, W; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Mariani, C; Marti, L; Martin, J F; Martin, C; Martins, P P J; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mezzetto, M; Minakata, H; Minamino, A; Mine, S; Mineev, O; Miura, M; Monroe, J; Mori, T; Moriyama, S; Mueller, T; Muheim, F; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Needham, M; Nicholls, T; Nirkko, M; Nishimura, Y; Noah, E; Nowak, J; Nunokawa, H; O'Keeffe, H M; Okajima, Y; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; O'Sullivan, E; Ovsiannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Pérez, J; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Pistillo, C; Playfer, S; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Quilain, B; Quinto, M; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A; Redij, A; Retiere, F; Riccio, C; Richard, E; Rondio, E; Rose, H J; Ross-Lonergan, M; Rott, C; Rountree, S D; Rubbia, A; Sacco, R; Sakuda, M; Sanchez, M C; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shaikhiev, A; Shimizu, I; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Sinnis, G; Smy, M B; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H W; Stewart, T; Stone, J L; Suda, Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, A T; Svoboda, R; Tacik, R; Takeda, A; Taketa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, H K M; Tanaka, H; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorpe, M; Tobayama, S; Tolich, N; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M R; Vasseur, G; Vogelaar, R B; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Xin, T; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zito, M

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be establis...

  2. Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyper-Kamiokande Proto-Collaboraion; :; K. Abe; H. Aihara; C. Andreopoulos; I. Anghel; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; R. Asfandiyarov; M. Askins; J. J. Back; P. Ballett; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; F. Bay; P. Beltrame; V. Berardi; M. Bergevin; S. Berkman; T. Berry; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; F. S. Cafagna; G. Carminati; S. L. Cartwright; M. G. Catanesi; K. Choi; J. H. Choi; G. Collazuol; G. Cowan; L. Cremonesi; G. Davies; G. De Rosa; C. Densham; J. Detwiler; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; S. Emery; A. Ereditato; P. Fernández; T. Feusels; A. Finch; M. Fitton; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; D. Fukuda; V. Galymov; K. Ganezer; M. Gonin; P. Gumplinger; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; Y. Haga; B. Hartfiel; M. Hartz; Y. Hayato; M. Hierholzer; J. Hill; A. Himmel; S. Hirota; S. Horiuchi; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; T. Iijima; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; K. Inoue; J. Insler; R. A. Intonti; T. Irvine; T. Ishida; H. Ishino; M. Ishitsuka; Y. Itow; A. Izmaylov; B. Jamieson; H. I. Jang; M. Jiang; K. K. Joo; C. K. Jung; A. Kaboth; T. Kajita; J. Kameda; Y. Karadhzov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; J. Y. Kim; S. B. Kim; Y. Kishimoto; T. Kobayashi; M. Koga; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. R. Kropp; Y. Kudenko; T. Kutter; M. Kuze; L. Labarga; J. Lagoda; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; J. G. Learned; I. T. Lim; T. Lindner; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; W. Ma; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; C. Mariani; L. Marti; J. F. Martin; C. Martin; P. P. J. Martins; E. Mazzucato; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; M. Mezzetto; H. Minakata; A. Minamino; S. Mine; O. Mineev; M. Miura; J. Monroe; T. Mori; S. Moriyama; T. Mueller; F. Muheim; M. Nakahata; K. Nakamura; T. Nakaya; S. Nakayama; M. Needham; T. Nicholls; M. Nirkko; Y. Nishimura; E. Noah; J. Nowak; H. Nunokawa; H. M. O'Keeffe; Y. Okajima; K. Okumura; S. M. Oser; E. O'Sullivan; T. Ovsiannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; J. Pérez; M. Y. Pac; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; C. Pistillo; S. Playfer; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; B. Quilain; M. Quinto; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. Rayner; A. Redij; F. Retiere; C. Riccio; E. Richard; E. Rondio; H. J. Rose; M. Ross-Lonergan; C. Rott; S. D. Rountree; A. Rubbia; R. Sacco; M. Sakuda; M. C. Sanchez; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; A. Shaikhiev; I. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; G. Sinnis; M. B. Smy; J. Sobczyk; H. W. Sobel; T. Stewart; J. L. Stone; Y. Suda; Y. Suzuki; A. T. Suzuki; R. Svoboda; R. Tacik; A. Takeda; A. Taketa; Y. Takeuchi; H. A. Tanaka; H. K. M. Tanaka; H. Tanaka; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; M. Thorpe; S. Tobayama; N. Tolich; T. Tomura; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; M. R. Vagins; G. Vasseur; R. B. Vogelaar; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; J. R. Wilson; T. Xin; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; M. Zito

    2015-03-31

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be established with a statistical significance of more than $3\\,\\sigma$ ($5\\,\\sigma$) for $76\\%$ ($58\\%$) of the $\\delta_{CP}$ parameter space. Using both $\

  3. Wave-packet treatment of neutrino oscillations and its implications on determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yat-Long Chan; M. -C. Chu; Ka Ming Tsui; Chan Fai Wong; Jianyi Xu

    2015-07-23

    We derive the neutrino flavor transition probabilities with the neutrino treated as a wave packet. The decoherence and dispersion effects from the wave-packet treatment show up as damping and phase-shifting of the plane-wave neutrino oscillation patterns. If the energy uncertainty in the initial neutrino wave packet is larger than around 0.01 of the neutrino energy, the decoherence and dispersion effects would degrade the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments to mass hierarchy measurement to lower than 3 $\\sigma$ confidence level.

  4. Wave-packet treatment of neutrino oscillations and its implications on determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Yat-Long; Tsui, Ka Ming; Wong, Chan Fai; Xu, Jianyi

    2015-01-01

    We derive the neutrino flavor transition probabilities with the neutrino treated as a wave packet. The decoherence and dispersion effects from the wave-packet treatment show up as damping and phase-shifting of the plane-wave neutrino oscillation patterns. If the energy uncertainty in the initial neutrino wave packet is larger than around 0.01 of the neutrino energy, the decoherence and dispersion effects would degrade the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments to mass hierarchy measurement to lower than 3 $\\sigma$ confidence level.

  5. Decommissioning experience from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henslee, S.P.; Rosenberg, K.E.

    2002-03-28

    Consistent with the intent of this International Atomic Energy Agency technical meeting, decommissioning operating experience and contributions to the preparation for the Coordinated Research Project from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II activities will be discussed. This paper will review aspects of the decommissioning activities of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, make recommendations for future decommissioning activities and reactor system designs and discuss relevant areas of potential research and development. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was designed as a 62.5 MWt, metal fueled, pool reactor with a conventional 19 MWe power plant. The productive life of the EBR-II began with first operations in 1964. Demonstration of the fast reactor fuel cycle, serving as an irradiation facility, demonstration of fast reactor passive safety and lastly, was well on its way to close the fast breeder fuel cycle for the second time when the Integral Fast Reactor program was prematurely ended in October 1994 with the shutdown of the EBR-II. The shutdown of the EBR-II was dictated without an associated planning phase that would have provided a smooth transition to shutdown. Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy arrived at a logical plan and sequence for closure activities. The decommissioning activities as described herein fall into in three distinct phases.

  6. Limit on UHE Neutrino Flux from the Parkes Lunar Radio Cherenkov Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. James; R. M. Crocker; R. D. Ekers; T. H. Hankins; J. D. O'Sullivan; R. J. Protheroe

    2007-05-14

    The first search for ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos using a radio telescope was conducted by Hankins, Ekers and O'Sullivan (1996). This was a search for nanosecond duration radio Cherenkov pulses from electromagnetic cascades initiated by ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino interactions in the lunar regolith, and was made using a broad-bandwidth receiver fitted to the Parkes radio telescope, Australia. At the time, no simulations were available to convert the null result into a neutrino flux limit. Since then, similar experiments at Goldstone, USA, and Kalyazin, Russia, have also recorded null results, and computer simulations have been used to model the experimental sensitivities of these two experiments and put useful limits on the UHE neutrino flux. Proposed future experiments include the use of broad-bandwidth receivers, making the sensitivity achieved by the Parkes experiment highly relevant to the future prospects of this field. We have therefore calculated the effective aperture for the Parkes experiment and found that when pointing at the lunar limb, the effective aperture at all neutrino energies was superior to single-antenna, narrow-bandwidth experiments, and that the detection threshold was comparable to that of the double-antenna experiment at Goldstone. However, because only a small fraction of the observing time was spent pointing the limb, the Parkes experiment places only comparatively weak limits on the UHE neutrino flux. Future efforts should use multiple telescopes and broad-bandwidth receivers.

  7. Super-NOnuA: A Long-baseline neutrino experiment with two off-axis detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena Requejo, Olga; /Fermilab; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; /Vanderbilt U.; Pascoli, Silvia; /CERN

    2005-04-01

    Establishing the neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the fundamental questions that will have to be addressed in the next future. Its determination could be obtained with long-baseline experiments but typically suffers from degeneracies with other neutrino parameters. We consider here the NOvA experiment configuration and propose to place a second off-axis detector, with a shorter baseline, such that, by exploiting matter effects, the type of neutrino mass hierarchy could be determined with only the neutrino run. We show that the determination of this parameter is free of degeneracies, provided the ratio L/E, where L the baseline and E is the neutrino energy, is the same for both detectors.

  8. Lithium Experiment in the Interplay of Solar and Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly Kopylov; Valery Petukhov

    2003-06-17

    In a future study of solar neutrinos a special emphasis should be given to the measurement of the fluxes of neutrinos generated in CNO cycle, because this is a direct way to measure with record uncertainty - less than 1% the contribution to the solar luminosity of a pp-chain of reactions. Combined with the luminosity constraint method suggested by M. Spiro and D. Vignaud this will put the foundation for the further substantial progress in the study of neutrinos and thermonuclear reactions in the interior of the Sun. So far the hypothesis of CNO cycle hasn't found any experimental confirmation. A lithium-based radiochemical detector has a potential to detect neutrinos from CNO cycle what will be a direct proof of its existence. This will be a stringent test of the theory of stellar evolution and will complete a long-standing goal of recording the neutrino spectrum of the Sun. The energy generated in the Sun and neutrino oscillation parameters are inherently interconnected in this research. The analysis shows that although a lithium detector is a radiochemical one, principally it is possible to find separately the fluxes of 13N- and 15O-neutrinos from the total neutrino capture rate measured by this detector.

  9. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week Day Year(active tab) 2016The Dark Side of the

  10. Neutrino experiments and the Large Hadron Collider: friends across 14 orders of magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Janet

    This paper explores some of the questions that connect the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and neutrino experiments. What is the origin of mass? What is the meaning of flavor? Is there direct evidence of new forces or particles? ...

  11. NA61-SHINE: Hadron Production Measurements for Cosmic Ray and Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Abgrall

    2010-05-25

    As neutrino long baseline experiments enter a new domain of precision, important systematic errors due to poor knowledge of production cross-sections for pions and kaons require more dedicated measurements for precise neutrino flux predictions. The cosmic ray experiments require dedicated hadron production measurements to tune simulation models used to describe air shower profiles. Among other goals, the NA61-SHINE (SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment at the CERN SPS aims at precision measurements (5% and below) for both neutrino and cosmic ray experiments: those will improve the prediction of the neutrino flux for the T2K experiment at J-PARC and the prediction of muon production in the propagation of air showers for the Auger and KASCADE experiments. Motivations for new hadron production measurements are briefly discussed. NA61-SHINE took data during a pilot run in 2007 and in 2009 with different Carbon targets. The NA61-SHINE setup and preliminary spectra for positive and negative pions obtained with the 2007 thin (4% interaction length) Carbon target data are presented. The use of the NA61 data for the T2K neutrino flux predictions is finally discussed in further details.

  12. Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiments: Absorption Cross sections, Neutrino spectra, and Predicted Event Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall

    1997-10-28

    Neutrino absorption cross sections for 71Ga are calculated for all solar neutrino sources with standard energy spectra, and for laboratory sources of 51Cr and 37Ar; the calculations include, where appropriate, the thermal energy of fusing solar ions and use improved nuclear and atomic data. The ratio, R, of measured (in GALLEX and SAGE) to calculated 51Cr capture rate is R = 0.95 +/- 0.07 (exp)} + ^{+0.04}_{-0.03} (theory). Cross sections are also calculated for specific neutrino energies chosen so that a spline fit determines accurately the event rates in a gallium detector even if new physics changes the energy spectrum of solar neutrinos. Theoretical uncertainties are estimated for cross sections at specific energies and for standard neutrino energy spectra. Standard energy spectra are presented for pp and CNO neutrino sources in the appendices. Neutrino fluxes predicted by standard solar models, corrected for diffusion, have been in the range 120 SNU to 141 SNU since 1968.

  13. The Science and Strategy for Phasing of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diwan, Milind V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2012-05-22

    This note is about the principles behind a phased plan for realizing a Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment(LBNE) in the U.S.. The most important issue that must be resolved is the direction of the first phase of the experiment. Based on both scientific and programmatic considerations, the U.S. should pursue the best option for accelerator neutrino physics, which is the longer baseline towards Homestake with an optimizedbroadband intense beam.

  14. Measurements of neutrino oscillation in appearance and disappearance channels by the T2K experiment with 6.6E20 protons on target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; ?muda, J

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements of neutrino oscillation using data from the T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment collected between 2010 and 2013. In an analysis of muon neutrino disappearance alone, we find the following estimates and 68% confidence intervals for the two possible mass hierarchies: Normal Hierarchy: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.514^{+0.055}_{-0.056}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{32}=(2.51\\pm0.10)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$ Inverted Hierarchy: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.511\\pm0.055$ and $\\Delta m^2_{13}=(2.48\\pm0.10)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$ The analysis accounts for multi-nucleon mechanisms in neutrino interactions which were found to introduce negligible bias. We describe our first analyses that combine measurements of muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance to estimate four oscillation parameters and the mass hierarchy. Frequentist and Bayesian intervals are presented for combinations of these parameters, with and without including recent reactor measurements. At 90% confidence level and including...

  15. Neutrinoless double beta decay and future neutrino oscillation precision experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choubey, Sandhya [Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Rodejohann, Werner [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    We discuss to what extent future precision measurements of neutrino mixing observables will influence the information we can draw from a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay. Whereas the {delta}m{sup 2} corresponding to solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations are expected to be known with good precision, the parameter {theta}{sub 12} will govern a large part of the uncertainty. We focus, in particular, on the possibility of distinguishing the neutrino mass hierarchies and on setting a limit on the neutrino mass. We give the largest allowed values of the neutrino masses which allow to distinguish the normal from the inverted hierarchy. All aspects are discussed as a function of the uncertainty stemming from the involved nuclear matrix elements. The implications of a vanishing, or extremely small, effective mass are also investigated. By giving a large list of possible neutrino mass matrices and their predictions for the observables, we finally explore how a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay can help to identify the neutrino mass matrix if more precise values of the relevant parameters are known.

  16. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Future Neutrino Oscillation Precision Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Choubey; W. Rodejohann

    2005-07-25

    We discuss to what extent future precision measurements of neutrino mixing observables will influence the information we can draw from a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay. Whereas the Delta m^2 corresponding to solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations are expected to be known with good precision, the parameter theta_{12} will govern large part of the uncertainty. We focus in particular on the possibility of distinguishing the neutrino mass hierarchies and on setting a limit on the neutrino mass. We give the largest allowed values of the neutrino masses which allow to distinguish the normal from the inverted hierarchy. All aspects are discussed as a function of the uncertainty stemming from the involved nuclear matrix elements. The implications of a vanishing, or extremely small, effective mass are also investigated. By giving a large list of possible neutrino mass matrices and their predictions for the observables, we finally explore how a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay can help to identify the neutrino mass matrix if more precise values of the relevant parameters are known.

  17. Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Sinev

    2012-07-30

    Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

  18. Measurement of low energy neutrino cross sections with the PEANUT experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, A. [INFN, Sez. di Napoli (Italy)

    2011-11-23

    The PEANUT experiment was designed to study neutrino interactions in the few GeV range using the NuMi beam at Fermilab. The detector uses a hybrid technique, being made of nuclear emulsions and scintillator trackers. Emulsion films act as a tracking device and they are interleaved with lead plates used as neutrino target. The detector is designed to reconstruct the topology of neutrino interactions at the single particle level. We present here the full reconstruction and analysis of a sample of 147 neutrino interactions occurred in the PEANUT detector and the measurement of the quasi-elastic, resonance and deep-inelastic contributions to the total charged current cross-section. This technique could be applied for the beam monitoring for future neutrino facilities.

  19. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammersley, R.J. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  20. An Overview of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gulliford, Jim

    2014-10-09

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties associated with advanced modeling and simulation accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Data provided by those two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades. An overview of the IRPhEP and a brief update of the ICSBEP are provided in this paper.

  1. Nuclear Graphite -Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nuclear Graphite - Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and Understanding Professor Barry J Marsden and Dr. Graham N Hall Nuclear Graphite Research Group The University of Manchester 20 March 201313 9PL Tel: +44 (0) 161 275 4399, barry.marsden@manchester.ac.uk #12;Overview · Nuclear Graphite

  2. The Power of Neutrino Mass Sum Rules for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen F. King; Alexander Merle; Alexander J. Stuart

    2013-07-31

    Neutrino mass sum rules relate the three neutrino masses within generic classes of flavour models, leading to restrictions on the effective mass parameter measured in experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay as a function of the lightest neutrino mass. We perform a comprehensive study of the implications of such neutrino mass sum rules, which provide a link between model building, phenomenology, and experiments. After a careful explanation of how to derive predictions from sum rules, we discuss a large number of examples both numerically, using all three global fits available for the neutrino oscillation data, and analytically wherever possible. In some cases, our results disagree with some of those in the literature for reasons that we explain. Finally we discuss the experimental prospects for many current and near-future experiments, with a particular focus on the uncertainties induced by the unknown nuclear physics involved. We find that, in many cases, the power of the neutrino mass sum rules is so strong as to allow certain classes of models to be tested by the next generation of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Our study can serve as both a guideline and a theoretical motivation for future experimental studies.

  3. New Limits for the Violation of the Equivalence Principle in the Solar-Reactor Neutrino Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdiviesso, G do A; De Holanda, P C

    2008-01-01

    A model for the violation of the equivalence principle (VEP) on solar and reactor neutrinos is investigated. New limits for the VEP are obtained considering the mass-flavor mixing hypothesis and the VEP model. Our analysis shows two solutions were the VEP effects practically don't change the solar sector. In a first case, the mass scale of the reactor sector remains the same and in a second situation this scale falls slightly, becoming closer to the solar solution without VEP. The combined solution points to the following set of parameters: a ``higher VEP'' $|\\phi\\Delta\\gamma|=9,12^{+0,97}_{-0,78}\\times10^{-21}$, $\\tan^2\\theta=0,478^{+0,040}_{-0,038}$ and $\\Delta m^2=6,63\\pm0,31\\times10^{-5} eV^2$ ($77,7%$ C.L.) and a ``lower VEP'' $|\\phi\\Delta\\gamma|=1,91^{+0,84}_{-0,61}\\times10^{-21}$, $\\tan^2\\theta=0,478^{+0,040}_{-0,038}$ e $\\Delta m^2=7,73^{+0,17}_{-0,20}\\times10^{-5} eV^2$ ($77,7%$ C.L.). Both solutions have increased confidence level when compared with the MSW solution ($\\tan^2\\theta=0,462^{+0,043}_{-0...

  4. Experiment operations plan for the MT-4 experiment in the NRU reactor. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for MT-4 - the fourth materials deformation experiment conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. A major objective of MT-4 was to simulate a pressurized water reactor LOCA that could induce fuel rod cladding deformation and rupture due to a short-term adiabatic transient and a peak fuel cladding temperature of 1200K (1700/sup 0/F).

  5. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  6. Estimating matter induced CPT violation in Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monika Randhawa; Mandip Singh; Manmohan Gupta

    2014-12-16

    We examine matter induced CPT violation effects in long baseline electron neutrino appearance experiments in a low energy neutrino factory setup. Assuming CPT invariance in vacuum, the magnitude of CPT violating asymmetry in matter has been estimated using the exact expressions for the transition probabilities. The dependence of the asymmetry on the oscillation parameters like mixing angles, mass squared differences as well as on the Dirac CP violating phase has been investigated.

  7. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-12-24

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (?Beta Beams?), one based on decays of stored muon beams (?Neutrino Factory?), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (?Superbeam?). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R&D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R&D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  8. Electron neutrino charged-current quasielastic scattering in the MINERvA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Wolcott; for the MINERvA collaboration

    2015-10-28

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross section for a CCQE-like process, made using the MINERvA detector. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^2$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^2$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between this measurement and the predictions of the GENIE generator.

  9. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolcott, J

    2016-01-01

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter for electron neutrino appearance oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically begin with the muon neutrino cross section and apply theoretical corrections to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section. However, at present no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments exists. We present the cross sections for a CCQE-like process determined using the MINERvA detector, which are the first measurements of any exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^{2}$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^{2}$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between these measurements and the predictions of the GENIE generato...

  10. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Conceptual Design ReportThe LBNE Water Cherenkov DetectorApril 13 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell S. H.; Bishai, M.; Brown, R.; Chen, H.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J., Geronimo, G.; Gill, R.; Hackenburg, R.; Hahn, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D.; Junnarkar, S.; Kettell, S.H.; Lanni,F.; Li, Y.; Ling, J.; Littenberg, L.; Makowiecki, D.; Marciano, W.; Morse, W.; Parsa, Z.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Samios, N.; Sharma, R.; Simos, N.; Sondericker, J.; Stewart, J.; Tanaka, H.; Themann, H.; Thorn, C.; Viren, B., White, S.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Yu, B.; Zhang, C.

    2012-04-13

    Conceptual Design Report (CDR) developed for the Water Cherekov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  11. Design and Fabrication of In-Reactor Experiment to Measure Tritium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Design and Fabrication of In-Reactor Experiment to Measure Tritium Release and Speciation from LiAlO2 and LiAlO2Zr Cermets Design and Fabrication of In-Reactor Experiment to...

  12. SNO Data: Results from Experiments at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was built 6800 feet under ground, in INCO's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario. SNO is a heavy-water Cherenkov detector that is designed to detect neutrinos produced by fusion reactions in the sun. It uses 1000 tonnes of heavy water, on loan from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), contained in a 12 meter diameter acrylic vessel. Neutrinos react with the heavy water (D2O) to produce flashes of light called Cherenkov radiation. This light is then detected by an array of 9600 photomultiplier tubes mounted on a geodesic support structure surrounding the heavy water vessel. The detector is immersed in light (normal) water within a 30 meter barrel-shaped cavity (the size of a 10 story building!) excavated from Norite rock. Located in the deepest part of the mine, the overburden of rock shields the detector from cosmic rays. The detector laboratory is extremely clean to reduce background signals from radioactive elements present in the mine dust which would otherwise hide the very weak signal from neutrinos. (From http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/]

    The SNO website provides access to various datasets. See also the SNO Image Catalog at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/images/ and computer-generated images of SNO events at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/events/ and the list of published papers.

  13. Studying Neutrinos with the EXO Experiment Nicole Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    .2948, July 2008. NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY Similar to 'normal' double beta decay, except no neutrinos to neutrinoless double beta decay is given by: S0 1/2 a A MT B 1/2 =efficiency, a=isotopic abundance A Tritium Endpoint meNeutrinoless double

  14. Comparison of the CERN-MEMPHYS and T2HK neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2006-11-20

    In this talk I compare the physics potential of possible future neutrino oscillation experiments from CERN to a Mt scale water Cerenkov detector at Frejus (MEMPHYS) and of the T2HK proposal in Japan, where for the CERN experiments an SPL Superbeam and a $\\gamma=100$ Beta Beam are considered.

  15. Nuclear Propelled Vessels and Neutrino Oscillation Experiments J. Detwiler, G. Gratta, N. Tolich, and Y. Uchida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Nuclear Propelled Vessels and Neutrino Oscillation Experiments J. Detwiler, G. Gratta, N. Tolich given, until now, to the background due to nuclear propelled vessels to these experiments. Although we estimate that the total thermal power generated by such vessels is just a few percent of the total nuclear

  16. The Status of Double Chooz Experiment as a proceeding of PIC 2013 conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang Yang

    2014-04-09

    Double Chooz is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at Chooz, France. The purpose of this experiment is to measure the non-zero neutrino oscillation parameter theta13, a parameter for changing electron neutrinos into other neutrinos. This experiment uses reactors of the Chooz Nuclear Power Plant as a neutrino source. Double Chooz has published 2 result papers showing the measurement of the mixing angle, and 3rd publication is processing.

  17. Two experiments for the price of one? -- The role of the second oscillation maximum in long baseline neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Huber; Joachim Kopp

    2011-05-09

    We investigate the quantitative impact that data from the second oscillation maximum has on the performance of wide band beam neutrino oscillation experiments. We present results for the physics sensitivities to standard three flavor oscillation, as well as results for the sensitivity to non-standard interactions. The quantitative study is performed using an experimental setup similar to the Fermilab to DUSEL Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). We find that, with the single exception of sensitivity to the mass hierarchy, the second maximum plays only a marginal role due to the experimental difficulties to obtain a statistically significant and sufficiently background-free event sample at low energies. This conclusion is valid for both water Cherenkov and liquid argon detectors. Moreover, we confirm that non-standard neutrino interactions are very hard to distinguish experimentally from standard three-flavor effects and can lead to a considerable loss of sensitivity to \\theta_{13}, the mass hierarchy and CP violation.

  18. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  19. Online Monitoring of the Osiris Reactor with the Nucifer Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boireau, G; Collin, A P; Coulloux, G; Cribier, M; Deschamp, H; Durand, V; Fechner, M; Fischer, V; Gaffiot, J; Castaing, N Gerard; Granelli, R; Kato, Y; Lasserre, T; Latron, L; Legou, P; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Mention, G; Mueller, T; Nghiem, T-A; Pedrol, N; Pelzer, J; Pequignot, M; Piret, Y; Prono, G; Scola, L; Starzinski, P; Vivier, M; Dumonteil, E; Varignon, C; Buck, C; Lindner, M; Bazoma, J; Bouvier, S; Bui, V M; Communeau, V; Cucoanes, A; Fallot, M; Gautier, M; Giot, L; Guilloux, G; Lenoir, M; Martino, J; Mercier, G; Milleto, T; Peuvrel, N; Porta, A; Quere, N Le; Renard, C; Rigalleau, L M; Roy, D; Vilajosana, T; Yermia, F

    2015-01-01

    The detection of electron antineutrinos emitted in the decay chains of the fission products in nuclear reactors, combined with reactor core simulations, provides an efficient tool to assess both the thermal power and the fissile content of the whole nuclear core. This new information could be used by the International Agency for Atomic Energy (IAEA) to enhance the Safeguards of civil nuclear reactors. We report the first results of the Nucifer experiment demonstrating the concept of "neutrinometry" at the pre-industrialized stage. A novel detector has been designed to meet requirements discussed with the IAEA for the last ten years as well as international nuclear safety standards. Nucifer has been deployed at only 7.2m away from the Osiris research reactor core (70 MW) operating at the Saclay research center of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). We describe the performances of the 1 m3 detector remotely operating at a shallow depth equivalent to 12m of water and under intense...

  20. MOON for a next-generation neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment: Present status and perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shima, T.; /Osaka U., Res. Ctr. Nucl. Phys.; Doe, P.J.; /Washington U., Seattle; Ejiri, H.; /Osaka U., Res. Ctr. Nucl. Phys. /NIRS, Chiba /Prague, Tech. U.; Elliot, S.R.; /Washington U., Seattle /Los Alamos; Engel, J.; /North Carolina U.; Finger, M.; /Charles U.; Finger, M.; /Charles U.; Fushimi, K.; /Tokushima U.; Gehman, V.M.; /Washington U., Seattle /Los Alamos; Greenfield, M.B.; /Tokyo, Intl. Christian U.; Hazama, R.; /Hiroshima U. /NIRS, Chiba

    2008-01-01

    The performance of the MOON detector for a next-generation neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment was evaluated by means of the Monte Carlo method. The MOON detector was found to be a feasible solution for the future experiment to search for the Majorana neutrino mass in the range of 100-30 meV.

  1. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ankowski, Artur M; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun-Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-01-01

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two muon-neutrino disappearance experiments operating in different energy regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with a ~10% accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. On the other hand, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the dete...

  2. Reactor ??e disappearance in the Double Chooz experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abe, Y.; Aberle, C.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Barriere, J. C.; Bergevin, M.; Bernstein, A.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukhov, L.; Blucher, E.; Bowden, N. S.; et al

    2012-09-18

    The Double Chooz experiment has observed 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events in 227.93 live days with 33.71 GW-ton-years (reactor power×detector mass×live time) exposure using a 10.3 m³ fiducial volume detector located at 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant in France. The expectation in case of ???=0 is 8937 events. The deficit is interpreted as evidence of electron antineutrino disappearance. From a rate plus spectral shape analysis we find sin?²2???=0.109±0.030(stat)±0.025(syst). The data exclude the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% CL (2.9?).

  3. Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Marco Laveder

    2004-10-01

    In this review we present the main features of the current status of neutrino physics. After a review of the theory of neutrino mixing and oscillations, we discuss the current status of solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that the current data can be nicely accommodated in the framework of three-neutrino mixing. We discuss also the problem of the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale through Tritium beta-decay experiments and astrophysical observations, and the exploration of the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos through neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Finally, future prospects are briefly discussed.

  4. Experiment operations plan for the TH-2 experiment in the NRU reactor. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for TH-2--the second experiment in the series of thermal-hydraulic tests conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The major objective of TH-2 was to develop the experiment reflood control parameters and the procedures to be used in subsequent experiments in this program. In this experiment, the data acquisition and control system was used to control the fuel cladding temperature during a simulated LOCA by using variable reflood coolant flow.

  5. The earth matter effects in neutrino oscillation experiments from Tokai to Kamioka and Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaoru Hagiwara; Naotoshi Okamura; Ken-ichi Senda

    2011-09-08

    We study the earth matter effects in the Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Korea experiment (T2KK), which is a proposed extension of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) neutrino oscillation experiment between J-PARC at Tokai and Super-Kamiokande (SK) in Kamioka, where an additional detector is placed in Korea along the same neutrino beam line.By using recent geophysical measurements, we examine the earth matter effects on the oscillation probabilities at Kamioka and Korea. The average matter density along the Tokai-to-Kamioka baseline is found to be 2.6 g/cm^3, and that for the Tokai-to-Korea baseline is 2.85, 2.98, and 3.05 g/cm^3 for the baseline length of L = 1000, 1100, and 1200 km, respectively. The uncertainty of the average density is about 6%, which is determined by the uncertainty in the correlation between the accurately measured sound velocity and the matter density. The effect of the matter density distribution along the baseline is studied by using the step function approximation and the Fourier analysis. We find that the nu_mu -> nu_e oscillation probability is dictated mainly by the average matter density, with small but non-negligible contribution from the real part of the first Fourier mode. We also find that the sensitivity of the T2KK experiment on the neutrino mass hierarchy does not improve significantly by reducing the matter density error from 6% to 3%, since the measurement is limited by statistics for the minimum scenario of T2KK with SK at Kamioka anda 100 kt detector in Korea considered in this report. The sensitivity of the T2KK experiment on the neutrino mass hierarchy improves significantly by splitting the total beam time into neutrino and anti-neutrino runs, because the matter effect term contributes to the oscillation amplitudes with the opposite sign.

  6. White Paper on the Majorana Zero-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Majorana collaboration

    2003-11-13

    The objective of the Majorana Experiment is to study neutrinoless double beta decay (0nbb) with an effective Majorana-neutrino mass sensitivity below 50 meV in order to characterize the Majorana nature of the neutrino, the Majorana mass spectrum, and the absolute mass scale. An experimental study of the neutrino mass scale implied by neutrino oscillation results is now technically within our grasp. This exciting physics goal is best pursued using the well-established technique of searching for 0nbb of 76Ge, augmented with recent advances in signal processing and detector design. The Majorana Experiment will consist of a large mass of 76Ge in the form of high-resolution intrinsic germanium detectors located deep underground within a low-background shielding environment. Observation of a sharp peak at the bb endpoint will quantify the 0nbb half-life and thus the effective Majorana mass of the electron neutrino. In addition to the modest R&D program, we present here an overview of the entire project in order to help put in perspective the scope, the low level of technical risk, and the readiness of the Collaboration to immediately begin the undertaking.

  7. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments David Schmitz, Fermilab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Constraints on cosmic neutrino fluxes from the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2006-05-01

    We report new limits on cosmic neutrino fluxes from the test flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, which completed an 18.4 day flight of a prototype long-duration balloon payload, called ANITA-lite, in early 2004...

  9. The muon system of the Daya Bay Reactor antineutrino experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daya Bay Collaboration

    2014-11-28

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described.

