Sample records for reactor neutrino experiment

  1. Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measurement are also briefed.

  2. Constraining Sterile Neutrinos Using Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Girardi; Davide Meloni; Tommy Ohlsson; He Zhang; Shun Zhou

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of neutrino mixing involving one or more sterile neutrinos have resurrected their importance in the light of recent cosmological data. In this case, reactor antineutrino experiments offer an ideal place to look for signatures of sterile neutrinos due to their impact on neutrino flavor transitions. In this work, we show that the high-precision data of the Daya Bay experi\\-ment constrain the 3+1 neutrino scenario imposing upper bounds on the relevant active-sterile mixing angle $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{14} \\lesssim 0.06$ at 3$\\sigma$ confidence level for the mass-squared difference $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ in the range $(10^{-3},10^{-1}) \\, {\\rm eV^2}$. The latter bound can be improved by six years of running of the JUNO experiment, $\\sin^22\\theta_{14} \\lesssim 0.016$, although in the smaller mass range $ \\Delta m^2_{41} \\in (10^{-4} ,10^{-3}) \\, {\\rm eV}^2$. We have also investigated the impact of sterile neutrinos on precision measurements of the standard neutrino oscillation parameters $\\theta_{13}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{31}$ (at Daya Bay and JUNO), $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ (at JUNO), and most importantly, the neutrino mass hierarchy (at JUNO). We find that, except for the obvious situation where $\\Delta m^2_{41}\\sim \\Delta m^2_{31}$, sterile states do not affect these measurements substantially.

  3. Review of Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Mariani

    2012-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document we will review the current status of reactor neutrino oscillation experiments and present their physics potentials for measuring the $\\theta_{13}$ neutrino mixing angle. The neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ is currently a high-priority topic in the field of neutrino physics. There are currently three different reactor neutrino experiments, \\textsc{Double Chooz}, \\textsc{Daya Bay} and \\textsc{Reno} and a few accelerator neutrino experiments searching for neutrino oscillations induced by this angle. A description of the reactor experiments searching for a non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$ is given, along with a discussion of the sensitivities that these experiments can reach in the near future.

  4. Status and Prospects of Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Soo-Bong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New generation of three reactor neutrino experiments have made definitive measurements of the smallest neutrino mixing angle theta13 in 2012, based on the disappearance of electron antineutrinos. More precise measurements of the mixing angle have been made as well as the squared mass difference between electron neutrinos. A rather large value of theta13 has opened a new window to find the CP violation phase and to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. Future reactor experiments, JUNO and RENO50, are proposed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make highly precise measurements of theta12, the squared mass difference between neutrino masses 2 and 1, and the squared mass difference between electron neutrinos.

  5. Neutrino Oscillation Experiments at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Gratta

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper I give an overview of the status of neutrino oscillation experiments performed using nuclear reactors as sources of neutrinos. I review the present generation of experiments (Chooz and Palo Verde) with baselines of about 1 km as well as the next generation that will search for oscillations with a baseline of about 100 km. While the present detectors provide essential input towards the understanding of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, in the future, the KamLAND reactor experiment represents our best opportunity to study very small mass neutrino mixing in laboratory conditions. In addition KamLAND with its very large fiducial mass and low energy threshold, will also be sensitive to a broad range of different physics.

  6. Reactor-based neutrino oscillation experiments Carlo Bemporad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Reactor-based neutrino oscillation experiments Carlo Bemporad Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare 91125 (Published 18 March 2002) The status of neutrino oscillation searches employing nuclear reactors neutrinos produced in the sun and in the earth's atmosphere. The low energy of the reactor Że makes them

  7. Reactor Neutrino Experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Kopp; Manfred Lindner; Alexander Merle; Mark Rolinec

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss several new ideas for reactor neutrino oscillation experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector. We consider two different scenarios for a measurement of the small mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ with a mobile $\\bar{\

  8. The Neutrino Mass Hierarchy from Nuclear Reactor Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Xinmin Zhang

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    10 years from now reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine which neutrino mass eigenstate is the most massive. In this letter we present the results of more than seven million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the mass hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models, geoneutrinos and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that a recently reported spurious dependence of the data analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. We determine the optimal baselines and corresponding detector locations. For most values of the CP-violating, leptonic Dirac phase delta, a degeneracy prevents NOvA and T2K from determining either delta or the hierarchy. We determine the confidence with which a reactor experiment can determine the hierarchy, breaking the degeneracy.

  9. Latest News from Double Chooz Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Kuze; for Double Chooz Collaboration

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double Chooz experiment will search for a disappearance of the reactor neutrinos from Chooz reactor cores in Ardenne, France, in order to detect the yet unknown neutrino oscillation angle \\theta 13. The far detector was completed in 2010 and data-taking has started in spring 2011. Status of data-taking is presented and some performance plots from physics data are shown in this paper for the first time. Also the prospect of experimental sensitivity is presented, in light of recent indication from T2K for a non-zero \\theta 13 value.

  10. Recent Results from Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Bei-Zhen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment announced the discovery of a non-zero value of \\sin^22\\theta_{13} with significance better than 5 \\sigma in 2012. The experiment is continuing to improve the precision of \\sin^22\\theta_{13} and explore other physics topics. In this talk, I will show the current oscillation and mass-squared difference results which are based on the combined analysis of the measured rates and energy spectra of antineutrino events, an independent measurement of \\theta_{13} using IBD events where delayed neutrons are captured on hydrogens, and a search for light sterile neutrinos.

  11. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

  12. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

  13. A New Nuclear Reactor Neutrino Experiment to Measure theta 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Anderson

    2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An International Working Group has been meeting to discuss ideas for a new Nuclear Reactor Neutrino Experiment at meetings in May 2003 (Alabama), October 2003 (Munich) and plans for March 2004 (Niigata). This White Paper Report on the Motivation and Feasibility of such an experiment is the result of these meetings. After a discussion of the context and opportunity for such an experiment, there are sections on detector design, calibration, overburden and backgrounds, systematic errors, other physics, tunneling issues, safety and outreach. There are 7 appendices describing specific site opportunities.

  14. Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiments | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase,Reaction-Driven Restructuring of BimetallicReactor

  15. Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

  16. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  17. Reactor Neutrino Physics -- An Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Boehm

    1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Long baseline oscillation experiments at Palo Verde and Chooz have provided limits for the oscillation parameters while the recently proposed Kamland experiment at a baseline of more than 100km is now in the planning stage. We also describe the status of neutrino magnetic moment experiments at reactors.

  18. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yu-Feng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs) at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline) dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters.

  19. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Feng Li; Ye-Ling Zhou

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs) at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline) dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters.

  20. Investigation of Neutrino Properties in Experiments at Nuclear Reactors: Present Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Mikaelyan

    2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper was submitted in Russian edition of Journal Physics of Atomic Nuclei in 2001. The present status of experiments that are being performed at nuclear reactors in order to seek the neutrino masses, mixing, and magnetic moments, whose discovery would be a signal of the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model, is considered, along with their future prospects.

  1. Evidence for Neutrino Oscillations I: Solar and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. McDonald

    2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses evidence for neutrino oscillations obtained from measurements with solar neutrinos and reactor neutrinos.

  2. Modern Status of Neutrino Experiments at the Underground Neutrino Laboratory of Kurchatov Institute Near Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; S. V. Sukhotin; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov

    1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of antineutrino-deuteron interaction at Krasnoyarsk reactor are discussed. The characteristics of the installation ''Deuteron'', present results and perspectives of Krasnoyarsk neutrino laboratory are presented.

  3. Nonstandard interaction effects on neutrino parameters at medium-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommy Ohlsson; He Zhang; Shun Zhou

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision measurements of leptonic mixing parameters and the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy are the primary goals of the forthcoming medium-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments, such as JUNO and RENO-50. In this work, we investigate the impact of nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSIs) on the measurements of {sin^2 theta_{12}, Delta m^2_{21}} and {sin^2 theta_{13}, Delta m^2_{31}}, and on the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy, at the medium-baseline reactor experiments by assuming a typical experimental setup. It turns out that the true mixing parameter sin^2 theta_{12} can be excluded at a more than 3 sigma level if the NSI parameter varepsilon_{e mu} or varepsilon_{e tau} is as large as 2% in the most optimistic case. However, the discovery reach of NSI effects has been found to be small, and depends crucially on the CP-violating phases. Finally, we show that NSI effects could enhance or reduce the discrimination power of the JUNO and RENO-50 experiments between the normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies.

  4. Waterproofed Photomultiplier Tube Assemblies for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Ken; Edwards, Emily; Edwards, William; Ely, Ry; Hoff, Matthew; Lebanowski, Logan; Li, Bo; Li, Piyi; Lin, Shih-Kai; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Jinchang; Luk, Kam-Biu; Miao, Jiayuan; Napolitano, Jim; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Qi, Ming; Steiner, Herbert; Stoler, Paul; Stuart, Mary; Wang, Lingyu; Yang, Changgen; Zhong, Weili

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment 960 20-cm-diameter waterproof photomultiplier tubes are used to instrument three water pools as Cherenkov detectors for detecting cosmic-ray muons. Of these 960 photomultiplier tubes, 341 are recycled from the MACRO experiment. A systematic program was undertaken to refurbish them as waterproof assemblies. In the context of passing the water leakage check, a success rate better than 97% was achieved. Details of the design, fabrication, testing, operation, and performance of these waterproofed photomultiplier-tube assemblies are presented.

  5. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cribier

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  6. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Vogel; Liangjian Wen; Chao Zhang

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  7. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Vogel; Liangjian Wen; Chao Zhang

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Petr; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  9. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogel, P. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Kellog Radiation Lab.; Wen, L.J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle ?13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  10. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

  11. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Djurcic; J. A. Detwiler; A. Piepke; V. R. Foster Jr.; L. Miller; G. Gratta

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

  12. Mass Hierarchy via Mossbauer and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Parke; Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroshi Nunokawa; Renata Zukanovich Funchal

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how one could determine the neutrino mass hierarchy with Mossbauer neutrinos and also revisit the question of whether the hierarchy can be determined with reactor neutrinos.

  13. Mass Hierarchy via Mossbauer and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parke, Stephen; Nunokawa, Hiroshi; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how one could determine the neutrino mass hierarchy with Mossbauer neutrinos and also revisit the question of whether the hierarchy can be determined with reactor neutrinos.

  14. Search for sterile neutrinos at reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuda, Osamu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensitivity to the sterile neutrino mixing at very short baseline reactor neutrino experiments is investigated. In the case of conventional (thermal neutron) reactors it is found that the sensitivity is lost for $\\Delta m^2 \\gtrsim$ 1 eV$^2$ due to smearing of the reactor core size. On the other hand, in the case of an experimental fast neutron reactor Joyo, because of its small size, sensitivity to $\\sin^22\\theta_{14}$ can be as good as 0.03 for $\\Delta m^2 \\sim$ several eV$^2$ with the Bugey-like detector setup.

  15. Leakage Tests of the Stainless Steel Vessels of the Antineutrino Detectors in the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaohui Chen; Xiaolan Luo; Yuekun Heng; Lingshu Wang; Xiao Tang; Xiaoyan Ma; Honglin Zhuang; Henry Band; Jeff Cherwinka; Qiang Xiao; Karsten M. Heeger

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The antineutrino detectors in the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment are liquid scintillator detectors designed to detect low energy particles from antineutrino interactions with high efficiency and low backgrounds. Since the antineutrino detector will be installed in a water Cherenkov cosmic ray veto detector and will run for 3 to 5 years, ensuring water tightness is critical to the successful operation of the antineutrino detectors. We choose a special method to seal the detector. Three leak checking methods have been employed to ensure the seal quality. This paper will describe the sealing method and leak testing results.

  16. Constraints on neutrinoless double beta decay from neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; M. Monteno

    1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that, in the framework of a general model with mixing of three Majorana neutrinos and a neutrino mass hierarchy, the results of the Bugey and Krasnoyarsk reactor neutrino oscillation experiments imply strong limitations for the effective Majorana mass || that characterizes the amplitude of neutrinoless double beta decay. We obtain further limitations on || from the data of the atmospheric neutrino experiments. We discuss the possible implications of the results of the future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments for neutrinoless double beta decay.

  17. Neutrino Mass Models: Impact of non-zero reactor angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen F. King

    2011-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk neutrino mass models are reviewed and the impact of a non-zero reactor angle and other deviations from tri-bimaximal mixing are discussed. We propose some benchmark models, where the only way to discriminate between them is by high precision neutrino oscillation experiments.

  18. Measuring theta12 Despite an Uncertain Reactor Neutrino Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciuffoli, Emilio; Grassi, Marco; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently discovered 5 MeV bump highlights that the uncertainty in the reactor neutrino spectrum is far greater than some theoretical estimates. Medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments will deliver by far the most precise ever measurements of theta12. However, as a result of the bump, such a determination of theta12 using the theoretical spectrum would yield a value of sin^2(2theta12) which is more than 1% higher than the true value. We show that by using recent measurements of the reactor neutrino spectrum the precision of a measurement of theta12 at a medium baseline reactor neutrino experiment can be improved appreciably. We estimate this precision as a function of the 9Li spallation background veto efficiency and dead time.

  19. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  20. The Water Purification System for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Wilhelmi; R. Bopp; R. Brown; J. Cherwinka; J. Cummings; E. Dale; M. Diwan; J. Goett; R. W. Hackenburg; J. Kilduff; L. Littenberg; G. S. Li; X. N. Li; J. C. Liu; H. Q. Lu; J. Napolitano; C. Pearson; N. Raper; R. Rosero; P. Stoler; Q. Xiao; C. G. Yang; Y. Yang; M. Yeh

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the design, installation, and operation of a purification system that is able to provide large volumes of high purity ASTM (D1193-91) Type-I water to a high energy physics experiment. The water environment is underground in a lightly sealed system, and this provides significant challenges to maintaining high purity in the storage pools, each of which contains several thousand cubic meters. High purity is dictated by the need for large optical absorption length, which is critical for the operation of the experiment. The system is largely successful, and the water clarity criteria are met. We also include a discussion of lessons learned.

  1. Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katori, Teppei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Series of short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments provided unexpected results, and now they are called short baseline anomalies, and all indicates an existence of sterile neutrinos with a mass scale around 1~eV. The signals of short baseline anomalies are reported from 4 different classes of experiments. However, at this moment, there is no convincing theoretical model to explain such sterile neutrinos, and a single experiment to confirm 1~eV sterile neutrinos may be challenging. In this short note, we describe classes of short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and their goals.

  2. Booster Neutrino Experiment - About Neutrinos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolarAbout Neutrinos General Information

  3. Reanalysis of the Reactor Neutrino Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, A C; Garvey, G T; Jonkmans, Guy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reanalyze the reactor neutrino anomaly, wherein it is suggested that only about 94% of the emitted antineutrino flux was detected in short baseline experiments. We find that the form of the corrections that lead to the anomaly are very uncertain for the 30% of the flux that is determined by forbidden beta-decay transitions. This uncertainty was estimated in four ways and is larger than the size of the anomaly, and is unlikely to be reduced without accurate direct measurements of the antineutrino flux. Neutrino physics conclusions based on the original anomaly need to be revisited, as do oscillation analyses that assumed that the antineutrino flux is known to better than ~5%.

  4. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors Z. Djurcic 1 , ?emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined fromlarge commercial nuclear reactors are playing an important

  5. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

  6. SNIF: A Futuristic Neutrino Probe for Undeclared Nuclear Fission Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Lasserre; Maximilien Fechner; Guillaume Mention; Romain Reboulleau; Michel Cribier; Alain Letourneau; David Lhuillier

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Today reactor neutrino experiments are at the cutting edge of fundamental research in particle physics. Understanding the neutrino is far from complete, but thanks to the impressive progress in this field over the last 15 years, a few research groups are seriously considering that neutrinos could be useful for society. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) works with its Member States to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. In a context of international tension and nuclear renaissance, neutrino detectors could help IAEA to enforce the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). In this article we discuss a futuristic neutrino application to detect and localize an undeclared nuclear reactor from across borders. The SNIF (Secret Neutrino Interactions Finder) concept proposes to use a few hundred thousand tons neutrino detectors to unveil clandestine fission reactors. Beyond previous studies we provide estimates of all known background sources as a function of the detector's longitude, latitude and depth, and we discuss how they impact the detectability.

  7. Review of Solar and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. P. Poon

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last several years, experiments have conclusively demonstrated that neutrinos are massive and that they mix. There is now direct evidence for $\

  8. Reactor monitoring with Neutrinos Michel Cribier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable, but also book keeping of the fuel element composition before and after their use in the nuclear powerReactor monitoring with Neutrinos Michel Cribier Astroparticule & Cosmologie 10, rue Alice Domon et

  9. Optimisation of future long baseline neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olga Mena

    2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this talk is to review near and far future long baseline neutrino experiments as superbeams, beta-Beams and neutrino factories, comparing their sensitivities to the unknown parameters in the neutrino oscillation sector. We focus on the extraction of the neutrino mass hierarchy, exploring alternatives to the commonly used neutrino-antineutrino comparison. Special attention to a new concept of neutrino factory design, the low energy neutrino factory, is given.

  10. Global neutrino data and recent reactor fluxes: status of three-flavour oscillation parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz; Mariam Tórtola; J. W. F. Valle

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a global neutrino oscillation data analysis within the three-flavour framework. We include latest results from the MINOS long-baseline experiment (including electron neutrino appearance as well as anti-neutrino data), updating all relevant solar (SK II+III), atmospheric (SK I+II+III) and reactor (KamLAND) data. Furthermore, we include a recent re-calculation of the anti-neutrino fluxes emitted from nuclear reactors. These results have important consequences for the analysis of reactor experiments and in particular for the status of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In our recommended default analysis we find from the global fit that the hint for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ remains weak, at 1.8$\\sigma$ for both neutrino mass hierarchy schemes. However, we discuss in detail the dependence of these results on assumptions concerning the reactor neutrino analysis.

  11. Physics Prospects with an Intense Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Solomey

    2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With new forthcoming intense neutrino beams, for the study of neutrino oscillations, it is possible to consider other physics experiments that can be done with these extreme neutrino fluxes available close to the source.