  10. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Littenberg, L.; Pearson, C. E.; Qian, X.; Theman, H.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-02-01

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  11. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; et al

    2014-10-05

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  12. Earth Matter Effects in Detection of Supernova Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. -H. Guo; Bing-Lin Young

    2006-05-11

    We calculated the matter effect, including both the Earth and supernova, on the detection of neutrinos from type II supernovae at the proposed Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. It is found that apart from the dependence on the flip probability P_H inside the supernova and the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, the amount of the Earth matter effect depends on the direction of the incoming supernova neutrinos, and reaches the biggest value when the incident angle of neutrinos is around 93^\\circ. In the reaction channel \\bar{\

  13. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment: Exploring Fundamental Symmetries of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNE Collaboration; Corey Adams; David Adams; Tarek Akiri; Tyler Alion; Kris Anderson; Costas Andreopoulos; Mike Andrews; Ioana Anghel; João Carlos Costa dos Anjos; Maddalena Antonello; Enrique Arrieta-Diaz; Marina Artuso; Jonathan Asaadi; Xinhua Bai; Bagdat Baibussinov; Michael Baird; Baha Balantekin; Bruce Baller; Brian Baptista; D'Ann Barker; Gary Barker; William A. Barletta; Giles Barr; Larry Bartoszek; Amit Bashyal; Matt Bass; Vincenzo Bellini; Pietro Angelo Benetti; Bruce E. Berger; Marc Bergevin; Eileen Berman; Hans-Gerd Berns; Adam Bernstein; Robert Bernstein; Babu Bhandari; Vipin Bhatnagar; Bipul Bhuyan; Jianming Bian; Mary Bishai; Andrew Blake; Flor Blaszczyk; Erik Blaufuss; Bruce Bleakley; Edward Blucher; Steve Blusk; Virgil Bocean; F. Boffelli; Jan Boissevain; Timothy Bolton; Maurizio Bonesini; Steve Boyd; Andrew Brandt; Richard Breedon; Carl Bromberg; Ralph Brown; Giullia Brunetti; Norman Buchanan; Bill Bugg; Jerome Busenitz; E. Calligarich; Leslie Camilleri; Giada Carminati; Rachel Carr; Cesar Castromonte; Flavio Cavanna; Sandro Centro; Alex Chen; Hucheng Chen; Kai Chen; Daniel Cherdack; Cheng-Yi Chi; Sam Childress; Brajesh Chandra Choudhary; Georgios Christodoulou; Cabot-Ann Christofferson; Eric Church; David Cline; Thomas Coan; Alfredo Cocco; Joao Coelho; Stephen Coleman; Janet M. Conrad; Mark Convery; Robert Corey; Luke Corwin; Jack Cranshaw; Daniel Cronin-Hennessy; A. Curioni; Helio da Motta; Tristan Davenne; Gavin S. Davies; Steven Dazeley; Kaushik De; Andre de Gouvea; Jeffrey K. de Jong; David Demuth; Chris Densham; Milind Diwan; Zelimir Djurcic; R. Dolfini; Jeffrey Dolph; Gary Drake; Stephen Dye; Hongue Dyuang; Daniel Edmunds; Steven Elliott; Muhammad Elnimr; Sarah Eno; Sanshiro Enomoto; Carlos O. Escobar; Justin Evans; A. Falcone; Lisa Falk; Amir Farbin; Christian Farnese; Angela Fava; John Felde; S. Fernandes; Fernando Ferroni; Farshid Feyzi; Laura Fields; Alex Finch; Mike Fitton; Bonnie Fleming; Jack Fowler; Walt Fox; Alex Friedland; Stu Fuess; Brian Fujikawa; Hugh Gallagher; Raj Gandhi; Gerald Garvey; Victor M. Gehman; Gianluigi de Geronimo; Daniele Gibin; Ronald Gill; Ricardo A. Gomes; Maury C. Goodman; Jason Goon; Nicholas Graf; Mathew Graham; Rik Gran; Christopher Grant; Nick Grant; Herbert Greenlee; Leland Greenler; Sean Grullon; Elena Guardincerri; Victor Guarino; Evan Guarnaccia; Germano Guedes; Roxanne Guenette; Alberto Guglielmi; Marcelo M. Guzzo; Alec T. Habig; Robert W. Hackenburg; Haleh Hadavand; Alan Hahn; Martin Haigh; Todd Haines; Thomas Handler; Sunej Hans; Jeff Hartnell; John Harton; Robert Hatcher; Athans Hatzikoutelis; Steven Hays; Eric Hazen; Mike Headley; Anne Heavey; Karsten Heeger; Jaret Heise; Robert Hellauer; Jeremy Hewes; Alexander Himmel; Matthew Hogan; Pedro Holanda; Anna Holin; Glenn Horton-Smith; Joe Howell; Patrick Hurh; Joey Huston; James Hylen; Richard Imlay; Jonathan Insler; G. Introzzi; Zeynep Isvan; Chris Jackson; John Jacobsen; David E. Jaffe; Cat James; Chun-Min Jen; Marvin Johnson; Randy Johnson; Robert Johnson; Scott Johnson; William Johnston; John Johnstone; Ben J. P. Jones; H. Jostlein; Thomas Junk; Richard Kadel; Karl Kaess; Georgia Karagiorgi; Jarek Kaspar; Teppei Katori; Boris Kayser; Edward Kearns; Paul Keener; Ernesto Kemp; Steve H. Kettell; Mike Kirby; Joshua Klein; Gordon Koizumi; Sacha Kopp; Laura Kormos; William Kropp; Vitaly A. Kudryavtsev; Ashok Kumar; Jason Kumar; Thomas Kutter; Franco La Zia; Kenneth Lande; Charles Lane; Karol Lang; Francesco Lanni; Richard Lanza; Tony Latorre; John Learned; David Lee; Kevin Lee; Qizhong Li; Shaorui Li; Yichen Li; Zepeng Li; Jiang Libo; Steve Linden; Jiajie Ling; Jonathan Link; Laurence Littenberg; Hu Liu; Qiuguang Liu; Tiankuan Liu; John Losecco; William Louis; Byron Lundberg; Tracy Lundin; Jay Lundy; Ana Amelia Machado; Cara Maesano; Steve Magill; George Mahler; David Malon; Stephen Malys; Francesco Mammoliti; Samit Kumar Mandal; Anthony Mann; Paul Mantsch; Alberto Marchionni; William Marciano; Camillo Mariani; Jelena Maricic; Alysia Marino; Marvin Marshak; John Marshall; Shiegenobu Matsuno; Christopher Mauger; Konstantinos Mavrokoridis; Nate Mayer; Neil McCauley; Elaine McCluskey; Kirk McDonald; Kevin McFarland; David McKee; Robert McKeown; Robert McTaggart; Rashid Mehdiyev; Dongming Mei; A. Menegolli; Guang Meng; Yixiong Meng; David Mertins; Mark Messier; William Metcalf; Radovan Milincic; William Miller; Geoff Mills; Sanjib R. Mishra; Nikolai Mokhov; Claudio Montanari; David Montanari; Craig Moore; Jorge Morfin; Ben Morgan; William Morse; Zander Moss; Célio A. Moura; Stuart Mufson; David Muller; Jim Musser; Donna Naples; Jim Napolitano; Mitch Newcomer; Ryan Nichol; Tim Nicholls; Evan Niner; Barry Norris

    2014-04-22

    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early Universe, the dynamics of the supernova bursts that produced the heavy elements necessary for life and whether protons eventually decay --- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our Universe, its current state and its eventual fate. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) represents an extensively developed plan for a world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions. LBNE is conceived around three central components: (1) a new, high-intensity neutrino source generated from a megawatt-class proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, (2) a near neutrino detector just downstream of the source, and (3) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber deployed as a far detector deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. This facility, located at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, is approximately 1,300 km from the neutrino source at Fermilab -- a distance (baseline) that delivers optimal sensitivity to neutrino charge-parity symmetry violation and mass ordering effects. This ambitious yet cost-effective design incorporates scalability and flexibility and can accommodate a variety of upgrades and contributions. With its exceptional combination of experimental configuration, technical capabilities, and potential for transformative discoveries, LBNE promises to be a vital facility for the field of particle physics worldwide, providing physicists from around the globe with opportunities to collaborate in a twenty to thirty year program of exciting science. In this document we provide a comprehensive overview of LBNE's scientific objectives, its place in the landscape of neutrino physics worldwide, the technologies it will incorporate and the capabilities it will possess.

  14. Neutrino

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Neutrinos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic(MillionNature andNeutrinos from the NuMI beamline in the

  16. The 2010 Interim Report of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment Collaboration Physics Working Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LBNE Collaboration; T. Akiri; D. Allspach; M. Andrews; K. Arisaka; E. Arrieta-Diaz; M. Artuso; X. Bai; B. Balantekin; B. Baller; W. Barletta; G. Barr; M. Bass; A. Beck; B. Becker; V. Bellini; O. Benhar; B. Berger; M. Bergevin; E. Berman; H. Berns; A. Bernstein; F. Beroz; V. Bhatnagar; B. Bhuyan; R. Bionta; M. Bishai; A. Blake; E. Blaufuss; B. Bleakley; E. Blucher; S. Blusk; D. Boehnlein; T. Bolton; J. Brack; R. Bradford; R. Breedon; C. Bromberg; R. Brown; N. Buchanan; L. Camilleri; M. Campbell; R. Carr; G. Carminati; A. Chen; H. Chen; D. Cherdack; C. Chi; S. Childress; B. Choudhary; E. Church; D. Cline; S. Coleman; R. Corey; M. D'Agostino; G. Davies; S. Dazeley; J. De Jong; B. DeMaat; D. Demuth; A. Dighe; Z. Djurcic; J. Dolph; G. Drake; A. Drozhdin; H. Duan; H. Duyang; S. Dye; T. Dykhuis; D. Edmunds; S. Elliott; S. Enomoto; C. Escobar; J. Felde; F. Feyzi; B. Fleming; J. Fowler; W. Fox; A. Friedland; B. Fujikawa; H. Gallagher; G. Garilli; G. Garvey; V. Gehman; G. Geronimo; R. Gill; M. Goodman; J. Goon; D. Gorbunov; R. Gran; V. Guarino; E. Guarnaccia; R. Guenette; P. Gupta; A. Habig; R. Hackenberg; A. Hahn; R. Hahn; T. Haines; S. Hans; J. Harton; S. Hays; E. Hazen; Q. He; A. Heavey; K. Heeger; R. Hellauer; A. Himmel; G. Horton-Smith; J. Howell; P. Huber; P. Hurh; J. Huston; J. Hylen; J. Insler; D. Jaffe; C. James; C. Johnson; M. Johnson; R. Johnson; W. Johnson; W. Johnston; J. Johnstone; B. Jones; H. Jostlein; T. Junk; S. Junnarkar; R. Kadel; T. Kafka; D. Kaminski; G. Karagiorgi; A. Karle; J. Kaspar; T. Katori; B. Kayser; E. Kearns; S. Kettell; F. Khanam; J. Klein; J. Kneller; G. Koizumi; J. Kopp; S. Kopp; W. Kropp; V. Kudryavtsev; A. Kumar; J. Kumar; T. Kutter; T. Lackowski; K. Lande; C. Lane; K. Lang; F. Lanni; R. Lanza; T. Latorre; J. Learned; D. Lee; K. Lee; Y. Li; S. Linden; J. Ling; J. Link; L. Littenberg; L. Loiacono; T. Liu; J. Losecco; W. Louis; P. Lucas; C. Lunardini; B. Lundberg; T. Lundin; D. Makowiecki; S. Malys; S. Mandal; A. Mann; A. Mann; P. Mantsch; W. Marciano; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; A. Marino; M. Marshak; R. Maruyama; J. Mathews; S. Matsuno; C. Mauger; E. McCluskey; K. McDonald; K. McFarland; R. McKeown; R. McTaggart; R. Mehdiyev; W. Melnitchouk; Y. Meng; B. Mercurio; M. Messier; W. Metcalf; R. Milincic; W. Miller; G. Mills; S. Mishra; S. MoedSher; D. Mohapatra; N. Mokhov; C. Moore; J. Morfin; W. Morse; A. Moss; S. Mufson; J. Musser; D. Naples; J. Napolitano; M. Newcomer; B. Norris; S. Ouedraogo; B. Page; S. Pakvasa; J. Paley; V. Paolone; V. Papadimitriou; Z. Parsa; K. Partyka; Z. Pavlovic; C. Pearson; S. Perasso; R. Petti; R. Plunkett; C. Polly; S. Pordes; R. Potenza; A. Prakash; O. Prokofiev; X. Qian; J. Raaf; V. Radeka; R. Raghavan; R. Rameika; B. Rebel; S. Rescia; D. Reitzner; M. Richardson; K. Riesselman; M. Robinson; M. Rosen; C. Rosenfeld; R. Rucinski; T. Russo; S. Sahijpal; S. Salon; N. Samios; M. Sanchez; R. Schmitt; D. Schmitz; J. Schneps; K. Scholberg; S. Seibert; F. Sergiampietri; M. Shaevitz; P. Shanahan; M. Shaposhnikov; R. Sharma; N. Simos; V. Singh; G. Sinnis; W. Sippach; T. Skwarnicki; M. Smy; H. Sobel; M. Soderberg; J. Sondericker; W. Sondheim; J. Spitz; N. Spooner; M. Stancari; I. Stancu; J. Stewart; P. Stoler; J. Stone; S. Stone; J. Strait; T. Straszheim; S. Striganov; G. Sullivan; R. Svoboda; B. Szczerbinska; A. Szelc; R. Talaga; H. Tanaka; R. Tayloe; D. Taylor; J. Thomas; L. Thompson; M. Thomson; C. Thorn; X. Tian; W. Toki; N. Tolich; M. Tripathi; M. Trovato; H. Tseung; M. Tzanov; J. Urheim; S. Usman; M. Vagins; R. Van Berg; R. Van de Water; G. Varner; K. Vaziri; G. Velev; B. Viren; T. Wachala; C. Walter; H. Wang; Z. Wang; D. Warner; D. Webber; A. Weber; R. Wendell; C. Wendt; M. Wetstein; H. White; S. White; L. Whitehead; W. Willis; R. J. Wilson; L. Winslow; J. Ye; M. Yeh; B. Yu; G. Zeller; C. Zhang; E. Zimmerman; R. Zwaska

    2011-10-27

    In early 2010, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) science collaboration initiated a study to investigate the physics potential of the experiment with a broad set of different beam, near- and far-detector configurations. Nine initial topics were identified as scientific areas that motivate construction of a long-baseline neutrino experiment with a very large far detector. We summarize the scientific justification for each topic and the estimated performance for a set of far detector reference configurations. We report also on a study of optimized beam parameters and the physics capability of proposed Near Detector configurations. This document was presented to the collaboration in fall 2010 and updated with minor modifications in early 2011.

  17. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže E-mail: PVMcDonald@lbl.gov E-mail: BAReid@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2014-05-01

    We present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant — DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ? 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is ? 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. We do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors — these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  18. Measurement of the Solar Neutrino Capture Rate by the Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment During One Half of the 22-Year Cycle of Solar Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAGE Collaboration; J. N. Abdurashitov

    2002-07-09

    We present the results of measurements of the solar neutrino capture rate in gallium metal by the Russian-American Gallium Experiment SAGE during slightly more than half of a 22-year cycle of solar activity. Combined analysis of the data of 92 runs during the 12-year period January 1990 through December 2001 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keV of 70.8 +5.3/-5.2 (stat.) +3.7/-3.2 (syst.) SNU. This represents only slightly more than half of the predicted standard solar model rate of 128 SNU. We give the results of new runs beginning in April 1998 and the results of combined analysis of all runs since 1990 during yearly, monthly, and bimonthly periods. Using a simple analysis of the SAGE results combined with those from all other solar neutrino experiments, we estimate the electron neutrino pp flux that reaches the Earth to be (4.6 +/- 1.1) E10/(cm^2-s). Assuming that neutrinos oscillate to active flavors the pp neutrino flux emitted in the solar fusion reaction is approximately (7.7 +/- 1.8) E10/(cm^2-s), in agreement with the standard solar model calculation of (5.95 +/- 0.06) E10/(cm^2-s).

  19. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  20. Super-NO{nu}A: A long-baseline neutrino experiment with two off-axis detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Requejo, Olga Mena [Theoretical Physics Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States); Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Pascoli, Silvia [Physics Department, Theory Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    Establishing the neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the fundamental questions that will have to be addressed in the near future. Its determination could be obtained with long-baseline experiments but typically suffers from degeneracies with other neutrino parameters. We consider here the NO{nu}A experiment configuration and propose to place a second off-axis detector, with a shorter baseline, such that, by exploiting matter effects, the type of neutrino mass hierarchy could be determined with only the neutrino run. We show that the determination of this parameter is free of degeneracies, provided the ratio L/E, where L is the baseline and E is the neutrino energy, is the same for both detectors.

  1. Neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, J.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gu, W. Q.; Li, G. S.; McKeown, R. D.; Qian, X.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wu, F. F.; Zhang, C.

    2015-07-09

    We describe the design and construction of the low rate neutron calibration sources used in the Daya Bay Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiment. Such sources are free of correlated gamma-neutron emission, which is essential in minimizing induced background in the anti-neutrino detector. Thus, the design characteristics have been validated in the Daya Bay anti-neutrino detector.

  2. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  3. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two ?? ? ?? disappearance experiments operating in different energymore »regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.« less

  4. Common Radiative Origin of Active and Sterile Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debasish Borah; Rathin Adhikari

    2014-01-08

    Sterile neutrinos with sub-electron volt (eV) masses have recently received serious attention due to the tantalizing hints from reactor neutrino experiments as well as cosmology. While the nine year old Wilkinson Mass Anisotropy Probe experiment suggests the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom to be $N_{\\text{eff}} = 3.84 \\pm 0.40$, recently reported Planck collaboration results show more preference towards the standard three light neutrino scenario $ N_{\\text{eff}} = 3.30^{+0.54}_{-0.51}$. Keeping in mind that the issue of existence or non-existence of sub-eV scale sterile neutrinos is not yet settled, here we outline a mechanism to generate sub-eV scale masses for three active and one sterile neutrinos simultaneously. The model is based on an abelian extension of standard model where the fermion and scalar fields are charged under the additional $U(1)$ gauge group in such an anomaly free way that it allows one eV scale neutrino and three massless neutrinos at tree level. However, at one loop level, this model naturally allows three active and one sterile neutrino with mass at the sub-eV scale. The model also allows for mixing between active and sterile neutrinos at one loop level which can have interesting signatures in reactor neutrino experiments.

  5. Probing New Limits for the Violation of the Equivalence Principle in the solar-reactor neutrino sector as a next to leading order effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Valdiviesso; M. M. Guzzo; P. C. Holanda

    2013-12-06

    New limits for the Violation of Equivalence Principle (VEP) are obtained considering the mass-flavor mixing hypothesis. This analysis includes observations of solar and reactor neutrinos and has obtained a limit for the VEP parameter $|\\Delta \\gamma|$ contributing to the $\

  6. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao He; for the JUNO collaboration

    2014-12-13

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a multipurpose neutrino-oscillation experiment designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to precisely measure oscillation parameters by detecting reactor antineutrinos, observe supernova neutrinos, study the atmospheric, solar neutrinos and geo-neutrinos, and perform exotic searches, with a 20 kiloton liquid scintillator detector of unprecedented $3\\%$ energy resolution (at 1 MeV) at 700-meter deep underground and to have other rich scientific possibilities. Currently MC study shows a sensitivity of the mass hierarchy to be $\\overline{\\Delta\\chi^2}\\sim 11$ and $\\overline{\\Delta\\chi^2}\\sim 16$ in a relative and an absolute measurement, respectively. JUNO has been approved by Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2013, and an international collaboration was established in 2014. The civil construction is in preparation and the R$\\&$D of the detectors are ongoing. A new offline software framework was developed for the detector simulation, the event reconstruction and the physics analysis. JUNO is planning to start taking data around 2020.

  7. Search for neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment by using quasi-elastic interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piteira, Rodolphe; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2005-09-01

    The enthusiasm of the scientific community for studying oscillations of neutrinos is equaled only by the mass of their detectors. The MINOS experiment determines and compares the near spectrum of muonic neutrinos from the NUMI beam to the far one, in order to measure two oscillation parameters: {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 23}). The spectra are obtained by analyzing the charged current interactions which difficulty lies in identifying the interactions products (e.g. muons). An alternative method identifying the traces of muons, bent by the magnetic field of the detectors, and determining their energies is presented in this manuscript. The sensitivity of the detectors is optimal for the quasi-elastic interactions, for which a selection method is proposed, to study their oscillation. Even though it reduces the statistics, such a study introduces fewer systematic errors, constituting the ideal method on the long range.

  8. Neutrino Properties Before and After KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pakvasa; J. W. F. Valle

    2003-02-05

    We review neutrino oscillation physics, including the determination of mass splittings and mixings from current solar, atmospheric, reactor and accelerator neutrino data. A brief discussion is given of cosmological and astrophysical implications. Non-oscillation phenomena such as neutrinoless double beta decay would, if discovered, probe the absolute scale of neutrino mass and also reveal their Majorana nature. Non-oscillation descriptions in terms of spin-flavor precession (SFP) and non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) currently provide an excellent fit of the solar data. However they are at odds with the first results from the KamLAND experiment which imply that, despite their theoretical interest, non-standard mechanisms can only play a sub-leading role in the solar neutrino anomaly. Accepting the LMA-MSW solution, one can use the current solar neutrino data to place important restrictions on non-standard neutrino properties, such as neutrino magnetic moments. Both solar and atmospheric neutrino data can also be used to place constraints on neutrino instability as well as the more exotic possibility of $CPT$ and Lorentz Violation. Weillustrate the potential of future data from experiments such as KamLAND, Borexino and the upcoming neutrino factories in constraining non-standard neutrino properties.

  9. Decommissioning of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment: A technical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Notz, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    This report completes a technical evaluation of decommissioning planning for the former Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, which was shut down in December, 1969. The key issues revolve around the treatment and disposal of some five tons of solid fuel salt which contains over 30 kg of fissionable uranium-233 plus fission products and higher actinides. The chemistry of this material is complicated by the formation of elemental fluorine via a radiolysis reaction under certain conditions. Supporting studies carried out as part of this evaluation include (a) a broad scope analysis of possible options for storage/disposal of the salts, (b) calculation of nuclide decay in future years, (c) technical evaluation of the containment facility and hot cell penetrations, (d) review and update of surveillance and maintenance procedures, (e) measurements of facility groundwater radioactivity and sump pump operation, (f) laboratory studies of the radiolysis reaction, and (g) laboratory studies which resulted in finding a suitable getter for elemental fluorine. In addition, geologic and hydrologic factors of the surrounding area were considered, and also the implications of entombment of the fuel in-place with concrete. The results of this evaluation show that the fuel salt cannot be left in its present form and location permanently. On the other hand, extended storage in its present form is quite acceptable for 20 to 30 years, or even longer. For continued storage in-place, some facility modifications are recommended. 30 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Nucleon Decay and Neutrino Experiments, Experiments at High Energy Hadron Colliders, and String Theor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Chang Kee; Douglas, Michaek; Hobbs, John; McGrew, Clark; Rijssenbeek, Michael

    2013-07-29

    This is the final report of the DOE grant DEFG0292ER40697 that supported the research activities of the Stony Brook High Energy Physics Group from November 15, 1991 to April 30, 2013. During the grant period, the grant supported the research of three Stony Brook particle physics research groups: The Nucleon Decay and Neutrino group, the Hadron Collider Group, and the Theory Group.

  11. On the determination of anti-neutrino spectra from nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Huber

    2012-01-17

    In this paper we study the effect of, well-known, higher order corrections to the allowed beta decay spectrum on the determination of anti-neutrino spectra resulting from the decays of fission fragments. In particular, we try to estimate the associated theory errors and find that induced currents like weak magnetism may ultimately limit our ability to improve the current accuracy and under certain circumstance could even largely increase the theoretical errors. We also perform a critical evaluation of the errors associated with our method to extract the anti-neutrino spectrum using synthetic beta spectra. It turns out, that a fit using only virtual beta branches with a judicious choice of the effective nuclear charge provides results with a minimal bias. We apply this method to actual data for U235, Pu239 and Pu241 and confirm, within errors, recent results, which indicate a net 3% upward shift in energy averaged anti-neutrino fluxes. However, we also find significant shape differences which can in principle be tested by high statistics anti-neutrino data samples.

  12. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auty, David John; /Sussex U.

    2010-05-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

  13. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Water Cherenkov Detector Schedule and Cost Books LBNE Far Site Internal Review(December 6-9,2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

    2011-12-09

    Schedule and Cost Books developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  14. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Water Cherenkov Detector Basis of Estimate Forms and Backup Documentation LBNE Far Site Internal Review (December 6-9, 2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

    2011-12-09

    Basis of Estimate (BOE) forms and backup documentation developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  15. Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sinev

    2009-02-22

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  16. Solar Neutrinos and the Decaying Neutrino Hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey M. Berryman; Andre de Gouvea; Daniel Hernandez

    2014-11-02

    We explore, mostly using data from solar neutrino experiments, the hypothesis that the neutrino mass eigenstates are unstable. We find that, by combining $^8$B solar neutrino data with those on $^7$Be and lower-energy solar neutrinos, one obtains a mostly model-independent bound on both the $\

  17. Inverse Beta Decay in a Nonequilibrium Antineutrino Flux from a Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Kopeikin; L. A. Mikaelyan; V. V. Sinev

    2001-10-23

    The evolution of the reactor antineutrino spectrum toward equilibrium above the inverse beta-decay threshold during the reactor operating period and the decay of residual antineutrino radiation after reactor shutdown are considered. It is found that, under certain conditions, these processes can play a significant role in experiments seeking neutrino oscillations.

  18. Development and Mass Production of a Mixture of LAB- and DIN-based Gadolinium-loaded Liquid Scintillator for the NEOS Short-baseline Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ba Ro Kim; Boyoung Han; Eun-ju Jeon; Kyung Kwang Joo; H. J. Kim; Hyunsoo Kim; Jinyu Kim; Yeongduk Kim; Youngju Ko; Jaison Lee; Jooyoung Lee; Moohyun Lee; Kyungju Ma; Yoomin Oh; Hyangkyu Park; Kang-soon Park; Kyungmin Seo; Gwang-Min Seon; Kim Siyeon

    2015-11-16

    A new experiment, which is called as NEOS (NEutrino Oscillation at Short baseline), is proposed on the site of Hanbit reactors at Yonggwang, South Korea, to investigate a reactor antineutrino anomaly. A homogeneous NEOS detector having a 1000-L target volume has been constructed and deployed at the tendon gallery ~25 m away from the reactor core. A linear alkylbenzene (LAB) is used as a main base solvent of the NEOS detector. Furthermore, a di-isopropylnaphthalene (DIN) is added to improve the light output and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) ability. The ratio of LAB to DIN is 90:10. PPO (3 g/L) and bis-MSB (30 mg/L) are dissolved to formulate the mixture of LAB- and DIN-based liquid scintillator (LS). Then, ~0.5% gadolinium (Gd) is loaded into the LS by using the solvent-solvent extraction technique. In this paper, we report the characteristics of Gd-loaded LS (GdLS) for the NEOS detector and the handling during mass production.

  19. Constraints on Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions and Unparticle Physics with Neutrino-Electron Scattering at the Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Deniz er al.; TEXONO Collaboration

    2010-08-09

    Neutrino-electron scatterings are purely leptonic processes with robust Standard Model (SM) predictions. Their measurements can therefore provide constraints to physics beyond SM. The $\

  20. Constraints on Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions and Unparticle Physics with Neutrino-Electron Scattering at the Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    al., M Deniz er

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino-electron scatterings are purely leptonic processes with robust Standard Model (SM) predictions. Their measurements can therefore provide constraints to physics beyond SM. The $\

  1. Realistic Earth matter effects and a method to acquire information about small ?_{13} in the detection of supernova neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

    2009-04-14

    In this paper, we first calculate the realistic Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos at the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment which is currently under construction. It is found that the Earth matter effects depend on the neutrino incident angle $\\theta$, the neutrino mass hierarchy $\\Delta m_{31}^{2}$, the crossing probability at the high resonance region inside the supernova, $P_{H}$, the neutrino temperature, $T_{\\alpha}$, and the pinching parameter in the neutrino spectrum, $\\eta_{\\alpha}$. We also take into account the collective effects due to neutrino-neutrino interactions inside the supernova. With the expression for the dependence of $P_H$ on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$, we obtain the relations between $\\theta_{13}$ and the event numbers for various reaction channels of supernova neutrinos. Using these relations, we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$. Such a sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment which has a sensitivity of the order of $\\theta_{13}\\sim 3^\\circ$. Furthermore, we apply this method to other neutrino experiments, i.e. Super-K, SNO, KamLAND, LVD, MinBooNE, Borexino, and Double-Chooz. We also study the energy spectra of the differential event numbers, ${\\rm d}N/{\\rm d}E$.

  2. Neutrino Physics with JUNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Fengpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Avanzini, Margherita Buizza; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Herve; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Goger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cecile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Mollenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M; McDonough, William F; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Bjorn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frederic; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2015-01-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. Neutrino burst from a typical cor...

  3. Flooding Experiments and Modeling for Improved Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solmos, M., Hogan, K.J., VIerow, K.

    2008-09-14

    Countercurrent two-phase flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems are being investigated experimentally and analytically to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. The aspects that will be better clarified are the effects of condensation and tube inclination on flooding in large diameter tubes. The current project aims to improve the level of understanding of flooding mechanisms and to develop an analysis model for more accurate evaluations of flooding in the pressurizer surge line of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Interest in flooding has recently increased because Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) in the AP600 pressurizer surge line can affect the vessel refill rate following a small break LOCA and because analysis of hypothetical severe accidents with the current flooding models in reactor safety codes shows that these models represent the largest uncertainty in analysis of steam generator tube creep rupture. During a hypothetical station blackout without auxiliary feedwater recovery, should the hot leg become voided, the pressurizer liquid will drain to the hot leg and flooding may occur in the surge line. The flooding model heavily influences the pressurizer emptying rate and the potential for surge line structural failure due to overheating and creep rupture. The air-water test results in vertical tubes are presented in this paper along with a semi-empirical correlation for the onset of flooding. The unique aspects of the study include careful experimentation on large-diameter tubes and an integrated program in which air-water testing provides benchmark knowledge and visualization data from which to conduct steam-water testing.

  4. Status of the KATRIN experiment and prospects to search for keV-mass sterile neutrinos in tritium ?-decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mertens, Susanne

    2015-03-24

    In this contribution the current status and future perspectives of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment are presented. The prime goal of this single ?-decay experiment is to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV (90% CL). We discuss first results of the recent main spectrometer commissioning measurements, successfully verifying the spectrometer’s basic vacuum, transmission and background properties. We also discuss the prospects of making use of the KATRIN tritium source, to search for sterile neutrinos in the multi-keV mass range constituting a classical candidate for Warm Dark Matter. Due to the very high sourcemore »luminosity, a statistical sensitivity down to active-sterile mixing angles of sin² ? « less

  5. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Batra, P.; /Columbia U.; Bugel, Leonard G.; /Columbia U.; Camilleri, Leslie Loris; /Columbia U.; Conrad, Janet Marie; /MIT; de Gouvea, A.; /Northwestern U.; Fisher, Peter H.; /MIT; Formaggio, Joseph Angelo; /MIT; Jenkins, J.; /Northwestern U.; Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; /MIT; Kobilarcik, T.R.; /Fermilab /Texas U.

    2009-06-01

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parameterized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of 'Beyond the Standard Model' physics.

  6. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Adams; P. Batra; L. Bugel; L. Camilleri; J. M. Conrad; A. de Gouvêa; P. H. Fisher; J. A. Formaggio; J. Jenkins; G. Karagiorgi; T. R. Kobilarcik; S. Kopp; G. Kyle; W. A. Loinaz; D. A. Mason; R. Milner; R. Moore; J. G. Morfín; M. Nakamura; D. Naples; P. Nienaber; F. I. Olness; J. F. Owens; S. F. Pate; A. Pronin; W. G. Seligman; M. H. Shaevitz; H. Schellman; I. Schienbein; M. J. Syphers; T. M. P. Tait; T. Takeuchi; C. Y. Tan; R. G. Van de Water; R. K. Yamamoto; J. Y. Yu

    2009-06-19

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parameterized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of "Beyond the Standard Model" physics.

  7. Neutrino factory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; et al

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable ofmore »making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.« less

  8. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  9. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J.?B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F.?J.?P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L.?J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J.?R.?J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T.?R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J.?J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J.?S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.?C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J.?G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S.?A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R.?J.; Ankenbrandt, C.?M.; Beard, K.?B.; Cummings, M.?A.?C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.?P.; Roberts, T.?J.; Yoshikawa, C.?Y.; Graves, V.?B.; McDonald, K.?T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  10. EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 27, 2015 EA-1943: Draft Environmental Assessment Long Baseline Neutrino FacilityDeep Underground Neutrino Experiment (LBNFDUNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois and the...

  11. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Huaiyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  12. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the experiment. The first experiment was inserted in the ATR in August 2009 and started its irradiation in September 2009. It is anticipated to complete its irradiation in early calendar 2011. This paper will discuss the design of the experiment including the test train and the temperature and compressive load monitoring, control, and the irradiation experience to date.

  13. Double Beta Decay Constraints on Neutrino Masses and Mixing; Reanalysis with KamLAND Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroaki Sugiyama

    2003-03-04

    In the light of KamLAND data just released, we reanalyze and update the constraints on neutrino masses and mixing parameters, the most general ones that can be derived in three-flavor mixing scheme of neutrinos with use of the bounds imposed by neutrinoless double beta decay search and reactor experiments. We point out that with KamLAND data and assuming Majorana neutrinos one can derive, for the first time, an upper bound on neutrino contribution to the cosmological \\Omega parameter, \\Omega_{\

  14. FRC Fusion Reactor for Deep Space The Star Thrust Experiment (STX)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    FRC Fusion Reactor for Deep Space Propulsion The Star Thrust Experiment (STX) an experimental=vchar 2/2ttrip vship=vexhaust vchar=2xtrip/ttrip, =vchar 2/2. Fusion is Necessary for Deep Space Travel Propulsion System Exhaust (km/sec) Chemical 5 Electric 30 FRC at RPPL 200 Thermal Fusion 2000 Fusion Proton

  15. FRC Fusion Reactor for Deep Space STXThe Star Thrust Experiment (STX)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    FRC Fusion Reactor for Deep Space Propulsion STXThe Star Thrust Experiment (STX) an experimental=vchar 2/2ttrip vship=vexhaust vchar=2xtrip/ttrip, =vchar 2/2. Fusion is Necessary for Deep Space Travel Propulsion System Exhaust (km/sec) Chemical 5 Electric 30 FRC at RPPL 200 Thermal Fusion 2000 Fusion Proton

  16. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  17. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  18. Neutrino Physics with JUNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fengpeng An; Guangpeng An; Qi An; Vito Antonelli; Eric Baussan; John Beacom; Leonid Bezrukov; Simon Blyth; Riccardo Brugnera; Margherita Buizza Avanzini; Jose Busto; Anatael Cabrera; Hao Cai; Xiao Cai; Antonio Cammi; Guofu Cao; Jun Cao; Yun Chang; Shaomin Chen; Shenjian Chen; Yixue Chen; Davide Chiesa; Massimiliano Clemenza; Barbara Clerbaux; Janet Conrad; Davide D'Angelo; Herve De Kerret; Zhi Deng; Ziyan Deng; Yayun Ding; Zelimir Djurcic; Damien Dornic; Marcos Dracos; Olivier Drapier; Stefano Dusini; Stephen Dye; Timo Enqvist; Donghua Fan; Jian Fang; Laurent Favart; Richard Ford; Marianne Goger-Neff; Haonan Gan; Alberto Garfagnini; Marco Giammarchi; Maxim Gonchar; Guanghua Gong; Hui Gong; Michel Gonin; Marco Grassi; Christian Grewing; Mengyun Guan; Vic Guarino; Gang Guo; Wanlei Guo; Xin-Heng Guo; Caren Hagner; Ran Han; Miao He; Yuekun Heng; Yee Hsiung; Jun Hu; Shouyang Hu; Tao Hu; Hanxiong Huang; Xingtao Huang; Lei Huo; Ara Ioannisian; Manfred Jeitler; Xiangdong Ji; Xiaoshan Jiang; Cecile Jollet; Li Kang; Michael Karagounis; Narine Kazarian; Zinovy Krumshteyn; Andre Kruth; Pasi Kuusiniemi; Tobias Lachenmaier; Rupert Leitner; Chao Li; Jiaxing Li; Weidong Li; Weiguo Li; Xiaomei Li; Xiaonan Li; Yi Li; Yufeng Li; Zhi-Bing Li; Hao Liang; Guey-Lin Lin; Tao Lin; Yen-Hsun Lin; Jiajie Ling; Ivano Lippi; Dawei Liu; Hongbang Liu; Hu Liu; Jianglai Liu; Jianli Liu; Jinchang Liu; Qian Liu; Shubin Liu; Shulin Liu; Paolo Lombardi; Yongbing Long; Haoqi Lu; Jiashu Lu; Jingbin Lu; Junguang Lu; Bayarto Lubsandorzhiev; Livia Ludhova; Shu Luo; Vladimir Lyashuk; Randolph Mollenberg; Xubo Ma; Fabio Mantovani; Yajun Mao; Stefano M. Mari; William F. McDonough; Guang Meng; Anselmo Meregaglia; Emanuela Meroni; Mauro Mezzetto; Lino Miramonti; Thomas Mueller; Dmitry Naumov; Lothar Oberauer; Juan Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux; Alexander Olshevskiy; Fausto Ortica; Alessandro Paoloni; Haiping Peng; Jen-Chieh Peng; Ezio Previtali; Ming Qi; Sen Qian; Xin Qian; Yongzhong Qian; Zhonghua Qin; Georg Raffelt; Gioacchino Ranucci; Barbara Ricci; Markus Robens; Aldo Romani; Xiangdong Ruan; Xichao Ruan; Giuseppe Salamanna; Mike Shaevitz; Valery Sinev; Chiara Sirignano; Monica Sisti; Oleg Smirnov; Michael Soiron; Achim Stahl; Luca Stanco; Jochen Steinmann; Xilei Sun; Yongjie Sun; Dmitriy Taichenachev; Jian Tang; Igor Tkachev; Wladyslaw Trzaska; Stefan van Waasen; Cristina Volpe; Vit Vorobel; Lucia Votano; Chung-Hsiang Wang; Guoli Wang; Hao Wang; Meng Wang; Ruiguang Wang; Siguang Wang; Wei Wang; Yi Wang; Yi Wang; Yifang Wang; Zhe Wang; Zheng Wang; Zhigang Wang; Zhimin Wang; Wei Wei; Liangjian Wen; Christopher Wiebusch; Bjorn Wonsak; Qun Wu; Claudia-Elisabeth Wulz; Michael Wurm; Yufei Xi; Dongmei Xia; Yuguang Xie; Zhi-zhong Xing; Jilei Xu; Baojun Yan; Changgen Yang; Chaowen Yang; Guang Yang; Lei Yang; Yifan Yang; Yu Yao; Ugur Yegin; Frederic Yermia; Zhengyun You; Boxiang Yu; Chunxu Yu; Zeyuan Yu; Sandra Zavatarelli; Liang Zhan; Chao Zhang; Hong-Hao Zhang; Jiawen Zhang; Jingbo Zhang; Qingmin Zhang; Yu-Mei Zhang; Zhenyu Zhang; Zhenghua Zhao; Yangheng Zheng; Weili Zhong; Guorong Zhou; Jing Zhou; Li Zhou; Rong Zhou; Shun Zhou; Wenxiong Zhou; Xiang Zhou; Yeling Zhou; Yufeng Zhou; Jiaheng Zou

    2015-10-18

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. Neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at 10 kpc would lead to ~5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ~2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton elastic scattering events in JUNO. Detection of DSNB would provide valuable information on the cosmic star-formation rate and the average core-collapsed neutrino energy spectrum. Geo-neutrinos can be detected in JUNO with a rate of ~400 events per year, significantly improving the statistics of existing geoneutrino samples. The JUNO detector is sensitive to several exotic searches, e.g. proton decay via the $p\\to K^++\\bar\

  19. Neutrino Physics with JUNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fengpeng An; Guangpeng An; Qi An; Vito Antonelli; Eric Baussan; John Beacom; Leonid Bezrukov; Simon Blyth; Riccardo Brugnera; Margherita Buizza Avanzini; Jose Busto; Anatael Cabrera; Hao Cai; Xiao Cai; Antonio Cammi; Guofu Cao; Jun Cao; Yun Chang; Shaomin Chen; Shenjian Chen; Yixue Chen; Davide Chiesa; Massimiliano Clemenza; Barbara Clerbaux; Janet Conrad; Davide D'Angelo; Herve De Kerret; Zhi Deng; Ziyan Deng; Yayun Ding; Zelimir Djurcic; Damien Dornic; Marcos Dracos; Olivier Drapier; Stefano Dusini; Stephen Dye; Timo Enqvist; Donghua Fan; Jian Fang; Laurent Favart; Richard Ford; Marianne Goger-Neff; Haonan Gan; Alberto Garfagnini; Marco Giammarchi; Maxim Gonchar; Guanghua Gong; Hui Gong; Michel Gonin; Marco Grassi; Christian Grewing; Mengyun Guan; Vic Guarino; Gang Guo; Wanlei Guo; Xin-Heng Guo; Caren Hagner; Ran Han; Miao He; Yuekun Heng; Yee Hsiung; Jun Hu; Shouyang Hu; Tao Hu; Hanxiong Huang; Xingtao Huang; Lei Huo; Ara Ioannisian; Manfred Jeitler; Xiangdong Ji; Xiaoshan Jiang; Cecile Jollet; Li Kang; Michael Karagounis; Narine Kazarian; Zinovy Krumshteyn; Andre Kruth; Pasi Kuusiniemi; Tobias Lachenmaier; Rupert Leitner; Chao Li; Jiaxing Li; Weidong Li; Weiguo Li; Xiaomei Li; Xiaonan Li; Yi Li; Yufeng Li; Zhi-Bing Li; Hao Liang; Guey-Lin Lin; Tao Lin; Yen-Hsun Lin; Jiajie Ling; Ivano Lippi; Dawei Liu; Hongbang Liu; Hu Liu; Jianglai Liu; Jianli Liu; Jinchang Liu; Qian Liu; Shubin Liu; Shulin Liu; Paolo Lombardi; Yongbing Long; Haoqi Lu; Jiashu Lu; Jingbin Lu; Junguang Lu; Bayarto Lubsandorzhiev; Livia Ludhova; Shu Luo; Vladimir Lyashuk; Randolph Mollenberg; Xubo Ma; Fabio Mantovani; Yajun Mao; Stefano M. Mari; William F. McDonough; Guang Meng; Anselmo Meregaglia; Emanuela Meroni; Mauro Mezzetto; Lino Miramonti; Thomas Mueller; Dmitry Naumov; Lothar Oberauer; Juan Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux; Alexander Olshevskiy; Fausto Ortica; Alessandro Paoloni; Haiping Peng; Jen-Chieh Peng; Ezio Previtali; Ming Qi; Sen Qian; Xin Qian; Yongzhong Qian; Zhonghua Qin; Georg Raffelt; Gioacchino Ranucci; Barbara Ricci; Markus Robens; Aldo Romani; Xiangdong Ruan; Xichao Ruan; Giuseppe Salamanna; Mike Shaevitz; Valery Sinev; Chiara Sirignano; Monica Sisti; Oleg Smirnov; Michael Soiron; Achim Stahl; Luca Stanco; Jochen Steinmann; Xilei Sun; Yongjie Sun; Dmitriy Taichenachev; Jian Tang; Igor Tkachev; Wladyslaw Trzaska; Stefan van Waasen; Cristina Volpe; Vit Vorobel; Lucia Votano; Chung-Hsiang Wang; Guoli Wang; Hao Wang; Meng Wang; Ruiguang Wang; Siguang Wang; Wei Wang; Yi Wang; Yi Wang; Yifang Wang; Zhe Wang; Zheng Wang; Zhigang Wang; Zhimin Wang; Wei Wei; Liangjian Wen; Christopher Wiebusch; Bjorn Wonsak; Qun Wu; Claudia-Elisabeth Wulz; Michael Wurm; Yufei Xi; Dongmei Xia; Yuguang Xie; Zhi-zhong Xing; Jilei Xu; Baojun Yan; Changgen Yang; Chaowen Yang; Guang Yang; Lei Yang; Yifan Yang; Yu Yao; Ugur Yegin; Frederic Yermia; Zhengyun You; Boxiang Yu; Chunxu Yu; Zeyuan Yu; Sandra Zavatarelli; Liang Zhan; Chao Zhang; Hong-Hao Zhang; Jiawen Zhang; Jingbo Zhang; Qingmin Zhang; Yu-Mei Zhang; Zhenyu Zhang; Zhenghua Zhao; Yangheng Zheng; Weili Zhong; Guorong Zhou; Jing Zhou; Li Zhou; Rong Zhou; Shun Zhou; Wenxiong Zhou; Xiang Zhou; Yeling Zhou; Yufeng Zhou; Jiaheng Zou

    2015-07-20

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. Neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at 10 kpc would lead to ~5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ~2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton elastic scattering events in JUNO. Detection of DSNB would provide valuable information on the cosmic star-formation rate and the average core-collapsed neutrino energy spectrum. Geo-neutrinos can be detected in JUNO with a rate of ~400 events per year, significantly improving the statistics of existing geoneutrino samples. The JUNO detector is sensitive to several exotic searches, e.g. proton decay via the $p\\to K^++\\bar\

  20. CP violation from a combined Beta Beam and Electron Capture neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernabeu, Jose [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, E-46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Espinoza, Catalina [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, E-46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Orme, Christopher; Pascoli, Silvia [Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio [IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-30

    We consider the proposal of a facility comprising a hybrid setup for a neutrino beam which combines an electron capture decay with a beta{sup +} decay from the same radioactive ion with the same boost. We study the sensitivity to the mixing angle theta{sub 13} and the CP-phase, the CP discovery potential and the reach to determine the type of neutrino mass hierarchy. The analysis is performed for different boosts and baselines demonstrating that the combination of the two decay channels, with different neutrino energies, achieves remarkable results.

  1. Background Study on nu_e Appearance from a nu_mu Beam in Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments with a Large Water Cherenkov Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaki Yanagisawa; Chang Kee Jung; Trung Le; Brett Viren

    2011-02-23

    There is a growing interest in very long baseline neutrino oscillation experimentation using accelerator produced neutrino beam as a machinery to probe the last three unmeasured neutrino oscillation parameters: the mixing angle theta_13, the possible CP violating phase delta_CP and the mass hierarchy, namely, the sign of delta-m^2_32. Water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have shown to be very successful at detecting neutrino interactions. Scaling up this technology may continue to provide the required performance for the next generation of experiments. This report presents the latest effort to demonstrate that a next generation (> 100 kton) water Cherenkov detector can be used effectively for the rather difficult task of detecting nu_e events from the neutrino oscillation nu_mu -> nu_e despite the large expected potential background resulting from pi^0 events produced via neutral current interactions.

  2. FLOWSHEET EVALUATION FOR THE DISSOLVING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, W. E.; Hansen, E. K.; Shehee, T. C.

    2012-10-30

    This report includes the literature review, hydrogen off-gas calculations, and hydrogen generation tests to determine that H-Canyon can safely dissolve the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE; thorium fuel), Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR; aluminum alloy fuel), and Denmark Reactor (DR-3; silicide fuel, aluminum alloy fuel, and aluminum oxide fuel) assemblies in the L-Bundles with respect to the hydrogen levels in the projected peak off-gas rates. This is provided that the number of L-Bundles charged to the dissolver is controlled. Examination of SRE dissolution for potential issues has aided in predicting the optimal batching scenario. The calculations detailed in this report demonstrate that the FNR, SRE, and DR-3 used nuclear fuel (UNF) are bounded by MURR UNF and may be charged using the controls outlined for MURR dissolution in a prior report.

  3. Non standard neutrino interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, O G

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations have become well-known phenomenon; the measurements of neutrino mixing angles and mass squared differences are continuously improving. Future oscillation experiments will eventually determine the remaining unknown neutrino parameters, namely, the mass ordering, normal or inverted, and the CP-violating phase. On the other hand, the absolute mass scale of neutrinos could be probed by cosmological observations, single beta decay as well as by neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Furthermore, the last one may shed light on the nature of neutrinos, Dirac or Majorana, by measuring the effective Majorana mass of neutrinos. However, the neutrino mass generation mechanism remains unknown. A well-motivated phenomenological approach to search for new physics, in the neutrino sector, is that of non-standard interactions. In this short review, the current constraints in this picture, as well as the perspectives from future experiments, are discussed.

  4. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  5. Design Studies for a Multiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation Experiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Michael A.; Gougar, Hans D.; Ryskamp, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Should unforeseen circumstances lead to the decommissioning of ATR, the U.S. Government would be left without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. A survey was conducted in order to catalogue the anticipated needs of potential customers. Then, concepts were evaluated to fill the role for this reactor, dubbed the Multi-Application Thermal Reactor Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX). The baseline MATRIX design is expected to be capable of longer cycle lengths than ATR given a particular batch scheme. The volume of test space in In-Pile-Tubes (IPTs) is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. Furthermore, MATRIX has more locations of greater volume having high fast neutron flux than ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the lead MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design is developed further.

  6. Theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. M.; Dos Santos, A. [Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitaria, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor employing the coupled NJOY/AMPX-II/TORT systems was successfully accomplished. All the analysis was performed employing ENDF/B-VII.0. The theoretical approach follows all the steps of the subcritical model of Gandini and Salvatores. The theory/experiment comparison reveals that the calculated subcritical reactivity is in a very good agreement to the experimental values. The subcritical index ({xi}) shows some discrepancies although in this particular case some work still have to be made to model in a better way the neutron source present in the experiments. (authors)

  7. Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

  8. Neutrino Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton

    2008-08-05

    I review the current status of neutrino astrophysics, including solar neutrinos; atmospheric neutrinos; neutrino mass and oscillations; supernova neutrinos; neutrino nucleosynthesis (Big Bang nucleosynthesis, the neutrino process, the r-process); neutrino cooling and red giants; and high energy neutrino astronomy.

  9. Preparation of Gd Loaded Liquid Scintillator for Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yayun; Zhang Zhiyong

    2010-05-12

    Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) is an excellent target material for reactor antineutrino experiments. Ideal Gd-LS should have long attenuation length, high light yield, long term stability, low toxicity, and should be compatible with the material used to build the detector. We have developed a new Gd-LS recipe in which carboxylic acid 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoic acid is used as the complexing ligand to gadolinium, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl]benzene (bis-MSB) are used as primary fluor and wavelength shifter, respectively. The scintillator base is linear alkyl benzene (LAB). Eight hundred liters of Gd-LS has been synthesized and tested in a prototype detector. Results show that the Gd-LS has high quality and is suitable for underground experiments in large quantity. Large scale production facility has been built. A full batch production of 4 t Gd-LS has been produced and monitored for several months. The production of 180 t Gd-LS will be carried out in the near future.

  10. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2010-01-08

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  11. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

    2010-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  12. Energy Dependence of Solar Neutrino Suppression and Bounds on the Neutrino Magnetic Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joao Pulido; Ana M. Mourao

    1998-03-02

    An analysis of neutrino electron scattering as applied to the SuperKamiokande solar neutrino experiment with the data from the Homestake experiment leads to an upper bound on the neutrino magnetic moment in the range $\\mu_{\

  13. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  14. Steady-State Neutronic Analysis of Converting the UK CONSORT Reactor for ADS Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Hywel; Chambers, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    CONSORT is the UK's last remaining civilian research reactor, and its present core is soon to be removed. This study examines the feasibility of re-using the reactor facility for accelerator-driven systems research by replacing the fuel and installing a spallation neutron target driven by an external proton accelerator. MCNP5/MCNPX were used to model alternative, high-density fuels and their coupling to the neutrons generated by 230 MeV protons from a cyclotron striking a solid tungsten spallation target side-on to the core. Low-enriched U3Si2 and U-9Mo were considered as candidates, with only U-9Mo found to be feasible in the compact core; fuel element size and arrangement were kept the same as the original core layout to minimise thermal hydraulic and other changes. Reactor thermal power up to 2.5 kW is predicted for a keff of 0.995, large enough to carry out reactor kinetic experiments.

  15. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP will be discussed in the full paper, selected benchmarks that have been added to the ICSBEP Handbook will be highlighted, and a preview of the new benchmarks that will appear in the September 2011 edition of the Handbook will be provided. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP will also be highlighted and the future of both projects will be discussed. REFERENCES (1) International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03/I-IX, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), September 2010 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99140-8. (2) International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(2006)1, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), March 2011 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99141-5.

  16. Toward CP-even Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fukumi; I. Nakano; H. Nanjo; N. Sasao; S. Sato; M. Yoshimura

    2009-01-20

    The best method of measuring CP violating effect in neutrino oscillation experiments is to construct and use a neutrino beam made of an ideal mixture of $\\bar{\

  17. The Use of experiments on a single fuel element to determine the nuclear parameters of reactor lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilat, E. E., 1937-

    1967-01-01

    The nuclear parameters of a reactor lattice may be determined by critical experiments on that lattice, by theoretical calculations in which only cross sections are used as input, or by methods which combine theory and ...

  18. New Revelation of Lightning Ball Observation and Proposal for a Nuclear Reactor Fusion Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domokos Tar

    2009-10-12

    In this paper, the author brings further details regarding his Lightning Ball observation that were not mentioned in the first one (Ref.1-2). Additionally, he goes more into detail as the three forces that are necessary to allow the residual crescent form the hydrodynamic vortex ring to shrink into a sphere.Further topics are the similarities and analogies between the Lightning Ball formation's theory and the presently undertaken Tokamak-Stellarator-Spheromak fusion reactor experiments. A new theory and its experimental realisation are proposed as to make the shrinking of the hot plasma of reactors into a ball possible by means of the so called long range electromagnetic forces. In this way,the fusion ignition temperature could possibly atteined.

  19. New Revelation of Lightning Ball Observation and Proposal for a Nuclear Reactor Fusion Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tar, Domokos

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the author brings further details regarding his Lightning Ball observation that were not mentioned in the first one (Ref.1-2). Additionally, he goes more into detail as the three forces that are necessary to allow the residual crescent form the hydrodynamic vortex ring to shrink into a sphere.Further topics are the similarities and analogies between the Lightning Ball formation's theory and the presently undertaken Tokamak-Stellarator-Spheromak fusion reactor experiments. A new theory and its experimental realisation are proposed as to make the shrinking of the hot plasma of reactors into a ball possible by means of the so called long range electromagnetic forces. In this way,the fusion ignition temperature could possibly atteined.

  20. Reactor ??e disappearance in the Double Chooz experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, Y.; Aberle, C.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Barriere, J. C.; Bergevin, M.; Bernstein, A.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukhov, L.; Blucher, E.; Bowden, N. S.; Buck, C.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Caden, E.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, P.-J.; Chimenti, P.; Classen, T.; Collin, A. P.; Conover, E.; Conrad, J. M.; Crespo-Anadón, J. I.; Crum, K.; Cucoanes, A.; D’Agostino, M. V.; Damon, E.; Dawson, J. V.; Dazeley, S.; Dietrich, D.; Djurcic, Z.; Dracos, M.; Durand, V.; Ebert, J.; Efremenko, Y.; Elnimr, M.; Etenko, A.; Fallot, M.; Fechner, M.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Felde, J.; Franco, D.; Franke, A. J.; Franke, M.; Furuta, H.; Gama, R.; Gil-Botella, I.; Giot, L.; Göger-Neff, M.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Goodman, M. C.; Goon, J. TM.; Greiner, D.; Haag, N.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hartmann, F. X.; Haser, J.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hayakawa, T.; Hofmann, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Hourlier, A.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jochum, J.; Jollet, C.; Jones, C. L.; Kaether, F.; Kalousis, L. N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D. M.; Kawasaki, T.; Keefer, G.; Kemp, E.; de Kerret, H.; Kibe, Y.; Konno, T.; Kryn, D.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lane, C. E.; Langbrandtner, C.; Lasserre, T.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Lima, H. P.; Lindner, M.; López-Castanõ, J. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lucht, S.; McKee, D.; Maeda, J.; Maesano, C. N.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Martino, J.; Matsubara, T.; Mention, G.; Meregaglia, A.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Miyata, H.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Novella, P.; Obolensky, M.; Oberauer, L.; Onillon, A.; Osborn, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Palomares, C.; Pepe, I. M.; Perasso, S.; Perrin, P.; Pfahler, P.; Porta, A.; Potzel, W.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reinhold, B.; Remoto, A.; Röhling, M.; Roncin, R.; Roth, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Santorelli, R.; Sato, F.; Schönert, S.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwetz, T.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shimojima, S.; Shrestha, D.; Sida, J-L.; Sinev, V.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smith, E.; Spitz, J.; Stahl, A.; Stancu, I.; Stokes, L. F. F.; Strait, M.; Stüken, A.; Suekane, F.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sun, Y.; Svoboda, R.; Terao, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Toups, M.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Valdiviesso, G.; Veyssiere, C.; Wagner, S.; Watanabe, H.; White, B.; Wiebusch, C.; Winslow, L.; Worcester, M.; Wurm, M.; Yermia, F.; Zimmer, V.

    2012-09-01

    The Double Chooz experiment has observed 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events in 227.93 live days with 33.71 GW-ton-years (reactor power×detector mass×live time) exposure using a 10.3 m³ fiducial volume detector located at 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant in France. The expectation in case of ???=0 is 8937 events. The deficit is interpreted as evidence of electron antineutrino disappearance. From a rate plus spectral shape analysis we find sin?²2???=0.109±0.030(stat)±0.025(syst). The data exclude the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% CL (2.9?).

  1. Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor: Stainless steel, carbon steel and nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simoes de; Jerez, Rogerio; Liambos Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242 - CEP 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    New experiments devoted to the measurements of physical parameters of a light water core surrounded by a heavy reflector were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. These experiments comprise three sets of heavy reflector (SS-304, Carbon Steel, and Nickel) in a form of laminates around 3 mm thick. Each set was introduced individually in the west face of the core of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The aim here is to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check for the SS-304 reflector experiment. The experimental results comprise critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. Particularly to the case of Nickel, the experimental data are unique of its kind. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this nuclear data library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

  2. Overview of the 2014 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2014-10-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is a widely recognized world class program. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Integral data from the IRPhEP Handbook is used by reactor safety and design, nuclear data, criticality safety, and analytical methods development specialists, worldwide, to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques. The IRPhEP Handbook is among the most frequently quoted reference in the nuclear industry and is expected to be a valuable resource for future decades.

  3. EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (LBNF/DUNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois and the Sanford Underground Research Facility, Lead, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of using the existing Main Injector Accelerator at Fermilab to produce a pure beam of muon neutrinos. The neutrinos would be examined at a "near detector" proposed to be constructed at Fermilab, and at a "far detector," at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota. NOTE: This Project was previously designated (DOE/EA-1799).

  4. Common Radiative Origin of Active and Sterile Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borah, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    Sterile neutrinos with sub-electron volt (eV) masses have recently received serious attention due to the tantalizing hints from reactor neutrino experiments as well as cosmology. While the nine year old Wilkinson Mass Anisotropy Probe experiment suggests the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom to be $N_{\\text{eff}} = 3.84 \\pm 0.40$, recently reported Planck collaboration results show more preference towards the standard three light neutrino scenario $ N_{\\text{eff}} = 3.30^{+0.54}_{-0.51}$. Keeping in mind that the issue of existence or non-existence of sub-eV scale sterile neutrinos is not yet settled, here we outline a mechanism to generate sub-eV scale masses for three active and one sterile neutrinos simultaneously. The model is based on an abelian extension of standard model where the fermion and scalar fields are charged under the additional U(1) gauge group in such an anomaly free way that it allows one eV scale neutrino and three massless neutrinos at tree level. However, at one loop l...

  5. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  6. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 17 P HY S I CA L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 APRIL 2000 Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors F. Boehm, 3 J. Busenitz, 1 B. Cook, 3 G. Gratta, 4 H. Henrikson at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using.15.+g, 14.60.Lm, 25.30.Pt Nuclear reactors have been used as intense sources of â?¢ n e in experiments

  7. Neutrinos and Arms Control: Thinking Big about Detection of Neutrinos from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    Neutrinos and Arms Control: Thinking Big about Detection of Neutrinos from Reactors at Long detect and monitor any new reactor, in particular one which may be producing illicit nuclear weapons FOR INTERNATIONAL REACTOR MONITORING In the present world political environment when nuclear weapons capability

  8. A Measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic interaction and a test of Lorentz violation with the MiniBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei; /Indiana U.

    2008-12-01

    The Mini-Booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is designed to search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance neutrino oscillations. Muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interactions ({nu}{sub {mu}} + n {yields} {mu} + p) make up roughly 40% of our data sample, and it is used to constrain the background and cross sections for the oscillation analysis. Using high-statistics MiniBooNE CCQE data, the muon-neutrino CCQE cross section is measured. The nuclear model is tuned precisely using the MiniBooNE data. The measured total cross section is {sigma} = (1.058 {+-} 0.003 (stat) {+-} 0.111 (syst)) x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} at the MiniBooNE muon neutrino beam energy (700-800 MeV). {nu}{sub e} appearance candidate data is also used to search for Lorentz violation. Lorentz symmetry is one of the most fundamental symmetries in modern physics. Neutrino oscillations offer a new method to test it. We found that the MiniBooNE result is not well-described using Lorentz violation, however further investigation is required for a more conclusive result.

  9. Theta 13 Determination with Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Dalnoki-Veress

    2004-06-24

    Recently there has been a lot of interest around the world in the use of nuclear reactors to measure theta 13, the last undetermined angle in the 3-neutrino mixing scenario. In this paper the motivations for theta 13 measurement using short baseline nuclear reactor experiments are discussed. The features of such an experiment are described in the context of Double Chooz, which is a new project planned to start data-taking in 2008, and to reach a sensitivity of sinsq(2 theta 13) < 0.03.

  10. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N.G.

    1997-12-31

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  11. Sterile Neutrino Fits to Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews short-baseline oscillation experiments as interpreted within the context of one, two, and three sterile neutrino models associated with additional neutrino mass states in the ~1?eV range. Appearance and ...

  12. Critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories : technical meeting on low-power critical facilities and small reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Barber, Allison Delo

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted radiation effects testing for the Department of Energy (DOE) and other contractors supporting the DOE since the 1960's. Over this period, the research reactor facilities at Sandia have had a primary mission to provide appropriate nuclear radiation environments for radiation testing and qualification of electronic components and other devices. The current generation of reactors includes the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), a water-moderated pool-type reactor, fueled by elements constructed from UO2-BeO ceramic fuel pellets, and the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR-III), a bare metal fast burst reactor utilizing a uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. The SPR-III is currently defueled. The SPR Facility (SPRF) has hosted a series of critical experiments. A purpose-built critical experiment was first operated at the SPRF in the late 1980's. This experiment, called the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Critical Experiment (CX), was designed to explore the reactor physics of a nuclear thermal rocket motor. This experiment was fueled with highly-enriched uranium carbide fuel in annular water-moderated fuel elements. The experiment program was completed and the fuel for the experiment was moved off-site. A second critical experiment, the Burnup Credit Critical Experiment (BUCCX) was operated at Sandia in 2002. The critical assembly for this experiment was based on the assembly used in the CX modified to accommodate low-enriched pin-type fuel in water moderator. This experiment was designed as a platform in which the reactivity effects of specific fission product poisons could be measured. Experiments were carried out on rhodium, an important fission product poison. The fuel and assembly hardware for the BUCCX remains at Sandia and is available for future experimentation. The critical experiment currently in operation at the SPRF is the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX). This experiment is designed to provide benchmark reactor physics data to support validation of the reactor physics codes used to design commercial reactor fuel elements in an enrichment range above the current 5% enrichment cap. A first set of critical experiments in the 7uPCX has been completed. More experiments are planned in the 7uPCX series. The critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are currently funded by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). The NCSP has committed to maintain the critical experiment capability at Sandia and to support the development of a critical experiments training course at the facility. The training course is intended to provide hands-on experiment experience for the training of new and re-training of practicing Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers. The current plans are for the development of the course to continue through the first part of fiscal year 2011 with the development culminating is the delivery of a prototype of the course in the latter part of the fiscal year. The course will be available in fiscal year 2012.

  13. Predicting Reactor Antineutrino Emissions Using New Precision Beta Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wootan, David W.

    2013-05-01

    Neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors are currently vital to the study of neutrino oscillations. The observed antineutrino rates at reactors are typically lower than model expectations. This observed deficit is called the “reactor neutrino anomaly”. A new understanding of neutrino physics may be required to explain this deficit, though model estimation uncertainties may also play a role in the apparent discrepancy. PNNL is currently investigating an experimental technique that promises reduced uncertainties for measured data to support these hypotheses and interpret reactor antineutrino measurements. The experimental approach is to 1) direct a proton accelerator beam on a metal target to produce a source of neutrons, 2) use spectral tailoring to modify the neutron spectrum to closely simulate the energy distribution of a power reactor neutron spectrum, 3) irradiate isotopic fission foils (235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu) in this neutron spectrum so that fissions occur at energies representative of a reactor, 4) transport the beta particles released by the fission products in the foils to a beta spectrometer, 5) measure the beta energy spectrum, and 6) invert the measured beta energy spectrum to an antineutrino energy spectrum. A similar technique using a beta spectrometer and isotopic fission foils was pioneered in the 1980’s at the ILL thermal reactor. Those measurements have been the basis for interpreting all subsequent antineutrino measurements at reactors. A basic constraint in efforts to reduce uncertainties in predicting the antineutrino emission from reactor cores is any underlying limitation of the original measurements. This may include beta spectrum energy resolution, the absolute normalization of beta emission to number of fission, statistical counting uncertainties, lack of 238U data, the purely thermal nature of the IIL reactor neutrons used, etc. An accelerator-based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra (i.e. "in the reactor core") affects the resulting fission product beta spectrum. Furthermore, the 238U antineutrino spectrum, which has not been measured, can be studied directly because of the enhanced 1 MeV fast neutron flux available at the accelerator source. A facility such as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) 30 MeV proton linear accelerator at Fermilab is being considered for this experiment. The hypothesis is that a new approach utilizing the flexibility of an accelerator neutron source with spectral tailoring coupled with a careful design of an isotopic fission target and beta spectrometer and the inversion of the beta spectrum to the neutrino spectrum will allow further reduction in the uncertainties associated with prediction of the reactor antineutrino spectrum.

  14. Solar Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson

    2006-02-05

    Experimental work with solar neutrinos has illuminated the properties of neutrinos and tested models of how the sun produces its energy. Three experiments continue to take data, and at least seven are in various stages of planning or construction. In this review, the current experimental status is summarized, and future directions explored with a focus on the effects of a non-zero theta-13 and the interesting possibility of directly testing the luminosity constraint. Such a confrontation at the few-percent level would provide a prediction of the solar irradiance tens of thousands of years in the future for comparison with the present-day irradiance. A model-independent analysis of existing low-energy data shows good agreement between the neutrino and electromagnetic luminosities at the +/- 20 % level.