  12. Bimetric Relativity and the Opera Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, J W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of explaining the propagation of neutrinos measured by the OPERA experiment with $\\delta v_\

  13. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolarAbout Neutrinos General Informationclose

  14. A Study of Reactor Neutrino Monitoring at Experimental Fast Reactor JOYO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuta, H; Hara, T; Haruna, T; Ishihara, N; Ishitsuka, M; Ito, C; Katsumata, M; Kawasaki, T; Konno, T; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Matsubara, T; Miyata, H; Nagasaka, Y; Nitta, K; Sakamoto, Y; Suekane, F; Sumiyoshi, T; Tabata, H; Takamatsu, M; Tamura, N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We carried out a study of neutrino detection at the experimental fast reactor JOYO using a 0.76 tons gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator detector. The detector was set up on the ground level at 24.3m from the JOYO reactor core of 140MW thermal power. The measured neutrino event rate from reactor on-off comparison was 1.11\\pm1.24(stat.)\\pm0.46(syst.)events/day. Although the statistical significance of the measurement was not enough, the background in such a compact detector at the ground level was studied in detail and MC simulation was found to describe the data well. A study for improvement of the detector for future such experiments is also shown.

  15. A Study of Reactor Neutrino Monitoring at Experimental Fast Reactor JOYO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Furuta; Y. Fukuda; T. Hara; T. Haruna; N. Ishihara; M. Ishitsuka; C. Ito; M. Katsumata; T. Kawasaki; T. Konno; M. Kuze; J. Maeda; T. Matsubara; H. Miyata; Y. Nagasaka; K. Nitta; Y. Sakamoto; F. Suekane; T. Sumiyoshi; H. Tabata; M. Takamatsu; N. Tamura

    2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We carried out a study of neutrino detection at the experimental fast reactor JOYO using a 0.76 tons gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator detector. The detector was set up on the ground level at 24.3m from the JOYO reactor core of 140MW thermal power. The measured neutrino event rate from reactor on-off comparison was 1.11\\pm1.24(stat.)\\pm0.46(syst.)events/day. Although the statistical significance of the measurement was not enough, the background in such a compact detector at the ground level was studied in detail and MC simulation was found to describe the data well. A study for improvement of the detector for future such experiments is also shown.

  16. Systematic Uncertainties in the Analysis of the Reactor Neutrino Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Hayes; J. L. Friar; G. T. Garvey; G. Jungman; Guy Jonkmans

    2014-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine uncertainties in the analysis of the reactor neutrino anomaly, wherein it is suggested that only about 94% of the emitted antineutrino flux was detected in short baseline experiments. We find that the form of the corrections that lead to the anomaly are very uncertain for the 30% of the flux that arises from forbidden decays. This uncertainty was estimated in four ways, is as large as the size of the anomaly, and is unlikely to be reduced without accurate direct measurements of the antineutrino flux. Given the present lack of detailed knowledge of the structure of the forbidden transitions, it is not possible to convert the measured aggregate fission beta spectra to antineutrino spectra to the accuracy needed to infer an anomaly. Neutrino physics conclusions based on the original anomaly need to be revisited, as do oscillation analyses that assumed that the antineutrino flux is known to better than approximately 4%.

  17. On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

    2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

  18. Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. B. Ma; F. Lu; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; W. L. Zhong; F. P. An

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor antineutrino experiment are used to study neutrino oscillation, search for signatures of nonstandard neutrino interaction, and monitor reactor operation for safeguard application. Reactor simulation is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. Commercial code is used for reactor simulation to evaluate fission fraction in Daya Bay neutrino experiment, but the source code doesn't open to our researcher results from commercial secret. In this study, The open source code DRAGON was improved to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions, $^{235}$U,$^{238}$U,$^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu, and then was validated for PWRs using the Takahama-3 benchmark. The fission fraction results are consistent with those of MIT's results. Then, fission fraction of Daya Bay reactor core was calculated by using improved DRAGON code, and the fission fraction calculated by DRAGON agreed well with these calculated by SCIENCE. The average deviation less than 5\\% for all the four isotopes. The correlation coefficient matrix between $^{235}$U,$^{238}$U,$^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu were also studied using DRAGON, and then the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was calculated by using the correlation coefficient matrix. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6\\% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment. The uncertainties source of fission fraction calculation need further to be studied in the future.

  19. Limits on the neutrino magnetic moment from the MUNU experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraktchieva, Z; Link, O; Amsler, Claude; Avenier, M; Broggini, C; Busto, J; Cerna, C; Gervasio, G; Jeanneret, J B; Jonkmans, G; Koang, D H; Lebrun, D; Ould-Saada, F; Puglierin, G; Stutz, A; Tadsen, A; Vuilleumier, J L

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MUNU experiment was carried out at the Bugey nuclear power reactor. The aim was the study of electron antineutrino-electron elastic scattering at low energy. The recoil electrons were recorded in a gas time projection chamber, immersed in a tank filled with liquid scintillator serving as veto detector, suppressing in particular Compton electrons. The measured electron recoil spectrum is presented. Upper limits on the neutrino magnetic moment were derived and are discussed.

  20. Common origin of reactor and sterile neutrino mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Merle; Stefano Morisi; Walter Winter

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    If the hints for light sterile neutrinos from short-baseline anomalies are to be taken seriously, global fits indicate active-sterile mixings of a magnitude comparable to the known reactor mixing. We therefore study the conditions under which the active-sterile and reactor mixings could have the same origin in an underlying flavour model. As a starting point, we use $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry in the active neutrino sector, which (for three neutrinos) yields a zero reactor neutrino angle and a maximal atmospheric one. We demonstrate that adding one sterile neutrino can change this setting, so that the active-sterile mixing and non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ can be generated simultaneously. From the phenomenological perspective, electron (anti)neutrino disappearance can be easily accommodated, while muon neutrino disappearance can vanish. It is, however, difficult to reconcile the LSND results with this scenario. From the theory perspective, the setting requires the misalignment of some of the flavon vacuum expectation values, which may be achieved in an $A_4$ or $D_4$ flavour symmetry model using extra dimensions.

  1. The effect of sterile states on the magnetic moments of neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Vassh, N. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review recent work exploring the effect of light sterile neutrino states on the neutrino magnetic moment as explored by the reactor and solar neutrino experiments.

  2. Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Boehm; J. Busenitz; B. Cook; G. Gratta; H. Henrikson; J. Kornis; D. Lawrence; K. B. Lee; K. McKinny; L. Miller; V. Novikov; A. Piepke; B. Ritchie; D. Tracy; P. Vogel; Y-F. Wang; J. Wolf

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the initial results from a measurement of the anti-neutrino flux and spectrum at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium-loaded scintillation detector. We find that the anti-neutrino flux agrees with that predicted in the absence of oscillations to better than 5%, excluding at 90% CL $\\rm\\bar\

  3. Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil-Botella, I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac) of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end.

  4. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  5. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  6. The Origin and Implications of the Shoulder in Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Hayes; J. L. Friar; G. T. Garvey; Duligur Ibeling; Gerard Jungman; T. Kawano; Robert W. Mills

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze within a nuclear database framework the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra in current reactor experiments. We find that the ENDF/B-VII.1 database predicts that the antineutrino shoulder arises from an analogous shoulder in the aggregate fission beta spectra. In contrast, the JEFF-3.1.1 database does not predict a shoulder. We consider several possible origins of the shoulder, and find possible explanations. For example, there could be a problem with the measured aggregate beta spectra, or the harder neutron spectrum at a light-water power reactor could affect the distribution of beta-decaying isotopes. In addition to the fissile actinides, we find that $^{238}$U could also play a significant role in distorting the total antineutrino spectrum. Distinguishing these and quantifying whether there is an anomaly associated with measured reactor neutrino signals will require new short-baseline experiments, both at thermal reactors and at reactors with a sizable epithermal neutron component.

  7. The Origin and Implications of the Shoulder in Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, A C; Garvey, G T; Ibeling, Duligur; Jungman, Gerard; Kawano, T; Mills, Robert W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze within a nuclear database framework the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra in current reactor experiments. We find that the ENDF/B-VII.1 database predicts that the antineutrino shoulder arises from an analogous shoulder in the aggregate fission beta spectra. In contrast, the JEFF-3.1.1 database does not predict a shoulder. We consider several possible origins of the shoulder, and find possible explanations. For example, there could be a problem with the measured aggregate beta spectra, or the harder neutron spectrum at a light-water power reactor could affect the distribution of beta-decaying isotopes. In addition to the fissile actinides, we find that $^{238}$U could also play a significant role in distorting the total antineutrino spectrum. Distinguishing these and quantifying whether there is an anomaly associated with measured reactor neutrino signals will require new short-baseline experiments, both at thermal reactors and at reactors with a sizable epithermal neutron component.

  8. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino crossN u F a c t

  9. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Virtual Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolarAbout Neutrinos General

  10. A select overview of neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanski, Raymond J.

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the lepton sector and the quark sector is an interesting source of discourse in the current theoretical climate. Models that might someday supersede the Standard Model typically require quark structure, with implications for the lepton sector. This talk will explore some of the consequences of newer models, in the context of certain neutrino experiments.

  11. Ortho-positronium observation in the Double Chooz Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Abe; J. C. dos Anjos; J. C. Barriere; E. Baussan; I. Bekman; M. Bergevin; T. J. C. Bezerra; L. Bezrukov; E. Blucher; C. Buck; J. Busenitz; A. Cabrera; E. Caden; L. Camilleri; R. Carr; M. Cerrada; P. -J. Chang; E. Chauveau; P. Chimenti; A. P. Collin; E. Conover; J. M. Conrad; J. I. Crespo-Anadon; K. Crum; A. S. Cucoanes; E. Damon; J. V. Dawson; J. Dhooghe; D. Dietrich; Z. Djurcic; M. Dracos; M. Elnimr; A. Etenko; M. Fallot; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Felde; S. M. Fernandes; V. Fischer; D. Franco; M. Franke; H. Furuta; I. Gil-Botella; L. Giot; M. Goger-Neff; L. F. G. Gonzalez; L. Goodenough; M. C. Goodman; C. Grant; N. Haag; T. Hara; J. Haser; M. Hofmann; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Hourlier; M. Ishitsuka; J. Jochum; C. Jollet; F. Kaether; L. N. Kalousis; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; T. Kawasaki; E. Kemp; H. de Kerret; D. Kryn; M. Kuze; T. Lachenmaier; C. E. Lane; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; H. P. Lima Jr; M. Lindner; J. M. Lopez-Castano; J. M. LoSecco; B. Lubsandorzhiev; S. Lucht; J. Maeda; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; J. Martino; T. Matsubara; G. Mention; A. Meregaglia; T. Miletic; R. Milincic; A. Minotti; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nikitenko; P. Novella; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; A. Onillon; A. Osborn; C. Palomares; I. M. Pepe; S. Perasso; P. Pfahler; A. Porta; G. Pronost; J. Reichenbacher; B. Reinhold; M. Rohling; R. Roncin; S. Roth; B. Rybolt; Y. Sakamoto; R. Santorelli; A. C. Schilithz; S. Schonert; S. Schoppmann; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Sharankova; S. Shimojima; D. Shrestha; V. Sibille; V. Sinev; M. Skorokhvatov; E. Smith; J. Spitz; A. Stahl; I. Stancu; L. F. F. Stokes; M. Strait; A. Stuken; F. Suekane; S. Sukhotin; T. Sumiyoshi; Y. Sun; R. Svoboda; K. Terao; A. Tonazzo; H. H. Trinh Thi; G. Valdiviesso; N. Vassilopoulos; C. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Wagner; N. Walsh; H. Watanabe; C. Wiebusch; L. Winslow; M. Wurm; G. Yang; F. Yermia; V. Zimmer

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Double Chooz experiment measures the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by detecting reactor $\\bar{\

  12. Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Steidl

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

  13. Exotic Solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem and Some Implications for Low Energy Solar Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Nunokawa

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I review, from the phenomenological point of view, solutions to the solar neutrino problem, which are not provided by the conventional neutrino oscillation induced by mass and flavor mixing, and show that they can provide a good fit to the observed data. I also consider some simple implications for low energy solar neutrino experiments.

  14. Light Dark Matter Detection Prospects at Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Jason; Smith, Stefanie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the prospects for the detection of relatively light dark matter through direct annihilation to neutrinos. We specifically focus on the detection possibilities of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator neutrino detection devices. We find in particular that liquid scintillator detectors may potentially provide excellent detection prospects for dark matter in the 4-10 GeV mass range. These experiments can provide excellent corroborative checks of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal, but may yield results for low mass dark matter in any case. We identify important tests of the ratio of electron to muon neutrino events (and neutrino versus anti-neutrino events), which discriminate against background atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the fraction of events which arise from muon neutrinos or anti-neutrinos ($R_{\\mu}$ and $R_{\\bar \\mu}$) can potentially yield information about the branching fractions of hypothetical dark matter annihilations into different neutrino flavors. These results apply to n...

  15. Reactor Anti-Neutrino Oscillations and Gadolinium Loaded Super-Kamiokande Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhya Choubey; S. T. Petcov

    2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the potential of measuring the solar neutrino oscillation parameters in the proposed gadolinium loaded Super-Kamiokande (SK-Gd) detector. Gadolinium dissolved in water can detect neutrons much more efficiently than pure water. This imparts the detector the ability to observe electron type antineutrinos, transforming Super-Kamiokande into a huge reactor antineutrino detector with an event rate approximately 43 times higher than that observed in KamLAND. We simulate the reactor antineutrino data expected in this high statistics detector. We use these prospective data to study the precision with which the solar neutrino oscillation parameters, $\\Delta m^2_{\\odot}$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{\\odot}$, can be determined i) with the SK-Gd detector, and ii) by combining the SK-Gd data with the global data on solar neutrino oscillations. For comparison and completeness the allowed regions of $\\Delta m^2_{\\odot}$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{\\odot}$, expected to be obtained from the data of the solar neutrino and KamLAND experiments, are also presented.

  16. A Lithium Experiment in the Program of Solar Neutrino Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kopylov; I. Orekhov; V. Petukhov; A. Solomatin

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The experiments sensitive to pp-neutrinos from the Sun are very perspective for the precise measurement of a mixing angle $\\theta_{12}$. A $\

  17. SAGE: Solar Neutrino Data from SAGE, the Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SAGE Collaboration

    SAGE is a solar neutrino experiment based on the reaction 71Ga + n goes to 71Ge + e-. The 71Ge atoms are chemically extracted from a 50-metric ton target of Ga metal and concentrated in a sample of germane gas mixed with xenon. The atoms are then individually counted by observing their decay back to 71Ga in a small proportional counter. The distinguishing feature of the experiment is its ability to detect the low-energy neutrinos from proton-proton fusion. These neutrinos, which are made in the primary reaction that provides the Sun's energy, are the major component of the solar neutrino flux and have not been observed in any other way. To shield the experiment from cosmic rays, it is located deep underground in a specially built facility at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the northern Caucasus mountains of Russia. Nearly 100 measurements of the solar neutrino flux have been made during 1990-2000, and their combined result is a neutrino capture rate that is well below the prediction of the Standard Solar Model. The significant suppression of the solar neutrino flux that SAGE and other solar neutrino experiments have observed gives a strong indication for the existence of neutrino oscillations. [copied from the SAGE homepage at http://ewi.npl.washington.edu/SAGE/SAGE.html

  18. Probing CP violation at LBNE with reactor experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debajyoti Dutta; Kalpana Bora

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we have explored the possibilities of improving CP violation discovery potential of newly planned Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), U.S.A., by combining with data from reactors. The third mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ is now very precisely measured and this precise measurenent of $\\theta_{13}$ helps in measurement of CP violation. Here, CP violation is studied with and without data from reactors. Impact of placing a ND is also studied. It is found that CPV discovery potential of LBNE with ND increases when combined with data from reactors. With a far detector of 35 kt, it is possible to obtain 5$\\sigma$ sensitivity of CPV when run for 5 years in $\

  19. A PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRINO MIXING ANGLE THETA (SUB 13) USING REACTOR ANTINEUTRINOS AT DAYA BAY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETTELL, S.; ET AL.

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the design of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. Recent discoveries in neutrino physics have shown that the Standard Model of particle physics is incomplete. The observation of neutrino oscillations has unequivocally demonstrated that the masses of neutrinos are nonzero. The smallness of the neutrino masses (<2 eV) and the two surprisingly large mixing angles measured have thus far provided important clues and constraints to extensions of the Standard Model. The third mixing angle, {delta}{sub 13}, is small and has not yet been determined; the current experimental bound is sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.17 at 90% confidence level (from Chooz) for {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. It is important to measure this angle to provide further insight on how to extend the Standard Model. A precision measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} using nuclear reactors has been recommended by the 2004 APS Multi-divisional Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics as well as a recent Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NUSAG) report. We propose to perform a precision measurement of this mixing angle by searching for the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from the nuclear reactor complex in Daya Bay, China. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will be vital in resolving the neutrino-mass hierarchy and future measurements of CP violation in the lepton sector because this technique cleanly separates {theta}{sub 13} from CP violation and effects of neutrino propagation in the earth. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will provide important, complementary information to that from long-baseline, accelerator-based experiments. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 0.01 or better in sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} at 90% confidence level.