  15. Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a particular batch scheme). The volume of test space in IPTs is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. In addition to the IPTs, the Cylindrical MATRIX concept features test spaces at the centers of fuel assemblies where very high fast flux can be achieved. This magnitude of fast flux is similar to that achieved in the ATR A-positions, however, the available volume having these conditions is greater in the MATRIX design than in the ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the Cylindrical MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this statement must be qualified by acknowledging that this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design matures. Also, some of the requirements were not strictly met, but are believed to be achievable once features to be added later are designed.

  16. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  17. Booster Neutrino Experiment - About Neutrinos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBerylliumBiomimetic(cousinDataTalks and

  18. Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bess, John [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

  19. Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Keith C. Bledsoe; Bradley T. Rearden

    2011-02-01

    An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

  20. Neutrino Oscillations With Recently Measured Sterile-Active Neutrino Mixing Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger

    2015-06-01

    This brief report is an extension of a prediction of neutrino oscillation with a sterile neutrino using parameters of the sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle recently extracted from experiment.

  1. Research Program towards Observation of Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry T. Wong

    2006-09-15

    The article describes the research program pursued by the TEXONO Collaboration towards an experiment to observe coherent scattering between neutrinos and the nucleus at the power reactor. The motivations of studying this process are surveyed. In particular, a threshold of 100-200 eV has been achieved with an ultra-low-energy germanium detector prototype. This detection capability at low energy can also be adapted to conduct searches of Cold Dark Matter in the low-mass region as well as to enhance the sensitivities in the study of neutrino magnetic moments.

  2. Late Time Neutrino Masses, the LSND Experiment and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chacko, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Experiment and the Cosmic Microwave Background Z. Chacko,Experiment and the Cosmic Microwave Background Z. Chacko,distributions of the cosmic microwave background. arXiv:hep-

  3. An Experimental Method to Remove Neutrino Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -neutrinos · Feasibility (Cost and Time) · Future outlook 2 #12;Neutrino Mixing · The neutrino flavor states are related) "Atmospheric " (Super-K, K2K, MINOS) 23 = 45°±6° (90% C.L.) "Solar " (SNO, KamLAND) 12 = 33.9°±1.0° "Reactor is given for comparison. 9 CP Violation Sensitivity · To fully exploit the data taken by the next

  4. A U. S. Perspective on Fast Reactor Fuel Fabrication Technology and Experience Part I: Metal Fuels and Assembly Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas E. Burkes; Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Porter; Douglas C. Crawford; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2009-06-01

    This paper is Part I of a review focusing on the United States experience with metallic fast reactor fuel fabrication and assembly design for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility, and it also refers to the impact of development in other nations. Experience with metal fuel fabrication in the United States is extensive, including over 60 years of research conducted by the government, national laboratories, industry, and academia. This experience has culminated into a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate metallic fast reactor fuel. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies for metallic fuels, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  5. Massive neutrinos and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Lesgourgues; Sergio Pastor

    2006-05-29

    The present experimental results on neutrino flavour oscillations provide evidence for non-zero neutrino masses, but give no hint on their absolute mass scale, which is the target of beta decay and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Crucial complementary information on neutrino masses can be obtained from the analysis of data on cosmological observables, such as the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background or the distribution of large-scale structure. In this review we describe in detail how free-streaming massive neutrinos affect the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We summarize the current bounds on the sum of neutrino masses that can be derived from various combinations of cosmological data, including the most recent analysis by the WMAP team. We also discuss how future cosmological experiments are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses well into the sub-eV range.

  6. LUNASKA experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for ultrahigh energy neutrinos and develop technology for the lunar Cherenkov technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, C. W.; Protheroe, R. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Phillips, C. J.; Roberts, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Bray, J. D.; McFadden, R. A.

    2010-02-15

    We describe the design, performance, sensitivity and results of our recent experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) for lunar Cherenkov observations with a very wide (600 MHz) bandwidth and nanosecond timing, including a limit on an isotropic neutrino flux. We also make a first estimate of the effects of small-scale surface roughness on the effective experimental aperture, finding that contrary to expectations, such roughness will act to increase the detectability of near-surface events over the neutrino energy-range at which our experiment is most sensitive (though distortions to the time-domain pulse profile may make identification more difficult). The aim of our 'Lunar UHE Neutrino Astrophysics using the Square Kilometre Array' (LUNASKA) project is to develop the lunar Cherenkov technique of using terrestrial radio telescope arrays for ultrahigh energy (UHE) cosmic ray (CR) and neutrino detection, and, in particular, to prepare for using the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its path-finders such as the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) for lunar Cherenkov experiments.

  7. Experimental spectrum of reactor antineutrinos and spectra of main fissile isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinev, V. V., E-mail: vsinev@pcbai10.inr.ruhep.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Within the period between the years 1988 and 1990, the spectrum of positrons from the inverse-beta-decay reaction on a proton was measured at the Rovno atomic power plant in the course of experiments conducted there. The measured spectrum has the vastest statistics in relation to other neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors and the lowest threshold for positron detection. An experimental reactor-antineutrino spectrum was obtained on the basis of this positron spectrum and was recommended as a reference spectrum. The spectra of individual fissile isotopes were singled out from the measured antineutrino spectrum. These spectra can be used to analyze neutrino experiments performed at nuclear reactors for various compositions of the fuel in the reactor core.

  8. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogler, Laura

    2011-11-03

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2{nu}{beta}{beta}). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO{sub 2} crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of #24;10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with {sup 130}Te and 2 with {sup 128}Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of #24;350 g {sup 130}Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2{nu}{beta}{beta} half-life was measured to be T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = [9.81{+-} #6;0.96(stat){+-} 0.49(syst)]#2;x10{sup 20} y.

  9. Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino at Daya Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. P. An; A. B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; W. Beriguete; M. Bishai; S. Blyth; I. Butorov; G. F. Cao; J. Cao; Y. L. Chan; J. F. Chang; L. C. Chang; Y. Chang; C. Chasman; H. Chen; Q. Y. Chen; S. M. Chen; X. Chen; X. Chen; Y. X. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. P. Cheng; J. J. Cherwinka; M. C. Chu; J. P. Cummings; J. de Arcos; Z. Y. Deng; Y. Y. Ding; M. V. Diwan; E. Draeger; X. F. Du; D. A. Dwyer; W. R. Edwards; S. R. Ely; J. Y. Fu; L. Q. Ge; R. Gill; M. Gonchar; G. H. Gong; H. Gong; M. Grassi; W. Q. Gu; M. Y. Guan; X. H. Guo; R. W. Hackenburg; G. H. Han; S. Hans; M. He; K. M. Heeger; Y. K. Heng; P. Hinrichs; Y. K. Hor; Y. B. Hsiung; B. Z. Hu; L. M. Hu; L. J. Hu; T. Hu; W. Hu; E. C. Huang; H. Huang; X. T. Huang; P. Huber; G. Hussain; Z. Isvan; D. E. Jaffe; P. Jaffke; K. L. Jen; S. Jetter; X. P. Ji; X. L. Ji; H. J. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; R. A. Johnson; L. Kang; S. H. Kettell; M. Kramer; K. K. Kwan; M. W. Kwok; T. Kwok; W. C. Lai; K. Lau; L. Lebanowski; J. Lee; R. T. Lei; R. Leitner; A. Leung; J. K. C. Leung; C. A. Lewis; D. J. Li; F. Li; G. S. Li; Q. J. Li; W. D. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. F. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; C. J. Lin; G. L. Lin; P. Y. Lin; S. K. Lin; Y. C. Lin; J. J. Ling; J. M. Link; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; D. W. Liu; H. Liu; J. L. Liu; J. C. Liu; S. S. Liu; Y. B. Liu; C. Lu; H. Q. Lu; K. B. Luk; Q. M. Ma; X. Y. Ma; X. B. Ma; Y. Q. Ma; K. T. McDonald; M. C. McFarlane; R. D. McKeown; Y. Meng; I. Mitchell; J. Monari Kebwaro; Y. Nakajima; J. Napolitano; D. Naumov; E. Naumova; I. Nemchenok; H. Y. Ngai; Z. Ning; J. P. Ochoa-Ricoux; A. Olshevski; S. Patton; V. Pec; J. C. Peng; L. E. Piilonen; L. Pinsky; C. S. J. Pun; F. Z. Qi; M. Qi; X. Qian; N. Raper; B. Ren; J. Ren; R. Rosero; B. Roskovec; X. C. Ruan; B. B. Shao; H. Steiner; G. X. Sun; J. L. Sun; Y. H. Tam; X. Tang; H. Themann; K. V. Tsang; R. H. M. Tsang; C. E. Tull; Y. C. Tung; B. Viren; V. Vorobel; C. H. Wang; L. S. Wang; L. Y. Wang; M. Wang; N. Y. Wang; R. G. Wang; W. Wang; W. W. Wang; X. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. M. Wang; D. M. Webber; H. Y. Wei; Y. D. Wei; L. J. Wen; K. Whisnant; C. G. White; L. Whitehead; T. Wise; H. L. H. Wong; S. C. F. Wong; E. Worcester; Q. Wu; D. M. Xia; J. K. Xia; X. Xia; Z. Z. Xing; J. Y. Xu; J. L. Xu; J. Xu; Y. Xu; T. Xue; J. Yan; C. C. Yang; L. Yang; M. S. Yang; M. T. Yang; M. Ye; M. Yeh; Y. S. Yeh; B. L. Young; G. Y. Yu; J. Y. Yu; Z. Y. Yu; S. L. Zang; B. Zeng; L. Zhan; C. Zhang; F. H. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; Q. M. Zhang; Q. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; Y. C. Zhang; Y. M. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. X. Zhang; Z. J. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; Y. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; L. Zheng; W. L. Zhong; L. Zhou; Z. Y. Zhou; H. L. Zhuang; J. H. Zou

    2014-10-08

    A search for light sterile neutrino mixing was performed with the first 217 days of data from the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment. The experiment's unique configuration of multiple baselines from six 2.9~GW$_{\\rm th}$ nuclear reactors to six antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512~m and 561~m) and one far (1579~m) underground experimental halls makes it possible to test for oscillations to a fourth (sterile) neutrino in the $10^{\\rm -3}~{\\rm eV}^{2} < |\\Delta m_{41}^{2}| < 0.3~{\\rm eV}^{2}$ range. The relative spectral distortion due to electron antineutrino disappearance was found to be consistent with that of the three-flavor oscillation model. The derived limits on $\\sin^22\\theta_{14}$ cover the $10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}^{2} \\lesssim |\\Delta m^{2}_{41}| \\lesssim 0.1~{\\rm eV}^{2}$ region, which was largely unexplored.

  10. Results of Reactor Materials Experiments Investigating 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction and Debris Coolability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Basu, S. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, MS-T10K8, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is conducting reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: 1) resolution of the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and 2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants and provide the technical basis for better containment designs of future plants. With respect to the second objective, there remain uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a first step in bridging this gap, a large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiment (CCI-1) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test investigated the interaction of a 400 kg core-oxide melt with a crucible made of siliceous concrete along two walls and the base. The two remaining walls were made of non-ablative magnesium oxide. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predefined ablation depth was achieved, the cavity was flooded to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a description of the test facility and an overview of results from this test. (authors)

  11. Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in the Design of Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Experiments for Advanced Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, B.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Anderson, W.J. [Framatome ANP, Inc. (France); Harms, G.A. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

    2005-08-15

    Framatome ANP, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the University of Florida are cooperating on the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project 2001-0124 to design, assemble, execute, analyze, and document a series of critical experiments to validate reactor physics and criticality safety codes for the analysis of commercial power reactor fuels consisting of UO{sub 2} with {sup 235}U enrichments {>=}5 wt%. The experiments will be conducted at the SNL Pulsed Reactor Facility.Framatome ANP and SNL produced two series of conceptual experiment designs based on typical parameters, such as fuel-to-moderator ratios, that meet the programmatic requirements of this project within the given restraints on available materials and facilities. ORNL used the Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) to assess, from a detailed physics-based perspective, the similarity of the experiment designs to the commercial systems they are intended to validate. Based on the results of the TSUNAMI analysis, one series of experiments was found to be preferable to the other and will provide significant new data for the validation of reactor physics and criticality safety codes.

  12. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  13. Waste Stream Generated and Waste Disposal Plans for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghighi, M. H.; Szozda, R. M.; Jugan, M. R.

    2002-02-26

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site is located in Tennessee, on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), south of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant across Haw Ridge in Melton Valley. The MSRE was run by ORNL to demonstrate the desirable features of the molten-salt concept in a practical reactor that could be operated safely and reliably. It introduced the idea of a homogeneous reactor using fuel salt media and graphite moderation for power and breeder reactors. The MSRE reactor and associated components are located in cells beneath the floor in the high-bay area of Building 7503 (Figure 1). The reactor was operated from June 1965 to December 1969. When the reactor was shut down, fuel salt was drained from the reactor circuit to two drain tanks. A ''clean'' salt was then circulated through the reactor as a decontamination measure and drained to a third drain tank. When operations ceased, the fuel and flush salts were allowed t o cool and solidify in the drain tanks. At shutdown, the MSRE facility complex was placed in a surveillance and maintenance program. As a result of the S&M program, it was discovered in 1994 that gaseous uranium (233U/232U) hexafluoride (UF6) had moved throughout the MSRE process systems. The UF6 was generated when radiolysis of the fluorine salts caused the individual constituents to dissociate to their component atoms, including free fluorine.Some of the free fluorine combined with uranium fluorides (UF4) in the salt to form UF6. UF6 is gaseous at slightly above ambient temperatures; thus, periodic heating of the fuel salts (which was intended to remedy the radiolysis problems) and simple diffusion had allowed the UF6 to move out of the salt and into the process systems of MSRE.

  14. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  15. Electromagnetic neutrino: a short review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander I. Studenikin

    2014-11-09

    A short review on selected issues related to the problem of neutrino electromagnetic properties is given. After a flash look at the theoretical basis of neutrino electromagnetic form factors, constraints on neutrino magnetic moments and electric millicharge from terrestrial experiments and astrophysical observations are discussed. We also focus on some recent studies of the problem and on perspectives.

  16. On the Sensitivity of L/E Analysis of Super-Kamiokande Atmospheric Neutrino Data to Neutrino Oscillation Part~2 --- Four Possible L/E Analyses for the Maximum Oscillation by the Numerical Computer Experiment ---

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Konishi; Y. Minorikawa; V. I. Galkin; M. Ishiwata; I. Nakamura; N. Takahashi; M. Kato; A. Misaki

    2010-07-28

    In the previous paper (Part~1), we have verified that the SK assumption on the direction does not hold in the analysis of neutrino events occurred inside the SK detector. We have made four possible L/E analyses, L_nu/E_nu, L_nu/E_mu, L_mu/E_nu and L_mu/E_mu. Among four kinds of L/E analyses, we have shown that only L_nu/E_nu analysis can give the signature of maximum oscillations clearly, while the L_mu/E_mu analysis which are really done by Super-Kamiokande Collaboration cannot give the maximum oscillation at all. It is thus concluded that Super-Kamiokande type experiment cannot find the maximum oscillation from L/E analysis. Therefore, we would suggest Super-Kamiokande Collaboration to re-analyze the zenith angle distribution of the neutrino events which occur inside the detector carefully.

  17. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koskinen, David Jason; /University Coll. London

    2009-09-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} V{sub {tau}} transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  18. Solar neutrino detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2009-01-22

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  19. Raymond Davis Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the Solar Neutrino Problems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discrepancy. While at Brookhaven, Ray Davis conducted research and experiments in solar neutrinos at Homestake Gold Mine in South Dakota. This research was funded by the...

  20. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control and monitoring systems are very similar. The purpose and design of this experiment will be discussed followed by its progress and status to date.

  1. LOCA simulation in the national research universal reactor program: postirradiation examination results for the third materials experiment (MT-3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rausch, W.N.

    1984-04-01

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. The third materials experiment (MT-3) was the sixth in the series of thermal-hydraulic and materials deformation/rutpure experiments conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The main objective of the experiment was to evaluate ballooning and rupture during active two-phase cooling in the temperature range from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F (1030 to 1090 K). The 12 test rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 550 psi (3.8 MPa) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 of the rods ruptured, with an average peak bundle strain of approx. 55%. The UKAEA also funded destructive postirradiation examination (PIE) of several of the ruptured rods from the MT-3 experiment. This report describes the work performed and presents the PIE results. Information obtained during the PIE included cladding thickness measurements metallography, and particle size analysis of the cracked and broken fuel pellets.

  2. Task I: Dark Matter Search Experiments with Cryogenic Detectors: CDMS-I and CDMS-II Task II: Experimental Study of Neutrino Properties: EXO and KamLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabrera, Blas [Professor, Stanford University] [Professor, Stanford University; Gratta, Giorgio [Professor, Stanford University] [Professor, Stanford University

    2013-08-30

    Dark Matter Search - During the period of performance, our group continued the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. As a key member of the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) collaboration, we completed the CDMS II experiment which led the field in sensitivity for more than five years. We fabricated all detectors, and participated in detector testing and verification. In addition, we participated in the construction and operation of the facility at the Soudan Underground Laboratory and played key roles in the data acquisition and analysis. Towards the end of the performance period, we began operating the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment, which consists of 15 advanced Ge (9 kg) detectors. The advanced detector design called iZIP grew out of our earlier DOE Particle Detector R&D program which demonstrated the rejection of surface electrons to levels where they are no longer the dominant source of background. Our group invented this advanced design and these larger detectors were fabricated on the Stanford campus in collaboration with the SLAC CDMS group and the Santa Clara University group. The sensitivity reach is expected to be up to 5 times better than CDMS II after two years of operation. We will check the new limits on WIMPs set by XENON100, and we expect improved sensitivity for light mass WIMPs beyond that of any other existing experiment. Our group includes the Spokesperson for SuperCDMS and continues to make important contributions to improvements in the detector technology which are enabling the very low trigger thresholds used to explore the low mass WIMP region. We are making detailed measurements of the charge transport and trapping within Ge crystals, measuring the diffusive trapping distance of the quasiparticle excitations within the Al phonon collector fins on the detector surface, and we are contributing to the development of much improved detector Monte Carlos which are essential to guide the detector design and optimize the analysis. Neutrino Physics – In the period of performance the neutrino group successfully completed the construction of EXO-200 and commissioned the detector. Science data taking started on Jun 1, 2011. With the discovery of the 2-neutrino double-beta decay in 136-Xe and the first measurement of the 0-neutrino mode resulting in the most stringent limit of Majorana masses, our group continues to be a leading innovator in the field of neutrino physics which is central to DOE-HEP Intensity Frontier program. The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations, in part elucidated by our earlier efforts with the Palo Verde and KamLAND experiments, provides the crucial information that neutrino masses are non-zero and, yet, it contains no information on the value of the neutrino mass scale. In recent times our group has therefore shifted its focus to a high sensitivity 0-neutrino double beta decay program, EXO. The 0-neutrino double beta decay provides the best chance of extending the sensitivity to the neutrino mass scale below 10 meV but, maybe more importantly, it tests the nature of the neutrino wave function, providing the most sensitive probe for Majorana particles and lepton number violation. The EXO program, formulated by our group several years ago, plans to use up to tonnes of the isotope 136-Xe to study the 0-neutrino double beta decay mode. The EXO-200 detector is the first step in this program and it represents the only large US-led and based experiment taking data. The EXO-200 isotope enrichment program broke new grounds for the enterprise of double beta decay. The detector design and material selection program paid off, resulting in a background that is among the very best in the field. The “first light" of EXO-200 was very exciting with the discovery -in the first month of data- of the rarest 2-neutrino double beta decay mode ever observed. The lower limit on the 0-neutrino double beta decay half-life, published in Phys. Rev. Lett. and based on the first 120 days of data is the second best but, when translated into a Majorana mass scale, it

  3. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  4. Neutrino-Nucleon Cross section in Ultra High Energy Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bora, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino Physics is now entering precision era and neutrino-nucleon cross sections are an im- portant ingredient in all neutrino oscillation experiments. Specially, precise knowledge of neutrino- nucleon cross sections in Ultra High Energy (UHE) regime (TeV-PeV) is becoming more important now, as several experiments worldwide are going to observe processes involving such UHE neutrinos. In this work, we present new results on neutrino-nucleon cross-sections in this UHE regime, using QCD.

  5. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  6. Neutrino Scattering Physics at Superbeams and Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kumano

    2003-10-14

    Neutrino scattering physics is discussed for investigating internal structure of the nucleon and nuclei at future neutrino facilities. We explain structure functions in neutrino scattering. In particular, there are new polarized functions g_3, g_4, and g_5, and they should provide us important information for determining internal nucleon spin structure. Next, nuclear structure functions are discussed. From F_3 structure function measurements, valence-quark shadowing should be clarified. Nuclear effects on the NuTeV sin^2\\theta_W anomaly are explained. We also comment on low-energy neutrino scattering, which is relevant to current long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  7. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangano, Salvatore [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificio Institutos de Investigatión, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  8. Research in Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busenitz, Jerome

    2014-09-30

    Research in Neutrino Physics We describe here the recent activities of our two groups over the first year of this award (effectively November 2010 through January 2012) and our proposed activities and associated budgets for the coming grant year. Both of our groups are collaborating on the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment and are playing major roles in calibration and analysis. A major milestone was reached recently: the collaboration obtained the first result on the search for 13 based on 100 days of data from the far detector. Our data indicates that 13 is not zero; specifically the best fit of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to our data gives sin2 (2 13) = 0.086 ± 0.041 (stat) ± 0.030 (syst) The null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at the 94.6% C.L. This result1 has been submitted to Physical Review Letters. As we continue to take data with the far detector in the coming year, in parallel with completing the construction of the near lab and installing the near detector, we expect the precision of our measurement to improve as we gather significantly more statistics, gain better control of backgrounds through use of partial power data and improved event selection, and better understand the detector energy scale and detection efficiency from calibration data. With both detectors taking data starting in the second half of 2013, we expect to further drive down the uncertainty on our measurement of sin2 (2 13) to less than 0.02. Stancu’s group is also collaborating on the MiniBooNE experiment. Data taking is scheduled to continue through April, by which time 1.18 × 1021 POT is projected. The UA group is playing a leading role in the measurement of antineutrino cross sections, which should be the subject of a publication later this year as well as of Ranjan Dharmapalan’s Ph.D. thesis, which he is expected to defend by the end of this year. It is time to begin working on projects which will eventually succeed Double Chooz and MiniBooNE as the main foci of our efforts. The Stancu group plans to become re–involved in LBNE and possibly also to join NO A, and the Busenitz group has begun to explore joining a direct dark matter search.

  9. Low Energy Neutrino Cross Sections: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This large collection of low-energy (less than 30 GEV) neutrino cross sections is extracted from the results of many experiments from 1973 through 2002. The experiments, facilities, and collaborations include ANL, BNL, and FNAL in the U.S., along with CERN, Gargamelle, SKAT, LSND, and others. The data are presented in both tabular and plotted formats. The Durham High Energy Physics Database Group makes these data available in one place, easy to access and compare. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  10. Deep Inelastic Neutrino Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kretzer; M. H. Reno

    2003-06-30

    Understanding neutrino interactions is an important task in searches for neutrino oscillations; e.g. the nu_{mu} -> nu_{tau} oscillation hypothesis will be tested through nu_{tau} production of tau in long-baseline experiments as well as underground neutrino telescopes. An anomaly in the deep inelastic interaction of neutrinos has recently been observed by the NuTeV collaboration -- resulting in a measured weak mixing angle sin^2 Theta_{W} that differs by ~ 3 sigma from the standard model expectation. In this contribution to the proceedings of NUINT02, we summarize results on the NLO neutrino structure functions and cross sections in which charm quark mass and target mass effects in the collinear approximation are included.

  11. Prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux for the Double Chooz experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Christopher LaDon

    2012-01-01

    This thesis benchmarks the deterministic lattice code, DRAGON, against data, and then applies this code to make a prediction for the antineutrino flux from the Chooz BI and B2 reactors. Data from the destructive assay of ...

  12. Conceptual Design of Molten Salt Loop Experiment for MIT Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Malcolm K.

    2011-08-01

    Molten salt is a promising coolant candidate for Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) Gen-IV designs. The low neutron absorption, high thermal capacity, chemical inertness, and high boiling point at low pressure of ...

  13. Radiative Emission of Neutrino Pairs in Atoms and Light Sterile Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. N. Dinh; S. T. Petcov

    2015-01-22

    The process of Radiative Emission of Neutrino Pair (RENP) in atoms is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, the type of spectrum neutrino masses obey and the nature - Dirac or Majorana - of massive neutrinos. We analyse the possibility to test the hypothesis of existence of neutrinos with masses at the eV scale coupled to the electron in the weak charged lepton current in an RENP experiment. The presence of eV scale neutrinos in the neutrino mixing is associated with the existence of sterile neutrinos which mix with the active flavour neutrinos. At present there are a number of hints for active-sterile neutrino oscillations driven by $\\Delta m^2 \\sim 1~{\\rm eV^2}$. We perform a detailed analysis of the RENP phenomenology within the "3 + 1" scheme with one sterile neutrino.

  14. Radiative Emission of Neutrino Pairs in Atoms and Light Sterile Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinh, D N

    2014-01-01

    The process of Radiative Emission of Neutrino Pair (RENP) in atoms is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, the type of spectrum neutrino masses obey and the nature - Dirac or Majorana - of massive neutrinos. We analyse the possibility to test the hypothesis of existence of neutrinos with masses at the eV scale coupled to the electron in the weak charged lepton current in an RENP experiment. The presence of eV scale neutrinos in the neutrino mixing is associated with the existence of sterile neutrinos which mix with the active flavour neutrinos. At present there are a number of hints for active-sterile neutrino oscillations driven by $\\Delta m^2 \\sim 1~{\\rm eV^2}$. We perform a detailed analysis of the RENP phenomenology within the "3 + 1" scheme with one sterile neutrino.

  15. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walter, Chris [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States

    2010-01-08

    In this talk, I will review how a set of experiments in the last decade has given us our current understanding of neutrino properties.  I will show how experiments in the last year or two have clarified this picture, and will discuss how new experiments about to start will address remaining questions.  I will particularly emphasize the relationship between various experimental techniques.

  16. Solar Neutrinos: Solved and Unsolved Problems John N. Bahcall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    that solar neutrino experiments may have already provided strong hints that at least one neutrino type has. One can quantify the sensitivity of solar neutrinos relative to laboratory experiments by consideringChapter 10 Solar Neutrinos: Solved and Unsolved Problems John N. Bahcall Institute for Advanced

  17. The Fermilab neutrino beam program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rameika, Regina A.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    This talk presents an overview of the Fermilab Neutrino Beam Program. Results from completed experiments as well as the status and outlook for current experiments is given. Emphasis is given to current activities towards planning for a future program.

  18. Neutrinoless double beta decay in four-neutrino models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Kalliomaki; Jukka Maalampi

    2000-03-29

    The most stringent constraint on the so-called effective electron neutrino mass from the present neutrinoless double beta decay experiments is |M_{ee}| < 0.2 eV, while the planned next generation experiment GENIUS is anticipated to reach a considerably more stringent limit |M_{ee}|< 0.001 eV. We investigate the constraints these bounds set on the neutrino masses and mixings of neutrinos in four-neutrino models where there exists a sterile neutrino along with the three ordinary neutrinos. We find that the GENIUS experiment would be sensitive to the electron neutrino masses down to the limit m_{\

  19. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooks Are Fun book fair Books Are

  20. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBerylliumBiomimetic(cousinDataTalks andclose The

  1. Progress in the physics of massive neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; D. Marfatia; K. Whisnant

    2003-09-16

    The current status of the physics of massive neutrinos is reviewed with a forward-looking emphasis. The article begins with the general phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and matter and documents the experimental evidence for oscillations of solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos. Both active and sterile oscillation possibilities are considered. The impact of cosmology (BBN, CMB, leptogenesis) and astrophysics (supernovae, highest energy cosmic rays) on neutrino observables and vice versa, is evaluated. The predictions of grand unified, radiative and other models of neutrino mass are discussed. Ways of determining the unknown parameters of three-neutrino oscillations are assessed, taking into account eight-fold degeneracies in parameters that yield the same oscillation probabilities, as well as ways to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale (from beta-decay, neutrinoless double-beta decay, large scale structure and Z-bursts). Critical unknowns at present are the amplitude of \

  2. Light Collection and Pulse-Shape Discrimination in Elongated Scintillator Cells for the PROSPECT Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashenfelter, J; Band, H R; Barclay, G; Bass, C D; Berish, D; Bowden, N S; Bowes, A; Brodsky, J P; Bryan, C D; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, R; Classen, T; Commeford, K; Davee, D; Dean, D; Deichert, G; Diwan, M V; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Dwyer, D A; Gaison, J K; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilje, K; Glenn, A; Goddard, B W; Green, M; Han, K; Hans, S; Heeger, K M; Heffron, B; Jaffe, D E; Langford, T J; Littlejohn, B R; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McKeown, R D; Mendenhall, M P; Mueller, P; Mumm, H P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Norcini, D; Pushin, D; Qian, X; Romero, E; Rosero, R; Saldana, L; Seilhan, B S; Sharma, R; Sheets, S; Stemen, N T; Surukuchi, P T; Varner, R L; Viren, B; Wang, W; White, B; White, C; Wilhelmi, J; Williams, C; Wise, T; Yao, H; Yeh, M; Yen, Y -R; Zangakis, G; Zhang, C; Zhang, X

    2015-01-01

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron/gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell long axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. Key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  3. Light Collection and Pulse-Shape Discrimination in Elongated Scintillator Cells for the PROSPECT Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ashenfelter; B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; G. Barclay; C. D. Bass; D. Berish; N. S. Bowden; A. Bowes; J. P. Brodsky; C. D. Bryan; J. J. Cherwinka; R. Chu; T. Classen; K. Commeford; D. Davee; D. Dean; G. Deichert; M. V. Diwan; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; D. A. Dwyer; J. K. Gaison; A. Galindo-Uribarri; K. Gilje; A. Glenn; B. W. Goddard; M. Green; K. Han; S. Hans; K. M. Heeger; B. Heffron; D. E. Jaffe; T. J. Langford; B. R. Littlejohn; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; R. D. McKeown; M. P. Mendenhall; P. Mueller; H. P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; R. Neilson; D. Norcini; D. Pushin; X. Qian; E. Romero; R. Rosero; L. Saldana; B. S. Seilhan; R. Sharma; S. Sheets; N. T Stemen; P. T. Surukuchi; R. L. Varner; B. Viren; W. Wang; B. White; C. White; J. Wilhelmi; C. Williams; T. Wise; H. Yao; M. Yeh; Y. -R. Yen; G. Zangakis; C. Zhang; X. Zhang

    2015-08-26

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron/gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell long axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. Key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  4. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  5. Neutrino Mass and Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David O. Caldwell

    1998-12-01

    Despite direct observations favoring a low mass density, a critical density universe with a neutrino component of dark matter provides the best existing model to explain the observed structure of the universe over more than three orders of magnitude in distance scale. In principle this hot dark matter could consist of one, two, or three species of active neutrinos. If all present indications for neutrino mass are correct, however, only the two-species (muon neutrino and tau neutrino) possibility works. This requires the existence of at least one light sterile neutrino to explain the solar electron neutrino deficit via nu(e)->nu(s), leaving nu(mu)->nu(tau) as the explanation for the anomalous nu(mu)/nu(e) ratio produced by atmospheric neutrinos, and having the LSND experiment demonstrating via anti-nu(mu)-> anti-nu(e) the mass difference between the light nu(e)-nu(s) pair and the heavier nu(mu)-nu(tau) pair required for dark matter. Other experiments do not conflict with the LSND results when all the experiments are analyzed in the same way, and when analyzed conservatively the LSND data is quite compatible with the mass difference needed for dark matter. Further support for this mass pattern is provided by the need for a sterile neutrino to rescue heavy-element nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and it could even aid the concordance in light element abundances from the early universe.

  6. White paper report on using nuclear reactors to search for a value of theta13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.; Anjos, J.C.; Ayres, D.; Beacom, J.; Bediaga, I.; de Bellefon, A.; Berger, B.E.; Bilenky, S.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T.; Buck, C.; Bugg, W.; Busenitz, J.; Choubey, S.; Conrad, J.; Cribier, M.; Dadoun, O.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Decowski, M.; de Gouvea, Andre; Demutrh, D.; Dessages-Ardellier, F.; Efremenko, Y.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Finley, D.; Formaggio, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Garbini, M.; Giusti, P.; Goger-Neff, M.; Goodman, M.; Gray, F.; Grieb, C.; Grudzinski, J.J.; Guarino, V.J.; Hartmann, F.; Hagner, C.; Heeger, K.M.; Hofmann, W.; Horton-Smith, G.; Huber, P.; Inzhechik, L.; Jochum, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kadel, R.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D.; Kasper, P.; de Kerret, H.; Kersten, J.; Klein, J.; Knopfle, K.T.; Kopeikin, V.; Kozlov, Yu.; Kryn, D.; Kuchler, V.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laughton, C.; Lendvai, C.; Li, J.; Lindner, M.; Link, J.; Longo, M.; Lu, Y.S.; Luk, K.B.; Ma, Y.Q.; Martemyanov, V.P.; Mauger, C.; Manghetti, H.; McKeown, R.; Mention, G.; Meyer, J.P.; Mikaelyan, L.; Minakata, H.; Naples, D.; Nunokawa, H.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Parke, S.; Petcov, S.T.; Peres, O.L.G.; Potzel, W.; Pilcher, J.; Plunkett, R.; Raffelt, G.; Rapidis, P.; Reyna, D.; Roe, B.; Rolinec, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sartorelli, G.; Schonert, S.; Schwertz, T.; Selvi, M.; Shaevitz, M.; Shellard, R.; Shrock, R.; Sidwell, R.; Sims, J.; Sinev, V.; Stanton, N.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R.; Seukane, F.; Sugiyama, H.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Svoboda, R.; Talaga, R.; Tamura, N.; Tanimoto, M.; Thron, J.; von Toerne, E.; Vignaud, D.; Wagner, C.; Wang, Y.F.; Wang, Z.; Winter, W.; Wong, H.; Yakushev, E.; Yang, C.G.; Yasuda, O.