  20. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adams; J. R. Alonso; A. M. Ankowski; J. A. Asaadi; J. Ashenfelter; S. N. Axani; K. Babu; C. Backhouse; H. R. Band; P. S. Barbeau; N. Barros; A. Bernstein; M. Betancourt; M. Bishai; E. Blucher; J. Bouffard; N. Bowden; S. Brice; C. Bryan; L. Camilleri; J. Cao; J. Carlson; R. E. Carr; A. Chatterjee; M. Chen; S. Chen; M. Chiu; E. D. Church; J. I. Collar; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; M. R. Convery; R. L. Cooper; D. Cowen; H. Davoudiasl; A. De Gouvea; D. J. Dean; G. Deichert; F. Descamps; T. DeYoung; M. V. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; B. Donnelly; D. A. Dwyer; S. Dytman; Y. Efremenko; L. L. Everett; A. Fava; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; B. Fleming; A. Friedland; B. K. Fujikawa; T. K. Gaisser; M. Galeazzi; D. C. Galehouse; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. T. Garvey; S. Gautam; K. E. Gilje; M. Gonzalez-Garcia; M. C. Goodman; H. Gordon; E. Gramellini; M. P. Green; A. Guglielmi; R. W. Hackenburg; A. Hackenburg; F. Halzen; K. Han; S. Hans; D. Harris; K. M. Heeger; M. Herman; R. Hill; A. Holin; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; R. A. Johnson; J. Joshi; G. Karagiorgi; L. J. Kaufman; B. Kayser; S. H. Kettell; B. J. Kirby; J. R. Klein; Yu. G. Kolomensky; R. M. Kriske; C. E. Lane; T. J. Langford; A. Lankford; K. Lau; J. G. Learned; J. Ling; J. M. Link; D. Lissauer; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; S. Lockwitz; M. Lokajicek; W. C. Louis; K. Luk; J. Lykken; W. J. Marciano; J. Maricic; D. M. Markoff; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. Mauger; K. Mavrokoridis; E. McCluskey; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; G. Mills; I. Mocioiu; B. Monreal; M. R. Mooney; J. G. Morfin; P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; R. Neilson; J. K. Nelson; M. Nessi; D. Norcini; F. Nova; D. R. Nygren; G. D. Orebi Gann; O. Palamara; Z. Parsa; R. Patterson; P. Paul; A. Pocar; X. Qian; J. L. Raaf; R. Rameika; G. Ranucci; H. Ray; D. Reyna; G. C. Rich; P. Rodrigues; E. Romero Romero; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; B. Rybolt; M. C. Sanchez; G. Santucci; D. Schmitz; K. Scholberg; D. Seckel; M. Shaevitz; R. Shrock; M. B. Smy; M. Soderberg; A. Sonzogni; A. B. Sousa; J. Spitz; J. M. St. John; J. Stewart; J. B. Strait; G. Sullivan; R. Svoboda; A. M. Szelc; R. Tayloe; M. A. Thomson; M. Toups; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; R. G. Van de Water; R. B. Vogelaar; M. Weber; W. Weng; M. Wetstein; C. White; B. R. White; L. Whitehead; D. W. Whittington; M. J. Wilking; R. J. Wilson; P. Wilson; D. Winklehner; D. R. Winn; E. Worcester; L. Yang; M. Yeh; Z. W. Yokley; J. Yoo; B. Yu; J. Yu; C. Zhang

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  1. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  2. Lectures on Neutrino Astronomy: Theory and Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Overview of neutrino astronomy: multidisciplinary science. 2. Cosmic accelerators: the highest energy cosmic rays. 3. Neutrino beam dumps: supermassive black holes and gamma ray bursts. 4. Neutrino telescopes: water and ice. 5. Indirect dark matter detection. 6. Towards kilometer-scale detectors.

  3. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. McKeown

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  4. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, R D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  5. Scientific Opportunities with the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, C.; et al.,

    2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, we describe the wealth of science opportunities and capabilities of LBNE, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. LBNE has been developed to provide a unique and compelling program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of particle physics. Chief among the discovery opportunities are observation of CP symmetry violation in neutrino mixing, resolution of the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination of maximal or near-maximal mixing in neutrinos, searches for nucleon decay signatures, and detailed studies of neutrino bursts from galactic supernovae. To fulfill these and other goals as a world-class facility, LBNE is conceived around four central components: (1) a new, intense wide-band neutrino source at Fermilab, (2) a fine-grained `near' neutrino detector just downstream of the source, (3) the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota at an optimal distance (~1300 km) from the neutrino source, and (4) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) deployed there as a 'far' detector. The facilities envisioned are expected to enable many other science opportunities due to the high event rates and excellent detector resolution from beam neutrinos in the near detector and atmospheric neutrinos in the far detector. This is a mature, well developed, world class experiment whose relevance, importance, and probability of unearthing critical and exciting physics has increased with time.

  6. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holin, Anna Maria; /University Coll. London

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which sends a high intensity muon neutrino beam through two functionally identical detectors, a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, 1km from the beam source, and a Far detector, 734km away, in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. MINOS may be able to measure the neutrino mixing angle parameter sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} for the first time. Detector granularity, however, makes it very hard to distinguish any {nu}{sub e} appearance signal events characteristic of a non-zero value of {theta}{sub 13} from background neutral current (NC) and short-track {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current (CC) events. Also, uncertainties in the hadronic shower modeling in the kinematic region characteristic of this analysis are relatively large. A new data-driven background decomposition method designed to address those issues is developed and its results presented. By removing the long muon tracks from {nu}{sub {mu}}-CC events, the Muon Removed Charge Current (MRCC) method creates independent pseudo-NC samples that can be used to correct the MINOS Monte Carlo to agree with the high-statistics Near detector data and to decompose the latter into components so as to predict the expected Far detector background. The MRCC method also provides an important cross-check in the Far detector to test the background in the signal selected region. MINOS finds a 1.0-1.5 {sigma} {nu}{sub e}-CC excess above background in the Far detector data, depending on method used, for a total exposure of 3.14 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target. Interpreting this excess as signal, MINOS can set limits on sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}. Using the MRCC method, MINOS sets a limit of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.265 at the 90% confidence limit for a CP-violating phase {delta} = 0.

  7. Neutrino Oscillation Physics Potential of the T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodr'iguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; S'anchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shaker, F; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal $\\sin^22\\theta_{23}$, the octant of $\\theta_{23}$, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of $\\delta_{CP}$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$, and $\\Delta m^2_{32}$, for various combinations of $\

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Physics Potential of the T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Abe; J. Adam; H. Aihara; T. Akiri; C. Andreopoulos; S. Aoki; A. Ariga; S. Assylbekov; D. Autiero; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; P. Bartet-Friburg; M. Bass; M. Batkiewicz; F. Bay; V. Berardi; B. E. Berger; S. Berkman; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; C. Bojechko; S. Bordoni; S. B. Boyd; D. Brailsford; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; N. Buchanan; R. G. Calland; J. Caravaca Rodr'iguez; S. L. Cartwright; R. Castillo; M. G. Catanesi; A. Cervera; D. Cherdack; G. Christodoulou; A. Clifton; J. Coleman; S. J. Coleman; G. Collazuol; K. Connolly; L. Cremonesi; A. Dabrowska; I. Danko; R. Das; S. Davis; P. de Perio; G. De Rosa; T. Dealtry; S. R. Dennis; C. Densham; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; T. Duboyski; K. Duffy; J. Dumarchez; S. Dytman; M. Dziewiecki; S. Emery-Schrenk; A. Ereditato; L. Escudero; T. Feusels; A. J. Finch; G. A. Fiorentini; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; A. P. Furmanski; V. Galymov; A. Garcia; S. Giffin; C. Giganti; K. Gilje; D. Goeldi; T. Golan; M. Gonin; N. Grant; D. Gudin; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; M. D. Haigh; P. Hamilton; D. Hansen; T. Hara; M. Hartz; T. Hasegawa; N. C. Hastings; T. Hayashino; Y. Hayato; C. Hearty; R. L. Helmer; M. Hierholzer; J. Hignight; A. Hillairet; A. Himmel; T. Hiraki; S. Hirota; J. Holeczek; S. Horikawa; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; K. Ieki; M. Ieva; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; J. Insler; T. J. Irvine; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; E. Iwai; K. Iwamoto; K. Iyogi; A. Izmaylov; A. Jacob; B. Jamieson; R. A. Johnson; S. Johnson; J. H. Jo; P. Jonsson; C. K. Jung; M. Kabirnezhad; A. C. Kaboth; T. Kajita; H. Kakuno; J. Kameda; Y. Kanazawa; D. Karlen; I. Karpikov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; D. Kielczewska; T. Kikawa; A. Kilinski; J. Kim; S. King; J. Kisiel; P. Kitching; T. Kobayashi; L. Koch; T. Koga; A. Kolaceke; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. Kropp; H. Kubo; Y. Kudenko; R. Kurjata; T. Kutter; J. Lagoda; K. Laihem; I. Lamont; E. Larkin; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; M. Lazos; T. Lindner; C. Lister; R. P. Litchfield; A. Longhin; J. P. Lopez; L. Ludovici; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; S. Manly; A. D. Marino; J. Marteau; J. F. Martin; P. Martins; S. Martynenko; T. Maruyama; V. Matveev; K. Mavrokoridis; E. Mazzucato; M. McCarthy; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; A. Mefodiev; C. Metelko; M. Mezzetto; P. Mijakowski; C. A. Miller; A. Minamino; O. Mineev; A. Missert; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; Th. A. Mueller; A. Murakami; M. Murdoch; S. Murphy; J. Myslik; T. Nakadaira; M. Nakahata; K. G. Nakamura; K. Nakamura; S. Nakayama; T. Nakaya; K. Nakayoshi; C. Nantais; C. Nielsen; M. Nirkko; K. Nishikawa; Y. Nishimura; J. Nowak; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. Ohta; K. Okumura; T. Okusawa; W. Oryszczak; S. M. Oser; T. Ovsyannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; Y. Petrov; L. Pickard; E. S. Pinzon Guerra; C. Pistillo; P. Plonski; E. Poplawska; B. Popov; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; P. Przewlocki; B. Quilain; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. M. Rayner; A. Redij; M. Reeves; E. Reinherz-Aronis; C. Riccio; P. A. Rodrigues; P. Rojas; E. Rondio; S. Roth; A. Rubbia; D. Ruterbories; R. Sacco; K. Sakashita; F. S'anchez; F. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; S. Schoppmann; J. Schwehr; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; D. Sgalaberna; R. Shah; F. Shaker; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; Y. Shustrov; P. Sinclair; B. Smith; M. Smy; J. T. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Sorel; L. Southwell; P. Stamoulis; J. Steinmann; B. Still; Y. Suda; A. Suzuki; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Y. Suzuki; R. Tacik; M. Tada; S. Takahashi; A. Takeda; Y. Takeuchi; H. K. Tanaka; H. A. Tanaka; M. M. Tanaka; D. Terhorst; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; A. Thorley; S. Tobayama; W. Toki; T. Tomura; Y. Totsuka; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; G. Vasseur; T. Wachala; A. V. Waldron; K. Wakamatsu; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; W. Warzycha; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; C. Wilkinson; Z. Williamson; J. R. Wilson; R. J. Wilson; T. Wongjirad; Y. Yamada; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; K. Yoshida; T. Yuan; M. Yu; A. Zalewska; J. Zalipska; L. Zambelli; K. Zaremba; M. Ziembicki; E. D. Zimmerman; M. Zito; J. Zmuda

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal $\\sin^22\\theta_{23}$, the octant of $\\theta_{23}$, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of $\\delta_{CP}$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$, and $\\Delta m^2_{32}$, for various combinations of $\

  9. Light Dark Matter Detection Prospects at Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Kumar; John G. Learned; Stefanie Smith

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the prospects for the detection of relatively light dark matter through direct annihilation to neutrinos. We specifically focus on the detection possibilities of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator neutrino detection devices. We find in particular that liquid scintillator detectors may potentially provide excellent detection prospects for dark matter in the 4-10 GeV mass range. These experiments can provide excellent corroborative checks of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal, but may yield results for low mass dark matter in any case. We identify important tests of the ratio of electron to muon neutrino events (and neutrino versus anti-neutrino events), which discriminate against background atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the fraction of events which arise from muon neutrinos or anti-neutrinos ($R_{\\mu}$ and $R_{\\bar \\mu}$) can potentially yield information about the branching fractions of hypothetical dark matter annihilations into different neutrino flavors. These results apply to neutrinos from secondary and tertiary decays as well, but will suffer from decreased detectability.

  10. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill;

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  11. Conventional Neutrino Beam Experiments: Present and Future Generations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Deborah A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently four conventional neutrino beams produced around the world serving a total of six different neutrino experiments devoted to a broad range of physics. In this article we discuss the current generation of experiments served by those beamlines, future plans for those beamlines, and plans for yet newer facilities, with a focus on lessons the current generation of experiments can pass on to future generations.

  12. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern; /Harvard U.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillate to {nu}{sub {tau}} but a small fraction may oscillate instead to {nu}{sub e}. This thesis presents a measurement of the {nu}{sub e} appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6{sigma} excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of {nu}{sub e} appearance.

  13. Letter of Intent: The Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anghel, I; Bergevin, M; Blanco, C; Catano-Mur, E; Di Lodovico, F; Elagin, A; Frisch, H; Griskevich, J; Hill, R; Jocher, G; Katori, T; Krennrich, F; Learned, J; Malek, M; Northrop, R; Pilcher, C; Ramberg, E; Repond, J; Sacco, R; Sanchez, M C; Smy, M; Sobel, H; Svoboda, R; Usman, S M; Vagins, M; Varner, G; Wagner, R; Weinstein, A; Wetstein, M; Winslow, L; Xia, L; Yeh, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron tagging in Gadolinium-doped water may play a significant role in reducing backgrounds from atmospheric neutrinos in next generation proton-decay searches using megaton-scale Water Cherenkov detectors. Similar techniques might also be useful in the detection of supernova neutrinos. Accurate determination of neutron tagging efficiencies will require a detailed understanding of the number of neutrons produced by neutrino interactions in water as a function of momentum transferred. We propose the Atmospheric Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE), designed to measure the neutron yield of atmospheric neutrino interactions in gadolinium-doped water. An innovative aspect of the ANNIE design is the use of precision timing to localize interaction vertices in the small fiducial volume of the detector. We propose to achieve this by using early production of LAPPDs (Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors). This experiment will be a first application of these devices demonstrating their feasibility for Wate...

  14. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 17 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 APRIL 2000 Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G. Gratta,4 H. Henrikson,3 J the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium.30.Pt Nuclear reactors have been used as intense sources of ÂŻne in experiments searching for neutrino

  15. Pebble Flow Experiments For Pebble Bed Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    of Technology 2nd International Topical Meeting on High Temperature Reactor Technology Institute of NuclearPebble Flow Experiments For Pebble Bed Reactors Andrew C. Kadak1 Department of Nuclear Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Martin Z. Bazant Department of Mathematics Massachusetts Institute

  16. Four-neutrino analysis of 1.5km-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Sin Kyu; Ko, Young-Ju; Siyeon, Kim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of sterile neutrinos are not yet known, and depending on the orders of magnitudes, their existence may explain reactor anomalies or the spectral shape of reactor neutrino events at 1.5km-baseline detector. Here, we present four-neutrino analysis of the results announced by RENO and Daya Bay, which performed the definitive measurements of $\\theta_{13}$ based on the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos at km-order baselines. Our results using 3+1 scheme include the exclusion curve of $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ vs. $\\theta_{14}$ and the adjustment of $\\theta_{13}$ due to correlation with $\\theta_{14}$. The value of $\\theta_{13}$ obtained by RENO and Daya Bay with a three-neutrino oscillation analysis is included in the $1\\sigma$ interval of $\\theta_{13}$ allowed by our four-neutrino analysis.

  17. Four-neutrino analysis of 1.5km-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin Kyu Kang; Yeong-Duk Kim; Young-Ju Ko; Kim Siyeon

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of sterile neutrinos are not yet known, and depending on the orders of magnitudes, their existence may explain reactor anomalies or the spectral shape of reactor neutrino events at 1.5km-baseline detector. Here, we present four-neutrino analysis of the results announced by RENO and Daya Bay, which performed the definitive measurements of $\\theta_{13}$ based on the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos at km-order baselines. Our results using 3+1 scheme include the exclusion curve of $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ vs. $\\theta_{14}$ and the adjustment of $\\theta_{13}$ due to correlation with $\\theta_{14}$. The value of $\\theta_{13}$ obtained by RENO and Daya Bay with a three-neutrino oscillation analysis is included in the $1\\sigma$ interval of $\\theta_{13}$ allowed by our four-neutrino analysis.

  18. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Stephen James; /William-Mary Coll.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = (2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and the mixing angle sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 32}) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2{sigma} and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0{sigma}.

  19. Neutrino oscillations and electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potzel, Walter

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillations in the electron-capture (EC) decay rate observed in storage-ring experiments are reconsidered in connection with the neutrino mass difference. Taking into account that - according to Relativity Theory - time is slowed down in the reference frame of the orbiting charged particles as compared to the neutral particles (neutrinos) moving on a rectilinear path after the EC decay, we derive a value of $\\Delta m^{2}_{21}=(0.768\\pm0.012)\\cdot10^{-4} eV^{2}$ for the neutrino mass-squared difference which fully agrees with that observed in other neutrino-oscillation experiments. To further check the connection between EC-decay oscillations and $\\Delta m^{2}_{21}$ we suggest experiments with different orbital speeds, i.e., different values of the Lorentz factor.

  20. Neutrino oscillations and electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Potzel

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillations in the electron-capture (EC) decay rate observed in storage-ring experiments are reconsidered in connection with the neutrino mass difference. Taking into account that - according to Relativity Theory - time is slowed down in the reference frame of the orbiting charged particles as compared to the neutral particles (neutrinos) moving on a rectilinear path after the EC decay, we derive a value of $\\Delta m^{2}_{21}=(0.768\\pm0.012)\\cdot10^{-4} eV^{2}$ for the neutrino mass-squared difference which fully agrees with that observed in other neutrino-oscillation experiments. To further check the connection between EC-decay oscillations and $\\Delta m^{2}_{21}$ we suggest experiments with different orbital speeds, i.e., different values of the Lorentz factor.

  1. anammox biofilm reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    theta13 by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding...

  2. argonaut type reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    theta13 by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding...

  3. agr type reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    theta13 by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding...

  4. argonne thermal source reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    theta13 by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding...

  5. aerated biofilm reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle theta13 by reactor...