    2004-02-26

    There has been superb progress in understanding the neutrino sector of elementary particle physics in the past few years. It is now widely recognized that the possibility exists for a rich program of measuring CP violation and matter effects in future accelerator {nu} experiments, which has led to intense efforts to consider new programs at neutrino superbeams, off-axis detectors, neutrino factories and beta beams. However, the possibility of measuring CP violation can be fulfilled only if the value of the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} is such that sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 13}) greater than or equal to on the order of 0.01. The authors of this white paper are an International Working Group of physicists who believe that a timely new experiment at a nuclear reactor sensitive to the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} in this range has a great opportunity for an exciting discovery, a non-zero value to {theta}{sub 13}. This would be a compelling next step of this program. We are studying possible new reactor experiments at a variety of sites around the world, and we have collaborated to prepare this document to advocate this idea and describe some of the issues that are involved.

  7. Improved measurements of the neutrino mixing angle $?_{13}$ with the Double Chooz detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Abe; J. C. dos Anjos; J. C. Barriere; E. Baussan; I. Bekman; M. Bergevin; T. J. C. Bezerra; L. Bezrukov; E. Blucher; C. Buck; J. Busenitz; A. Cabrera; E. Caden; L. Camilleri; R. Carr; M. Cerrada; P. -J. Chang; E. Chauveau; P. Chimenti; A. P. Collin; E. Conover; J. M. Conrad; J. I. Crespo-Anadón; K. Crum; A. S. Cucoanes; E. Damon; J. V. Dawson; J. Dhooghe; D. Dietrich; Z. Djurcic; M. Dracos; M. Elnimr; A. Etenko; M. Fallot; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Felde; S. M. Fernandes; V. Fischer; D. Franco; M. Franke; H. Furuta; I. Gil-Botella; L. Giot; M. Göger-Neff; L. F. G. Gonzalez; L. Goodenough; M. C. Goodman; C. Grant; N. Haag; T. Hara; J. Haser; M. Hofmann; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Hourlier; M. Ishitsuka; J. Jochum; C. Jollet; F. Kaether; L. N. Kalousis; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; T. Kawasaki; E. Kemp; H. de Kerret; D. Kryn; M. Kuze; T. Lachenmaier; C. E. Lane; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; H. P. Lima Jr; M. Lindner; J. M. López-Castaño; J. M. LoSecco; B. Lubsandorzhiev; S. Lucht; J. Maeda; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; J. Martino; T. Matsubara; G. Mention; A. Meregaglia; T. Miletic; R. Milincic; A. Minotti; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nikitenko; P. Novella; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; A. Onillon; A. Osborn; C. Palomares; I. M. Pepe; S. Perasso; P. Pfahler; A. Porta; G. Pronost; J. Reichenbacher; B. Reinhold; M. Röhling; R. Roncin; S. Roth; B. Rybolt; Y. Sakamoto; R. Santorelli; A. C. Schilithz; S. Schönert; S. Schoppmann; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Sharankova; S. Shimojima; D. Shrestha; V. Sibille; V. Sinev; M. Skorokhvatov; E. Smith; J. Spitz; A. Stahl; I. Stancu; L. F. F. Stokes; M. Strait; A. Stüken; F. Suekane; S. Sukhotin; T. Sumiyoshi; Y. Sun; R. Svoboda; K. Terao; A. Tonazzo; H. H. Trinh Thi; G. Valdiviesso; N. Vassilopoulos; C. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Wagner; N. Walsh; H. Watanabe; C. Wiebusch; L. Winslow; M. Wurm; G. Yang; F. Yermia; V. Zimmer

    2015-01-21

    The Double Chooz experiment presents improved measurements of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ using the data collected in 467.90 live days from a detector positioned at an average distance of 1050 m from two reactor cores at the Chooz nuclear power plant. Several novel techniques have been developed to achieve significant reductions of the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties with respect to previous publications, whereas the efficiency of the $\\bar\

  8. Evidence for neutrino mass: A decade of discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2004-12-08

    Neutrino mass and mixing are amongst the major discoveries of recent years. From the observation of flavor change in solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments to the measurements of neutrino mixing with terrestrial neutrinos, recent experiments have provided consistent and compelling evidence for the mixing of massive neutrinos. The discoveries at Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND have solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem and demand that we make the first significant revision of the Standard Model in decades. Searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay probe the particle nature of neutrinos and continue to place limits on the effective mass of the neutrino. Possible signs of neutrinoless double-beta decay will stimulate neutrino mass searches in the next decade and beyond. I review the recent discoveries in neutrino physics and the current evidence for massive neutrinos.

  9. SOLAR NEUTRINOS: WHERE WE ARE JOHN BAHCALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    SOLAR NEUTRINOS: WHERE WE ARE JOHN BAHCALL Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 This talk compares standard model predictions for solar neutrino experiments with the results of actual a standard solar model. I emphasize the importance of recent analyses in which the neutrino fluxes

  10. Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics : Highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry Tsz-King Wong

    2007-02-28

    This article presents an overview of neutrino physics research, with highlights on the physics goals, results and interpretations of the current neutrino experiments and future directions and program. It is not meant to be a comprehensive account or detailed review article. Interested readers can pursue the details via the listed references.

  11. Physics Potential of Future Atmospheric Neutrino Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2008-12-12

    The potential of future high statistics atmospheric neutrino experiments is considered, having in mind currently discussed huge detectors of various technologies (water Cerekov, magnetized iron, liquid Argon). I focus on the possibility to use atmospheric data to determine the octant of $\\theta_{23}$ and the neutrino mass hierarchy. The sensitivity to the $\\theta_{23}$-octant of atmospheric neutrinos is competitive (or even superior) to long-baseline experiments. I discuss the ideal properties of a fictitious atmospheric neutrino detector to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  12. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

  13. Constraints on the Sum of Neutrino Masses from Cosmology and their impact on world neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Melchiorri; G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. I. Silk

    2005-01-25

    We derive upper limits on the sum of neutrino masses from an updated combination of data from Cosmic Microwave Background experiments and Galaxy Redshifts Surveys. The results are discussed in the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing and compared with neutrino oscillation data, with upper limits on the effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments and with the claimed lower bound on the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment.

  14. Neutrinos as astrophysical probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flavio Cavanna; Maria Laura Costantini; Ornella Palamara; Francesco Vissani

    2003-11-11

    The aim of these notes is to provide a brief review of the topic of neutrino astronomy and in particular of neutrinos from core collapse supernovae. They are addressed to a curious reader, beginning to work in a multidisciplinary area that involves experimental neutrino physics, astrophysics, nuclear physics and particle physics phenomenology. After an introduction to the methods and goals of neutrinos astronomy, we focus on core collapse supernovae, as (one of) the most promising astrophysical source of neutrinos. The first part is organized almost as a tale, the last part is a bit more technical. We discuss the impact of flavor oscillations on the supernova neutrino signal (=the change of perspective due to recent achievements) and consider one specific example of signal in detail. This shows that effects of oscillations are important, but astrophysical uncertainties should be thought as an essential systematics for a correct interpretation of future experimental data. Three appendices corroborate the text with further details and some basics on flavor oscillations; but no attempt of a complete bibliographical survey is done (in practice, we selected a few references that we believe are useful for a `modern' introduction to the subject. We suggest the use of public databases for papers as SPIRES or NASA/ESO or for experiments as SPIRES or PaNAGIC to get a more complete information).

  15. A new investigation of electron neutrino appearance oscillations with improved sensitivity in the MiniBooNE+ experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Dharmapalan; S. Habib; C. Jiang; I. Stancu; Z. Djurcic; R. A. Johnson; A. Wickremasinghe; G. Karagiorgi; M. H. Shaevitz; B. C. Brown; F. G. Garcia; R. Ford; W. Marsh; C. D. Moore; D. Perevalov; C. C. Polly; J. Grange; J. Mousseau; B. Osmanov; H. Ray; R. Cooper; R. Tayloe; R. Thornton; G. T. Garvey; W. Huelsnitz; W. C. Louis; C. Mauger; G. B. Mills; Z. Pavlovic; R. Van de Water; D. H. White; R. Imlay; M. Tzanov; B. P. Roe; A. A. Aguilar-Arevalo; T. Katori; P. Nienaber

    2013-10-02

    We propose the addition of scintillator to the existing MiniBooNE detector to allow a test of the neutral-current/charged-current (NC/CC) nature of the MiniBooNE low-energy excess. Scintillator will enable the reconstruction of 2.2 MeV $\\gamma$s from neutron-capture on protons following neutrino interactions. Low-energy CC interactions where the oscillation excess is observed should have associated neutrons with less than a 10% probability. This is in contrast to the NC backgrounds that should have associated neutrons in approximately 50% of events. We will measure these neutron fractions with $\

  16. Sterile neutrino searches in MiniBooNE and MicroBooNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignarra, Christina M

    2014-01-01

    Tension among recent short baseline neutrino experiments has pointed toward the possible need for the addition of one or more sterile (non-interacting) neutrino states into the existing neutrino oscillation framework. This ...

  17. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  18. A new anti-neutrino detection technique based on positronium tagging with plastic scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consolati, G; Jollet, C; Meregaglia, A; Minotti, A; Perasso, S; Tonazzo, A

    2015-01-01

    The main signature for anti-neutrino detection in reactor and geo-neutrino experiments based on scintillators is provided by the space-time coincidence of positron and neutron produced in the Inverse Beta Decay reaction. Such a signature strongly suppresses backgrounds and allows for measurements performed underground with a relatively high signal-to-background ratio. In an aboveground environment, however, the twofold coincidence technique is not sufficient to efficiently reject the high background rate induced by cosmogenic events. Enhancing the positron-neutron twofold coincidence efficiency has the potential to pave the way future aboveground detectors for reactor monitoring. We propose a new detection scheme based on a threefold coincidence, between the positron ionization, the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) decay, and the neutron capture, in a sandwich detector with alternated layers of plastic scintillator and aerogel powder. We present the results of a set of dedicated measurements on the achievable light y...

  19. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  20. Neutrino Physics with Thermal Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nucciotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2009-11-09

    The investigation of fundamental neutrino properties like its mass and its nature calls for the design of a new generation of experiments. High sensitivity, high energy resolution, and versatility together with the possibility of a simple multiplexing scheme are the key features of future detectors for these experiments. Thermal detectors can combine all these features. This paper reviews the status and the perspectives for what concerns the application of this type of detectors to neutrino physics, focusing on direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

  1. A Sterile Neutrino at DUNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey M. Berryman; Andre de Gouvea; Kevin J. Kelly; Andrew Kobach

    2015-07-14

    We investigate the potential for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to probe the existence and effects of a fourth neutrino mass-eigenstate. We study the mixing of the fourth mass-eigenstate with the three active neutrinos of the Standard Model, including the effects of new sources of CP-invariance violation, for a wide range of new mass-squared differences, from lower than 10^-5 eV^2 to higher than 1 eV^2. DUNE is sensitive to previously unexplored regions of the mixing angle - mass-squared difference parameter space. If there is a fourth neutrino, in some regions of the parameter space, DUNE is able to measure the new oscillation parameters (some very precisely) and clearly identify two independent sources of CP-invariance violation. Finally, we use the hypothesis that there are four neutrino mass-eigenstates in order to ascertain how well DUNE can test the limits of the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm. In this way, we briefly explore whether light sterile neutrinos can serve as proxies for other, in principle unknown, phenomena that might manifest themselves in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  2. Phenomenological relations for neutrino masses and mixing parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khruschov, V. V.

    2013-11-15

    Phenomenological relations for masses, angles, and CP phases in the neutrino mixing matrix are proposed with allowance for available experimental data. For the case of CP violation in the lepton sector, an analysis of the possible structure of the neutrino mass matrix and a calculation of the neutrino mass features and the Dirac CP phase for the bimodal-neutrino model are performed. The values obtained in this way can be used to interpret and predict the results of various neutrino experiments.

  3. Confidence in the neutrino mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarah Evslin

    2013-11-14

    The number of sigma of confidence in a determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy may be obtained from the statistic Delta chi squared. However, as the hierarchy is a discrete variable, this number is not given by the usual square root formula. We review a simple Bayesian formula for the sensitivity to the hierarchy that can be obtained from the median experiment as a function of Delta chi squared. We compare this analytical formula to 6 years of simulated data from JUNO together with a 4% (1%) determination of the effective atmospheric mass splitting from the disappearance channel at MINOS (NOvA). We find a Delta chi squared of 11 (20) yielding 2.6 sigma (3.9 sigma). However when the unknown nonlinear energy response of the detector is included in our analysis this significance degrades considerably. This degradation can be eliminated by dividing the single detector into a near and far detector of the same total target mass. A further advantage of a second detector is that, even while the reactor neutrino experiment runs, the decay at rest of a single, high intensity, continuously running pion source close to one of the detectors, such as that described by the DAEdALUS project, may determine the leptonic CP-violating phase delta.

  4. Last CPT-Invariant Hope for LSND Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giunti

    2003-02-21

    It is shown that the 99% confidence limits from the analyses of the data of cosmological and neutrino experiments imply a small marginally allowed region in the space of the neutrino oscillation parameters of 3+1 four-neutrino mixing schemes. This region can be confirmed or falsified by experiments in the near future.

  5. Qualification of JEFF3.1.1 library for high conversion reactor calculations using the ERASME/R experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidal, J. F.; Noguere, G.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.

    2012-07-01

    With its low CO{sub 2} production, Nuclear Energy appears to be an efficient solution to the global warming due to green-house effect. However, current LWR reactors are poor uranium users and, pending the development of Fast Neutron Reactors, alternative concepts of PWR with higher conversion ratio (HCPWR) are being studied again at CEA, first studies dating from the middle 80's. In these French designs, low moderation ratio has been performed by tightening the lattice pitch, achieving a conversion ratio of 0.8-0.9 with a MOX fuel coming from PWR UOX recycling. Theses HCPWRs are characterized by a harder neutron spectrum and the calculation uncertainties on the fundamental neutronics parameters are increased by a factor 3 regarding a standard PWR lattice, due to the major contribution of the Plutonium isotopes and of the epithermal energy range to the reaction rates. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a 3-year experimental validation program called ERASME has been performed by CEA from 1984 to 1986 in the EOLE reactor. Monte Carlo analysis of the ERASME/R experiments with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI4 allowed the qualification of the recommended JEFF.3.1.1 library for major neutronics parameters. K{sub eff} of the MOX under-moderated lattice is over-predicted by 440 {+-} 830 pcm (2{sigma}); the conversion ratio, indicator of the good use of uranium, is also slightly over-predicted: 2 % {+-} 4 % (2{sigma}) and the same for B4C absorber rods worth and soluble boron worth, over-predicted by 2 %, both in the 2 standard deviations range. The radial fission maps of heterogeneities (water-holes, B4C and fertile rods) are well reproduced: maximal (C-E)/E dispersion is 1.3 %, maximal power peak error is 2.7 %. The void reactivity worth is the only parameter poorly calculated with an overprediction of +12.4% {+-} 1.5%. ERASME/R analysis of MOX reactivity, void effect and spectral indexes will contribute to the reevaluation of {sup 241}Am and Plutonium isotopes nuclear data for the next library JEFF3.2. (authors)

  6. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  7. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  8. Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

  9. Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Joseph A. Formaggio

    2011-10-12

    The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

  10. Using Quasi-elastic Events to Measure Neutrino Oscillations with MINOS Detectors in the NuMI Neutrino Beam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watabe, Masaki

    2010-07-14

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has been designed to search for a change in the avor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as they travel between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Far...

  11. Collective neutrino oscillations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations in a hot and dense astrophysical environment such as a core-collapse supernova pose a challenging, seven-dimensional flavor transport problem. To make the problem even more difficult (and interesting), neutrinos can experience collective oscillations through nonlinear refraction in the dense neutrino medium in this environment. Significant progress has been made in the last decade towards the understanding of collective neutrino oscillations in various simplified neutrino gas models with imposed symmetries and reduced dimensions. However, a series of recent studies seem to have "reset" this progress by showing that these models may not be compatible with collective neutrino oscillations because the latter can break the symmetries spontaneously if they are not imposed. We review some of the key concepts of collective neutrino oscillations by using a few simple toy models. We also elucidate the breaking of spatial and directional symmetries in these models because of collective oscillation...

  12. Reactor Measurement of theta_12; Principles, Accuracies and Physics Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Minakata; H. Nunokawa; W. J. C. Teves; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2005-01-07

    We discuss reactor measurement of \\theta_{12} which has a potential of reaching the ultimate sensitivity which surpasses all the methods so far proposed. The key is to place a detector at an appropriate baseline distance from the reactor neutrino source to have an oscillation maximum at around a peak energy of the event spectrum in the absence of oscillation. By a detailed statistical analysis the optimal distance is estimated to be \\simeq (50-70) km x [8 x 10^{-5} eV^2/\\Delta m^2_{21}], which is determined by maximizing the oscillation effect in the event number distribution and minimizing geo-neutrino background contamination. To estimate possible uncertainty caused by surrounding nuclear reactors in distance of \\sim 100 km, we examine a concrete example of a detector located at Mt. Komagatake, 54 km away from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Japan, the most powerful reactor complex in the world. The effect turns out to be small. Under a reasonable assumption of systematic error of 4% in the experiment, we find that sin^2{\\theta_{12}} can be determined to the accuracy of \\simeq 2% (\\simeq 3%), at 68.27% CL for 1 degree of freedom, for 60 GW_th kton yr (20 GW_th kton yr) operation. We also discuss implications of such an accurate measurement of \\theta_{12}.

  13. Large-Mass Ultra-Low Noise Germanium Detectors: Performance and Applications in Neutrino and Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Barbeau; J. I. Collar; O. Tench

    2007-01-07

    A new type of radiation detector, a p-type modified electrode germanium diode, is presented. The prototype displays, for the first time, a combination of features (mass, energy threshold and background expectation) required for a measurement of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering in a nuclear reactor experiment. The device hybridizes the mass and energy resolution of a conventional HPGe coaxial gamma spectrometer with the low electronic noise and threshold of a small x-ray semiconductor detector, also displaying an intrinsic ability to distinguish multiple from single-site particle interactions. The present performance of the prototype and possible further improvements are discussed, as well as other applications for this new type of device in neutrino and astroparticle physics (double-beta decay, neutrino magnetic moment and WIMP searches).

  14. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-09-30

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material - There are likely multiple phases of material in the salt (metal or compound), either suspended through the salt matrix, layered in the bottom of the tank, or both. These phases may contribute to plugging during any planned transfer. There is not enough data to know for sure. (4) Probe heat trace - The alternate transfer method does not include heat tracing of the bottom of the probe. There is a concern that this may cool the salt and other phases of materials present enough to block the flow of salt. (5) Stress-corrosion cracking - Additionally, there is a concern regarding moisture that may have been introduced into the tanks. Due to time constraints, this concern was not validated. However, if moisture was introduced into the tanks and not removed during heating the tanks before HF and F2 sparging, there would be an additional concern regarding the potential for stress-corrosion cracking of the tank walls.

  15. Short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance, tritium beta decay, and neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giunti, Carlo; Laveder, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica G. Galilei, Universita di Padova, and INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    We consider the interpretation of the MiniBooNE low-energy anomaly and the gallium radioactive source experiments anomaly in terms of short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance in the framework of 3+1 four-neutrino mixing schemes. The separate fits of MiniBooNE and gallium data are highly compatible, with close best-fit values of the effective oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}2{theta}. The combined fit gives {Delta}m{sup 2}(greater-or-similar sign)0.1 eV{sup 2} and 0.11(less-or-similar sign)sin{sup 2}2{theta}(less-or-similar sign)0.48 at 2{sigma}. We consider also the data of the Bugey and Chooz reactor antineutrino oscillation experiments and the limits on the effective electron antineutrino mass in {beta} decay obtained in the Mainz and Troitsk tritium experiments. The fit of the data of these experiments limits the value of sin{sup 2}2{theta} below 0.10 at 2{sigma}. Considering the tension between the neutrino MiniBooNE and gallium data and the antineutrino reactor and tritium data as a statistical fluctuation, we perform a combined fit which gives {Delta}m{sup 2}{approx_equal}2 eV and 0.01(less-or-similar sign)sin{sup 2}2{theta}(less-or-similar sign)0.13 at 2{sigma}. Assuming a hierarchy of masses m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}, m{sub 3}<neutrino masses in {beta} decay and neutrinoless double-{beta} decay are, respectively, between about 0.06 and 0.49 and between about 0.003 and 0.07 eV at 2{sigma}. We also consider the possibility of reconciling the tension between the neutrino MiniBooNE and gallium data and the antineutrino reactor and tritium data with different mixings in the neutrino and antineutrino sectors. We find a 2.6{sigma} indication of a mixing angle asymmetry.

  16. Electron Neutrinos at T2K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melissa George

    2010-06-07

    Tokai-to-Kamioka T2K is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, looking for sub-dominant muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations. One of the primary aims of the T2K experiment is to narrow down the current limit on the value of theta13 (which if this value large enough, suggests CP violation in the neutrino sector) and to find whether theta23 is maximal, which is crucial for constraining neutrino mass models. T2K produces a high power neutrino beam at the J-PARC facility on the east coast of Japan, and this beam is then characterised by the near detector ND280 280 m from the start of the beam, the far detector (Super-Kamiokande), a 50 kton water Cherenkov detector, then detects the beam at the oscillation maximum of 295 km on Japan's west coast. T2K will be the first experiment to really study the electron neutrino appearance measurement - whose result will be sensitive to theta13 arguably the main physics goal of T2K. The ND280 detector is imperative to this measurement and will be used to understand the electron neutrino appearance background. The status of the T2K experiment and the predicted performance for the electron neutrino appearance measurement is presented here.

  17. Cosmic neutrino cascades from secret neutrino interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny C. Y. Ng; John F. Beacom

    2014-11-01

    The first detection of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube provides new opportunities for tests of neutrino properties. The long baseline through the Cosmic Neutrino Background (C$\

  18. Neutrino Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operators in the Lagrangian (Majorana mass terms), or both. The ongoing neutrinoless double-beta decay searches may be able to shine light on the matter. But the neutrino sector...

  19. Letter of Intent for KASKA: High Accuracy Neutrino Oscillation Measurements with anti-nu_es from Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Aoki; K. Akiyama; Y. Fukuda; A. Fukui; Y. Funaki; H. Furuta; T. Hara; T. Haruna; N. Ishihara; T. Iwabuchi; M. Katsumata; T. Kawasaki; M. Kuze; J. Maeda; T. Matsubara; T. Matsumoto; H. Minakata; H. Miyata; Y. Nagasaka; T. Nakagawa; N. Nakajima; H. Nakano; K. Nitta; M. Nomachi; K. Sakai; Y. Sakamoto; K. Sakuma; M. Sasaki; F. Suekane; H. Sugiyama; T. Sumiyoshi; H. Tabata; N. Tamura; M. Tanimoto; Y. Tsuchiya; R. Watanabe; O. Yasuda

    2006-07-11

    One of the current most-demanded experiments in neutrino physics is to measure the last mixing angle theta_13. KASKA is an experiment to detect new type of reactor neutrino oscillation and to measure sin^2 2theta_13 accurately using the world's most powerful nuclear reactor complex; Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station. KASKA utilizes near and far detectors of identical structure at nearly optimized baselines and underground depths to cancel most of the systematics and reduce backgrounds. The expected sensitivity is sin^2 2theta_13~0.015, which is 10 times better sensitivity than the current upper limit measured by CHOOZ reactor experiment. Extension of KASKA project has potential to accurately measure other anti-nu_e oscillation parameters. Intense and precisely known neutrino flux measured by the KASKA-theta_13 phase can be used to pin down sin^2 2theta_12 at a baseline ~50km and to measure Dm^2_13 for the first time at a baseline ~5km. This Letter of Intent describes physics motivation, detector system and expected performance of the KASKA experiment.

  20. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  1. The possibility of high amplitude driven contained modes during ion Bernstein wave experiments in the tokamak fusion test reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor TFTR ,1 substantial evidence of interaction of IBWs with fast par- ticles in interacting with the IBW albeit that the beam ions were being heated as opposed to cooled , while wall in the tokamak fusion test reactor Daniel S. Clarka) and Nathaniel J. Fisch Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

  2. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor M. H. Redi a , S. H. Batha, M. G. Bell, R. V. Budny, D. S. Darrow, F. M on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plas. 5 , 1577 (1998)] are found to be in good agreement code which includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first­principles model

  3. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor M. H. Redia , S. H. Batha, M. G. Bell, R. V. Budny, D. S. Darrow, F. M on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plas. 5, 1577 (1998)] are found to be in good agreement code which includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first-principles model

  4. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradin, Michael; Anderson, M.; Muci, M.; Hassan, Yassin; Dominguez, A.; Tokuhiro, Akira; Hamman, K.

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  5. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. A Sterile Neutrino at DUNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, Jeffrey M; Kelly, Kevin J; Kobach, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to probe the existence and effects of a fourth neutrino mass-eigenstate. We study the mixing of the fourth mass-eigenstate with the three active neutrinos of the Standard Model, including the effects of new sources of CP-invariance violation, for a wide range of new mass-squared differences, from lower than 10^-5 eV^2 to higher than 1 eV^2. DUNE is sensitive to previously unexplored regions of the mixing angle - mass-squared difference parameter space. If there is a fourth neutrino, in some regions of the parameter space, DUNE is able to measure the new oscillation parameters (some very precisely) and clearly identify two independent sources of CP-invariance violation. Finally, we use the hypothesis that there are four neutrino mass-eigenstates in order to ascertain how well DUNE can test the limits of the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm. In this way, we briefly explore whether light sterile neutrinos can serve as proxies for ot...

  8. Testing the minimal $S_4$ model of neutrinos with the Dirac and Majorana phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    We propose two new simple lepton flavor models in the framework of the $S_4$ flavor symmetry. The neutrino mass matrices, which are given by two complex parameters, lead to the inverted mass hierarchy. The charged lepton mass matrix has the 1-2 lepton flavor mixing, which gives the non-vanishing reactor angle $\\theta_{13}$. These models predict the Dirac phase and the Majorana phases, which are testable in the future experiments. The predicted magnitudes of the effective neutrino mass for the neutrino-less double beta decay are in the regions as $32~\\text{meV}\\lesssim |m_{ee}|\\lesssim 49~\\text{meV}$ and $34~\\text{meV}\\lesssim |m_{ee}|\\lesssim 59~\\text{meV}$, respectively. These values are close to the expected reaches of the coming experiments. The total sum of the neutrino masses are predicted in both models as $0.0952~\\text{eV}\\lesssim \\sum m_i\\lesssim 0.101~\\text{eV}$ and $0.150~\\text{eV}\\lesssim \\sum m_i\\lesssim 0.160~\\text{eV}$, respectively.

  9. Neutrinos: an Open Window on Fundamental Physics and the Evolution of the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pascoli, Silvia (IPPP, Durham University) [IPPP, Durham University

    2010-08-18

    In the past ten years, a series of experiments has confirmed that neutrinos can oscillate between different types ('flavors') and have mass. These results are the first solid evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics, with profound implications for the Universe and the laws that govern it. Thanks to a broad experimental program, including accelerator- and reactor-based experiments such as MINOS, MiniBooNE, T2K, Double-CHOOZ, Daya Bay, NOvA, LBNE, and searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, we have just entered the 'precision era' in neutrino physics. I will review the status of experimental results, their implications for our understanding of neutrino properties, and the questions that must be addressed. I will give an overview of the exciting experimental program that is underway and I will discuss how neutrino physics will help in opening a new window on the fundamental laws of Nature, its fundamental constituents, and the evolution of the Universe.

  10. Entanglement of neutrino states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Khokhlov

    2008-11-12

    Muon and muon antineutrino born in the decay of charged pion form the entangled spin state. The decay of muon with the left helicity triggers the left helicity for muon antineutrino to preserve the null total angular momentum of muon and muon antineutrino. This is forbidden for antineutrino hence one cannot detect the muon antineutrino after the decay of muon. This effect may explain the deficit of muon neutrino flux in the Super-Kamiokande, K2K, MINOS experiments.

  11. In-Reactor Experiment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Stainless Steel Cladding Aluminide Coating on Cladding ID Zircaloy-4 Getter LiAlO 2 Pellet Ni Plating on Getter Not to scale 4 TPBAR Irradiation Performance In 2004, during the...

  12. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the delta m**2 about equals 1-eV**2 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, David W.; /Columbia U.

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  13. Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

    2004-10-22

    The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very large scale water Cerenkov detector, or a magnetized detector with flavor and antiflavor sensitivity. Additional priorities are nuclear physics measurements which will reduce the uncertainties in the predictions of the Standard Solar Model, and similar supporting measurements for atmospheric neutrinos (cosmic ray fluxes, magnetic fields, etc.). We note as well that the detectors for both solar and atmospheric neutrino measurements can serve as multipurpose detectors, with capabilities of discovering dark matter, relic supernova neutrinos, proton decay, or as targets for long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments.

  14. Non-Oscillation Probes of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster Institut fuer Kernphysik, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2010-03-30

    The absolute scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing statements on the neutrino mass from cosmological observations, two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and the direct neutrino mass search. For both methods currently experiments with a sensitivity of O(100) meV are being set up or commissioned.

  15. Neutrinos from Supernovas and Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Vissani; Maria Laura Costantini

    2005-08-05

    Supernovae (SN) and supernova remnants (SNR) have key roles in galaxies, but their physical descriptions is still incomplete. Thus, it is of interest to study neutrino radiation to understand SN and SNR better. We will discuss: (1) The ~10 MeV thermal neutrinos that arise from core collapse SN, that were observed for SN1987A, and can be seen with several existing or planned experiments. (2) The 10-100 TeV neutrinos expected from galactic SNR (in particular from RX J1713.7-3946) targets of future underwater neutrino telescopes.

  16. Letter of Intent for KASKA: High Accuracy Neutrino Oscillation Measurements with anti-nu_es from Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoki, M; Fukuda, Y; Fukui, A; Funaki, Y; Furuta, H; Hara, T; Haruna, T; Ishihara, N; Iwabuchi, T; Katsumata, M; Kawasaki, T; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Matsubara, T; Matsumoto, T; Minakata, H; Miyata, H; Nagasaka, Y; Nakagawa, T; Nakajima, N; Nakano, H; Nitta, K; Nomachi, M; Sakai, K; Sakamoto, Y; Sakuma, K; Sasaki, M; Suekane, F; Sugiyama, H; Sumiyoshi, T; Tabata, H; Tamura, N; Tanimoto, M; Tsuchiya, Y; Watanabe, R; Yasuda, O

    2006-01-01

    One of the current most-demanded experiments in neutrino physics is to measure the last mixing angle theta_13. KASKA is an experiment to detect new type of reactor neutrino oscillation and to measure sin^2 2theta_13 accurately using the world's most powerful nuclear reactor complex; Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station. KASKA utilizes near and far detectors of identical structure at nearly optimized baselines and underground depths to cancel most of the systematics and reduce backgrounds. The expected sensitivity is sin^2 2theta_13~0.015, which is 10 times better sensitivity than the current upper limit measured by CHOOZ reactor experiment. Extension of KASKA project has potential to accurately measure other anti-nu_e oscillation parameters. Intense and precisely known neutrino flux measured by the KASKA-theta_13 phase can be used to pin down sin^2 2theta_12 at a baseline ~50km and to measure Dm^2_13 for the first time at a baseline ~5km. This Letter of Intent describes physics motivation, detector system...

  17. Can we learn something more on oscillations from atmospheric neutrinos?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2006-10-04

    We show that for long-baseline experiments using a Mt water Cerenkov detector atmospheric neutrino data provide a powerful method to resolve parameter degeneracies. In particular, the combination of long-baseline and atmospheric data increases significantly the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy and the octant of $\\theta_{23}$. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility to use $\\mu$-like atmospheric neutrino data from a big magnetized iron calorimeter to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  18. Everything under the sun: A review of solar neutrinos

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gann, Gabriel D. Orebi

    2015-07-15

    Solar neutrinos offer a unique opportunity to study the interaction of neutrinos with matter, a sensitive search for potential new physics effects, and a probe of solar structure and solar system formation. This paper describes the broad physics program addressed by solar neutrino studies, presents the current suite of experiments programs, and describes several potential future detectors that could address the open questions in this field. This paper is a summary of a talk presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference in Boston.