  6. Indication for the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos in the Double Chooz experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, Y; Akiri, T; Anjos, J C dos; Ardellier, F; Barbosa, A F; Baxter, A; Bernstein, A; Bezerra, T J C; Bezrukhov, L; Blucher, E; Bongrand, M; Bowden, N S; Buck, C; Busenitz, J; Cabrera, A; Caden, E; Camilleri, L; Carr, R; Cerrada, M; Chang, P -J; Chimenti, P; Classen, T; Collin, A; Conover, E; Conrad, J M; Cormon, S; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Cribier, M; Crum, K; Cucoanes, A; D'Agostino, M V; Damon, E; Dawson, J V; Dazeley, S; Dierckxsens, M; Dietrich, D; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Durand, V; Efremenko, Y; Endo, Y; Etenko, A; Falk, E; Fallot, M; Fechner, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Felde, J; Fernandes, S M; Franco, D; Franke, A; Franke, M; Furuta, H; Gama, R; Gil-Botella, I; Giot, L; Göger-Neff, M; Gonzalez, L F G; Goodman, M C; Goon, J TM; Greiner, D; Guillon, B; Haag, N; Hagner, C; Hara, T; Hartmann, F X; Hartnell, J; Haruna, T; Haser, J; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayakawa, T; Hofmann, M; Horton-Smith, G; Ishitsuka, M; Jochum, J; Jollet, C; Jones, C L; Kaether, F; Kalousis, L; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D; Kawasaki, T; Keefer, G; Kemp, E; de Kerret, H; Kibe, Y; Konno, T; Kryn, D; Kuze, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lane, C E; Langbrandtner, C; Lasserre, T; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Lima, H P; Lindner, M; Liu, Y; López-Castanő, J M; LoSecco, J M; Lubsandorzhiev, B K; Lucht, S; McKee, D; Maeda, J; Maesano, C N; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Martino, J; Matsubara, T; Mention, G; Meregaglia, A; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Milzstajn, A; Miyata, H; Motta, D; Mueller, Th A; Nagasaka, Y; Nakajima, K; Novella, P; Obolensky, M; Oberauer, L; Onillon, A; Osborn, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Palomares, C; Peeters, S J M; Pepe, I M; Perrin, P; Pfahler, P; Porta, A; Potzel, W; Queval, R; Reichenbacher, J; Reinhold, B; Remoto, A; Reyna, D; Röhling, M; Roth, S; Rubin, H A; Sakamoto, Y; Santorelli, R; Sato, F; Schönert, S; Schoppmann, S; Schwan, U; Schwetz, T; Shaevitz, M; Shrestha, D; Sida, J-L; Sinev, V; Skorokhvatov, M; Smith, E; Stahl, A; Stancu, I; Strait, M; Stüken, A; Suekane, F; Sukhotin, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Svoboda, R; Tabata, H; Tamura, N; Terao, K; Tonazzo, A; Toups, M; Thi, H H Trinh; Veyssiere, C; Vignaud, D; Wagner, S; Watanabe, H; White, B; Wiebusch, C; Winslow, L; Worcester, M; Wurm, M; Yanovitch, E; Yermia, F; Zbiri, K; Zimmer, V

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Double Chooz Experiment presents an indication of reactor electron antineutrino disappearance consistent with neutrino oscillations. A ratio of 0.944 $\\pm$ 0.016 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.040 (syst) observed to predicted events was obtained in 101 days of running at the Chooz Nuclear Power Plant in France, with two 4.25 GW$_{th}$ reactors. The results were obtained from a single 10 m$^3$ fiducial volume detector located 1050 m from the two reactor cores. The reactor antineutrino flux prediction used the Bugey4 measurement as an anchor point. The deficit can be interpreted as an indication of a non-zero value of the still unmeasured neutrino mixing parameter \\sang. Analyzing both the rate of the prompt positrons and their energy spectrum we find \\sang = 0.086 $\\pm$ 0.041 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.030 (syst), or, at 90% CL, 0.015 $<$ \\sang $\\ <$ 0.16.

  7. A Sterile-Neutrino Search with the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, Philip; /Oxford U.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the the NuMI beamline at Fermilab, USA. Using a near detector at 1 km distance from the neutrino production target, and a far detector at 735 km from the target, it is designed primarily to measure the disappearance of muon neutrinos. This thesis presents an analysis using MINOS data of the possibility of oscil- lation of the neutrinos in the NuMI beam to a hypothetical sterile flavour, which would have no Standard Model couplings. Such oscillations would result in a deficit in the neutral current interaction rate in the MINOS far detector relative to the expectation derived from the near detector data. The method used to identify neutral current and charged current events in the MINOS detectors is described and a new method of predicting and fitting the far detector spectrum presented, along with the effects of systematic uncertainties on the sterile neutrino oscillation analysis. Using this analysis, the fraction f{sub s} of the disappearing neutrinos that go to steriles is constrained to be below 0.15 at the 90% confidence level in the absence of electron neutrino appearance in the NuMI beam. With electron appearance at the CHOOZ limit, f{sub s} < 0.41 at 90% C.L.

  8. The BAIKAL neutrino experiment - physics results and perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Wischnewski; for the Baikal Collaboration

    2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status of the Lake Baikal Neutrino Experiment. The Neutrino Telescope NT200 has been operating since 1998 and has been upgraded to the 10 Mton detector NT200+ in 2005. We present selected astroparticle physics results from long-term operation of NT200. Also discussed are activities towards acoustic detection of UHE-energy neutrinos, and results of associated science activities. Preparation towards a km3-scale (Gigaton volume) detector in Lake Baikal is currently a central activity. As an important milestone, a km3-prototype string, based on completely new technology, has been installed and is operating together with NT200+ since April, 2008.

  9. A SCENARIO FOR A BROOKHAVEN NEUTRINO SUPER BEAM EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIWAN,M.V.; KAHN,S.A.; PALMER,R.B.; STUMER,I.; PARSA,Z.; MCDONALD,K.T.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the feasibility of a long baseline neutrino beam facility based on a proposed upgrade to the AGS accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It assumes that the AGS is upgraded initially to a 1 MW proton driver and eventually to a 4 MW proton machine. This upgrade would provide a strong incentive for a long baseline low energy neutrino beam to study neutrino oscillations. In this paper we look at a possible long baseline experiment with a detector at Cornell, which is 350 km away from BNL.

  10. KATRIN: an experiment to measure the neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson; for the KATRIN Collaboration

    2007-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    KATRIN is a very large scale tritium-beta-decay experiment to determine the mass of the neutrino. It is presently under construction at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, and makes use of the Tritium Laboratory built there for the ITER project. The combination of a very large retarding-potential electrostatic-magnetic spectrometer and an intense gaseous molecular tritium source makes possible a sensitivity to neutrino mass of 0.2 eV, about an order of magnitude below present laboratory limits. The measurement is kinematic and independent of whether the neutrino is Dirac or Majorana. The status of the project is summarized briefly in this report.

  11. Postdoctoral Position in Experimental Neutrino Physics at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    Postdoctoral Position in Experimental Neutrino Physics at UC Davis The experimental Neutrinos physics is required. Double Chooz is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment that seeks to measure on the data analysis. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) is a next-generation oscillation experiment

  12. Fission reactor experiments for solid breeder blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gierszewski, P.J.; Abdou, M.A.; Puigh, R.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The testing needs for solid breeder blanket development are different from those for liquid breeder blankets. In particular, a reasonable number of moderate volume test sites in a neutron environment are needed. Existing fission reactors are shown to be able to provide this environment with reasonable simulation of many important blanket conditions. Three major additional fission reactor tests are identified beyond those presently underway. These are thermal behavior, advanced in-situ tritium recovery and nuclear submodule experiments.

  13. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reactors are determined from thermal power measure- ments and ?ssion rate calculations.of a reactor’s ther- mal power is given by a calculation ofCALCULATIONS During the power cycle of a nuclear reactor,

  14. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  15. Small entries of neutrino mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider phenomenologically allowed structures of the neutrino mass matrix in the case of three light neutrino species. Constraints from the solar, atmospheric and reactor neutrino experiments as well as those from the neutrinoless double beta decay are taken into account. Both hierarchical and quasi-degenerate neutrino mass cases are studied. Assuming maximal $\

  16. A Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Aihara, H; Andreopoulos, C; Anghel, I; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Asfandiyarov, R; Askins, M; Back, J J; Ballett, P; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bay, F; Beltrame, P; Berardi, V; Bergevin, M; Berkman, S; Berry, T; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Cafagna, F S; Carminati, G; Cartwright, S L; Catanesi, M G; Choi, K; Choi, J H; Collazuol, G; Cowan, G; Cremonesi, L; Davies, G; De Rosa, G; Densham, C; Detwiler, J; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Fernandez, P; Feusels, T; Finch, A; Fitton, M; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Fukuda, D; Galymov, V; Ganezer, K; Gonin, M; Gumplinger, P; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haga, Y; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Hayato, Y; Hierholzer, M; Hill, J; Himmel, A; Hirota, S; Horiuchi, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Iijima, T; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Inoue, K; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T; Ishida, T; Ishino, H; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jang, H I; Jiang, M; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Karadhzov, Y; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koga, M; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W R; Kudenko, Y; Kutter, T; Kuze, M; Labarga, L; Lagoda, J; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Learned, J G; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Ma, W; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Mariani, C; Marti, L; Martin, J F; Martin, C; Martins, P P J; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mezzetto, M; Minakata, H; Minamino, A; Mine, S; Mineev, O; Miura, M; Monroe, J; Mori, T; Moriyama, S; Mueller, T; Muheim, F; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Needham, M; Nicholls, T; Nirkko, M; Nishimura, Y; Noah, E; Nowak, J; Nunokawa, H; O'Keeffe, H M; Okajima, Y; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; O'Sullivan, E; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Perez, J; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Pistillo, C; Playfer, S; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Quilain, B; Quinto, M; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M; Redij, A; Retiere, F; Riccio, C; Richard, E; Rondio, E; Rose, H J; Ross-Lonergan, M; Rott, C; Rountree, S D; Rubbia, A; Sacco, R; Sakuda, M; Sanchez, M C; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shaikhiev, A; Shimizu, I; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Sinnis, G; Smy, M B; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H W; Stewart, T; Stone, J L; Suda, Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, A T; Svoboda, R; Tacik, R; Takeda, A; Taketa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, H K M; Tanaka, H; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorpe, M; Tobayama, S; Tolich, N; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M R; Vasseur, G; Vogelaar, R B; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Xin, T; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zito, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this document, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis has been updated from the previous Letter of Intent [K. Abe et al., arXiv:1109.3262 [hep-ex

  17. A Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyper-Kamiokande Working Group; :; K. Abe; H. Aihara; C. Andreopoulos; I. Anghel; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; R. Asfandiyarov; M. Askins; J. J. Back; P. Ballett; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; F. Bay; P. Beltrame; V. Berardi; M. Bergevin; S. Berkman; T. Berry; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; F. S. Cafagna; G. Carminati; S. L. Cartwright; M. G. Catanesi; K. Choi; J. H. Choi; G. Collazuol; G. Cowan; L. Cremonesi; G. Davies; G. De Rosa; C. Densham; J. Detwiler; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; S. Emery; A. Ereditato; P. Fernandez; T. Feusels; A. Finch; M. Fitton; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; D. Fukuda; V. Galymov; K. Ganezer; M. Gonin; P. Gumplinger; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; Y. Haga; B. Hartfiel; M. Hartz; Y. Hayato; M. Hierholzer; J. Hill; A. Himmel; S. Hirota; S. Horiuchi; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; T. Iijima; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; K. Inoue; J. Insler; R. A. Intonti; T. Irvine; T. Ishida; H. Ishino; M. Ishitsuka; Y. Itow; A. Izmaylov; B. Jamieson; H. I. Jang; M. Jiang; K. K. Joo; C. K. Jung; A. Kaboth; T. Kajita; J. Kameda; Y. Karadhzov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; J. Y. Kim; S. B. Kim; Y. Kishimoto; T. Kobayashi; M. Koga; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. R. Kropp; Y. Kudenko; T. Kutter; M. Kuze; L. Labarga; J. Lagoda; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; J. G. Learned; I. T. Lim; T. Lindner; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; W. Ma; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; C. Mariani; L. Marti; J. F. Martin; C. Martin; P. P. J. Martins; E. Mazzucato; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; M. Mezzetto; H. Minakata; A. Minamino; S. Mine; O. Mineev; M. Miura; J. Monroe; T. Mori; S. Moriyama; T. Mueller; F. Muheim; M. Nakahata; K. Nakamura; T. Nakaya; S. Nakayama; M. Needham; T. Nicholls; M. Nirkko; Y. Nishimura; E. Noah; J. Nowak; H. Nunokawa; H. M. O'Keeffe; Y. Okajima; K. Okumura; S. M. Oser; E. O'Sullivan; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; J. Perez; M. Y. Pac; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; C. Pistillo; S. Playfer; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; B. Quilain; M. Quinto; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; A. Redij; F. Retiere; C. Riccio; E. Richard; E. Rondio; H. J. Rose; M. Ross-Lonergan; C. Rott; S. D. Rountree; A. Rubbia; R. Sacco; M. Sakuda; M. C. Sanchez; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; A. Shaikhiev; I. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; G. Sinnis; M. B. Smy; J. Sobczyk; H. W. Sobel; T. Stewart; J. L. Stone; Y. Suda; Y. Suzuki; A. T. Suzuki; R. Svoboda; R. Tacik; A. Takeda; A. Taketa; Y. Takeuchi; H. A. Tanaka; H. K. M. Tanaka; H. Tanaka; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; M. Thorpe; S. Tobayama; N. Tolich; T. Tomura; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; M. R. Vagins; G. Vasseur; R. B. Vogelaar; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; J. R. Wilson; T. Xin; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; M. Zito

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this document, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis has been updated from the previous Letter of Intent [K. Abe et al., arXiv:1109.3262 [hep-ex

  18. Vacuum Oscillations and Future Solar Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoya Hata

    1994-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacuum oscillations are considered for the combined solar neutrino observations, including the Kamiokande II spectrum data and incorporating theoretical uncertainties and their correlations. Despite the conceptual difficulty of the fine tuning between the neutrino parameters and the Sun-Earth distance, 2-flavor vacuum oscillations provide phenomenologically acceptable solutions. There are allowed regions at 99\\% C.L. for $\\Delta m^2 = (0.45 - 1.2) \\times 10^{-10} \\; \\mbox{eV}\\,^2$ and $\\sin^22\\theta = 0.6 - 1$; the best fit solution is $\\chi^2 / \\mbox{d.f.} = 19.2 / 16$, which is acceptable at 16\\% C.L. Oscillations for sterile neutrinos are, however, excluded by the averaged data at 99.4\\% C.L. The vacuum oscillation solutions predict characteristic energy spectrum distortions and seasonal variations in Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, Super-Kamiokande, and BOREXINO. Those predictions are given in detail, emphasizing that the vacuum solutions are distinguishable from the MSW solutions.

  19. Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao Zhang; for the Daya Bay Collaboration

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

  20. Recent Results From The Daya Bay Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has observed the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors at $\\sim$kilometer baselines. The relative measurement of the $\\bar\

  1. Beams for European Neutrino Experiments (BENE) Midterm scientific report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldini, A; Blondel, A; Campagne, J E; Cavata, C; Donini, A; Dracos, M; Dumarchez, J; Edgecock, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Huber, P; Long, K; Lindroos, M; Méot, F; Mezzetto, Mauro; Palladino, V; Rees, G; Sievers, P; Strolin, P; Volpe, C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of BENE during 2004 and 2005 are reviewed. Neutrino oscillation experiments at accelerators offer the richest possibilities of precision studies of neutrino mixing and mass differences, with the potential of important discoveries including leptonic CP or T violation. Two main options for a major initiative have been studied: 1) a high-energy Neutrino Factory coupled to a large dense magnetized detector; 2) a lower energy betabeam and conventional superbeam, coupled to a very large low-density, non-magnetic, detector. Both offer signi cant scienti c breakthroughs over other planned facilities. Much remains to be done to optimize and establish the cost, performance, and feasibility of either solution so as to allow comparison and decision. The proposal of a FP7 Design Study of a Neutrino Facility to be completed by the end of the decade is being prepared. Its success will require strong support and engagement at CERN and other European laboratories and funding agencies. International contributors...

  2. Searches for short-baseline electron-neutrino oscillations in the SAGE and BOREXINO experiments involving artificial neutrino sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbachev, V. V., E-mail: vvgor_gfb1@mail.ru; Veretenkin, E. P.; Gavrin, V. N.; Dan’shin, S. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Knodel, T. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of the SAGE and BOREXINO experiments with {sup 51}Cr artificial neutrino sources for searches for and determination of parameters of short-baseline oscillations.

  3. Solar Neutrino Experiments Neutrinos are ghostlike particles that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, in the 1950s. But these experiments were really the prelude.S.ArmyAir Forces and two years with the Monsanto Chemical Com- pany, he came to Brookhaven National Laboratory chemist in 1964. Retiring from the Laboratory in 1984, Davis joined the University of Pennsylva- nia

  4. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  5. Tests of Lorentz and CPT Violation in the Medium Baseline Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Feng Li; Zhen-hua Zhao

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests of Lorentz and CPT violation in the medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiment are presented in the framework of the Standard Model Extension (SME). Both the spectral distortion and sidereal variation are employed to derive the limits of Lorentz violation (LV) coefficients. We do the numerical analysis of the sensitivity of LV coefficients by taking the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an illustration, which can improve the sensitivity by more than two orders of magnitude compared with the current limits from reactor antineutrino experiments.

  6. Supernova Neutrinos Detection On Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we first discuss the detection of supernova neutrino on Earth. Then we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$ by detecting the ratio of the event numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos. Such an sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

  7. Optimization of neutrino fluxes for future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calviani, M; Galymov, V; Velten, P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main goals of the Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation experiment (LBNO) experiment is to study the L/E behaviour of the electron neutrino appearance probability in order to determine the unknown phase $\\delta_{CP}$. In the standard neutrino 3-flavour mixing paradigm, this parameter encapsulates a possibility of a CP violation in the lepton sector that in turn could help explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. In LBNO, the measurement of $\\delta_{CP}$ would rely on the observation of the electron appearance probability in a broad energy range covering the 1$^{st}$ and 2$^{nd}$ maxima of the oscillation probability. An optimization of the energy spectrum of the neutrino beam is necessary to find the best coverage of the neutrino energies of interest. This in general is a complex task that requires exploring a large parameter space describing hadron target and beamline focusing elements. In this paper we will present a numerical approach of finding a solution to this difficult optimiza...

  8. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiali [Physics department, Kunming University, Kunming, 650214 (China); Tiedt, Douglas [Physics department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD, 57701-3995 (United States)

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator|December 5,Detecting Neutrinos

  10. afrri-triga reactor facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    theta13 by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding...