  19. Everything Under the Sun: A Review of Solar Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. D. Orebi Gann

    2015-04-10

    Solar neutrinos offer a unique opportunity to study the interaction of neutrinos with matter, a sensitive search for potential new physics effects, and a probe of solar structure and solar system formation. This paper describes the broad physics program addressed by solar neutrino studies, presents the current suite of experiments programs, and describes several potential future detectors that could address the open questions in this field. This paper is a summary of a talk presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference in Boston.

  20. High Energy Neutrino Generator for Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Kowalski; Askhat Gazizov

    2003-12-08

    We present the high energy neutrino Monte Carlo event generator ANIS (All Neutrino Interaction Simulation). The aim of the program is to provide a detailed and flexible neutrino event simulation for high energy neutrino detectors, such as AMANDA and ICECUBE. It generates neutrinos of any flavor according to a specific flux, propagates them through the Earth and in a final step simulates neutrino interactions within a specified volume. All relevant standard model processes are implemented. We discuss strength and limitations of the program, and provide as an example event rates for atmospheric and E^-2 neutrino spectra.

  1. Solar models and solar neutrino oscillations John N Bahcall and Carlos Pea-Garay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    Solar models and solar neutrino oscillations John N Bahcall and Carlos Peña-Garay Institute and experimental, of solar neutrino fluxes and of the masses and mixing angles that characterize solar neutrino oscillations. We also summarize the principal reasons for performing new solar neutrino experiments and what we

  2. Solar models and solar neutrino oscillations John N Bahcall and Carlos PeaGaray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    Solar models and solar neutrino oscillations John N Bahcall and Carlos Peña­Garay Institute and experimental, of solar neutrino fluxes and of the masses and mixing angles that characterize solar neutrino oscillations. We also summarize the principal reasons for performing new solar neutrino experiments and what we

  3. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle ?23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  4. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with very large volume neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Yañez; A. Kouchner

    2015-09-28

    Neutrino oscillations have been probed during the last few decades using multiple neutrino sources and experimental set-ups. In the recent years, very large volume neutrino telescopes have started contributing to the field. First ANTARES and then IceCube have relied on large and sparsely instrumented volumes to observe atmospheric neutrinos for combinations of baselines and energies inaccessible to other experiments. Using this advantage, the latest result from IceCube starts approaching the precision of other established technologies, and is paving the way for future detectors, such as ORCA and PINGU. These new projects seek to provide better measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters, and eventually determine the neutrino mass ordering. The results from running experiments and the potential from proposed projects are discussed in this review, emphasizing the experimental challenges involved in the measurements.

  5. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with very large volume neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yañez, J P

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations have been probed during the last few decades using multiple neutrino sources and experimental set-ups. In the recent years, very large volume neutrino telescopes have started contributing to the field. First ANTARES and then IceCube have relied on large and sparsely instrumented volumes to observe atmospheric neutrinos for combinations of baselines and energies inaccessible to other experiments. Using this advantage, the latest result from IceCube starts approaching the precision of other established technologies, and is paving the way for future detectors, such as ORCA and PINGU. These new projects seek to provide better measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters, and eventually determine the neutrino mass ordering. The results from running experiments and the potential from proposed projects are discussed in this review, emphasizing the experimental challenges involved in the measurements.

  6. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle ?13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaffe, D. E.

    2014-10-03

    A new measurement of the ?13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the ?13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22?13=0.083±0.018 in the three-flavor oscillationmore »model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22?13=0.089±0.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.« less

  7. LBNO-DEMO: Large-scale neutrino detector demonstrators for phased performance assessment in view of a long-baseline oscillation experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Agostino; B. Andrieu; R. Asfandiyarov; D. Autiero; O. Bésida; F. Bay; R. Bayes; A. M. Blebea-Apostu; A. Blondel; M. Bogomilov; S. Bolognesi; S. Bordoni; A. Bravar; M. Buizza-Avanzini; F. Cadoux; D. Caiulo; M. Calin; M. Campanelli; C. Cantini; L. Chaussard; D. Chesneanu; N. Colino; P. Crivelli; I. De Bonis; Y. Déclais; J. Dawson; C. De La Taille; P. Del Amo Sanchez; A. Delbart; S. Di Luise; D. Duchesneau; F. Dulucq; J. Dumarchez; I. Efthymiopoulos; S. Emery; T. Enqvist; L. Epprecht; T. Esanu; D. Franco; D. Franco; M. Friend; V. Galymov; A. Gendotti; C. Giganti; I. Gil-Botella; M. C Gomoiu; P. Gorodetzky; A. Haesler; T. Hasegawa; S. Horikawa; M. Ieva; A. Jipa; Y. Karadzhov; I. Karpikov; A. Khotjantsev; A. Korzenev; D. Kryn; Y. Kudenko; P. Kuusiniemi; I. Lazanu; J. -M. Levy; K. Loo; T. Lux; J. Maalampi; R. M. Margineanu; J. Marteau; C. Martin; G. Martin-Chassard; E. Mazzucato; A. Mefodiev; O. Mineev; B. Mitrica; S. Murphy; T. Nakadaira; M. Nessi; K. Nikolics; L. Nita; E. Noah; P. Novella; G. A. Nuijten; T. Ovsiannikova; C. Palomares; T. Patzak; E. Pennacchio; L. Periale; H. Pessard; B. Popov; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; C. Regenfus; C. Ristea; O. Ristea; A. Robert; A. Rubbia; K. Sakashita; F. Sanchez; R. Santorelli; E. Scantamburlo; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; M. Slupecki; F. J. P. Soler; D. L. Stanca; A. Tonazzo; W. H. Trzaska; R. Tsenov; G. Vankova-Kirilova; F. Vannucci; G. Vasseur; A. Verdugo; T. Viant; S. Wu; N. Yershov; L. Zambelli; M. Zito

    2014-09-14

    In June 2012, an Expression of Interest for a long-baseline experiment (LBNO) has been submitted to the CERN SPSC. LBNO considers three types of neutrino detector technologies: a double-phase liquid argon (LAr) TPC and a magnetised iron detector as far detectors. For the near detector, a high-pressure gas TPC embedded in a calorimeter and a magnet is the baseline design. A mandatory milestone is a concrete prototyping effort towards the envisioned large-scale detectors, and an accompanying campaign of measurements aimed at assessing the detector associated systematic errors. The proposed $6\\times 6\\times 6$m$^3$ DLAr is an industrial prototype of the design discussed in the EoI and scalable to 20 kton or 50~kton. It is to be constructed and operated in a controlled laboratory and surface environment with test beam access, such as the CERN North Area (NA). Its successful operation and full characterisation will be a fundamental milestone, likely opening the path to an underground deployment of larger detectors. The response of the DLAr demonstrator will be measured and understood with an unprecedented precision in a charged particle test beam (0.5-20 GeV/c). The exposure will certify the assumptions and calibrate the response of the detector, and allow to develop and to benchmark sophisticated reconstruction algorithms, such as those of 3-dimensional tracking, particle ID and energy flow in liquid argon. All these steps are fundamental for validating the correctness of the physics performance described in the LBNO EoI.

  8. Big World of Small Neutrinos Hitoshi Murayama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    discovered by Cowan and Reines using a nuclear reactor in 1958 · Massless Neutrinos in the Standard Model theory, however, we may say that we have no argument, either empirical or theoretical, for upholding theorem in quantum field theory ­ C: interchange particles & anti- particles ­ P: parity ­ T: time

  9. Global neutrino parameter estimation using Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen Hannestad

    2007-10-10

    We present a Markov Chain Monte Carlo global analysis of neutrino parameters using both cosmological and experimental data. Results are presented for the combination of all presently available data from oscillation experiments, cosmology, and neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition we explicitly study the interplay between cosmological, tritium decay and neutrinoless double beta decay data in determining the neutrino mass parameters. We furthermore discuss how the inference of non-neutrino cosmological parameters can benefit from future neutrino mass experiments such as the KATRIN tritium decay experiment or neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.

  10. Post-remedial-action survey report for Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler Reactor Facility, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.

    1981-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous federally-funded contracted projects involving the use of radioactive materials. Among these was the Kinetics Experiment Water Boiler (KEWB) Reactor which was operated under the auspices of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The KEWB Reactor was last operated in 1966. The facility was subsequently declared excess and decontamination and decommissioning operations were conducted during the first half of calendar year 1975. The facility was completely dismantled and the site graded to blend with the surrounding terrain. During October 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of the KEWB site was conducted on the behalf of the US Department of Energy by the Radiological Survey Group (RSG) of the Occupational Health and Safety Division's Health Physics Section (OHS/HP) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The survey confirmed that the site was free from contamination and could be released for unrestricted use.

  11. Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Alexander Studenikin

    2010-06-08

    A short review on electromagnetic properties of neutrinos is presented. In spite of many efforts in the theoretical and experimental studies of neutrino electromagnetic properties, they still remain one of the main puzzles related to neutrinos.

  12. Sterile neutrinos with pseudoscalar self-interactions and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archidiacono, Maria; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Sterile neutrinos in the electronvolt mass range are hinted at by a number of terrestrial neutrino experiments. However, such neutrinos are highly incompatible with data from the Cosmic Microwave Background and large scale structure. This paper discusses how charging sterile neutrinos under a new pseudoscalar interaction can reconcile eV sterile neutrinos with terrestrial neutrino data. We show that this model can reconcile eV sterile neutrinos in cosmology, providing a fit to all available data which is way better than the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model with one additional fully thermalized sterile neutrino. In particular it also prefers a value of the Hubble parameter much closer to the locally measured value.

  13. Operating experience feedback report: Reliability of safety-related steam turbine-driven standby pumps. Commercial power reactors, Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, J.R.

    1994-10-01

    This report documents a detailed analysis of failure initiators, causes and design features for steam turbine assemblies (turbines with their related components, such as governors and valves) which are used as drivers for standby pumps in the auxiliary feedwater systems of US commercial pressurized water reactor plants, and in the high pressure coolant injection and reactor core isolation cooling systems of US commercial boiling water reactor plants. These standby pumps provide a redundant source of water to remove reactor core heat as specified in individual plant safety analysis reports. The period of review for this report was from January 1974 through December 1990 for licensee event reports (LERS) and January 1985 through December 1990 for Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure data. This study confirmed the continuing validity of conclusions of earlier studies by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and by the US nuclear industry that the most significant factors in failures of turbine-driven standby pumps have been the failures of the turbine-drivers and their controls. Inadequate maintenance and the use of inappropriate vendor technical information were identified as significant factors which caused recurring failures.

  14. 162 Fall 1999 Environmental Progress (Vol.18, No.3) A pilot/full-scale biotrickling filter reactor experiment was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    air and water is passed through an inert filter bed on which a consortium of microorganisms lives162 Fall 1999 Environmental Progress (Vol.18, No.3) A pilot/full-scale biotrickling filter reactor consisted of two stainless steel tanks in series, each with filter bed volumes of 4.0 m3, filled with 3

  15. Direct neutrino mass measurements after PLANCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    The absolute mass scale of neutrinos remains an open question subject to experimental investigation from both particle physics and cosmology. Over the next decade, a number of experiments from both disciplines will attempt ...

  16. On the 17-keV neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hime, A.

    1993-04-01

    A brief review on the status of the 17-keV neutrino is presented. Several different experiments found spectral distortions which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino admixture in {beta} decay. Recent experiments, however, rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino as well as escaping criticisms of earlier null results. Moreover, the majority of positive results have been reinterpreted in terms of instrumental effects, despite the need for a different explanation in each case. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

  17. On the 17-keV neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hime, A.

    1993-04-01

    A brief review on the status of the 17-keV neutrino is presented. Several different experiments found spectral distortions which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino admixture in [beta] decay. Recent experiments, however, rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino as well as escaping criticisms of earlier null results. Moreover, the majority of positive results have been reinterpreted in terms of instrumental effects, despite the need for a different explanation in each case. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

  18. Determining neutrino properties using future galaxy redshift surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. B. Abdalla; S. Rawlings

    2007-02-12

    Current measurements of the large-scale structure of galaxies are able to place an $\\sim 0.5 ~ \\rm eV$ upper limit on the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. An order-of-magnitude improvement in raw sensitivity, together with an insensitivity to systematic effects, is needed to reach the lowest value allowed by particle physics experiments. We consider the prospects of determining both the neutrino mass scale and the number of of massive neutrinos using future redshift surveys, specifically those undertaken with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), with and without additional constraints from the upcoming Planck CMB experiment. If the sum of the neutrino masses $\\sum m_i \\gtsimeq 0.25 ~ \\rm eV$ then the imprint of neutrinos on large-scale structure (LSS) should be enough, on its own, to establish the neutrino mass scale and, considered alongside CMB constraints, it will also determine the number of massive neutrinos $N_{\

  19. Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON -Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON -Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos- R. Hazamaa , P Be solar 's. The present status of MOON for the low energy solar experiment is briefly discussed the pp solar flux with good accuracy. 1. INTRODUCTION Realtime studies of the high-energy component of 8

  20. Solar Neutrinos: Where We Are, What We Need

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall

    1998-02-17

    This talk compares standard model predictions with the results of solar neutrino experiments. Here `standard model' means the combined standard model of minimal electroweak theory plus a standard solar model. I emphasize the importance of recent analyses in which the neutrino fluxes are treated as free parameters, independent of any constraints from solar models, and the stunning agreement between the predictions of standard solar models and helioseismological measurements. In order to interpret solar neutrino experiments more accurately in terms of fundamental physics and astronomy, we need improved improved nuclear physics data. I describe the five most important nuclear physics problems whose solution is required for understanding the precise implications of solar neutrino experiments.

  1. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The IRPhEP is patterned after its predecessor, the ICSBEP, but focuses on other integral measurements such as buckling, spectral characteristics, reactivity effects, reactivity coefficients, kinetics measurements, reaction-rate and power distributions, nuclide compositions and other miscellaneous types of measurements in addition to the critical configuration. The two projects are closely coordinated to avoid duplication of effort and to leverage limited resources to achieve a common goal. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. While coordination and administration of the IRPhEP takes place at an international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in an OECD NEA Handbook entitled, “International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.” The first edition of this Handbook, the 2006 Edition spans over 2000 pages and contains data from 16 different experimental series that were

  2. Weak interaction processes in nuclei involving neutrinos and CDM candidates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Tsakstara, V. [Theoretical Physics Section, University of Ioannina, GR 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Divari, P. C. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hellenic Army Academy, Vari 16673, Attica (Greece); Sinatkas, J. [Department of Informatics and Computer Technology, TEI of Western Macedonia, GR-52100 Kastoria (Greece)

    2009-11-09

    In this work, we concentrate on the nuclear physics aspects of low-energy neutrinos and in particular on problems related to neutrino detection by terrestrial experiments, neutrino astrophysics and neutrino-nucleus interactions. The detection of low-flux neutrinos, feasible by measuring the energy recoil of the recoiling nucleus with gaseous-detectors having very-low threshold-energy, is carried out in conjunction with direct-detection of cold dark matter events and nonstandard physics searches like the neutrinoless double beta decay.

  3. Neutrinos are the least familiar fundamental particles in the Standard Model, and are currently the focus of many high-energy physics experiments. Most of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Michael W.

    at: "Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at E3.5GeV" ( http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v111/i2/e022501 ) and "Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at E3.5GeV" ( http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v111/i2/e022502

  4. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Virtual Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBerylliumBiomimetic(cousinDataTalks andclose

  5. MINERvA Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonforsupernovae model (Journal AboutContent Skip to Search Skip

  6. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan; for the MAP; MICE Collaborations

    2014-12-10

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  7. Neutrino flux variations and solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikhsanov, R N

    2003-01-01

    We investigate temporal variations of the solar neutrino flux in 1970-1997. The periods of 11, 5 and 2 years have been found in the variations of the neutrino flux. The results indicate that a periodicity close to 5 years is the most significant in the data from both the Homestake and GALLEX experiments. Two groups of the solar activity indices have been distinguished regarding their interconnection with the neutrino flux series. The first group contains the indices showing predominantly 11-year period, while a periodicity at approximately 5 years is observed in the second group. The correlation coefficients between the neutrino flux and indices from the first group are negative, with their module not exceeding 0.5. The second group is characterized by positive correlation with the neutrino counting rates with coefficients not lower than 0.6. A discussion of findings is presented.

  8. Neutrino Oscillations in the Dualized Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J Bordes; HM Chan; J. Pfaudler; ST Tsou

    1998-02-25

    A method developed from the Dualized Standard Model for calculating the quark CKM matrix and masses is applied to the parallel problem in neutrino oscillations. Taking the parameters determined from quarks and the masses of two neutrinos: $m_3^2 \\sim 10^{-2} - 10^{-3} eV^2$ suggested by atmospheric neutrino data, and $m_2^2 \\sim 10^{-10} eV^2$ suggested by the long wave-length oscillation (LWO) solution of the solar neutrino problem, one obtains from a parameter-free calculation all the mixing angles in reasonable agreement with existing experiment. However, the scheme is found not to accommodate comfortably the mass values $m_2^2 \\sim 10^{-5} eV^2$ suggested by the MSW solution for solar neutrinos.

  9. Neutrino Oscillations in the Dualized Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordes, J; Pfaudler, J; Tsou, S T; Chan, HM; Tsou, ST

    1998-01-01

    A method developed from the Dualized Standard Model for calculating the quark CKM matrix and masses is applied to the parallel problem in neutrino oscillations. Taking the parameters determined from quarks and the masses of two neutrinos: $m_3^2 \\sim 10^{-2} - 10^{-3} eV^2$ suggested by atmospheric neutrino data, and $m_2^2 \\sim 10^{-10} eV^2$ suggested by the long wave-length oscillation (LWO) solution of the solar neutrino problem, one obtains from a parameter-free calculation all the mixing angles in reasonable agreement with existing experiment. However, the scheme is found not to accommodate comfortably the mass values $m_2^2 \\sim 10^{-5} eV^2$ suggested by the MSW solution for solar neutrinos.

  10. Detecting non-relativistic cosmic neutrinos by capture on tritium: phenomenology and physics potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Long; Cecilia Lunardini; Eray Sabancilar

    2014-11-12

    We study the physics potential of the detection of the Cosmic Neutrino Background via neutrino capture on tritium, taking the proposed PTOLEMY experiment as a case study. With the projected energy resolution of $\\Delta \\sim$ 0.15 eV, the experiment will be sensitive to neutrino masses with degenerate spectrum, $m_1 \\simeq m_2 \\simeq m_3 = m_\

  11. Muons and Neutrinos 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2008-01-29

    This paper is the written version of the rapporteur talk on Section HE-2, muons and neutrinos, presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Merida, Yucatan, July 11, 2007. Topics include atmospheric muons and neutrinos, solar neutrinos and astrophysical neutrinos as well as calculations and instrumentation related to these topics.

  12. Raymond Davis Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the Solar Neutrino Problems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access toSmall ReactorRaymond Davis, Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the

  13. Identification of nuclear effects in neutrino-carbon interactions at low three-momentum transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigues, P A; Miltenberger, E; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; Devan, J; Eberly, B; Elkins, M; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Leistico, J R; Lovlein, A; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman,; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Ruterbories, D; Schmitz, D W; Salinas, C J Solano; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D

    2015-01-01

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current $\

  14. Identification of nuclear effects in neutrino-carbon interactions at low three-momentum transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Rodrigues; J. Demgen; E. Miltenberger; L. Aliaga; O. Altinok; A. Bercellie; M. Betancourt; A. Bodek; A. Bravar; M. F. Carneiro; J. Chvojka; J. Devan; B. Eberly; M. Elkins; J. Felix; L. Fields; R. Fine; A. M. Gago; R. Galindo; H. Gallagher; A. Ghosh; T. Golan; R. Gran; D. A. Harris; A. Higuera; K. Hurtado; M. Kiveni; J. Kleykamp; M. Kordosky; T. Le; J. R. Leistico; A. Lovlein; E. Maher; S. Manly; W. A. Mann; C. M. Marshall; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; K. S. McFarland; C. L. McGivern; A. M. McGowan; B. Messerly; J. Miller; A. Mislivec; J. Mousseau; T. Muhlbeier; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; A. Norrick; Nuruzzaman; C. E. Patrick; G. N. Perdue; M. A. Ramirez; R. D. Ransome; H. Ray; L. Ren; D. Rimal; D. Ruterbories; D. W. Schmitz; C. J. Solano Salinas; B. G. Tice; E. Valencia; T. Walton; J. Wolcott; M. Wospakrik; G. Zavala; D. Zhang

    2015-11-18

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current $\

  15. A New Interpretation of Alpha-particle-driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Nazikian; G.J. Kramer; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; S.E. Sharapov

    2003-03-26

    The original description of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in terms of Toroidal Alfvin Eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the anti-ballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time.

  16. Double Beta Decay, Majorana Neutrinos, and Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank T. Avignone III; Steven R. Elliott; Jonathan Engel

    2007-11-26

    The theoretical and experimental issues relevant to neutrinoless double-beta decay are reviewed. The impact that a direct observation of this exotic process would have on elementary particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics and cosmology is profound. Now that neutrinos are known to have mass and experiments are becoming more sensitive, even the non-observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay will be useful. If the process is actually observed, we will immediately learn much about the neutrino. The status and discovery potential of proposed experiments are reviewed in this context, with significant emphasis on proposals favored by recent panel reviews. The importance of and challenges in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements that govern the decay are considered in detail. The increasing sensitivity of experiments and improvements in nuclear theory make the future exciting for this field at the interface of nuclear and particle physics.

  17. Double beta decay, Majorana neutrinos, and neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avignone, Frank T. III; Elliott, Steven R.; Engel, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The theoretical and experimental issues relevant to neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. The impact that a direct observation of this exotic process would have on elementary particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and cosmology is profound. Now that neutrinos are known to have mass and experiments are becoming more sensitive, even the nonobservation of neutrinoless double beta decay will be useful. If the process is actually observed, we will immediately learn much about the neutrino. The status and discovery potential of proposed experiments are reviewed in this context, with significant emphasis on proposals favored by recent panel reviews. The importance of and challenges in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements that govern the decay are considered in detail. The increasing sensitivity of experiments and improvements in nuclear theory make the future exciting for this field at the interface of nuclear and particle physics.

  18. Two-Phase Emission Detector for Measuring Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Hagmann; Adam Bernstein

    2004-11-04

    Coherent scattering is a flavor-blind, high-rate, as yet undetected neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. We propose to use a compact (kg-scale), two-phase (liquid-gas) argon ionization detector to measure coherent neutrino scattering off nuclei. In our approach, neutrino-induced nuclear recoils in the liquid produce a weak ionization signal, which is transported into a gas under the influence of an electric field, amplified via electroluminescence, and detected by phototubes or avalanche diodes. This paper describes the features of the detector, and estimates signal and background rates for a reactor neutrino source. Relatively compact detectors of this type, capable of detecting coherent scattering, offer a new approach to flavor-blind detection of man-made and astronomical neutrinos, and may allow development of compact neutrino detectors capable of non-intrusive real-time monitoring of fissile material in reactors.

  19. White paper report on using nuclear reactors to search for a value of theta13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    PAPER REPORT on Using Nuclear Reactors to Search for a valuetimely new experiment at a nuclear reactor sensitive to theand judicious choice of a nuclear reactor. The dominant

  20. Pion Production in High-Energy Neutrino Reactions with Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich Mosel

    2015-06-11

    [Background] A quantitative understanding of neutrino interactions with nuclei is needed for precision era neutrino long baseline experiments (MINOS, NOvA, DUNE) which all use nuclear targets. Pion production is the dominant reaction channel at the energies of these experiments. [Purpose] Investigate the influence of nuclear effects on neutrino-induced pion production cross sections and compare predictions for pion-production with available data. [Method] The Giessen Boltzmann--Uehling--Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) model is used for the description of all incohrent channels in neutrino-nucleus reactions. [Results] Differential cross sections for charged and neutral pion production for the MINER$\

  1. Detecting Neutrino Magnetic Moments with Conducting Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram; Schmitt, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that neutrinos have mass, yet it is very difficult to measure those masses directly. Within the standard model of particle physics, neutrinos will have an intrinsic magnetic moment proportional to their mass. We examine the possibility of detecting the magnetic moment using a conducting loop. According to Faraday's Law of Induction, a magnetic dipole passing through a conducting loop induces an electromotive force, or EMF, in the loop. We compute this EMF for neutrinos in several cases, based on a fully covariant formulation of the problem. We discuss prospects for a real experiment, as well as the possibility to test the relativistic formulation of intrinsic magnetic moments.

  2. Detecting Neutrino Magnetic Moments with Conducting Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Apyan; Armen Apyan; Michael Schmitt

    2007-09-23

    It is well established that neutrinos have mass, yet it is very difficult to measure those masses directly. Within the standard model of particle physics, neutrinos will have an intrinsic magnetic moment proportional to their mass. We examine the possibility of detecting the magnetic moment using a conducting loop. According to Faraday's Law of Induction, a magnetic dipole passing through a conducting loop induces an electromotive force, or EMF, in the loop. We compute this EMF for neutrinos in several cases, based on a fully covariant formulation of the problem. We discuss prospects for a real experiment, as well as the possibility to test the relativistic formulation of intrinsic magnetic moments.

  3. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan H. Davis

    2015-03-09

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

  4. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations for Earth Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can robustly measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of 4-5 percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  5. CP-phase effects on the effective neutrino mass m{sub ee} in the case of quasidegenerate neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maalampi, J. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Riittinen, J. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-02-01

    We study the possibility that the three mass states of the ordinary active neutrinos actually split into pairs of quasidegenerate states, with {Delta}m{sub kk}{sup '2{approx}}10{sup -12} eV{sup 2} or less, as a result of mixing of active neutrinos with sterile neutrinos. While in laboratory experiments these quasidegenerate pairs will look identical to single active states, the CP phase factors associated with active-sterile mixing might cause cancellations in the effective electron neutrino mass m{sub ee} measured in the neutrinoless double beta decay experiments thereby revealing the split nature of states.

  6. Optimization of neutrino beams for underground sites in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Longhin

    2012-06-19

    We present an optimization procedure for neutrino beams which could be produced at CERN and aimed to a set of seven possible underground sites in Europe with distances ranging from 130 km to 2300 km. Studies on the feasibility of a next generation very massive neutrino observatory have been performed for these sites in the context of the first phase of the LAGUNA design study. We consider specific scenarios for the proton driver (a high power proton driver at 4.5 GeV for the shortest baseline and a 50 GeV machine for longer baselines) and the far detector (a Water Cherenkov for the shortest baseline and a LAr TPC for longer baselines). The flux simulation profits of a full GEANT4 simulation. The optimization has been performed before the recent results on nu_e appearance by reactor and accelerator experiments and hence it is based on the maximization of the sensitivity on theta13. Nevertheless the optimized fluxes have been widely used since their publication on the internet (2010). This work is therefore mainly intended as a documentation of the adopted method and at the same time as an intermediate step towards future studies which will put the emphasis on the performances of beams for the study of delta_CP.

  7. Neutrino Sources and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Vissani

    2015-05-19

    In this lecture, prepared for PhD students, basic considerations on neutrino interactions, properties and sites of production are overviewed. The detailed content is as follows: Sect. 1, Weak interactions and neutrinos: Fermi coupling; definition of neutrinos; global numbers. Sect. 2, A list of neutrino sources: Explanatory note and examples (solar pp- and supernova-neutrinos). Sect. 3, Neutrinos oscillations: Basic formalism (Pontecorvo); matter effect (Mikheev, Smirnov, Wolfenstein); status of neutrino masses and mixings. Sect. 4, Modifying the standard model to include neutrinos masses: The fermions of the standard model; one additional operator in the standard model (Weinberg); implications. One summary table and several exercises offer the students occasions to check, consolidate and extend their understanding; the brief reference list includes historical and review papers and some entry points to active research in neutrino physics.

  8. Radiological Characterization Issues and Success Stories for the Melton Valley Scrap Yard and Homogeneous Reactor Experiment Evaporator Response Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, J.E.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Mitchell, K.G. [Strata-G, LLC, Knoxville, TN (United States); Gilpin, J.K. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Proper characterization is essential for assuring that wastes meet any treatment or disposal site waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In addition characterization is vital for proper preparation of shipping papers for transporting the waste for treatment or disposal. Process knowledge was inadequate for characterization of legacy waste items from two sites involved in the Melton Valley Decontamination and Decommissioning (MVD and D) project at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL): a scrap yard containing miscellaneous contaminated items, and a liquid waste evaporator used by an experimental nuclear reactor. Waste items at both sites were contaminated with Cs-137/Ba-137 m. Through the use of scaling factors, the gamma radiation associated with this radionuclide pair was used to characterize these items for proper disposal. Application of scaling factors permitted successful remediation of these sites on an accelerated schedule and avoided radiation exposure concerns associated with traditional sampling and analysis. (authors)

  9. Alternative Detection Methods for Highest Energy Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolf Nahnhauer

    2004-11-26

    Several experimental techniques are currently under development, to measure the expected tiny fluxes of highest energy neutrinos above 10**18 eV. Projects in different stages of realisation are discussed here, which are based on optical and radio as well as acoustic detectors. For the detection of neutrino events in this energy range a combination of different detector concepts in one experiment seems to be most promising.

  10. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses: Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; J. A. Grifols; E. Masso

    2003-03-27

    Compelling evidences in favor of neutrino masses and mixing obtained in the last years in Super-Kamiokande, SNO, KamLAND and other neutrino experiments made the physics of massive and mixed neutrinos a frontier field of research in particle physics and astrophysics. There are many open problems in this new field. In this review we consider the problem of the absolute values of neutrino masses, which apparently is the most difficult one from the experimental point of view. We discuss the present limits and the future prospects of beta-decay neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay. We consider the important problem of the calculation of nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double-beta decay and discuss the possibility to check the results of different model calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through their comparison with the experimental data. We discuss the upper bound of the total mass of neutrinos that was obtained recently from the data of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and other cosmological data and we discuss future prospects of the cosmological measurements of the total mass of neutrinos. We discuss also the possibility to obtain information on neutrino masses from the observation of the ultra high-energy cosmic rays (beyond the GZK cutoff). Finally, we review the main aspects of the physics of core-collapse supernovae, the limits on the absolute values of neutrino masses from the observation of SN1987A neutrinos and the future prospects of supernova neutrino detection.

  11. Neutrinos and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2002-03-18

    The role of neutrinos in big bang nucleosynthesis is discussed. The bounds on the number of neutrino families, neutrino degeneracy, parameters of neutrino oscillations are presented. A model of chemically inhomogeneous, while energetically smooth, universe created by inhomogeneous cosmological neutrino asymmetry is described. Nucleosynthesis limits on production of right-handed neutrinos are considered.

  12. LongBaseline Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Institute for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    LongBaseline Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Institute for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010 for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010 Robert J. Wilson 8/11/2010Page 2 Wednesday August 11th Session 6 PWG C520 14:00 Solar, Geo, and Reactor Neutrinos N. Tolich (Washington) 14:30 Q&A Guests/PWG Session 8

  13. Majorana Neutrinos, Neutrino Mass Spectrum and the || ~ 0.001 eV Frontier in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pascoli; S. T. Petcov

    2007-11-30

    If future neutrino oscillation experiments show that the neutrino mass spectrum is with normal ordering, m1 | > 0.01 eV give negative results, the next frontier in the quest for neutrinoless double beta-decay will correspond to || ~ 0.001 eV. Assuming that massive neutrinos are Majorana particles and their exchange is the dominant mechanism generating neutrinoless double beta-decay, we analise the conditions under which ||, in the case of three neutrino mixing and neutrino mass spectrum with normal ordering, would satisfy || > 0.001 eV. We consider the specific cases of i) normal hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum, ii) of relatively small value of the CHOOZ angle theta13 as well as iii) the general case of spectrum with normal ordering, partial hierarchy and a value of theta13 close to the existing upper limit. We study the ranges of the lightest neutrino mass m1 and/or of sin^2 theta13, for which ||> 0.001 eV and discuss the phenomenological implications of such scenarios. We provide also an estimate of || when the three neutrino masses and the neutrino mixing originate from neutrino mass term of Majorana type for the (left-handed) flavour neutrinos and m1 Ue1^2 + m2 U_e2^2 + m3 Ue3^2 =0, but there does not exist a symmetry which forbids the neutrinoless double beta-decay.

  14. The results of the CCI-3 reactor material experiment investigating 2-D core-concrete interaction and debris coolability with a silliceous concrete crucible.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Basu, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division; NRC

    2006-01-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. Despite years of international research, there are remaining uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. In the continuing effort to bridge this data gap, the third in a series of large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiments (CCI-3) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test involved the interaction of a 375 kg core-oxide melt within a two-dimensional siliceous concrete crucible. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predetermined ablation depth was reached, the cavity was flooded to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a summary description of the test facility and an overview of test results.

  15. Tau Neutrino Appearance via Neutrino Oscillations in Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    recommend acceptance of the dissertation. Dr. Chang Kee Jung Advisor Professor of Physics and Astronomy.1 Neutrinos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Neutrinos in the Standard Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.3.2 Outer Detector PMT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 2.4 Water Purification System

  16. 8Li electron spectrum versus 8B neutrino spectrum: implications for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Jonkmans; I. S. Towner; B. Sur

    1998-02-25

    The sensitivity of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) to measure the shape of the recoil electron spectrum in the charged-current reaction of $^{8}$B solar neutrinos interacting with deuterium can be improved if the results of a $^{8}$Li beta-decay calibration experiment are included in the test. We calculate an improvement in sensitivity, under certain idealistic assumptions, of about a factor of 2, sufficient to resolve different neutrino-oscillation solutions to the solar-neutrino problem. We further examine the role of recoil and radiative corrections on both the $^{8}$B neutrino spectrum and the $^{8}$Li electron spectrum and conclude that the influence of these effects on the ratio of the two spectra as measured by SNO is very small.

  17. Science and Technology of BOREXINO: A Real Time Detector for Low Energy Solar Neutrinos SOLAR NEUTRINOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borexino Collaboration; G. Alimonti

    2000-12-11

    BOREXINO, a real-time device for low energy neutrino spectroscopy is nearing completion of construction in the underground laboratories at Gran Sasso, Italy (LNGS). The experiment's goal is the direct measurement of the flux of 7Be solar neutrinos of all flavors via neutrino-electron scattering in an ultra-pure scintillation liquid. Seeded by a series of innovations which were brought to fruition by large scale operation of a 4-ton test detector at LNGS, a new technology has been developed for BOREXINO. It enables sub-MeV solar neutrino spectroscopy for the first time. This paper describes the design of BOREXINO, the various facilities essential to its operation, its spectroscopic and background suppression capabilities and a prognosis of the impact of its results towards resolving the solar neutrino problem. BOREXINO will also address several other frontier questions in particle physics, astrophysics and geophysics.

  18. Design of a californium source-driven measurement system for accountability of material recovered from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment charcoal bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentzinger, D.L.; Perez, R.B.; Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1998-05-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility (MSRE) operated from 1965 to 1969. The fuel was a molten salt that flowed through the reactor core which consisted of uranium tetrafluoride with molten lithium and beryllium salt used as the coolant. In 1968 the fuel was switched from {sup 235}U to {sup 233}U. The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment was canceled in 1969 at which time approximately 4800 kg of salt was transferred to the fuel drain tanks. There was about 36.3 kg of uranium, 675 grams of plutonium and various fission products present in the fuel salt. The salt was allowed to solidify in the fuel drain tanks. The salt was heated on a yearly basis to recombine the fluorine gas with the uranium salt mixture. In March 1994, a gas sample was taken from the off gas system that indicated {sup 233}U had migrated from the fuel drain tank system to the off gas system. It was found that approximately 2.6 kg of uranium had migrated to the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed (ACB). The ACB is located in the concrete-lined charcoal bed cell which is below ground level located outside the MSRE building. Therefore, there was a concern for the potential of a nuclear criticality accident, although water would have to leak into the chamber for a criticality accident to occur. Unstable carbon/fluorine compounds were also formed when the fluorine reacted with the charcoal in the charcoal bed. The purpose of the proposed measurement system was to perform an accountability measurement to determine the fissile mass of {sup 233}U in the primary vessel. The contents of the primary containment assembly will then be transferred to three smaller containers for long term storage. Calculations were performed using MCNP-DSP to determine the configuration of the measurement system. The information obtained from the time signatures can then be compared to the measurement data to determine the amount of {sup 233}U present in the primary containment assembly.

  19. Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyna, D.; Bernstein, A.; Lund, J.; Kiff, S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Bowden, N. S.; Dazeley, S.; Keefer, G.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our SNL/LLNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale liquid scintillator detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. The initial detector was deployed in an underground gallery that lies directly under the containment dome of an operating PWR. The gallery is 25 meters from the reactor core center, is rarely accessed by plant personnel, and provides a muon-screening effect of some 20-30 meters of water equivalent earth and concrete overburden. Unfortunately, many reactor facilities do not contain an equivalent underground location. We have therefore attempted to construct a complete detector system which would be capable of operating in an aboveground location and could be transported to a reactor facility with relative ease. A standard 6-meter shipping container was used as our transportable laboratory - containing active and passive shielding components, the antineutrino detector and all electronics, as well as climate control systems. This aboveground system was deployed and tested at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) in southern California in 2010 and early 2011. We will first present an overview of the initial demonstrations of our below ground detector. Then we will describe the aboveground system and the technological developments of the two antineutrino detectors that were deployed. Finally, some preliminary results of our aboveground test will be shown. (authors)

  20. Preparation of actinide specimens for the US/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinby, T C; Adair, H L; Kobisk, E H

    1982-05-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was initiated about four years ago for the purpose of studying the fuel behavior of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of integral cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes (physics specimens) was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the fuel pellets and physics samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the fuel study were /sup 241/Am and /sup 244/Cm in the forms of Am/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Am/sub 6/Cm(RE)/sub 7/O/sub 21/, where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanides. Milligram quantities of actinide oxides of /sup 248/Cm, /sup 246/Cm, /sup 244/Cm, /sup 243/Cm, /sup 243/Am, /sup 241/Am, /sup 244/Pu, /sup 242/Pu, /sup 241/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 237/Np, /sup 238/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 233/U, /sup 232/Th, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 231/Pa were encapsulated to obtain nuclear cross section and reaction rate data for these materials.

  1. Experimental Parameters for a Cerium 144 Based Intense Electron Antineutrino Generator Experiment at Very Short Baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Gaffiot; T. Lasserre; G. Mention; M. Vivier; M. Cribier; M. Durero; V. Fischer; A. Letourneau; E. Dumonteil; I. S. Saldikov; G. V. Tikhomirov

    2015-02-09

    The standard three-neutrino oscillation paradigm, associated with small squared mass splittings $\\ll 0.1\\ \\mathrm{eV^2}$, has been successfully built up over the last 15 years using solar, atmospheric, long baseline accelerator and reactor neutrino experiments. However, this well-established picture might suffer from anomalous results reported at very short baselines in some of these experiments. If not experimental artifacts, such results could possibly be interpreted as the existence of at least an additional fourth sterile neutrino species, mixing with the known active flavors with an associated mass splitting $\\ll 0.1\\ \\mathrm{eV^2}$, and being insensitive to standard weak interactions. Precision measurements at very short baselines (5 to 15 m) with intense MeV electronic antineutrino emitters can be used to probe these anomalies. In this article, the expected antineutrino signal and backgrounds of a generic experiment which consists of deploying an intense beta minus radioactive source inside or in the vicinity of a large liquid scintillator detector are studied. The technical challenges to perform such an experiment are identified, along with quantifying the possible source and detector induced systematics, and their impact on the sensitivity to the observation of neutrino oscillations at short baselines.

  2. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments an estimate of the actual alpha particle densities measured with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic. PACS in TFTR. These simulations are compared to profiles directly measured with the pellet charge exchange

  3. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redi, Martha H.

    1 Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic. PACS: 52.25.Fi, 52.55.Fa, 52.55.Pi, 52.65.-y a redi@princeton.edu b. These simulations are compared to profiles directly measured with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic (PCX) [4, 5

  4. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  5. Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?²Rb decay: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino spectrum shape [Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?²Rb: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino flux

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; et al

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermore »the fission of ²³?,²?¹Pu and ²³?,²³?U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ?²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ?²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ?²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered« less

  6. Solar neutrino measurement in Super-Kamiokande ICRR, University of Tokyo, Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    -Kamiokande collaboration ABSTRACT The results of solar neutrino data from the #12;rst phase of Super-Kamiokande are presented. Super-Kamiokande can measure not only the solar neutrino ux but also its energy spectrum and its the experiments has signi#12;cantly been smaller than the expected. 1) From the recent solar neutrino data

  7. Neutrino Astronomy Scott Wilbur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golwala, Sunil

    V protons, which should be created with neutrinos, have been seen Can be used to observe possible dark Particle Physics Extremely long baseline for neutrino oscillation studies Dark Matter Searches Many dark Detector Picture from AMANDA II Web Site: http://www.amanda.uci.edu #12;Advantages of Neutrino Astronomy

  8. MiniBooNE Results and Neutrino Schemes with 2 sterile Neutrinos: Possible Mass Orderings and Observables related to Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Werner Rodejohann

    2007-10-08

    The MiniBooNE and LSND experiments are compatible with each other when two sterile neutrinos are added to the three active ones. In this case there are eight possible mass orderings. In two of them both sterile neutrinos are heavier than the three active ones. In the next two scenarios both sterile neutrinos are lighter than the three active ones. The remaining four scenarios have one sterile neutrino heavier and another lighter than the three active ones. We analyze all scenarios with respect to their predictions for mass-related observables. These are the sum of neutrino masses as constrained by cosmological observations, the kinematic mass parameter as measurable in the KATRIN experiment, and the effective mass governing neutrinoless double beta decay. It is investigated how these non-oscillation probes can distinguish between the eight scenarios. Six of the eight possible mass orderings predict positive signals in the KATRIN and future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. We also remark on scenarios with three sterile neutrinos. In addition we make some comments on the possibility of using decays of high energy astrophysical neutrinos to discriminate between the mass orderings in presence of two sterile neutrinos.

  9. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadimitriou, Vaia

    2011-01-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the stat...

  10. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the status of the conceptual design and the associated challenges.

  11. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaia Papadimitriou

    2011-12-04

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the status of the conceptual design and the associated challenges.

  12. Low Energy Solar Neutrinos and Spin Flavour Precession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhag C. Chauhan; Joao Pulido; R. S. Raghavan

    2005-07-03

    The possibility that the Gallium data effectively indicates a time modulation of the solar active neutrino flux in possible connection to solar activity is examined on the light of spin flavour precession to sterile neutrinos as a subdominant process in addition to oscillations. We distinguish two sets of Gallium data, relating them to high and low solar activity. Such modulation affects principally the low energy neutrinos ($pp$ and $^7 Be$) so that the effect, if it exists, will become most clear in the forthcoming Borexino and LENS experiments and will provide evidence for a neutrino magnetic moment. Using a model previously developed, we perform two separate fits in relation to low and high activity periods to all solar neutrino data. These fits include the very recent charged current spectrum from the SNO experiment. We also derive the model predictions for Borexino and LENS experiments.

  13. Plans for Neutrino Super Beams in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dracos, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. The first part of these facilities consists of an intense proton driver producing a beam higher than a MW power. The protons hit a target able to afford the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to produce elements able to resist to the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from the LHC upgrades. For this reason, the initial design of these upgrades has to include the possibility to go to high power facilities.

  14. A new anti-neutrino detection technique based on positronium tagging with plastic scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Consolati; D. Franco; C. Jollet; A. Meregaglia; A. Minotti; S. Perasso; A. Tonazzo

    2015-06-30

    The main signature for anti-neutrino detection in reactor and geo-neutrino experiments based on scintillators is provided by the space-time coincidence of positron and neutron produced in the Inverse Beta Decay reaction. Such a signature strongly suppresses backgrounds and allows for measurements performed underground with a relatively high signal-to-background ratio. In an aboveground environment, however, the twofold coincidence technique is not sufficient to efficiently reject the high background rate induced by cosmogenic events. Enhancing the positron-neutron twofold coincidence efficiency has the potential to pave the way future aboveground detectors for reactor monitoring. We propose a new detection scheme based on a threefold coincidence, between the positron ionization, the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) decay, and the neutron capture, in a sandwich detector with alternated layers of plastic scintillator and aerogel powder. We present the results of a set of dedicated measurements on the achievable light yield and on the o-Ps formation and lifetime. The efficiencies for signal detection and background rejection of a preliminary detector design are also discussed.

  15. Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  16. Low-energy (anti)neutrino physics with Borexino: Neutrinos from the primary proton-proton fusion process in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mosteiro; G. Bellini; J. Benziger; D. Bick; G. Bonfini; D. Bravo; B. Caccianiga; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; A. Caminata; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; D. D'Angelo; S. Davini; A. Derbin; A. Empl; A. Etenko; K. Fomenko; D. Franco; F. Gabriele; C. Galbiati; S. Gazzana; C. Ghiano; M. Giammarchi; M. Goeger-Neff; A. Goretti; M. Gromov; C. Hagner; E. Hungerford; Al. Ianni; An. Ianni; V. Kobychev; D. Korablev; G. Korga; D. Kryn; M. Laubenstein; B. Lehnert; T. Lewke; E. Litvinovich; F. Lombardi; P. Lombardi; L. Ludhova; G. Lukyanchenko; I. Machulin; S. Manecki; W. Maneschg; S. Marcocci; Q. Meindl; E. Meroni; M. Meyer; L. Miramonti; M. Misiaszek; M. Montuschi; V. Muratova; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; F. Ortica; K. Otis; M. Pallavicini; L. Papp; L. Perasso; A. Pocar; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; A. Re; A. Romani; N. Rossi; R. Saldanha; C. Salvo; S. Schoenert; H. Simgen; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; S. Sukhotin; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; G. Testera; D. Vignaud; R. B. Vogelaar; F. von Feilitzsch; H. Wang; J. Winter; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; M. Wurm; O. Zaimidoroga; S. Zavatarelli; K. Zuber; G. Zuzel

    2015-08-21

    The Sun is fueled by a series of nuclear reactions that produce the energy that makes it shine. The primary reaction is the fusion of two protons into a deuteron, a positron and a neutrino. These neutrinos constitute the vast majority of neutrinos reaching Earth, providing us with key information about what goes on at the core of our star. Several experiments have now confirmed the observation of neutrino oscillations by detecting neutrinos from secondary nuclear processes in the Sun; this is the first direct spectral measurement of the neutrinos from the keystone proton-proton fusion. This observation is a crucial step towards the completion of the spectroscopy of pp-chain neutrinos, as well as further validation of the LMA-MSW model of neutrino oscillations.

  17. Low-energy (anti)neutrino physics with Borexino: Neutrinos from the primary proton-proton fusion process in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosteiro, P; Benziger, J; Bick, D; Bonfini, G; Bravo, D; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Caminata, A; Cavalcante, P; Chavarria, A; Chepurnov, A; D'Angelo, D; Davini, S; Derbin, A; Empl, A; Etenko, A; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Gazzana, S; Ghiano, C; Giammarchi, M; Goeger-Neff, M; Goretti, A; Gromov, M; Hagner, C; Hungerford, E; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; Kobychev, V; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kryn, D; Laubenstein, M; Lehnert, B; Lewke, T; Litvinovich, E; Lombardi, F; Lombardi, P; Ludhova, L; Lukyanchenko, G; Machulin, I; Manecki, S; Maneschg, W; Marcocci, S; Meindl, Q; Meroni, E; Meyer, M; Miramonti, L; Misiaszek, M; Montuschi, M; Muratova, V; Oberauer, L; Obolensky, M; Ortica, F; Otis, K; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Perasso, L; Pocar, A; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Re, A; Romani, A; Rossi, N; Saldanha, R; Salvo, C; Schoenert, S; Simgen, H; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vignaud, D; Vogelaar, R B; von Feilitzsch, F; Wang, H; Winter, J; Wojcik, M; Wright, A; Wurm, M; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuber, K; Zuzel, G

    2015-01-01

    The Sun is fueled by a series of nuclear reactions that produce the energy that makes it shine. The primary reaction is the fusion of two protons into a deuteron, a positron and a neutrino. These neutrinos constitute the vast majority of neutrinos reaching Earth, providing us with key information about what goes on at the core of our star. Several experiments have now confirmed the observation of neutrino oscillations by detecting neutrinos from secondary nuclear processes in the Sun; this is the first direct spectral measurement of the neutrinos from the keystone proton-proton fusion. This observation is a crucial step towards the completion of the spectroscopy of pp-chain neutrinos, as well as further validation of the LMA-MSW model of neutrino oscillations.

  18. Experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of urea-based selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) in a pilot-scale flow reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanh D.B. Nguyen; Young-Il Lim; Seong-Joon Kim; Won-Hyeon Eom; Kyung-Seun Yoo [Hankyong National University, Jungangno (Republic of Korea). Laboratory of Functional Analysis of Complex Systems (FACS)

    2008-11-15

    A turbulent reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model involving a droplet size distribution function in the discrete droplet phase is first built for selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) processes using urea solution as a NOx removal reagent. The model is validated with the experimental data obtained from a pilot-scale urea-based SNCR reactor installed with a 150 kW gas burner. New kinetic parameters of seven chemical reactions for the urea-based NOx reduction are identified and incorporated into the three-dimensional turbulent flow CFD model. The two-phase droplet model with the non-uniform droplet size is also combined with the CFD model to predict the trajectory of the droplets and to examine the mixing between the flue gas and reagents. The maximum NO reduction efficiency of about 80%, experimentally measured at the reactor outlet, is obtained at 940{degree}C and a normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR) = 2.0 under the conditions of 11% excess air and low CO concentration (10-15 ppm). At the reaction temperature of 940{degree}C, the difference of a maximum of 10% between experiments and simulations of the NO reduction percentage is observed for NSR = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The ammonia slip is overestimated in CFD simulation at low temperatures, especially lower than 900{degree}C. However, the CFD simulation results above 900{degree}C show a reasonable agreement with the experimental data of NOx reduction and ammonia slip as a function of the NSR. 31 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Geometric gravitational origin of neutrino oscillations and mass-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

    2014-05-21

    A mass-energy scale for neutrinos was calculated from the null cone curvature using geometric concepts. The scale is variable depending on the gravitational potential and the trajectory inclination with respect to the field direction. The proposed neutrino covariant equation provides the adequate curvature. The mass-energy at the Earth surface varies from a horizontal value 0.402 eV to a vertical value 0.569 eV. Earth spinor waves with winding numbers n show squared energy differences within ranges from 2.05 x 10*(-3) to 4.10 x 10*(-3) eV*2 for n=0,1 neutrinos and from 3.89 x 10*(-5) to 7.79 x 10*(-5) eV*2 for n=1,2 neutrinos. These waves interfere and the different phase velocities produce neutrino-like oscillations. The experimental results for atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation mass parameters respectivelly fall within these theoretical ranges. Neutrinos in outer space, where interactions may be neglected, appear as particles travelling with zero mass on null geodesics. These gravitational curvature energies are consistent with neutrino oscillations, zero neutrino rest masses and Einstein's General Relativity and energy mass equivalence principle. When analyzing or averaging experimental neutrino mass-energy results of different experiments on the Earth it is of interest to consider the possible influence of the trajectory inclination angle.

  20. Constraining four neutrino mass patterns from neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip Pakvasa; Probir Roy

    2002-04-19

    All existing data on neutrino oscillations (including those from the LSND experiment) imply a four neutrino scheme with six different allowed mass patterns. Some of the latter are shown to be disfavored by using a conservative upper bound on the $\\beta beta 0 \

  1. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Korzenev

    2014-09-28

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the neutrino flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming x_F scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments - NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) - are reviewed.

  2. Reconstruction of Energy Spectra of Neutrino Beams Independent of Nuclear Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. -G. Lu; D. Coplowe; R. Shah; G. Barr; D. Wark; A. Weber

    2015-09-03

    We propose a new technique which enables an event-by-event selection of neutrino-hydrogen interactions in multi-nuclear targets and thereby allows application of hydrogen as targets in experiments with neutrino beams without involving cryogenics or high pressure hydrogen gas. This technique could significantly improve the reconstruction of the neutrino energy spectra. Since it allows a separation between hydrogen and the accompanying nuclei, this technique also enables us to measure nuclear effects in neutrino interactions directly.

  3. Nuclear Effect-Independent Reconstruction of Energy Spectra of Neutrino Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, X -G; Shah, R; Barr, G; Wark, D; Weber, A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new technique which enables an event-by-event selection of neutrino-hydrogen interactions in multi-nuclear targets and thereby allows application of hydrogen as targets in experiments with neutrino beams without involving cryogenics or high pressure hydrogen gas. This technique could significantly improve the reconstruction of the neutrino energy spectra. Since it allows a separation between hydrogen and the accompanying nuclei, this technique also enables us to measure nuclear effects in neutrino interactions directly.

  4. Search for Sterile Neutrinos in the Muon Neutrino Disappearance Mode at FNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anokhina, A; Benettoni, M; Bernardini, P; Brugnera, R; Calabrese, M; Cecchetti, A; Cecchini, S; Chernyavskiy, M; Corso, F Dal; Dalkarov, O; Del Prete, A; De Robertis, G; De Serio, M; Di Ferdinando, D; Dusini, S; Dzhatdoev, T; Fini, R A; Fiore, G; Garfagnini, A; Guerzoni, M; Klicek, B; Kose, U; Jakovcic, K; Laurenti, G; Lippi, I; Loddo, F; Longhin, A; Malenica, M; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Margiotta, A; Marsell, G; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Mingazheva, R; Morgunova, O; Muciaccia, M T; Nessi, M; Orecchini, D; Paoloni, A; Papadia, G; Paparella, L; Pasqualini, L; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Polukhina, N; Pozzato, M; Roda, M; Roganova, T; Rosa, G; Sahnoun, Z; Shchedrina, T; Simone, S; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Spurio, M; Stanco, L; Starkov, N; Stipcevic, M; Surdo, A; Tenti, M; Togo, V; Vladymyrov, M

    2015-01-01

    The NESSiE Collaboration has been setup to undertake a conclusive experiment to clarify the {\\em muon--neutrino disappearance} measurements at short baselines in order to put severe constraints to models with more than the three--standard neutrinos, or even to robustly establish the presence of a new kind of neutrino oscillation for the first time. To this aim the use of the current FNAL--Booster neutrino beam for a Short--Baseline experiment was carefully evaluated by considering the use of magnetic spectrometers at two sites, near and far ones. The detector locations were extensively studied, together with the achievable performances of two OPERA--like spectrometers. The study was constrained by the availability of existing hardware and a time--schedule compatible with the undergoing project of multi--site Liquid--Argon detectors at FNAL. \

  5. Structure of Cosmological CP Violation via Neutrino Seesaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; Duane A. Dicus; Hong-Jian He; Tianjun Li

    2003-12-16

    The cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry can originate from CP-violating interactions of seesaw Majorana neutrinos via leptogenesis in the thermal phase of the early universe. Having the cosmological CP-phase for leptogenesis requires at least two right-handed Majorana neutrinos. Using only the low energy neutrino observables we quantitatively reconstruct a minimal neutrino seesaw. We establish a general criterion for minimal seesaw schemes in which the cosmological CP-phase is {\\it completely} reconstructed from the low energy CP-phases measured by neutrino oscillation and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. We reveal and analyze two distinct classes of such minimal schemes that are shown to be highly predictive. Extension of our reconstruction formalism to a three-heavy-neutrino seesaw is discussed.

  6. Neutrino flavor instabilities in a time-dependent supernova model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbar, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    A dense neutrino medium such as that inside a core-collapse supernova can experience collective flavor conversion or oscillations because of the neutral-current weak interaction among the neutrinos. This phenomenon has been studied in a restricted, stationary supernova model which possesses the (spatial) spherical symmetry about the center of the supernova and the (directional) axial symmetry around the radial direction. Recently it has been shown that these spatial and directional symmetries can be broken spontaneously by collective neutrino oscillations. In this paper we analyze the neutrino flavor instabilities in a time-dependent supernova model. Our results show that collective neutrino oscillations start at approximately the same radius in both the stationary and time-dependent supernova models unless there exist very rapid variations in local physical conditions on timescales of a few microseconds or shorter. Our results also suggest that collective neutrino oscillations can vary rapidly with time in t...

  7. Nucleosynthesis and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-05-06

    Neutrinos play the critical roles in nucleosynthesis of light-to-heavy mass nuclei in core-collapse supernovae. We study the nucleosynthesis induced by neutrino interactions and find suitable average neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta. These isotopes are predominantly synthesized by the supernova {nu}-process. We also study the neutrino oscillation effects on their abundances and propose a method to determine the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, i.e. {theta}{sub 13} and mass hierarchy.

  8. Light sterile neutrino sensitivity at the nuSTORM facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adey, D; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Back, J.J.; Barker, G.; Baussan, E.; Bayes, R.; Bhadra, S.; Blackmore, V.; Blondel, A.; Bogacz, S.A.; Booth, C.; Boyd, S.B.; Bramsiepe, S.G.; Bravar, A.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cadoux, F.; Cease, H.; Cervera, A.; Cobb, J.; Colling, D.; Coloma, P.; Coney, L.; Dobbs, A.; Dobson, J.; Donini, A.; Dornan, P.; Dracos, M.; Dufour, F.; Edgecock, R.; Geelhoed, M.; Uchida, M.A.; Ghosh, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; de Gouvea, A.; Haesler, A.; Hanson, G.; Harrison, P.F.; Hartz, M.; Hernandez, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; Hodgson, P.; Huber, P.; Izmaylov, A.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kopp, J.; Kormos, L.; Korzenev, A.; Kuno, Y.; Kurup, A.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.B.; Laing, A.; Liu, A.; Link, J.M.; Long, K.; Mahn, K.; Mariani, C.; Martin, C.; Martin, J.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, K.T.; Mena, O.; Mishra, S.R.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; Mori, Y.; Murray, W.; Neuffer, D.; Nichol, R.; Noah, E.; Palmer, M.A.; Parke, S.; Pascoli, S.; Pasternak, J.; Plunkett, R.; Popovic, M.; Ratoff, P.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Rubinov, P.; Santos, E.; Sato, A.; Sen, T.; Scantamburlo, E.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Smith, D.R.; Smith, P.J.; Sobczyk, J.T.; Sby, L.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sorel, M.; Snopok, P.; Stamoulis, P.; Stanco, L.; Striganov, S.; Tanaka, H.A.; Taylor, I.J.; Touramanis, C.; Tunnell, C.D.; Uchida, Y.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wascko, M.O.; Weber, A.; Wilking, M.J.; Wildner, E.; Winter, W.

    2014-01-01

    A facility that can deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam has the potential to unambiguously resolve the issue of the evidence for light sterile neutrinos that arises in short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and from estimates of the effective number of neutrino flavors from fits to cosmological data. In this paper, we show that the nuSTORM facility, with stored muons of 3.8 GeV/c $\\pm$ 10%, will be able to carry out a conclusive muon neutrino appearance search for sterile neutrinos and test the LSND and MiniBooNE experimental signals with 10$\\sigma$ sensitivity, even assuming conservative estimates for the systematic uncertainties. This experiment would add greatly to our knowledge of the contribution of light sterile neutrinos to the number of effective neutrino flavors from the abundance of primordial helium production and from constraints on neutrino energy density from the cosmic microwave background. The appearance search is complemented by a simulta...

  9. The Results of the CCI-3 Reactor Material Experiment Investigating 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction and Debris Coolability with a Siliceous Concrete Crucible

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Lomperski, S. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Basu, S. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, MS-T10K8, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two objectives: 1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and 2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs of future plants. With respect to the second objective, there are remaining uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion profiles predicted by codes such as WECHSL, COSACO, TOLBIAC, MEDICIS, and MELCOR. In the continuing effort to bridge this data gap, the third in a series of large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiments (CCI-3) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test investigated the long-term interaction of a 375 kg core-oxide melt within a two-dimensional siliceous concrete crucible. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predetermined time interval, the cavity was flooded with water to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a description of the facility and an overview of results from this test. (authors)

  10. Thermal Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  11. Observations of high energy neutrinos with water/ice neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht Karle

    2006-02-01

    The search for high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin is being conducted today with two water/ice Cherenkov experiments. New instruments of higher performance are now in construction and more are in the R&D phase. No sources have been found to date. Upper limits on neutrino fluxes are approaching model predictions. Results are reported on the search for point sources, diffuse fluxes, gamma ray bursts, dark matter and other sources.

  12. Letter of Intent to Construct a nuPRISM Detector in the J-PARC Neutrino Beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bhadra; A. Blondel; S. Bordoni; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; J. Caravaca-Rodriguez; M. Dziewiecki; T. Feusels; G. A. Fiorentini-Aguirre; M. Friend; L. Haegel; M. Hartz; R. Henderson; T. Ishida; M. Ishitsuka; C. K. Jung; A. C. Kaboth; H. Kakuno; H. Kamano; A. Konaka; Y. Kudenko; M. Kuze; T. Lindner; K. Mahn; J. F. Martin; J. Marzec; K. S. McFarland; S. Nakayama; T. Nakaya; S. Nakamura; Y. Nishimura; A. Rychter; F. Sanchez; T. Sato; M. Scott; T. Sekiguchi; M. Shiozawa; T. Sumiyoshi; R. Tacik; H. K. Tanaka; H. A. Tanaka; S. Tobayama; M. Vagins; J. Vo; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; M. J. Wilking; S. Yen; M. Yokoyama; M. Ziembicki

    2014-12-13

    As long-baseline neutrino experiments enter the precision era, the difficulties associated with understanding neutrino interaction cross sections on atomic nuclei are expected to limit experimental sensitivities to oscillation parameters. In particular, the ability to relate experimental observables to neutrino energy in previous experiments has relied solely on theoretical models of neutrino-nucleus interactions, which currently suffer from very large theoretical uncertainties. By observing charged current $\

  13. Low Energy Threshold Analysis of the Phase I and Phase II Data Sets of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The SNO Collaboration

    2010-06-09

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is T_eff=3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved with water Cherenkov detector data. In units of 10^6 cm^{-2} s^{-1}, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from 8B decay in the Sun measured using the neutral current (NC) reaction of neutrinos on deuterons, with no constraint on the 8B neutrino energy spectrum, is found to be Phi_NC = 5.140 ^{+0.160}_{-0.158} (stat) ^{+0.132}_{-0.117} (syst). These uncertainties are more than a factor of two smaller than previously published results. Also presented are the spectra of recoil electrons from the charged current reaction of neutrinos on deuterons and the elastic scattering of electrons. A fit to the SNO data in which the free parameters directly describe the total 8B neutrino flux and the energy-dependent nu_e survival probability provides a measure of the total 8B neutrino flux Phi_8B = 5.046 ^{+0.159}_{-0.152} (stat) ^{+0.107}_{-0.123} (syst). Combining these new results with results of all other solar experiments and the KamLAND reactor experiment yields best-fit values of the mixing parameters of theta_{12}=34.06 ^{+1.16}_{-0.84} degrees and Delta m^2_{21}=7.59 ^{+0.20}_{-0.21} x 10^{-5} eV^2. The global value of Phi_8B is extracted to a precision of ^{+2.38}_{-2.95} %. In a three-flavor analysis the best fit value of sin^2\\theta_{13} is 2.00 ^{+2.09}_{-1.63} x 10^{-2}. Interpreting this as a limit implies an upper bound of sin^2\\theta_{13} < 0.057 (95% C. L.).

  14. Neutrino telescopes in the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernenwein, J.-P.

    2007-01-12

    Neutrino astronomy has rapidly developed these last years, being the only way to get specific and reliable information about astrophysical objects still poorly understood.Currently two neutrino telescopes are operational in the World: BAIKAL, in the lake of the same name in Siberia, and AMANDA, in the ices of the South Pole. Two telescopes of the same type are under construction in the Mediterranean Sea: ANTARES and NESTOR. All these telescopes belong to a first generation, with an instrumented volume smaller or equal to 0.02 km3. Also in the Mediterranean Sea, the NEMO project is just in its stag phase, within the framework of a cubic kilometer size neutrino telescope study. Lastly, the ICECUBE detector, with a volume reaching about 1 km3, is under construction on the site of AMANDA experiment, while an extension of the BAIKAL detector toward km3 is under study. We will present here the characteristics of these experiments, as well as the results of their observations.

  15. ANIS: High Energy Neutrino Generator for Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Askhat Gazizov; Marek P. Kowalski

    2004-06-19

    We present the high-energy neutrino Monte Carlo event generator ANIS (All Neutrino Interaction Simulation). The program provides a detailed and flexible neutrino event simulation for high-energy neutrino detectors, such as AMANDA, ANTARES or ICECUBE. It generates neutrinos of any flavor according to a specified flux and propagates them through the Earth. In a final step neutrino interactions are simulated within a specified volume. All relevant standard model processes are implemented. We discuss strengths and limitations of the program.

  16. Neutrino physics with an intense \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Henning

    2010-11-16

    We study some of the physics potential of an intense $1\\,\\mathrm{MCi}$ $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr}$ source combined with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} enriched germanium detector array. The {\\sc Demonstrator} will consist of detectors with ultra-low radioactive backgrounds and extremely low energy thresholds of~$\\sim 400\\,\\mathrm{eV}$. We show that it can improve the current limit on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment. We briefly discuss physics applications of the charged-current reaction of the $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr} neutrino with the $^{73}\\mathrm{Ge} isotope. Finally, we argue that the rate from a realistic, intense tritium source is below the detectable limit of even a tonne-scale HPGe experiment

  17. Advances Towards Readily Deployable Antineutrino Detectors for Reactor Monitoring and Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, N S; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Lund, J; Reyna, D; Sadler, L; Svoboda, R

    2008-06-05

    Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our LLNL/SNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial PWR. With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. Recently, we have investigated several technology paths that could allow such devices to be more readily deployed in the field. In particular, we have developed and fielded two new detectors; a low cost, non- flammable water based design; and a robust solid-state design based upon plastic scintillator. Here we will describe the tradeoffs inherent in these designs, and present results from their field deployments.

  18. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: Constraints and correlations from world neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Melchiorri; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. Silk

    2004-11-17

    In the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing, we present a thorough study of the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay (m_beta); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m_2beta); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology (Sigma). We discuss the correlations among these variables which arise from the combination of all the available neutrino oscillation data, in both normal and inverse neutrino mass hierarchy. We set upper limits on m_beta by combining updated results from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments. We also consider the latest results on m_2beta from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment, both with and without the lower bound claimed by such experiment. We derive upper limits on Sigma from an updated combination of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite and the 2 degrees Fields (2dF) Galaxy Redshifts Survey, with and without Lyman-alpha forest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), in models with a non-zero running of the spectral index of primordial inflationary perturbations. The results are discussed in terms of two-dimensional projections of the globally allowed region in the (m_beta,m_2beta,Sigma) parameter space, which neatly show the relative impact of each data set. In particular, the (in)compatibility between Sigma and m_2beta constraints is highlighted for various combinations of data. We also briefly discuss how future neutrino data (both oscillatory and non-oscillatory) can further probe the currently allowed regions.