  11. A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    856 A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS David Cline University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wl 53706 David Neuffer Fermilab,* Batavia, IL 60510 ABSTRACT · + decay in a ~- Storage Ring can as a possible first ~ storage ring. INTRODUCTION Recent experimental reports 1'2 of a non-zero ~ mass and of e

  12. Determining the Octant of $?_{23}$ at LBNE in conjunction with Reactor Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalpana Bora; Debajyoti Dutta; Pomita Ghoshal

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have explored the possibilities of resolving the $\\theta_{23}$ octant degeneracy present in the newly planned Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) by combining reactor data. Reactor experiments have already measured the third mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ very precisely and this precise measurenent of $\\theta_{13}$ in turn helps in $\\theta_{23}$ octant measurement. We have examined the octant sensitivity with and without reactor data and it improves if reactor data is added. The comparative study of octant sensitivities of 10kt and 35kt liquid argon Far Detectors, with and without the Near Detector, reveals that the sensitivity increases with an increase in detector mass. Also, the presence of the Near Detector improves the sensitivity. The effect of adding priors on octant determination is also studied in this work.

  13. Monte Carlo Calculations of the Intrinsic Detector Backgrounds for the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Monte Carlo Calculations of the Intrinsic Detector Backgrounds for the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino of the Intrinsic Detector Backgrounds for the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment Michelle L. Leber Chair of the Supervisory Committee: Professor John F. Wilkerson Physics The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN

  14. A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Lane; S. M. Usman; J. Blackmon; C. Rasco; H. P. Mumm; D. Markoff; G. R. Jocher; R. Dorrill; M. Duvall; J. G. Learned; V. Li; J. Maricic; S. Matsuno; R. Milincic; S. Negrashov; M. Sakai; M. Rosen; G. Varner; P. Huber; M. L. Pitt; S. D. Rountree; R. B. Vogelaar; T. Wright; Z. Yokley

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity and project status.

  15. A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, C; Blackmon, J; Rasco, C; Mumm, H P; Markoff, D; Jocher, G R; Dorrill, R; Duvall, M; Learned, J G; Li, V; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Negrashov, S; Sakai, M; Rosen, M; Varner, G; Huber, P; Pitt, M L; Rountree, S D; Vogelaar, R B; Wright, T; Yokley, Z

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity an...

  16. Neutrino oscillations beyond two flavours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov

    2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    I review some theoretical aspects of neutrino oscillations in the case when more than two neutrino flavours are involved. These include: approximate analytic solutions for 3-flavour (3f) oscillations in matter; matter effects in nu_mu - nu_tau oscillations; 3f effects in oscillations of solar, atmospheric, reactor and supernova neutrinos and in accelerator long-baseline experiments; CP and T violation in neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter; the problem of U_{e3}; 4f oscillations.

  17. Status of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. F. Valle

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar and atmospheric neutrino data require physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The simplest, most generic, but not yet unique, interpretation of the data is in terms of neutrino oscillations. I summarize the results of the latest three-neutrino oscillation global fit of the data, in particular the bounds on the angle $\\theta_{13}$ probed in reactor experiments. Even though not implied by the data, bi-maximal neutrino mixing emerges as an attractive possibility either in hierarchical or quasi-degenerate neutrino scenarios.

  18. Some comments on high precision study of neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilenky, S M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss some problems connected with the high precision study of neutrino oscillations. In the general case of $n$-neutrino mixing I derive a convenient expression for transition probability in which only independent terms (and mass-squared differences) enter. For three-neutrino mixing I discuss a problem of a definition of a large (atmospheric) neutrino mass-squared difference. I comment also possibilities to reveal the character of neutrino mass spectrum in future reactor neutrino experiments.

  19. Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham Gal

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions in two-body decays. Whereas parent-ion decay rates cannot exhibit modulation with the several-second period reported in these experiments, the time evolution of the detected daughter ions is shown to produce oscillations that under certain conditions may provide resolution of the `GSI Oscillations' puzzle. New dedicated storage-ring or trap experiments could look up for these oscillations.

  20. A search for sterile neutrinos at the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pittam, Robert Neil; /Oxford U.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, USA. The experiment was designed to study neutrino oscillation phenomena. The {nu}{sub {mu}} beam produced by the NuMI beam facility at FNAL is used along with two functionally identical detectors. The Near Detector at FNAL and a Far Detector 735 km away in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. Comparison of the observed spectra of neutrinos at the two detectors provides the evidence for neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents work on the postulated phenomena of sterile neutrinos. Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos will lead to a deficit in the expected rate of measured Neutral Current interactions at the Far Detector. A technique for selecting Neutral Current events utilizing an Artificial Neural Network is presented with resulting overall efficiency of 91.1% and purity of 66.0%. A method of predicting the expected Charged and Neutral Current energy spectra at the Far Detector given the data recorded at the Near Detector is presented. A model to search for oscillations between sterile and active neutrinos is developed. Sources of systematic uncertainty that can effect the results of the analysis are discussed. The analysis developed is applied to a Standard Model 3 flavour oscillation model as a cross check under the scenarios with and without {nu}{sub e} appearance. The oscillation parameters measured by this model are {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} = (2.39{sub -0.15}{sup +0.23}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and {theta}{sub 23} = 0.727{sub -0.11}{sup +0.22} for the no {nu}{sub e} appearance result. An analysis of the resulting prediction reveals no evidence for active neutrino disappearance. The analysis is then performed using the 4 flavour neutrino oscillation model developed. Again this is done under the 2 scenarios of {nu}{sub e} appearance and no {nu}{sub e} appearance. The results of this analysis are {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.44{sub -0.14}{sup +0.23} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, {theta}{sub 23} = 0.755{sub -0.12}{sup +0.19} and {theta}{sub 34} = 0.00{sup +0.35} for no {nu}{sub e} appearance and {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = (2.46{sub -0.14}{sup +0.21}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, {theta}{sub 23} = 0.849{sub -0.19}{sup +0.12} and {theta}{sub 34} = 0.00{sup +0.60} for {nu}{sub e} appearance. This is consistent with no oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos.

  1. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro; /Caltech

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of {nu}{sub e} charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in {theta}{sub 13}. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  2. PROSPECT - A Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment at Short Baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ashenfelter; A. B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; G. Barclay; C. Bass; N. S. Bowden; C. D. Bryan; J. J. Cherwinka; R. Chu; T. Classen; D. Davee; D. Dean; G. Deichert; M. Diwan; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; D. A. Dwyer; Y. Efremenko; S. Fan; A. Galindo-Uribarri; K. Gilje; A. Glenn; M. Green; K. Han; S. Hans; K. M. Heeger; B. Heffron; L. Hu; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; Y. Kamyshkov; S. Kettell; C. Lane; T. J. Langford; B. R. Littlejohn; D. Martinez; R. D. McKeown; M. P. Mendenhall; S. Morrell; P. Mueller; H. P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; J. S. Nico; D. Norcini; D. Pushin; X. Qian; E. Romero; R. Rosero; B. S. Seilhan; R. Sharma; P. T. Surukuchi; S. J. Thompson; R. L. Varner; B. Viren; W. Wang; B. White; C. White; J. Wilhelmi; C. Williams; R. E. Williams; T. Wise; H. Yao; M. Yeh; N. Zaitseva; C. Zhang; X. Zhang

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Current models of antineutrino production in nuclear reactors predict detection rates and spectra at odds with the existing body of direct reactor antineutrino measurements. High-resolution antineutrino detectors operated close to compact research reactor cores can produce new precision measurements useful in testing explanations for these observed discrepancies involving underlying nuclear or new physics. Absolute measurement of the 235U-produced antineutrino spectrum can provide additional constraints for evaluating the accuracy of current and future reactor models, while relative measurements of spectral distortion between differing baselines can be used to search for oscillations arising from the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Such a measurement can be performed in the United States at several highly-enriched uranium fueled research reactors using near-surface segmented liquid scintillator detectors. We describe here the conceptual design and physics potential of the PROSPECT experiment, a U.S.-based, multi-phase experiment with reactor-detector baselines of 7-20 meters capable of addressing these and other physics and detector development goals. Current R&D status and future plans for PROSPECT detector deployment and data-taking at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be discussed.

  3. INTRODUCTION TO THE NEUTRINO PROPERTIES LISTINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of neutrino oscillation searches show that the mixing matrix contains two large mixing angles. We cannot oscillations provides us with the values of all neutrino mass-squared differences m2 ij m2 i - m2 j be determined. All confirmed neutrino oscillation experiments using solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator

  4. INTRODUCTION TO THE NEUTRINO PROPERTIES LISTINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of neutrino oscillation searches show that the mixing matrix contains two large mixing angles. We cannot oscillations provides us with the values of all neutrino mass-squared differences m2 ij m2 i - m2 j be determined. So far solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments can

  5. Neutrino oscillations: Current status and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize the status of neutrino oscillations from world neutrino oscillation data with date of October 2005. The results of a global analysis within the three-flavour framework are presented. Furthermore, a prospect on where we could stand in neutrino oscillations in ten years from now is given, based on a simulation of upcoming long-baseline accelerator and reactor experiments.

  6. Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bouchiat

    2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

  7. The Not-So-Sterile 4th Neutrino: Constraints on New Gauge Interactions from Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, Joachim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sterile neutrino models with new gauge interactions in the sterile sector are phenomenologically interesting since they can lead to novel effects in neutrino oscillation experiments, in cosmology and in dark matter detectors, possibly even explaining some of the observed anomalies in these experiments. Here, we use data from neutrino oscillation experiments, in particular from MiniBooNE, MINOS and solar neutrino experiments, to constrain such models. We focus in particular on the case where the sterile sector gauge boson $A'$ couples also to Standard Model particles (for instance to the baryon number current) and thus induces a large Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein potential. For eV-scale sterile neutrinos, we obtain strong constraints especially from MINOS, which restricts the strength of the new interaction to be less than $\\sim 10$ times that of the Standard Model weak interaction unless active-sterile neutrino mixing is very small ($\\sin^2 \\theta_{24} \\lesssim 10^{-3}$). This rules out gauge forces large eno...

  8. Citation: K. Nakamura et al. (Particle Data Group), JPG 37, 075021 (2010) (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov) Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accelerator experiments. Some neutrino oscillation experiments compare the flux in two or more detectors power reactors. 7 BOEHM 01 search for neutrino oscillations at 0.75 and 0.89 km distance from the Palo Verde reactors. 8 APOLLONIO 99, APOLLONIO 98 search for neutrino oscillations at 1.1 km fixed dis- tance

  9. Reactor Simulation for Antineutrino Experiments using DRAGON and MURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Jones; A. Bernstein; J. M. Conrad; Z. Djurcic; M. Fallot; L. Giot; G. Keefer; A. Onillon; L. Winslow

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulations to predict reactor fission rates. Here we present results from the DRAGON and MURE simulation codes and compare them to other industry standards for reactor core modeling. We use published data from the Takahama-3 reactor to evaluate the quality of these simulations against the independently measured fuel isotopic composition. The propagation of the uncertainty in the reactor operating parameters to the resulting antineutrino flux predictions is also discussed.

  10. Direct measurement of backgrounds using reactor-off data in Double Chooz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Janet

    Double Chooz is unique among modern reactor-based neutrino experiments studying ?Że disappearance in that data can be collected with all reactors off. In this paper, we present data from 7.53 days of reactor-off running. ...

  11. Comment on 'Time-energy uncertainty relations for neutrino oscillations and the Mossbauer neutrino experiment'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny Kh. Akhmedov; Joachim Kopp; Manfred Lindner

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the implications of the time-energy uncertainty relation to recoillessly emitted and captured neutrinos (Mossbauer neutrinos) and show that it does not preclude oscillations of these neutrinos, contrary to a recent claim (J. Phys. G35 (2008) 095003, arXiv:0803.0527).

  12. Future possibilities with Fermilab neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We will start with a brief overview of neutrino oscillation physics with emphasis on the remaining unanswered questions. Next, after mentioning near future reactor and accelerator experiments searching for a non zero {theta}{sub 13}, we will introduce the plans for the next generation of long-baseline accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments. We will focus on experiments utilizing powerful (0.7-2.1 MW) Fermilab neutrino beams, either existing or in the design phase.

  13. Large liquid-scintillator trackers for neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benussi, L; D'Ambrosio, N; Déclais, Y; Dupraz, J P; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Fanti, V; Forton, E; Frekers, D; Frenkel, A; Girerd, C; Golovkin, S V; Grégoire, G; Harrison, K; Jonkmans, G; Jonsson, P; Katsanevas, S; Kreslo, I; Marteau, J; Martellotti, G; Martínez, S; Medvedkov, A M; Moret, G; Niwa, K; Novikov, V; Van Beek, G; Penso, G; Vasilchenko, V G; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Zucchelli, P; Kreslo, I E

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are given on tests of large particle trackers for the detection of neutrino interactions in long-baseline experiments. Module prototypes have been assembled using TiO$_2$-doped polycarbonate panels. These were subdivided into cells of $\\sim 1$~cm$^2$ cross section and 6~m length, filled with liquid scintillator. A wavelength-shifting fibre inserted in each cell captured a part of the scintillation light emitted when a cell was traversed by an ionizing particle. Two different fibre-readout systems have been tested: an optoelectronic chain comprising an image intensifier and an Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD); and a hybrid photodiode~(HPD). New, low-cost liquid scintillators have been investigated for applications in large underground detectors. Testbeam studies have been performed using a commercially available liquid scintillator. The number of detected photoelectrons for minimum-ionizing particles crossing a module at different distances from the fibre readout end was 6 to 12 with the EBCCD chain and ...

  14. Energy reconstruction in the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich Mosel; Olga Lalakulich; Kai Gallmeister

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment aims at measuring fundamental physical parameters to high precision and exploring physics beyond the standard model. Nuclear targets introduce complications towards that aim. We investigate the uncertainties in the energy reconstruction, based on quasielastic scattering relations, due to nuclear effects. The reconstructed event distributions as a function of energy tend to be smeared out and shifted by several 100 MeV in their oscillatory structure if standard event selection is used. We show that a more restrictive experimental event selection offers the possibility to reach the accuracy needed for a determination of the mass ordering and the $CP$-violating phase. Quasielastic-based energy reconstruction could thus be a viable alternative to the calorimetric reconstruction also at higher energies.

  15. Reactor accelerator coupling experiments: a feasability study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woddi Venkat Krishna, Taraknath

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , from a safety perspective, limits on the allowable concentration of minor actinides (i.e, neptunium, americium, and curium) in fissile fuel for critical reactor systems is about 5%. This is due primarily to the lower delayed neutron fraction... actinides are developed. It has also been shown that critical fast reactor systems are not capable of transmuting the fission product waste from spent nuclear fuel [3]. This is due to the criticality limitation on neutron conservation in the system (i...

  16. Nuclear Graphite -Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nuclear Graphite - Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and Understanding Professor Barry J · Physical Changes ­ to Polycrystalline Graphite due to Fast Neutron Damage and Radiolytic Oxidation ­ Provided channels for control rods and coolant gas · Neutron Shield ­ Boronated graphite · Thermal columns

  17. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  18. Investigation of neutrino oscillations in the T2k long-baseline accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izmaylov, A. O., E-mail: izmaylov@inr.ru; Yershov, N. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Mineev, O. V.; Musienko, Yu. V.; Khabibulliun, M. M.; Khotjantsev, A. N.; Shaykhiev, A. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-sensitivity searches for transitions of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos are the main task of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) second-generation long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The present article is devoted to describing basic principles of T2K, surveying experimental apparatuses that it includes, and considering in detail the muon-range detector (SMRD) designed and manufactured by a group of physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The results of the first measurements with a neutrino beam are presented, and plans for the near future are discussed.

  19. The search for Majorana neutrinos with neutrinoless double beta decays: From CUORICINO to LUCIFER experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma I-00185 (Italy) and INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma I-00185 (Italy)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of neutrino properties is one of the fundamental challenges in particle physics nowadays. Fifty years of investigations established that neutrinos are massive but the absolute mass scale has not yet been measured. Moreover its true nature is still unknown. Is the neutrino its own antiparticle (thus violating the lepton number) as proposed by Majorana in 1937? The only way to probe the neutrino nature is through the observation of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}), a very rare spontaneous nuclear transition which emits two electrons and no neutrinos. In this paper, after a brief introduction to the theoretical framework of Majorana's neutrino, a presentation of experimental challenges posed by 0{nu}{beta}{beta} search will be given as well as an overview of present status and future perpectives of experiments.

  20. Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Anghel, I; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Asfandiyarov, R; Askins, M; Back, J J; Ballett, P; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bay, F; Beltrame, P; Berardi, V; Bergevin, M; Berkman, S; Berry, T; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Cafagna, F S; Carminati, G; Cartwright, S L; Catanesi, M G; Choi, K; Choi, J H; Collazuol, G; Cowan, G; Cremonesi, L; Davies, G; De Rosa, G; Densham, C; Detwiler, J; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Fernández, P; Feusels, T; Finch, A; Fitton, M; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Fukuda, D; Galymov, V; Ganezer, K; Gonin, M; Gumplinger, P; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haga, Y; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Hayato, Y; Hierholzer, M; Hill, J; Himmel, A; Hirota, S; Horiuchi, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Iijima, T; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Inoue, K; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T; Ishida, T; Ishino, H; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jang, H I; Jiang, M; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Karadhzov, Y; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koga, M; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W R; Kudenko, Y; Kutter, T; Kuze, M; Labarga, L; Lagoda, J; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Learned, J G; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Ma, W; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Mariani, C; Marti, L; Martin, J F; Martin, C; Martins, P P J; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mezzetto, M; Minakata, H; Minamino, A; Mine, S; Mineev, O; Miura, M; Monroe, J; Mori, T; Moriyama, S; Mueller, T; Muheim, F; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Needham, M; Nicholls, T; Nirkko, M; Nishimura, Y; Noah, E; Nowak, J; Nunokawa, H; O'Keeffe, H M; Okajima, Y; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; O'Sullivan, E; Ovsiannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Pérez, J; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Pistillo, C; Playfer, S; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Quilain, B; Quinto, M; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A; Redij, A; Retiere, F; Riccio, C; Richard, E; Rondio, E; Rose, H J; Ross-Lonergan, M; Rott, C; Rountree, S D; Rubbia, A; Sacco, R; Sakuda, M; Sanchez, M C; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shaikhiev, A; Shimizu, I; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Sinnis, G; Smy, M B; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H W; Stewart, T; Stone, J L; Suda, Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, A T; Svoboda, R; Tacik, R; Takeda, A; Taketa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, H K M; Tanaka, H; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorpe, M; Tobayama, S; Tolich, N; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M R; Vasseur, G; Vogelaar, R B; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Xin, T; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zito, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be establis...

  1. Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyper-Kamiokande Proto-Collaboraion; :; K. Abe; H. Aihara; C. Andreopoulos; I. Anghel; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; R. Asfandiyarov; M. Askins; J. J. Back; P. Ballett; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; F. Bay; P. Beltrame; V. Berardi; M. Bergevin; S. Berkman; T. Berry; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; F. S. Cafagna; G. Carminati; S. L. Cartwright; M. G. Catanesi; K. Choi; J. H. Choi; G. Collazuol; G. Cowan; L. Cremonesi; G. Davies; G. De Rosa; C. Densham; J. Detwiler; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; S. Emery; A. Ereditato; P. Fernández; T. Feusels; A. Finch; M. Fitton; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; D. Fukuda; V. Galymov; K. Ganezer; M. Gonin; P. Gumplinger; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; Y. Haga; B. Hartfiel; M. Hartz; Y. Hayato; M. Hierholzer; J. Hill; A. Himmel; S. Hirota; S. Horiuchi; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; T. Iijima; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; K. Inoue; J. Insler; R. A. Intonti; T. Irvine; T. Ishida; H. Ishino; M. Ishitsuka; Y. Itow; A. Izmaylov; B. Jamieson; H. I. Jang; M. Jiang; K. K. Joo; C. K. Jung; A. Kaboth; T. Kajita; J. Kameda; Y. Karadhzov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; J. Y. Kim; S. B. Kim; Y. Kishimoto; T. Kobayashi; M. Koga; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. R. Kropp; Y. Kudenko; T. Kutter; M. Kuze; L. Labarga; J. Lagoda; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; J. G. Learned; I. T. Lim; T. Lindner; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; W. Ma; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; C. Mariani; L. Marti; J. F. Martin; C. Martin; P. P. J. Martins; E. Mazzucato; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; M. Mezzetto; H. Minakata; A. Minamino; S. Mine; O. Mineev; M. Miura; J. Monroe; T. Mori; S. Moriyama; T. Mueller; F. Muheim; M. Nakahata; K. Nakamura; T. Nakaya; S. Nakayama; M. Needham; T. Nicholls; M. Nirkko; Y. Nishimura; E. Noah; J. Nowak; H. Nunokawa; H. M. O'Keeffe; Y. Okajima; K. Okumura; S. M. Oser; E. O'Sullivan; T. Ovsiannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; J. Pérez; M. Y. Pac; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; C. Pistillo; S. Playfer; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; B. Quilain; M. Quinto; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. Rayner; A. Redij; F. Retiere; C. Riccio; E. Richard; E. Rondio; H. J. Rose; M. Ross-Lonergan; C. Rott; S. D. Rountree; A. Rubbia; R. Sacco; M. Sakuda; M. C. Sanchez; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; A. Shaikhiev; I. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; G. Sinnis; M. B. Smy; J. Sobczyk; H. W. Sobel; T. Stewart; J. L. Stone; Y. Suda; Y. Suzuki; A. T. Suzuki; R. Svoboda; R. Tacik; A. Takeda; A. Taketa; Y. Takeuchi; H. A. Tanaka; H. K. M. Tanaka; H. Tanaka; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; M. Thorpe; S. Tobayama; N. Tolich; T. Tomura; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; M. R. Vagins; G. Vasseur; R. B. Vogelaar; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; J. R. Wilson; T. Xin; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; M. Zito

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be established with a statistical significance of more than $3\\,\\sigma$ ($5\\,\\sigma$) for $76\\%$ ($58\\%$) of the $\\delta_{CP}$ parameter space. Using both $\

  2. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precise measurements of two delta m**2 in electron-neutrino and muon-neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minakata, H.; /Tokyo Metropolitan U.; Nunokawa, H.; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol.; Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, the authors discuss the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the two effective atmospheric neutrino mass squared differences measured, respectively, in electron, and in muon neutrino disappearance oscillation experiments. if the former, is larger (smaller) than the latter, the mass hierarchy is of normal (inverted) type. They consider two very high precision (a few per mil) measurements of such mass squared differences by the phase II of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) experiment and by the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic errors of both measurements, they determine the region of sensitivities where the mass hierarchy can be distinguished. Due to the tight space limitation, they present only the general idea and show a few most important plots.

  3. Neutrino experiments and the Large Hadron Collider: friends across 14 orders of magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Janet

    This paper explores some of the questions that connect the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and neutrino experiments. What is the origin of mass? What is the meaning of flavor? Is there direct evidence of new forces or particles? ...

  4. Theta13 Neutrino Experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, LBNL Engineering Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oshatz, Daryl

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL/PUB-5505 Neutrino Experiment atDiablo Canyon Power Plant LBNL Engineering Summary Report*DE-AC03-76SF00098 ? 13 LBNL Engineering Summary Report,

  5. Perspectives for future neutrino oscillation experiments with accelerators: beams, detectors and physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquale Migliozzi

    2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years great progress toward the understanding of the mixing in the leptonic sector has been made. Nonetheless, this field of research is just at the beginning. Further advance by accelerator based neutrino oscillation experiments requires new beams and detectors to reach the wanted physics goals. In this paper we review the next possible steps that can be done for neutrino oscillation experiments with accelerators

  6. The Science and Strategy for Phasing of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diwan M. V.

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This note is about the principles behind a phased plan for realizing a Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment(LBNE) in the U.S.. The most important issue that must be resolved is the direction of the first phase of the experiment. Based on both scientific and programmatic considerations, the U.S. should pursue the best option for accelerator neutrino physics, which is the longer baseline towards Homestake with an optimizedbroadband intense beam.

  7. Measurements of neutrino oscillation in appearance and disappearance channels by the T2K experiment with 6.6E20 protons on target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; ?muda, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on measurements of neutrino oscillation using data from the T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment collected between 2010 and 2013. In an analysis of muon neutrino disappearance alone, we find the following estimates and 68% confidence intervals for the two possible mass hierarchies: Normal Hierarchy: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.514^{+0.055}_{-0.056}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{32}=(2.51\\pm0.10)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$ Inverted Hierarchy: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.511\\pm0.055$ and $\\Delta m^2_{13}=(2.48\\pm0.10)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$ The analysis accounts for multi-nucleon mechanisms in neutrino interactions which were found to introduce negligible bias. We describe our first analyses that combine measurements of muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance to estimate four oscillation parameters and the mass hierarchy. Frequentist and Bayesian intervals are presented for combinations of these parameters, with and without including recent reactor measurements. At 90% confidence level and including...

  8. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Future Neutrino Oscillation Precision Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Choubey; W. Rodejohann

    2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss to what extent future precision measurements of neutrino mixing observables will influence the information we can draw from a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay. Whereas the Delta m^2 corresponding to solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations are expected to be known with good precision, the parameter theta_{12} will govern large part of the uncertainty. We focus in particular on the possibility of distinguishing the neutrino mass hierarchies and on setting a limit on the neutrino mass. We give the largest allowed values of the neutrino masses which allow to distinguish the normal from the inverted hierarchy. All aspects are discussed as a function of the uncertainty stemming from the involved nuclear matrix elements. The implications of a vanishing, or extremely small, effective mass are also investigated. By giving a large list of possible neutrino mass matrices and their predictions for the observables, we finally explore how a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay can help to identify the neutrino mass matrix if more precise values of the relevant parameters are known.

  9. Neutrinoless double beta decay and future neutrino oscillation precision experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choubey, Sandhya [Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Rodejohann, Werner [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss to what extent future precision measurements of neutrino mixing observables will influence the information we can draw from a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay. Whereas the {delta}m{sup 2} corresponding to solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations are expected to be known with good precision, the parameter {theta}{sub 12} will govern a large part of the uncertainty. We focus, in particular, on the possibility of distinguishing the neutrino mass hierarchies and on setting a limit on the neutrino mass. We give the largest allowed values of the neutrino masses which allow to distinguish the normal from the inverted hierarchy. All aspects are discussed as a function of the uncertainty stemming from the involved nuclear matrix elements. The implications of a vanishing, or extremely small, effective mass are also investigated. By giving a large list of possible neutrino mass matrices and their predictions for the observables, we finally explore how a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay can help to identify the neutrino mass matrix if more precise values of the relevant parameters are known.

  10. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5, 2015ComputingTotal Wind89 060520

  11. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  12. Reactor accelerator coupling experiments: a feasability study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woddi Venkat Krishna, Taraknath

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    rods moved out one ring. 4. Target located in core central thimble and control rods moved out two rings. A full core MCNP model for the UT NETL reactor was constructed. This model explicitly simulated all fuel rods, control rods, graphite rods..., graphite reflector, beam ports, and pool water. The physical domain of the model ended at the pool wall. Each case was simulated in MCNP and the heat generation rate in the fuel was recorded. For the purposes of observing thermal feedback effects, heat...

  13. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  14. Advanced Test Reactor Testing Experience: Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world’s premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner “lobes” to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 48" long and 5.0" diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of test sponsors -- US government, foreign governments, private researchers, and commercial companies needing neutron irradiation services. There are three basic types of test configurations in the ATR. The simplest configuration is the sealed static capsule, wherein the target material is placed in a capsule, or plate form, and the capsule is in direct contact with the primary coolant. The next level of complexity of an experiment is an instrumented lead experiment, which allows for active monitoring and control of experiment conditions during the irradiation. The highest level of complexity of experiment is the pressurized water loop experiment, in which the test sample can be subjected to the exact environment of a pressurized water reactor. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and future plans.

  15. Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Sinev

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

  16. The Power of Neutrino Mass Sum Rules for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen F. King; Alexander Merle; Alexander J. Stuart

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino mass sum rules relate the three neutrino masses within generic classes of flavour models, leading to restrictions on the effective mass parameter measured in experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay as a function of the lightest neutrino mass. We perform a comprehensive study of the implications of such neutrino mass sum rules, which provide a link between model building, phenomenology, and experiments. After a careful explanation of how to derive predictions from sum rules, we discuss a large number of examples both numerically, using all three global fits available for the neutrino oscillation data, and analytically wherever possible. In some cases, our results disagree with some of those in the literature for reasons that we explain. Finally we discuss the experimental prospects for many current and near-future experiments, with a particular focus on the uncertainties induced by the unknown nuclear physics involved. We find that, in many cases, the power of the neutrino mass sum rules is so strong as to allow certain classes of models to be tested by the next generation of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Our study can serve as both a guideline and a theoretical motivation for future experimental studies.

  17. Constraining the absolute neutrino mass scale and Majorana CP violating phases by future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Nunokawa; W. J. C. Teves; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming that neutrinos are Majorana particles, in a three generation framework, current and future neutrino oscillation experiments can determine six out of the nine parameters which fully describe the structure of the neutrino mass matrix. We try to clarify the interplay among the remaining parameters, the absolute neutrino mass scale and two CP violating Majorana phases, and how they can be accessed by future neutrinoless double beta ($0\

  18. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Conceptual Design ReportThe LBNE Water Cherenkov DetectorApril 13 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell S. H.; Bishai, M.; Brown, R.; Chen, H.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J., Geronimo, G.; Gill, R.; Hackenburg, R.; Hahn, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D.; Junnarkar, S.; Kettell, S.H.; Lanni,F.; Li, Y.; Ling, J.; Littenberg, L.; Makowiecki, D.; Marciano, W.; Morse, W.; Parsa, Z.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Samios, N.; Sharma, R.; Simos, N.; Sondericker, J.; Stewart, J.; Tanaka, H.; Themann, H.; Thorn, C.; Viren, B., White, S.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Yu, B.; Zhang, C.

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptual Design Report (CDR) developed for the Water Cherekov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  19. Testing solar lepton mixing sum rules in neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballett, Peter; Luhn, Christoph; Pascoli, Silvia; Schmidt, Michael A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small discrete family symmetries such as S4, A4 or A5 may lead to simple leading-order predictions for the neutrino mixing matrix such as the bimaximal, tribimaximal or golden ratio mixing patterns, which may be brought into agreement with experimental data with the help of corrections from the charged-lepton sector. Such scenarios generally lead to relations among the parameters of the physical leptonic mixing matrix known as solar lepton mixing sum rules. In this article, we present a simple derivation of such solar sum rules, valid for arbitrary neutrino and charged lepton mixing angles and phases, assuming only {\\theta}13^{\

  20. Neutrinos Are Nearly Dirac Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Cahill

    2000-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino masses and mixings are analyzed in terms of left-handed fields and a 6x6 complex symmetric mass matrix whose singular values are the neutrino masses. An angle x_nu characterizes the kind of the neutrinos, with x_nu = 0 for Dirac neutrinos and x_nu = pi/2 for Majorana neutrinos. If x_nu = 0, then baryon-minus-lepton number is conserved. When x_nu is approximately zero, the six neutrino masses coalesce into three nearly degenerate pairs. Thus the smallness of the differences in neutrino masses exhibited in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments and the stringent limits on neutrinoless double beta decay are naturally explained if B-L is approximately conserved and neutrinos are nearly Dirac fermions. If one sets sin(x_nu) = 0.003, suppresses inter-generational mixing, and imposes a quark-like mass hierarchy, then one may fit the essential features of the solar, reactor, and atmospheric neutrino experiments with otherwise random mass matrices in the eV range. This B-L model leads to these predictions: neutrinos oscillate mainly between flavor eigenfields and sterile eigenfields, and so the probabilities of the appearance of neutrinos or antineutrinos are very small; neutrinos may well be of cosmological importance; in principle the disappearance of the tau neutrino should be observable; and neutrinoless double beta decay is suppressed by an extra factor of < 10^(-5) and hence will not be seen in the Heidelberg/Moscow, IGEX, GENIUS, or CUORE experiments.

  1. A new particle physics experiment, planned to take place at Fermilab and the Sanford Lab, aims to transform our understanding of neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    June 2013 A new particle physics experiment, planned to take place at Fermilab and the Sanford Lab, aims to transform our understanding of neutrinos and their role in the universe. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Mysterious neutrinos Neutrinos are among the most abundant particles in the universe

  2. New Limits for the Violation of the Equivalence Principle in the Solar-Reactor Neutrino Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdiviesso, G do A; De Holanda, P C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for the violation of the equivalence principle (VEP) on solar and reactor neutrinos is investigated. New limits for the VEP are obtained considering the mass-flavor mixing hypothesis and the VEP model. Our analysis shows two solutions were the VEP effects practically don't change the solar sector. In a first case, the mass scale of the reactor sector remains the same and in a second situation this scale falls slightly, becoming closer to the solar solution without VEP. The combined solution points to the following set of parameters: a ``higher VEP'' $|\\phi\\Delta\\gamma|=9,12^{+0,97}_{-0,78}\\times10^{-21}$, $\\tan^2\\theta=0,478^{+0,040}_{-0,038}$ and $\\Delta m^2=6,63\\pm0,31\\times10^{-5} eV^2$ ($77,7%$ C.L.) and a ``lower VEP'' $|\\phi\\Delta\\gamma|=1,91^{+0,84}_{-0,61}\\times10^{-21}$, $\\tan^2\\theta=0,478^{+0,040}_{-0,038}$ e $\\Delta m^2=7,73^{+0,17}_{-0,20}\\times10^{-5} eV^2$ ($77,7%$ C.L.). Both solutions have increased confidence level when compared with the MSW solution ($\\tan^2\\theta=0,462^{+0,043}_{-0...

  3. Studying Neutrinos with the EXO Experiment Nicole Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    .2948, July 2008. NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY Similar to 'normal' double beta decay, except no neutrinos to neutrinoless double beta decay is given by: S0 1/2 a A MT B 1/2 =efficiency, a=isotopic abundance A Tritium Endpoint meNeutrinoless double

  4. SNO Data: Results from Experiments at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was built 6800 feet under ground, in INCO's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario. SNO is a heavy-water Cherenkov detector that is designed to detect neutrinos produced by fusion reactions in the sun. It uses 1000 tonnes of heavy water, on loan from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), contained in a 12 meter diameter acrylic vessel. Neutrinos react with the heavy water (D2O) to produce flashes of light called Cherenkov radiation. This light is then detected by an array of 9600 photomultiplier tubes mounted on a geodesic support structure surrounding the heavy water vessel. The detector is immersed in light (normal) water within a 30 meter barrel-shaped cavity (the size of a 10 story building!) excavated from Norite rock. Located in the deepest part of the mine, the overburden of rock shields the detector from cosmic rays. The detector laboratory is extremely clean to reduce background signals from radioactive elements present in the mine dust which would otherwise hide the very weak signal from neutrinos. (From http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/]

    The SNO website provides access to various datasets. See also the SNO Image Catalog at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/images/ and computer-generated images of SNO events at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/events/ and the list of published papers.

  5. Comparison of the CERN-MEMPHYS and T2HK neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I compare the physics potential of possible future neutrino oscillation experiments from CERN to a Mt scale water Cerenkov detector at Frejus (MEMPHYS) and of the T2HK proposal in Japan, where for the CERN experiments an SPL Superbeam and a $\\gamma=100$ Beta Beam are considered.

  6. Abnormal operating procedures for ATR (Advanced Test Reactor's) experiment loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auflick, J.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the background from the TMI accident which resulted in the definition and development of function-oriented procedures. It also explains how function-oriented procedures were applied in a task for the Advanced Test Reactor's (ATR) NR experiment loops. Human performance design discrepancies were identified for existing procedures, and were corrected by upgrading them according to current NRC and DOE standards. Finally, specific recommendations are made with respect to future ATR control room and loop improvements, as they relate to the revision of operating procedures within INEL's power reactor program. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Neutrinos Are Nearly Dirac Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, K E

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino masses and mixings are analyzed in terms of left-handed fields and a 6x6 complex symmetric mass matrix whose singular values are the neutrino masses. An angle theta_nu characterizes the kind of the neutrinos, with theta_nu = 0 for Dirac neutrinos and theta_nu = pi/2 for Majorana neutrinos. If theta_nu = 0, then baryon-minus-lepton number is conserved. When theta_nu is approximately zero, the six neutrino masses coalesce into three nearly degenerate pairs. Thus the smallness of the differences in neutrino masses exhibited in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments and the stringent limits on neutrinoless double-beta decay are naturally explained if B-L is approximately conserved and neutrinos are nearly Dirac fermions. If one sets theta_nu = 0.0005, suppresses inter-generational mixing, and imposes a quark-like mass hierarchy, then one may fit the essential features of the solar, reactor, and atmospheric neutrino experiments with otherwise random mass matrices in the eV range. This B-L model le...