  19. Standard Neutrino Spectrum from B-8 Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; E. Lisi; D. E. Alburger; L. De Braeckeleer; S. J. Freedman; J. Napolitano

    1996-04-19

    We present a systematic evaluation of the shape of the neutrino energy spectrum produced by beta-decay of $^8$B. We place special emphasis on determining the range of uncertainties permitted by existing laboratory data and theoretical ingredients (such as forbidden and radiative corrections). We review and compare the available experimental data on the $^8$B$(\\beta^+){}^8$Be$(2\\alpha)$ decay chain. We analyze the theoretical and experimental uncertainties quantitatively. We give a numerical representation of the best-fit (standard-model) neutrino spectrum, as well as two extreme deviations from the standard spectrum that represent the total (experimental and theoretical) effective $\\pm3\\sigma$ deviations. Solar neutrino experiments that are currently being developed will be able to measure the shape of the $^8$B neutrino spectrum above about 5 MeV. An observed distortion of the $^8$B solar neutrino spectrum outside the range given in the present work could be considered as evidence, at an effective significance level greater than three standard deviations, for physics beyond the standard electroweak model. We use the most recent available experimental data on the Gamow--Teller strengths in the $A=37$ system to calculate the $^8$B neutrino absorption cross section on chlorine: $\\sigma_{\\rm Cl}=(1.14\\pm0.11)\\times10^{-42}$~cm$^2$ ($\\pm3\\sigma$ errors). The chlorine cross section is also given as a function of the neutrino energy. The $^8$B neutrino absorption cross section in gallium is $\\sigma_{\\rm Ga}=(2.46^{+2.1}_{-1.1})\\times10^{-42}$ cm$^2$ ($\\pm3\\sigma$ errors).

  20. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.1 for gravity-driven injection experiment in the core makeup tank of the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.I.; No, H.C.; Bang, Y.S.; Kim, H.J.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to improve the analysis capability of RELAP5/MOD3.1 on the direct contact condensation in the core makeup tank (CMT) of passive high-pressure injection system (PHPIS) in the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300). The gravity-driven injection experiment is conducted by using a small scale test facility to identify the parameters having significant effects on the gravity-driven injection and the major condensation modes. It turns out that the larger the water subcooling is, the more initiation of injection is delayed, and the sparger and the natural circulation of the hot water from the steam generator accelerate the gravity-driven injection. The condensation modes are divided into three modes: sonic jet, subsonic jet, and steam cavity. RELAP5/MOD3.1 is chosen to evaluate the cod predictability on the direct contact condensation in the CMT. It is found that the predictions of MOD3.1 are in better agreement with the experimental data than those of MOD3.0. From the nodalization study of the test section, the 1-node model shows better agreement with the experimental data than the multi-node models. RELAP5/MOD3.1 identifies the flow regime of the test section as vertical stratification. However, the flow regime observed in the experiment is the subsonic jet with the bubble having the vertical cone shape. To accurately predict the direct contact condensation in the CMT with RELAP5/MOD3.1, it is essential that a new set of the interfacial heat transfer coefficients and a new flow regime map for direct contact condensation in the CMT be developed.

  1. EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DUNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois and the Sanford Underground Research Facility, Lead, South Dakota EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino FacilityDeep Underground Neutrino...

  2. Constraining Mass Spectra with Sterile Neutrinos from Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay, Tritium Beta Decay and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Werner Rodejohann

    2006-05-18

    We analyze the constraints on neutrino mass spectra with extra sterile neutrinos as implied by the LSND experiment. The various mass related observables in neutrinoless double beta decay, tritium beta decay and cosmology are discussed. Both neutrino oscillation results as well as recent cosmological neutrino mass bounds are taken into account. We find that some of the allowed mass patterns are severely restricted by the current constraints, in particular by the cosmological constraints on the total sum of neutrino masses and by the non-maximality of the solar neutrino mixing angle. Furthermore, we estimate the form of the four neutrino mass matrices and also comment on the situation in scenarios with two additional sterile neutrinos.

  3. Constraining mass spectra with sterile neutrinos from neutrinoless double beta decay, tritium beta decay, and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Srubabati [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rodejohann, Werner [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2006-06-01

    We analyze the constraints on neutrino mass spectra with extra sterile neutrinos as implied by the LSND experiment. The various mass related observables in neutrinoless double beta decay, tritium beta decay and cosmology are discussed. Both neutrino oscillation results as well as recent cosmological neutrino mass bounds are taken into account. We find that some of the allowed mass patterns are severely restricted by the current constraints, in particular, by the cosmological constraints on the total sum of neutrino masses and by the nonmaximality of the solar neutrino mixing angle. Furthermore, we estimate the form of the four neutrino mass matrices and also comment on the situation in scenarios with two additional sterile neutrinos.

  4. ENDF/B-VII.1 Neutron Cross Section Data Testing with Critical Assembly Benchmarks and Reactor Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2011-12-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is the latest revision to the United States' Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). The ENDF library is currently in its seventh generation, with ENDF/B-VII.0 being released in 2006. This revision expands upon that library, including the addition of new evaluated files (was 393 neutron files previously, now 418 including replacement of elemental vanadium and zinc evaluations with isotopic evaluations) and extension or updating of many existing neutron data files. Complete details are provided in the companion paper [1]. This paper focuses on how accurately application libraries may be expected to perform in criticality calculations with these data. Continuous energy cross section libraries, suitable for use with the MCNP Monte Carlo transport code, have been generated and applied to a suite of nearly one thousand critical benchmark assemblies defined in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project's International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. This suite covers uranium and plutonium fuel systems in a variety of forms such as metallic, oxide or solution, and under a variety of spectral conditions, including unmoderated (i.e., bare), metal reflected and water or other light element reflected. Assembly eigenvalues that were accurately predicted with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections such as unmoderated and uranium reflected 235U and 239Pu assemblies, HEU solution systems and LEU oxide lattice systems that mimic commercial PWR configurations continue to be accurately calculated with ENDF/B-VII.1 cross sections, and deficiencies in predicted eigenvalues for assemblies containing selected materials, including titanium, manganese, cadmium and tungsten are greatly reduced. Improvements are also confirmed for selected actinide reaction rates such as 236U capture. Other deficiencies, such as the overprediction of Pu solution system critical eigenvalues and a decreasing trend in calculated eigenvalue for 233U fueled systems as a function of Above-Thermal Fission Fraction remain. The comprehensive nature of this critical benchmark suite and the generally accurate calculated eigenvalues obtained with ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron cross sections support the conclusion that this is the most accurate general purpose ENDF/B cross section library yet released to the technical community.

  5. Neutrino Decay and Solar Neutrino Seasonal Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picoreti, R; de Holanda, P C; Peres, O L G

    2015-01-01

    We consider the possibility of solar neutrino decay as a sub-leading effect on their propagation between production and detection. Using current oscillation data, we set a new lower bound to the $\

  6. Physics of Massive Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. F. Valle

    2004-10-07

    I summarize the present status of global analyses of neutrino oscillations, including the most recent KamLAND and K2K data, as well as the latest solar and atmospheric neutrino fluxes. I give the allowed ranges of the three--flavour oscillation parameters from the current worlds' global neutrino data sample, their best fit values and discuss the small parameters DeltaM_solar/DeltaM_atm and sin^2 theta_13, which characterize the strength of CP violation in neutrino oscillations. I briefly discuss neutrinoless double beta decay and the LSND neutrino oscillation hint, as well as the robustness of the neutrino oscillation results in the presence of non-standard physics.

  7. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deppisch, Frank F; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  8. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; P. S. Bhupal Dev; Apostolos Pilaftsis

    2015-08-04

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  9. Earthquake Forecast via Neutrino Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Wang; Ya-Zheng Chen; Xue-Qian Li

    2011-03-29

    We discuss the possibility of forecasting earthquakes by means of (anti)neutrino tomography. Antineutrinos emitted from reactors are used as a probe. As the antineutrinos traverse through a region prone to earthquakes, observable variations in the matter effect on the antineutrino oscillation would provide a tomography of the vicinity of the region. In this preliminary work, we adopt a simplified model for the geometrical profile and matter density in a fault zone. We calculate the survival probability of electron antineutrinos for cases without and with an anomalous accumulation of electrons which can be considered as a clear signal of the coming earthquake, at the geological region with a fault zone, and find that the variation may reach as much as 3% for $\\bar \

  10. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder ...

  11. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-12

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  12. Neutrino masses and the number of neutrino species from WMAP and 2dFGRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen Hannestad

    2003-03-04

    We have performed a thorough analysis of the constraints which can be put on neutrino parameters from cosmological observations, most notably those from the WMAP satellite and the 2dF galaxy survey. For this data we find an upper limit on the sum of active neutrino mass eigenstates of \\sum m_nu neutrinoless double beta decay reported by the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment. In terms of the relativistic energy density in neutrinos or other weakly interacting species we find, in units of the equivalent number of neutrino species, N_nu, that N_nu = 4.0+3.0-2.1 (95% conf.). When BBN constraints are added, the bound on N_\

  13. Quasi-energy-independent solar neutrino transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Palazzo

    2002-02-06

    Current solar, atmospheric, and reactor neutrino data still allow oscillation scenarios where the squared mass differences are all close to 10^-3 eV^2, rather than being hierarchically separated. For solar neutrinos, this situation (realized in the upper part of the so-called large-mixing angle solution) implies adiabatic transitions which depend weakly on the neutrino energy and on the matter density, as well as on the ``atmospheric'' squared mass difference. In such a regime of ``quasi-energy-independent'' (QEI) transitions, intermediate between the more familiar ``Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein'' (MSW) and energy-independent (EI) regimes, we first perform analytical calculations of the solar nu_e survival probability at first order in the matter density, beyond the usual hierarchical approximations. We then provide accurate, generalized expressions for the solar neutrino mixing angles in matter, which reduce to those valid in the MSW, QEI and EI regimes in appropriate limits. Finally, a representative QEI scenario is discussed in some detail.

  14. The State of the Art of Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deborah A. Harris

    2015-06-09

    The study of neutrino interactions has recently experienced a renaissance, motivated by the fact that neutrino oscillation experiments depend critically on an accurate models of neutrino interactions. These models have to predict not only the signal and background populations that oscillation experiments see at near and far detectors, but they must also predict how the neutrino's energy which enters a nucleus gets transferred to energies of the particles that leave the nucleus after the neutrino interacts. Over the past year there have been a number of new results on many different neutrino (and antineutrino) interaction channels using several different target nuclei. These results are often not in agreement with predictions extraolated from charged lepton scattering measurements, or even from predictions anchored to neutrino measurements on deuterium. These new measurements are starting to give the community the handles needed to improve the theoretical description of neutrino interactions, which ultimately pave the way for precision oscillation measurements. This report briefly summarizes recent results and points out where those results differ from the predictions based on current models.

  15. Fourth Generation Majorana Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Lenz; Heinrich Päs; Dario Schalla

    2012-05-02

    We investigate the possibility of a fourth sequential generation in the lepton sector. Assuming neutrinos to be Majorana particles and starting from a recent - albeit weak - evidence for a non-zero admixture of a fourth generation neutrino from fits to weak lepton and meson decays we discuss constraints from neutrinoless double beta decay, radiative lepton decay and like-sign dilepton production at hadron colliders. Also an idea for fourth generation neutrino mass model building is briefly outlined. Here we soften the large hierarchy of the neutrino masses within an extradimensional model that locates each generation on different lepton number violating branes without large hierarchies.

  16. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  17. Measuring Sin^22?_13 with the Daya Bay Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yifang Wang

    2006-10-09

    Angle \\theta_13 is one of the two unknown neutrino mixing parameters to be determined. Its value may determine the future trend of the neutrino physics. We propose to measure sin^22\\theta_13 with a sensitivity better than 0.01 (90% C.L) at the Daya Bay reactor power plant.

  18. Measurement of electron neutrino CCQE-like cross-section in MINERvA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Wolcott; for the MINERvA collaboration

    2015-01-21

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) cross-section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross-section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross-section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present a preliminary result from the MINERvA experiment on the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross-section for a CCQE-like process. The result is given both as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and $Q^{2}$, as well as a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy.

  19. In Situ NDA Conformation Measurements Performed at Auxiliary Charcoal Bed and Other Main Charcoal Beds After Uranium Removal from Molten Salt Reactor Experiment ACB at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghighi, M. H.; Kring, C. T.; McGehee, J. T.; Jugan, M. R.; Chapman, J.; Meyer, K. E.

    2002-02-26

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site is located in Tennessee, on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The MSRE was run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the desirable features of the molten-salt concept in a practical reactor that could be operated safely and reliably. It introduced the idea of a homogeneous reactor using fuel salt media and graphite moderation for power and breeder reactors. The MSRE reactor and associated components are located in cells beneath the floor in the high-bay area of Building 7503. The reactor was operated from June 1965 to December 1969. When the reactor was shut down, fuel salt was drained from the reactor circuit to two drain tanks. A ''clean'' salt was then circulated through the reactor as a decontamination measure and drained to a third drain tank. When operations ceased, the fuel and flush salts were allowed to cool and solidify in the drain tanks. At shutdown, the MSRE facility complex was placed in a surveillance and maintenance program. Beginning in 1987, it was discovered that gaseous uranium (U-233/U-232) hexafluoride (UF6) had moved throughout the MSRE process systems. The UF6 had been generated when radiolysis in the fluorine salts caused the individual constituents to dissociate to their component atoms, including free fluorine. Some of the free fluorine combined with uranium fluorides (UF4) in the salt to produce UF6. UF6 is gaseous at slightly above ambient temperatures; thus, periodic heating of the fuel salts (which was intended to remedy the radiolysis problems) and simple diffusion had allowed the UF6 to move out of the salt and into the process systems of MSRE. One of the systems that UF6 migrated into due to this process was the offgas system which is vented to the MSRE main charcoal beds and MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). Recently, the majority of the uranium laden-charcoal material residing within the ACB was safely and successfully removed using the uranium deposit removal system and equipment. After removal a series of NDA measurements was performed to determine the amount of uranium material remaining in the ACB, the amount of uranium material removed from the ACB, and the amount of uranium material remaining in the uranium removal equipment due to removal activities.

  20. NOvA: Exploring Neutrino Mysteries

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Vahle, Tricia; Messier, Mark

    2014-08-12

    Neutrinos are a mystery to physicists. They exist in three different flavors and mass states and may be able to give hints about the origins of the matter-dominated universe. A new long-baseline experiment led by Fermilab called NOvA may provide some answers.

  1. Particle physics implications of the WMAP neutrino mass bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bhattacharyya; H. Päs; L. Song; T. J. Weiler

    2003-04-25

    The recently published cosmological bound on the absolute neutrino masses obtained from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data has important consequences for neutrino experiments and models. Taken at face value, the new bound excludes the determination of the absolute neutrino mass in the KATRIN experiment and disfavors a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the LSND experiment. Combined with the KamLAND and Super-K data, the WMAP bound defines an accessible range for the neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude. The bound also impacts the Z-burst annihilation mechanism for resonant generation of extreme-energy cosmic rays on the cosmic neutrino background in two ways: it constrains the local overdensity of neutrino dark matter which is not helpful, but it also limits the resonant energy to a favorable range. In R-parity violating SUSY models neutrino masses are generated by trilinear and bilinear lepton number violating couplings. The WMAP result improves the constraints on these couplings over their existing values by an order of magnitude.

  2. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duerr

    2012-06-04

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between neutrinoless double beta decay and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter--Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate neutrinoless double beta decay from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  3. Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-27

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate 0{nu}{beta}{beta} from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  4. Neutrino mass in cosmology: status and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yvonne Y. Y. Wong

    2011-11-06

    I give an overview of the effects of neutrino masses in cosmology, focussing on the role they play in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. I discuss how recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the large-scale matter distribution can probe neutrino masses with greater precision than current laboratory experiments. I describe several new techniques that will be used to probe cosmology in the future, as well as recent advances in the computation of the nonlinear matter power spectrum and related observables.

  5. Physics of neutrino flavor transformation through matter-neutrino resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Meng-Ru; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In astrophysical environments such as core-collapse supernovae and neutron star-neutron star or neutron star-black hole mergers where dense neutrino media are present, matter-neutrino resonances (MNRs) can occur when the neutrino propagation potentials due to neutrino-electron and neutrino-neutrino forward scattering nearly cancel each other. We show that neutrino flavor transformation through MNRs can be explained by multiple adiabatic solutions similar to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein mechanism. We find that for the normal neutrino mass hierarchy, neutrino flavor evolution through MNRs can be sensitive to the shape of neutrino spectra and the adiabaticity of the system, but such sensitivity is absent for the inverted hierarchy.

  6. Probing neutrino magnetic moments at Spallation Neutron Source facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Kosmas; O. G. Miranda; D. K. Papoulias; M. Tortola; J. W. F. Valle

    2015-07-15

    Majorana neutrino electromagnetic properties are studied through neutral current coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. We focus on the potential of the recently planned COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source to probe muon-neutrino magnetic moments. The resulting sensitivities are determined on the basis of a chi^2 analysis employing realistic nuclear structure calculations in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation. We find that they can improve existing limits by half an order of magnitude. In addition, we show that these facilities allow for Standard Model precision tests in the low energy regime, with a competitive determination of the weak mixing angle. Finally, they also offer the capability to probe other electromagnetic neutrino properties, such as the neutrino charge-radius. We illustrate our results for various choices of experimental setup and target material.

  7. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses implied by the Seesaw Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, H

    2005-01-01

    It is found that the seesaw mechanism not only explain the smallness of neutrino masses but also account for the large mixing angles simultaneously, once the unification of the neutrino Dirac mass matrix with that of up-quark sector is realized. We show that provided the Majorana masses have hierarchical structure as is seen in the up-quark sector, we can reduce the information about the absolute values of neutrino masses through the data set of neutrino experiments. The results for the light neutrino masses are $m_1:m_2:m_3\\approx 1:3:17$ $(m_1\\simeq m_2:m_3\\approx 1.2:1)$ in the case of normal mass spectrum (inverted mass spectrum), and the heaviest Majorana mass turns out to be $m_3^R=1\\times 10^{15}$ GeV which just corresponds to the GUT scale.

  8. Neutrino Counter Nuclear Weapon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Radiations produced by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation at the Z0 pole can be used to heat up the primary stage of a thermonuclear warhead and can in principle detonate the device remotely. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can also be used as a tactical assault weapon to target hideouts that are unreachable by conventional means.

  9. Neutrino Counter Nuclear Weapon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfred Tang

    2013-06-25

    Radiations produced by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation at the Z0 pole can be used to heat up the primary stage of a thermonuclear warhead and can in principle detonate the device remotely. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can also be used as a tactical assault weapon to target hideouts that are unreachable by conventional means.

  10. Neutrino 2012: Outlook - theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yu. Smirnov

    2012-10-15

    Ongoing developments in theory and phenomenology are related to the measured large value of 1-3 mixing and indications of significant deviation of the 2-3 mixing from maximal one. "Race" for the mass hierarchy has started and there is good chance that multi-megaton scale atmospheric neutrino detectors with low threshold (e.g. PINGU) will establish the type of hierarchy. Two IceCube candidates of the PeV cosmic neutrinos if confirmed, is the beginning of new era of high energy neutrino astronomy. Accumulation of data on solar neutrinos (energy spectrum, D-N asymmetry, value of $\\Delta m^2_{21}$) may uncover some new physics. The Tri-bimaximal mixing is disfavored and the existing discrete symmetry paradigm may change. The confirmed QLC prediction, $\\theta_{13} \\approx \\theta_{C}/\\sqrt{2}$, testifies for GUT, seesaw and some symmetry at very high scales. However, the same value of 1-3 mixing can be obtained in various ways which have different implications. The situation in lepton sector changes from special (with specific neutrino symmetries, etc.) to normal, closer to that in the quark sector. Sterile neutrinos are challenge for neutrino physics but also opportunity with many interesting phenomenological consequences. Further studies of possible connections between neutrinos and the dark sector of the Universe may lead to breakthrough both in particle physics and cosmology.

  11. Wroclaw neutrino event generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaroslaw A. Nowak

    2006-07-07

    A neutrino event generator developed by the Wroclaw Neutrino Group is described. The physical models included in the generator are discussed and illustrated with the results of simulations. The considered processes are quasi-elastic scattering and pion production modelled by combining the $\\Delta$ resonance excitation and deep inelastic scattering.

  12. Sterile Neutrinos and Light Dark Matter Save Each Other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu Man Ho; Robert J. Scherrer

    2013-03-13

    Short baseline neutrino experiments such as LSND and MiniBooNE seem to suggest the existence of light sterile neutrinos. Meanwhile, current cosmic microwave background (CMB) and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) measurements place an upper bound on the effective number of light neutrinos, $N_{eff}$ and the PLANCK satellite will measure $N_{eff}$ to a much higher accuracy and further constrain the number of sterile neutrinos allowed. We demonstrate that if an MeV dark matter particle couples more strongly to electrons and/or photons than to neutrinos, then p-wave annihilation after neutrino decoupling can reduce the value of $N_{eff}$ inferred from BBN and PLANCK. This mechanism can accommodate two eV sterile neutrinos even if PLANCK observes $N_{eff}$ as low as the standard model theoretical value of 3.046, and a large neutrino asymmetry is not needed to obtain the correct primordial element abundances. The dark matter annihilation also weakens the cosmological upper bounds on the neutrino masses, and we derive a relationship between the change in these bounds and the corresponding change in $N_{eff}$. Dark matter with an electric dipole moment or anapole moment is a natural candidate that exhibits the desired properties for this mechanism. Coincidentally, a dark matter particle with these properties and lighter than 3 MeV is precisely one that can explain the 511 keV gamma-ray line observed by INTEGRAL. We show that the addition of two eV sterile neutrinos allows this kind of dark matter to be lighter than 3 MeV, which is otherwise ruled out by the CMB bound on $N_{eff}$ if only active neutrinos are considered.

  13. The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrina, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    At about 40 km off the coast of Toulon (France), anchored at 2475 m deep in the Mediterranean Sea, there is ANTARES: the first undersea neutrino telescope and the only one currently operating. The detector consists of 885 photomultiplier tubes arranged into 12 strings of 450-metres high, with the aim to detect the Cherenkov light induced by the charged superluminal interaction products of neutrinos. Its main scientific target is the search for high-energy (TeV and beyond) neutrinos from cosmic accelerators, as predicted by hadronic interaction models, and the measurement of the cosmic neutrino diffuse flux, focusing in particular on events coming from below the horizon (up-going events) in order to significantly reduce the atmospheric muons background. Thanks to the development of a strategy for the identification of neutrinos coming from above the horizon (down-going events) the field of view of the telescope will be extended.

  14. Neutrinos, WMAP, and BBN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence M. Krauss; Cecilia Lunardini; Christel Smith

    2010-11-18

    New data from WMAP have appeared, related to both the fractional energy density in relativistic species at decoupling and also the primordial helium abundance, at the same time as other independent observational estimates suggest a higher value of the latter than previously estimated. All the data are consistent with the possibility that the effective number of relativistic species in the radiation gas at the time of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis may exceed the value of 3, as expected from a CP-symmetric population of the known neutrino species. Here we explore the possibility that new neutrino physics accounts for such an excess. We explore different realizations, including neutrino asymmetry and new neutrino species, as well as their combination, and describe how existing constraints on neutrino physics would need to be relaxed as a result of the new data, as well as possible experimental tests of these possibilities.

  15. Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Lyashuk; Yu. S Lutostansky

    2015-04-13

    An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neutron flux (i.e., powerful neutron source) is requested for realization of considered neutrino sources (neutrino factories). Different realizations of lithium antineutrino sources (lithium converter on the base of high purified 7Li isotope) are discussed: static regime (i.e., without transport of 8Li isotope to the neutrino detector); dynamic regime (transport of 8Li isotope to the remote detector in a closed cycle); an operation of lithium converter in tandem of accelerator with a neutron-producing target on the base of tungsten, lead or bismuth. Different chemical compounds of lithium (as the substance of the converter) are considered. Heavy water solution of LiOD is proposed as a serious alternative to high-pure 7Li in a metallic state.

  16. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA FUSION REACTOR DESIGN IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    in the physics of laser-target interactions, target design and implosion experiments; 5.3. New ICF reactorCONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA FUSION REACTOR DESIGN IV Report on the Fourth IAEA Technical Committee Reactor Design and Technology at Yalta, USSR, from 26 May -- 6 June 1986. This report contains all

  17. Study of the intrinsic electron neutrino component in the T2K neutrino beam with the near detector, ND280

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophie E. King

    2015-04-30

    T2K is an off-axis long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment optimised to measure theta13 and deltaCP using a muon neutrino beam. The most sensitive mode is to look for electron neutrino appearance, and the dominant background for such measurements is the intrinsic electron neutrino component in the beam itself. A selection is made using data from the off-axis near detector (ND280) to detect charged current (CC) electron neutrino interactions; these are split into events with no pions in the final state (nue CC0pi) and the remaining CC interactions (nue CCother). This strategy will both improve the constraint of the intrinsic background by this analysis and allow a measurement of the CC0pi cross section

  18. Global fits to neutrino oscillation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2006-06-06

    I summarize the determination of neutrino oscillation parameters within the three-flavor framework from world neutrino oscillation data with date of May 2006, including the first results from the MINOS long-baseline experiment. It is illustrated how the determination of the leading "solar" and "atmospheric" parameters, as well as the bound on $\\theta_{13}$ emerge from an interplay of various complementary data sets. Furthermore, I discuss possible implications of sub-leading three-flavor effects in present atmospheric neutrino data induced by $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ and $\\theta_{13}$ for the bound on $\\theta_{13}$ and non-maximal values of $\\theta_{23}$, emphasizing, however, that these effects are not statistically significant at present. Finally, in view of the upcoming MiniBooNE results I briefly comment on the problem to reconcile the LSND signal.

  19. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

    2009-10-17

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  20. What can we learn from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nuclear properties; neutrino, mass; mass, hierarchy; neutrino, oscillation; neutrino, solar; neutrino, cosmic radiation; neutrino, Dirac; neutrino, Majorana nucleus, semileptonic...

  1. A study of muon neutrino disappearance in the MINOS detectors and the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Jiajie; /South Carolina U.

    2010-07-01

    There is now substantial evidence that the proper description of neutrino involves two representations related by the 3 x 3 PMNS matrix characterized by either distinct mass or flavor. The parameters of this mixing matrix, three angles and a phase, as well as the mass differences between the three mass eigenstates must be determined experimentally. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search experiment is designed to study the flavor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as it travels between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory at 1 km from the target, and the Far Detector in the Soudan iron mine in Minnesota at 735 km from the target. From the comparison of reconstructed neutrino energy spectra at the near and far location, precise measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance are expected. It is very important to know the neutrino flux coming from the source in order to achieve the main goal of the MINOS experiment: precise measurements of the atmospheric mass splitting |{Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2}|, sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 23}. The goal of my thesis is to accurately predict the neutrino flux for the MINOS experiment and measure the neutrino mixing angle and atmospheric mass splitting.

  2. The NOMAD Experiment at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vannucci, F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the experimental apparatus and some physics results fromthe NOMAD(neutrino oscillation magnetic detector) experiment which took data in the CERN wide-band neutrino beam from 1995 to 1998. It collected and reconstructed more than one million charged current(CC)$\

  3. Effects of kination and scalar-tensor cosmologies on sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehagen, Thomas; Gelmini, Graciela B., E-mail: trehagen@physics.ucla.edu, E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We study the effects of kination and scalar-tensor pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmologies on the non-resonant production of sterile neutrinos. We show that if the peak of the production rate of sterile neutrinos occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, the relic number density of sterile neutrinos could be reduced with respect to the number expected in the standard cosmology. Consequently, current bounds on active-sterile neutrino mixing derived from the relic energy density of sterile neutrinos could be greatly relaxed. In particular, we show that the sterile neutrinos which could explain the anomalies found in short-baseline neutrino experiments are compatible with recent joint Planck upper limits on their contribution to the energy density of the Universe in a scalar-tensor or a low-reheating temperature pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmology.

  4. Superheavy sterile neutrinos as dark matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yongjun

    2000-01-01

    neutrinos as a dark matter candidate, produced through MSW conversion of active neutrinos. Recently Allen proposed a different nonthermal mechanism for the production of superheavy sterile neutrinos. Such neutrinos are predicted by an SO(10) grand...

  5. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  6. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Don Lincoln

    2013-07-22

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  7. Directional Dark Matter Detection Beyond the Neutrino Bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Grothaus; Malcolm Fairbairn; Jocelyn Monroe

    2014-09-30

    Coherent scattering of solar, atmospheric and diffuse supernovae neutrinos creates an irreducible background for direct dark matter experiments with sensitivities to WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-sections of 10^(-46)-10^(-48) cm^2, depending on the WIMP mass. Even if one could eliminate all other backgrounds, this "neutrino floor" will limit future experiments with projected sensitivities to cross-sections as small as 10^(-48) cm^2. Direction-sensitive detectors have the potential to study dark matter beyond the neutrino bound by fitting event distributions in multiple dimensions: recoil kinetic energy, recoil track angle with respect to the sun, and event time. This work quantitatively explores the impact of direction-sensitivity on the neutrino bound in dark matter direct detection.

  8. Neutrino Mean Free Path in Neutron Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. T. P. Hutauruk

    2010-07-22

    Have been calculated the differential cross section and mean free path of neutrino of neutrino interaction in dense matter.

  9. MOON (Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos) for double beta decay M. Nomachia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    experiments. The neutrino mass matrix is severely constrained by experiment [1]. Limits on neutrinoless double beta decay require the ee element to be less than about 10 eV, and there must be an eigenstate, pre

  10. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Pharis E. [Williams Research, P.O. Box 554, Los Alamos, NM87544 (United States)

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  11. Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor Technology Advanced Reactor Concepts Advanced Instrumentation & Controls Light Water Reactor Sustainability Safety and Regulatory Technology Small Modular Reactors Nuclear...

  12. Collaborative Research: Neutrinos & Nucleosynthesis in Hot Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2013-09-06

    It is now firmly established that neutrinos, which are copiously produced in the hot and dense core of the supernova, play a role in the supernova explosion mechanism and in the synthesis of heavy elements through a phenomena known as r-process nucleosynthesis. They are also detectable in terrestrial neutrino experiments, and serve as a probe of the extreme environment and complex dynamics encountered in the supernova. The major goal of the UW research activity relevant to this project was to calculate the neutrino interaction rates in hot and dense matter of relevance to core collapse supernova. These serve as key input physics in large scale computer simulations of the supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis being pursued at national laboratories here in the United States and by other groups in Europe and Japan. Our calculations show that neutrino production and scattering rate are altered by the nuclear interactions and that these modifications have important implications for nucleosynthesis and terrestrial neutrino detection. The calculation of neutrino rates in dense matter are difficult because nucleons in the dense matter are strongly coupled. A neutrino interacts with several nucleons and the quantum interference between scattering off different nucleons depends on the nature of correlations between them in dense matter. To describe these correlations we used analytic methods based on mean field theory and hydrodynamics, and computational methods such as Quantum Monte Carlo. We found that due to nuclear effects neutrino production rates at relevant temperatures are enhanced, and that electron neutrinos are more easily absorbed than anti-electron neutrinos in dense matter. The latter, was shown to favor synthesis of heavy neutron-rich elements in the supernova.

  13. Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-02-01

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  14. Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  15. Neutrino astrophysics : recent advances and open issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristina Volpe

    2015-03-04

    We highlight recent advances in neutrino astrophysics, the open issues and the interplay with neutrino properties. We emphasize the important progress in our understanding of neutrino flavor conversion in media. We discuss the case of solar neutrinos, of core-collapse supernova neutrinos and of SN1987A, and of the recently discovered ultra-high energy neutrinos whose origin is to be determined.

  16. WMAPping out Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Pierce; Hitoshi Murayama

    2003-10-28

    Recent data from from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results impinge upon a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND). We also note that the Heidelberg--Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

  17. Fast Light, Fast Neutrinos?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Cahill

    2011-10-10

    In certain media, light has been observed with group velocities faster than the speed of light. The recent OPERA report of superluminal 17 GeV neutrinos may describe a similar phenomenon.

  18. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobrynina, A. A., E-mail: aleksandradobrynina@rambler.ru; Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N. [Demidov Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)] [Demidov Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  19. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, ?i?li, ?stanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  20. NOvA and T2K: The Race for the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, Olga; /Fermilab; Nunokawa, Hiroshi; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol.; Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    The determination of the ordering of the neutrino masses (the hierarchy) is probably a crucial prerequisite to understand the origin of lepton masses and mixings and to establish their relationship to the analogous properties in the quark sector. Here, we follow an alternative strategy to the usual neutrino-antineutrino comparison in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments: we exploit the combination of the neutrino-only data from the NOvA and the T2K experiments by performing these two off-axis experiments at different distances but at the same /L, where is the mean neutrino energy and L is the baseline. This would require a minor adjustment to the proposed off-axis angle for one or both of the proposed experiments.