  8. Karsten Heeger, Univ. of Wisconsin UW undergraduate colloquium, February 27, 2013 Recent Discoveries in Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    Discoveries in Neutrino Physics Experiments with Reactor Antineutrinos Karsten Heeger http://neutrino.physics violation? Where did all the antimatter go? The Big Questions in Neutrino Physics #12;Karsten Heeger, Univ, July 13, 2009 Standard Model and Particle Physics #12;Karsten Heeger, Univ. of Wisconsin UW

  9. Overview of the present status and challenges of neutrino oscillation physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mocioiu, Irina [Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an overview of the current status of neutrino oscillation physics, including atmospheric, solar, reactor and accelerator neutrino experiments. After summarizing our present understanding of all data, I discuss the open questions and how they might be addressed in the future. I also discuss how neutrinos can be used to learn about new physics and astrophysics.

  10. The Variation of the Solar Neutrino Fluxes over Time in the Homestake, GALLEX(GNO) and Super-Kamiokande Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Sakurai; H. J. Haubold; T. Shirai

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the records of the fluxes of solar neutrinos from the Homestake, GALLEX (GNO), and Super-Kamiokande experiments, their statistical analyses were performed to search for whether there existed a time variation of these fluxes. The results of the analysis for the three experiments indicate that these fluxes are varying quasi-biennially. This means that both efficiencies of the initial p-p and the pp-III reactions of the proton-proton chain are varying quasi-biennially together with a period of about 26 months. Since this time variation prospectively generated by these two reactions strongly suggests that the efficiency of the proton-proton chain as the main energy source of the Sun has a tendency to vary quasi-biennially due to some chaotic or non-linear process taking place inside the gravitationally stabilized solar fusion reactor. It should be, however, remarked that, at the present moment, we have no theoretical reasoning to resolve this mysterious result generally referred to as the quasi-biennial periodicity in the time variation of the fluxes of solar neutrinos. There is an urgent need to search for the reason why such a quasi-biennial periodicity is caused through some physical process as related to nuclear fusion deep inside the Sun.

  11. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  12. Neutrinos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30NeutrinoNeutrinos from the

  13. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 503 (2003) 187191 Geophysical aspects of very long baseline neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geller, Robert

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 503 (2003) 187­191 Geophysical aspects of very long baseline neutrino experiments Robert J. Gellera, *, Tatsuhiko Harab a Department of Earth, Tatehara 1, Tsukuba 305-0802, Japan Abstract Several proposed experiments will send beams of neutrinos

  14. Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Marco Laveder

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review we present the main features of the current status of neutrino physics. After a review of the theory of neutrino mixing and oscillations, we discuss the current status of solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that the current data can be nicely accommodated in the framework of three-neutrino mixing. We discuss also the problem of the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale through Tritium beta-decay experiments and astrophysical observations, and the exploration of the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos through neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Finally, future prospects are briefly discussed.

  15. The earth matter effects in neutrino oscillation experiments from Tokai to Kamioka and Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaoru Hagiwara; Naotoshi Okamura; Ken-ichi Senda

    2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the earth matter effects in the Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Korea experiment (T2KK), which is a proposed extension of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) neutrino oscillation experiment between J-PARC at Tokai and Super-Kamiokande (SK) in Kamioka, where an additional detector is placed in Korea along the same neutrino beam line.By using recent geophysical measurements, we examine the earth matter effects on the oscillation probabilities at Kamioka and Korea. The average matter density along the Tokai-to-Kamioka baseline is found to be 2.6 g/cm^3, and that for the Tokai-to-Korea baseline is 2.85, 2.98, and 3.05 g/cm^3 for the baseline length of L = 1000, 1100, and 1200 km, respectively. The uncertainty of the average density is about 6%, which is determined by the uncertainty in the correlation between the accurately measured sound velocity and the matter density. The effect of the matter density distribution along the baseline is studied by using the step function approximation and the Fourier analysis. We find that the nu_mu -> nu_e oscillation probability is dictated mainly by the average matter density, with small but non-negligible contribution from the real part of the first Fourier mode. We also find that the sensitivity of the T2KK experiment on the neutrino mass hierarchy does not improve significantly by reducing the matter density error from 6% to 3%, since the measurement is limited by statistics for the minimum scenario of T2KK with SK at Kamioka anda 100 kt detector in Korea considered in this report. The sensitivity of the T2KK experiment on the neutrino mass hierarchy improves significantly by splitting the total beam time into neutrino and anti-neutrino runs, because the matter effect term contributes to the oscillation amplitudes with the opposite sign.

  16. White Paper on the Majorana Zero-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Majorana collaboration

    2003-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Majorana Experiment is to study neutrinoless double beta decay (0nbb) with an effective Majorana-neutrino mass sensitivity below 50 meV in order to characterize the Majorana nature of the neutrino, the Majorana mass spectrum, and the absolute mass scale. An experimental study of the neutrino mass scale implied by neutrino oscillation results is now technically within our grasp. This exciting physics goal is best pursued using the well-established technique of searching for 0nbb of 76Ge, augmented with recent advances in signal processing and detector design. The Majorana Experiment will consist of a large mass of 76Ge in the form of high-resolution intrinsic germanium detectors located deep underground within a low-background shielding environment. Observation of a sharp peak at the bb endpoint will quantify the 0nbb half-life and thus the effective Majorana mass of the electron neutrino. In addition to the modest R&D program, we present here an overview of the entire project in order to help put in perspective the scope, the low level of technical risk, and the readiness of the Collaboration to immediately begin the undertaking.

  17. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments David Schmitz, Fermilab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino crossN u F a c

  18. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  19. Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding.

  20. TREAT light water reactor source term experiments program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herceg, J.E.; Blomquist, C.A.; Chung, K.S.; Dunn, P.F.; Johnson, C.E.; Kraft, D.A.; Schlenger, B.J.; Shaftman, D.H.; Simms, R.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four experiments are being conducted in the TREAT facility to investigate the behavior of fission products released from typical LWR fuel overheated to the point of catastrophic cladding degradation. Heatup and steam flow transients are used that simulate the conditions expected in operating power reactors undergoing various types of hypothetical severe accidents. The experiments are integral in nature and are aimed at the physicochemical characterization, near the point of origin, of the biologically important volatile fission products released early in such accidents. Detailed program objectives are discussed, a test matrix is presented, and the test apparatus is described. Pretest analysis and preliminary results are reported for the first test.

  1. The liquid Argon TPC: a powerful detector for future neutrino experiments and proton decay searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ereditato; A. Rubbia

    2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility of new generation neutrino and astroparticle physics experiments exploiting the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technique, following a graded strategy that envisions applications with increasing detector masses (from 100 ton to 100 kton). The ICARUS R&D program has already demonstrated that the technology is mature with the test of the T600 detector at surface. Since 2003 we have been working with the conceptual design of a very large LAr TPC with a mass of 50-100 kton to be built by employing a monolithic technology based on the use of industrial, large volume, cryogenic tankers developed by the petro-chemical industry. Such a detector, if realized, would be an ideal match for a Super Beam, Beta Beam or Neutrino Factory, covering a broad physics program that includes the detection of atmospheric, solar and supernova neutrinos, and searches for proton decay, in addition to the rich accelerator neutrino physics program. A "test module" with a mass of the order of 10 kton operated underground or at shallow depth would represent a necessary milestone towards the realization of the 100 kton detector, with an interesting physics program on its own. In parallel, physics is calling for a shorter scale application of the LAr TPC technique at the level of 100 ton mass, for low energy neutrino physics and for use as a near station setup in future long baseline neutrino facilities. We outline here the main physics objectives and the design of such a detector for operation in the upcoming T2K neutrino beam. We finally present the result of a series of R&D studies conducted with the aim of validating the design of the proposed detectors.

  2. Reactor ??e disappearance in the Double Chooz experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abe, Y.; Aberle, C.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Barriere, J. C.; Bergevin, M.; Bernstein, A.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukhov, L.; Blucher, E.; Bowden, N. S.; Buck, C.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Caden, E.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, P.-J.; Chimenti, P.; Classen, T.; Collin, A. P.; Conover, E.; Conrad, J. M.; Crespo-Anadón, J. I.; Crum, K.; Cucoanes, A.; D’Agostino, M. V.; Damon, E.; Dawson, J. V.; Dazeley, S.; Dietrich, D.; Djurcic, Z.; Dracos, M.; Durand, V.; Ebert, J.; Efremenko, Y.; Elnimr, M.; Etenko, A.; Fallot, M.; Fechner, M.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Felde, J.; Franco, D.; Franke, A. J.; Franke, M.; Furuta, H.; Gama, R.; Gil-Botella, I.; Giot, L.; Göger-Neff, M.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Goodman, M. C.; Goon, J. TM.; Greiner, D.; Haag, N.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hartmann, F. X.; Haser, J.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hayakawa, T.; Hofmann, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Hourlier, A.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jochum, J.; Jollet, C.; Jones, C. L.; Kaether, F.; Kalousis, L. N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D. M.; Kawasaki, T.; Keefer, G.; Kemp, E.; de Kerret, H.; Kibe, Y.; Konno, T.; Kryn, D.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lane, C. E.; Langbrandtner, C.; Lasserre, T.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Lima, H. P.; Lindner, M.; López-Castanő, J. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lucht, S.; McKee, D.; Maeda, J.; Maesano, C. N.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Martino, J.; Matsubara, T.; Mention, G.; Meregaglia, A.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Miyata, H.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Novella, P.; Obolensky, M.; Oberauer, L.; Onillon, A.; Osborn, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Palomares, C.; Pepe, I. M.; Perasso, S.; Perrin, P.; Pfahler, P.; Porta, A.; Potzel, W.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reinhold, B.; Remoto, A.; Röhling, M.; Roncin, R.; Roth, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Santorelli, R.; Sato, F.; Schönert, S.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwetz, T.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shimojima, S.; Shrestha, D.; Sida, J-L.; Sinev, V.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smith, E.; Spitz, J.; Stahl, A.; Stancu, I.; Stokes, L. F. F.; Strait, M.; Stüken, A.; Suekane, F.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sun, Y.; Svoboda, R.; Terao, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Toups, M.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Valdiviesso, G.; Veyssiere, C.; Wagner, S.; Watanabe, H.; White, B.; Wiebusch, C.; Winslow, L.; Worcester, M.; Wurm, M.; Yermia, F.; Zimmer, V.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Double Chooz experiment has observed 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events in 227.93 live days with 33.71 GW-ton-years (reactor power×detector mass×live time) exposure using a 10.3 mł fiducial volume detector located at 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant in France. The expectation in case of ???=0 is 8937 events. The deficit is interpreted as evidence of electron antineutrino disappearance. From a rate plus spectral shape analysis we find sin?˛2???=0.109±0.030(stat)±0.025(syst). The data exclude the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% CL (2.9?).

  3. Performance of piezoresistive and piezoelectric sensors in pulsed reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holbert, K. E. (Keith E.); McCready, S. S. (Steven S.); Heger, A. S. (A. Sharif); Harlow, T. H. (Thomas H.); Spearing, D. R. (Dane R.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed reactor-based experiments require radiation tolerant sensors that do not perturb the device under test, or allow a radiation-induced signal to mask the true sensor output. Several commercial off-the-shelf accelerometers, pressure transducers, and acoustic emission sensors were subjected to multiple high-power reactor pulses. A piezoresistive accelerometer capable of operation to at least 44 kGy and 8.7 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} is identified, and a piezoresistive pressure transducer that is resistant to about half that radiation level is selected. Further, two piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors employing lead metaniobate are also found to function to 55 kGy and 1.1 x 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Reactor electron antineutrino disappearance in the Double Chooz experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, Y; Anjos, J C dos; Barriere, J C; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bezerra, T J C; Bezrukhov, L; Blucher, E; Bowden, N S; Buck, C; Busenitz, J; Cabrera, A; Caden, E; Camilleri, L; Carr, R; Cerrada, M; Chang, P -J; Chimenti, P; Classen, T; Collin, A P; Conover, E; Conrad, J M; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Crum, K; Cucoanes, A; D'Agostino, M V; Damon, E; Dawson, J V; Dazeley, S; Dietrich, D; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Durand, V; Ebert, J; Efremenko, Y; Elnimr, M; Etenko, A; Fallot, M; Fechner, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Felde, J; Franco, D; Franke, A J; Franke, M; Furuta, H; Gama, R; Gil-Botella, I; Giot, L; Goger-Neff, M; Gonzalez, L F G; Goodman, M C; Goon, J TM; Greiner, D; Haag, N; Hagner, C; Hara, T; Hartmann, F X; Haser, J; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayakawa, T; Hofmann, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Hourlier, A; Ishitsuka, M; Jochum, J; Jollet, C; Jones, C L; Kaether, F; Kalousis, L N; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Kawasaki, T; Keefer, G; Kemp, E; de Kerret, H; Kibe, Y; Konno, T; Kryn, D; Kuze, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lane, C E; Langbrandtner, C; Lasserre, T; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Lima, H P; Lindner, M; López-Castanő, J M; LoSecco, J M; Lubsandorzhiev, B K; Lucht, S; McKee, D; Maeda, J; Maesano, C N; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Martino, J; Matsubara, T; Mention, G; Meregaglia, A; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Miyata, H; Mueller, Th A; Nagasaka, Y; Nakajima, K; Novella, P; Obolensky, M; Oberauer, L; Onillon, A; Osborn, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Palomares, C; Pepe, I M; Perasso, S; Perrin, P; Pfahler, P; Porta, A; Potzel, W; Reichenbacher, J; Reinhold, B; Remoto, A; Rohling, M; Roncin, R; Roth, S; Sakamoto, Y; Santorelli, R; Sato, F; Schonert, S; Schoppmann, S; Schwetz, T; Shaevitz, M H; Shimojima, S; Shrestha, D; Sida, J-L; Sinev, V; Skorokhvatov, M; Smith, E; Spitz, J; Stahl, A; Stancu, I; Stokes, L F F; Strait, M; Stuken, A; Suekane, F; Sukhotin, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Sun, Y; Svoboda, R; Terao, K; Tonazzo, A; Toups, M; Thi, H H Trinh; Valdiviesso, G; Veyssiere, C; Wagner, S; Watanabe, H; White, B; Wiebusch, C; Winslow, L; Worcester, M; Wurm, M; Yermia, F; Zimmer, V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Double Chooz experiment has observed 8,249 candidate electron antineutrino events in 227.93 live days with 33.71 GW-ton-years (reactor power x detector mass x livetime) exposure using a 10.3 cubic meter fiducial volume detector located at 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant in France. The expectation in case of theta13 = 0 is 8,937 events. The deficit is interpreted as evidence of electron antineutrino disappearance. From a rate plus spectral shape analysis we find sin^2 2{\\theta}13 = 0.109 \\pm 0.030(stat) \\pm 0.025(syst). The data exclude the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.9% CL (3.1{\\sigma}).

  5. KATRIN: an experiment to determine the neutrino mass from the beta decay of tritium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Hamish Robertson

    2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    KATRIN is a very large scale tritium-beta-decay experiment to determine the mass of the neutrino. It is presently under construction at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology north campus, and makes use of the Karlsruhe Tritium Laboratory built as a prototype for the ITER project. The combination of a large retarding-potential electrostatic-magnetic spectrometer and an intense gaseous molecular tritium source makes possible a sensitivity to neutrino mass of 0.2 eV, about an order of magnitude below present laboratory limits. The measurement is kinematic and independent of whether the neutrino is Dirac or Majorana. The status of the project is summarized briefly in this report.

  6. KATRIN: an experiment to determine the neutrino mass from the beta decay of tritium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KATRIN is a very large scale tritium-beta-decay experiment to determine the mass of the neutrino. It is presently under construction at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology north campus, and makes use of the Karlsruhe Tritium Laboratory built as a prototype for the ITER project. The combination of a large retarding-potential electrostatic-magnetic spectrometer and an intense gaseous molecular tritium source makes possible a sensitivity to neutrino mass of 0.2 eV, about an order of magnitude below present laboratory limits. The measurement is kinematic and independent of whether the neutrino is Dirac or Majorana. The status of the project is summarized briefly in this report.

  7. Earth Matter Effects in Detection of Supernova Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. -H. Guo; Bing-Lin Young

    2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculated the matter effect, including both the Earth and supernova, on the detection of neutrinos from type II supernovae at the proposed Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. It is found that apart from the dependence on the flip probability P_H inside the supernova and the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, the amount of the Earth matter effect depends on the direction of the incoming supernova neutrinos, and reaches the biggest value when the incident angle of neutrinos is around 93^\\circ. In the reaction channel \\bar{\

  8. Neutrino

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino cross section

  9. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment: Exploring Fundamental Symmetries of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNE Collaboration; Corey Adams; David Adams; Tarek Akiri; Tyler Alion; Kris Anderson; Costas Andreopoulos; Mike Andrews; Ioana Anghel; Joăo Carlos Costa dos Anjos; Maddalena Antonello; Enrique Arrieta-Diaz; Marina Artuso; Jonathan Asaadi; Xinhua Bai; Bagdat Baibussinov; Michael Baird; Baha Balantekin; Bruce Baller; Brian Baptista; D'Ann Barker; Gary Barker; William A. Barletta; Giles Barr; Larry Bartoszek; Amit Bashyal; Matt Bass; Vincenzo Bellini; Pietro Angelo Benetti; Bruce E. Berger; Marc Bergevin; Eileen Berman; Hans-Gerd Berns; Adam Bernstein; Robert Bernstein; Babu Bhandari; Vipin Bhatnagar; Bipul Bhuyan; Jianming Bian; Mary Bishai; Andrew Blake; Flor Blaszczyk; Erik Blaufuss; Bruce Bleakley; Edward Blucher; Steve Blusk; Virgil Bocean; F. Boffelli; Jan Boissevain; Timothy Bolton; Maurizio Bonesini; Steve Boyd; Andrew Brandt; Richard Breedon; Carl Bromberg; Ralph Brown; Giullia Brunetti; Norman Buchanan; Bill Bugg; Jerome Busenitz; E. Calligarich; Leslie Camilleri; Giada Carminati; Rachel Carr; Cesar Castromonte; Flavio Cavanna; Sandro Centro; Alex Chen; Hucheng Chen; Kai Chen; Daniel Cherdack; Cheng-Yi Chi; Sam Childress; Brajesh Chandra Choudhary; Georgios Christodoulou; Cabot-Ann Christofferson; Eric Church; David Cline; Thomas Coan; Alfredo Cocco; Joao Coelho; Stephen Coleman; Janet M. Conrad; Mark Convery; Robert Corey; Luke Corwin; Jack Cranshaw; Daniel Cronin-Hennessy; A. Curioni; Helio da Motta; Tristan Davenne; Gavin S. Davies; Steven Dazeley; Kaushik De; Andre de Gouvea; Jeffrey K. de Jong; David Demuth; Chris Densham; Milind Diwan; Zelimir Djurcic; R. Dolfini; Jeffrey Dolph; Gary Drake; Stephen Dye; Hongue Dyuang; Daniel Edmunds; Steven Elliott; Muhammad Elnimr; Sarah Eno; Sanshiro Enomoto; Carlos O. Escobar; Justin Evans; A. Falcone; Lisa Falk; Amir Farbin; Christian Farnese; Angela Fava; John Felde; S. Fernandes; Fernando Ferroni; Farshid Feyzi; Laura Fields; Alex Finch; Mike Fitton; Bonnie Fleming; Jack Fowler; Walt Fox; Alex Friedland; Stu Fuess; Brian Fujikawa; Hugh Gallagher; Raj Gandhi; Gerald Garvey; Victor M. Gehman; Gianluigi de Geronimo; Daniele Gibin; Ronald Gill; Ricardo A. Gomes; Maury C. Goodman; Jason Goon; Nicholas Graf; Mathew Graham; Rik Gran; Christopher Grant; Nick Grant; Herbert Greenlee; Leland Greenler; Sean Grullon; Elena Guardincerri; Victor Guarino; Evan Guarnaccia; Germano Guedes; Roxanne Guenette; Alberto Guglielmi; Marcelo M. Guzzo; Alec T. Habig; Robert W. Hackenburg; Haleh Hadavand; Alan Hahn; Martin Haigh; Todd Haines; Thomas Handler; Sunej Hans; Jeff Hartnell; John Harton; Robert Hatcher; Athans Hatzikoutelis; Steven Hays; Eric Hazen; Mike Headley; Anne Heavey; Karsten Heeger; Jaret Heise; Robert Hellauer; Jeremy Hewes; Alexander Himmel; Matthew Hogan; Pedro Holanda; Anna Holin; Glenn Horton-Smith; Joe Howell; Patrick Hurh; Joey Huston; James Hylen; Richard Imlay; Jonathan Insler; G. Introzzi; Zeynep Isvan; Chris Jackson; John Jacobsen; David E. Jaffe; Cat James; Chun-Min Jen; Marvin Johnson; Randy Johnson; Robert Johnson; Scott Johnson; William Johnston; John Johnstone; Ben J. P. Jones; H. Jostlein; Thomas Junk; Richard Kadel; Karl Kaess; Georgia Karagiorgi; Jarek Kaspar; Teppei Katori; Boris Kayser; Edward Kearns; Paul Keener; Ernesto Kemp; Steve H. Kettell; Mike Kirby; Joshua Klein; Gordon Koizumi; Sacha Kopp; Laura Kormos; William Kropp; Vitaly A. Kudryavtsev; Ashok Kumar; Jason Kumar; Thomas Kutter; Franco La Zia; Kenneth Lande; Charles Lane; Karol Lang; Francesco Lanni; Richard Lanza; Tony Latorre; John Learned; David Lee; Kevin Lee; Qizhong Li; Shaorui Li; Yichen Li; Zepeng Li; Jiang Libo; Steve Linden; Jiajie Ling; Jonathan Link; Laurence Littenberg; Hu Liu; Qiuguang Liu; Tiankuan Liu; John Losecco; William Louis; Byron Lundberg; Tracy Lundin; Jay Lundy; Ana Amelia Machado; Cara Maesano; Steve Magill; George Mahler; David Malon; Stephen Malys; Francesco Mammoliti; Samit Kumar Mandal; Anthony Mann; Paul Mantsch; Alberto Marchionni; William Marciano; Camillo Mariani; Jelena Maricic; Alysia Marino; Marvin Marshak; John Marshall; Shiegenobu Matsuno; Christopher Mauger; Konstantinos Mavrokoridis; Nate Mayer; Neil McCauley; Elaine McCluskey; Kirk McDonald; Kevin McFarland; David McKee; Robert McKeown; Robert McTaggart; Rashid Mehdiyev; Dongming Mei; A. Menegolli; Guang Meng; Yixiong Meng; David Mertins; Mark Messier; William Metcalf; Radovan Milincic; William Miller; Geoff Mills; Sanjib R. Mishra; Nikolai Mokhov; Claudio Montanari; David Montanari; Craig Moore; Jorge Morfin; Ben Morgan; William Morse; Zander Moss; Célio A. Moura; Stuart Mufson; David Muller; Jim Musser; Donna Naples; Jim Napolitano; Mitch Newcomer; Ryan Nichol; Tim Nicholls; Evan Niner; Barry Norris

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early Universe, the dynamics of the supernova bursts that produced the heavy elements necessary for life and whether protons eventually decay --- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our Universe, its current state and its eventual fate. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) represents an extensively developed plan for a world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions. LBNE is conceived around three central components: (1) a new, high-intensity neutrino source generated from a megawatt-class proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, (2) a near neutrino detector just downstream of the source, and (3) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber deployed as a far detector deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. This facility, located at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, is approximately 1,300 km from the neutrino source at Fermilab -- a distance (baseline) that delivers optimal sensitivity to neutrino charge-parity symmetry violation and mass ordering effects. This ambitious yet cost-effective design incorporates scalability and flexibility and can accommodate a variety of upgrades and contributions. With its exceptional combination of experimental configuration, technical capabilities, and potential for transformative discoveries, LBNE promises to be a vital facility for the field of particle physics worldwide, providing physicists from around the globe with opportunities to collaborate in a twenty to thirty year program of exciting science. In this document we provide a comprehensive overview of LBNE's scientific objectives, its place in the landscape of neutrino physics worldwide, the technologies it will incorporate and the capabilities it will possess.

  10. Standard and non-standard neutrino-nucleus reactions cross sections and event rates to neutrino detection experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. K. Papoulias; T. S. Kosmas

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Open neutrino physics issues require precision studies, both theoretical and experimental ones, and towards this aim coherent neutral current neutrino-nucleus scattering events are expected to be observed soon. In this work, we explore $\

  11. Standard and non-standard neutrino-nucleus reactions cross sections and event rates to neutrino detection experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papoulias, D K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open neutrino physics issues require precision studies, both theoretical and experimental ones, and towards this aim coherent neutral current neutrino-nucleus scattering events are expected to be observed soon. In this work, we explore $\

  12. A road map to solar neutrino fluxes, neutrino oscillation parameters, and tests for new physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Carlos Pena-Garay

    2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze all available solar and related reactor neutrino experiments, as well as simulated future 7Be, p-p, pep, and ^8B solar neutrino experiments. We treat all solar neutrino fluxes as free parameters subject to the condition that the total luminosity represented by the neutrinos equals the observed solar luminosity (the `luminosity constraint'). Existing experiments show that the p-p solar neutrino flux is 1.02 +- 0.02 (1 sigma) times the flux predicted by the BP00 standard solar model; the 7Be neutrino flux is 0.93^{+0.25}_{-0.63} the predicted flux; and the ^8B flux is 1.01 +- 0.04 the predicted flux. The neutrino oscillation parameters are: Delta m^2 = 7.3^{+0.4}_{-0.6}\\times 10^{-5} eV^2 and tan^2 theta_{12} = 0.41 +- 0.04. We evaluate how accurate future experiments must be to determine more precisely neutrino oscillation parameters and solar neutrino fluxes, and to elucidate the transition from vacuum-dominated to matter-dominated oscillations at low energies. A future 7Be nu-e scattering experiment accurate to +- 10 % can reduce the uncertainty in the experimentally determined 7Be neutrino flux by a factor of four and the uncertainty in the p-p neutrino flux by a factor of 2.5 (to +- 0.8 %). A future p-p experiment must be accurate to better than +- 3 % to shrink the uncertainty in tan^2 theta_{12} by more than 15 %. The idea that the Sun shines because of nuclear fusion reactions can be tested accurately by comparing the observed photon luminosity of the Sun with the luminosity inferred from measurements of solar neutrino fluxes. Based upon quantitative analyses of present and simulated future experiments, we answer the question: Why perform low-energy solar neutrino experiments?

  13. The muon system of the Daya Bay Reactor antineutrino experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daya Bay Collaboration

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described.

  14. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Littenberg, L.; Pearson, C. E.; Qian, X.; Theman, H.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  15. Phenomenology of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; W. Grimus

    1999-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This review is focused on neutrino mixing and neutrino oscillations in the light of the recent experimental developments. After discussing possible types of neutrino mixing for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos and considering in detail the phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and matter, we review all existing evidence and indications in favour of neutrino oscillations that have been obtained in the atmospheric, solar and LSND experiments. We present the results of the analyses of the neutrino oscillation data in the framework of mixing of three and four massive neutrinos and investigate possibilities to test the different neutrino mass and mixing schemes obtained in this way. We also discuss briefly future neutrino oscillation experiments.

  16. Neutrino oscillation constraints on neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; C. W. Kim; M. Monteno

    1997-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the constraints imposed by the results of neutrino oscillation experiments on the effective Majorana mass || that characterizes the contribution of Majorana neutrino masses to the matrix element of neutrinoless double-beta decay. We have shown that in a general scheme with three Majorana neutrinos and a hierarchy of neutrino masses (which can be explained by the see-saw mechanism), the results of neutrino oscillation experiments imply rather strong constraints on the parameter ||. From the results of the first reactor long-baseline experiment CHOOZ and the Bugey experiment it follows that || | > 10^{-1} eV would be a signal for a non-hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum and/or non-standard mechanisms of lepton number violation.

  17. Aerosol behavior experiments on light water reactor primary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahn, F.J.; Collen, J.; Wright, A.L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of three experimental programs relevant to the behavior of aerosols in the primary systems of light water reactors (LWRs) are presented. These are the Large-Scale Aerosol Transport Test programs performed at the Marviken test facility in Sweden, parts of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) performed at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, and the TRAP-MELT validation project performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Marviken experiments focused on the behavior of aerosols released from fuel and structural materials in a damaged core. Data on the transport of these aerosols and their physical characteristics were obtained in five experiments that simulated LWR primary systems. The LACE program data include results from the containment bypass accident tests, which focused on aerosol transport in pipes. The TRAP-MELT validation project data include results from two types of experiments: (a) aerosol transport tests to investigate aerosol wall plateout in a vertical pipe geometry and (b) aerosol resuspension tests to provide a data base from which analytical models can be developed. Typical results from these programs are presented and discussed.

  18. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  19. The Variation of the Solar Neutrino Fluxes over Time in the Homestake, GALLEX(GNO) and Super-Kamiokande Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakurai, K; Shirai, T

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the records of the fluxes of solar neutrinos from the Homestake, GALLEX (GNO), and Super-Kamiokande experiments, their statistical analyses were performed to search for whether there existed a time variation of these fluxes. The results of the analysis for the three experiments indicate that these fluxes are varying quasi-biennially. This means that both efficiencies of the initial p-p and the pp-III reactions of the proton-proton chain are varying quasi-biennially together with a period of about 26 months. Since this time variation prospectively generated by these two reactions strongly suggests that the efficiency of the proton-proton chain as the main energy source of the Sun has a tendency to vary quasi-biennially due to some chaotic or non-linear process taking place inside the gravitationally stabilized solar fusion reactor. It should be, however, remarked that, at the present moment, we have no theoretical reasoning to resolve this mysterious result generally referred to as the quasi-biennial per...

  20. Data processing and storage in the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Miao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment reported the first observation of the non-zero neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ using the first 55 days of data. It has also provided the most precise measurement of $\\theta_{13}$ with the extended data to 621 days. Daya Bay will keep running for another 3 years or so. There is about 100 TB raw data produced per year, as well as several copies of reconstruction data with similar volume to the raw data for each copy. The raw data is transferred to Daya Bay onsite and two offsite clusters: IHEP in Beijing and LBNL in California, with a short latency. There is quasi-real-time data processing at both onsite and offsite clusters, for the purpose of data quality monitoring, detector calibration and preliminary data analyses. The physics data production took place a couple of times per year according to the physics analysis plan. This paper will introduce the data movement and storage, data processing and monitoring, and the automation of the calibration.

  1. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  2. Probing New Limits for the Violation of the Equivalence Principle in the solar-reactor neutrino sector as a next to leading order effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Valdiviesso; M. M. Guzzo; P. C. Holanda

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New limits for the Violation of Equivalence Principle (VEP) are obtained considering the mass-flavor mixing hypothesis. This analysis includes observations of solar and reactor neutrinos and has obtained a limit for the VEP parameter $|\\Delta \\gamma|$ contributing to the $\

  3. Search for neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment by using quasi-elastic interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piteira, Rodolphe; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enthusiasm of the scientific community for studying oscillations of neutrinos is equaled only by the mass of their detectors. The MINOS experiment determines and compares the near spectrum of muonic neutrinos from the NUMI beam to the far one, in order to measure two oscillation parameters: {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 23}). The spectra are obtained by analyzing the charged current interactions which difficulty lies in identifying the interactions products (e.g. muons). An alternative method identifying the traces of muons, bent by the magnetic field of the detectors, and determining their energies is presented in this manuscript. The sensitivity of the detectors is optimal for the quasi-elastic interactions, for which a selection method is proposed, to study their oscillation. Even though it reduces the statistics, such a study introduces fewer systematic errors, constituting the ideal method on the long range.

  4. New features in the simulation of neutrino oscillation experiments with GLoBES 3.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Huber; Joachim Kopp; Manfred Lindner; Mark Rolinec; Walter Winter

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Version 3.0 of the GLoBES (``General Long Baseline Experiment Simulator'') software, which is a simulation tool for short- and long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. As a new feature, GLoBES 3.0 allows for user-defined systematical errors, which can also be used to simulate experiments with multiple discrete sources and detectors. In addition, the combination with external information, such as from different experiment classes, is simplified. As far as the probability calculation is concerned, GLoBES now provides an interface for the inclusion of non-standard physics without re-compilation of the software. The set of experiment prototypes coming with GLoBES has been updated. For example, built-in fluxes are now provided for the simulation of beta beams.

  5. Neutrino Properties Before and After KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pakvasa; J. W. F. Valle

    2003-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review neutrino oscillation physics, including the determination of mass splittings and mixings from current solar, atmospheric, reactor and accelerator neutrino data. A brief discussion is given of cosmological and astrophysical implications. Non-oscillation phenomena such as neutrinoless double beta decay would, if discovered, probe the absolute scale of neutrino mass and also reveal their Majorana nature. Non-oscillation descriptions in terms of spin-flavor precession (SFP) and non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) currently provide an excellent fit of the solar data. However they are at odds with the first results from the KamLAND experiment which imply that, despite their theoretical interest, non-standard mechanisms can only play a sub-leading role in the solar neutrino anomaly. Accepting the LMA-MSW solution, one can use the current solar neutrino data to place important restrictions on non-standard neutrino properties, such as neutrino magnetic moments. Both solar and atmospheric neutrino data can also be used to place constraints on neutrino instability as well as the more exotic possibility of $CPT$ and Lorentz Violation. Weillustrate the potential of future data from experiments such as KamLAND, Borexino and the upcoming neutrino factories in constraining non-standard neutrino properties.

  6. Neutrinos: Theory and Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory and phenomenology of neutrinos will be addressed, especially that relating to the observation of neutrino flavor transformations. The current status and implications for future experiments will be discussed with special emphasis on the experiments that will determine the neutrino mass ordering, the dominant flavor content of the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest electron neutrino content and the size of CP violation in the neutrino sector. Beyond the neutrino Standard Model, the evidence for and a possible definitive experiment to confirm or refute the existence of light sterile neutrinos will be briefly discussed.

  7. Nucleon Decay and Neutrino Experiments, Experiments at High Energy Hadron Colliders, and String Theor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Chang Kee [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Douglas, Michaek [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Hobbs, John [State University of New York at Stony Brook; McGrew, Clark [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Rijssenbeek, Michael [State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the DOE grant DEFG0292ER40697 that supported the research activities of the Stony Brook High Energy Physics Group from November 15, 1991 to April 30, 2013. During the grant period, the grant supported the research of three Stony Brook particle physics research groups: The Nucleon Decay and Neutrino group, the Hadron Collider Group, and the Theory Group.

  8. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auty, David John; /Sussex U.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

  9. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Water Cherenkov Detector Schedule and Cost Books LBNE Far Site Internal Review(December 6-9,2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Schedule and Cost Books developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  10. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Water Cherenkov Detector Basis of Estimate Forms and Backup Documentation LBNE Far Site Internal Review (December 6-9, 2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Basis of Estimate (BOE) forms and backup documentation developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  11. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  12. FELIX experiments and computational needs for eddy current analysis of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, L.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fusion reactor, changing magnetic fields are closely coupled to the electrically-conducting metal structure. This coupling is particularly pronounced in a tokamak reactor in which magnetic fields are used to confine, stabilize, drive, and heat the plasma. Electromagnetic effects in future fusion reactors will have far-reaching implications in the configuration, operation, and maintenance of the reactors. This paper describes the impact of eddy-current effects on future reactors, the requirements of computer codes for analyzing those effects, and the FELIX experiments which will provide needed data for code validation.

  13. Sensitivity of Next-Generation Tritium Beta-Decay Experiments for keV-Scale Sterile Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mertens; T. Lasserre; S. Groh; F. Glueck; A. Huber; A. W. P. Poon; M. Steidl; N. Steinbrink; C. Weinheimer

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the sensitivity of tritium $\\beta$-decay experiments for keV-scale sterile neutrinos. Relic sterile neutrinos in the keV mass range can contribute both to the cold and warm dark matter content of the universe. This work shows that a large-scale tritium beta-decay experiment, similar to the KATRIN experiment that is under construction, can reach a statistical sensitivity of the active-sterile neutrino mixing of $\\sin^2\\theta \\sim 10^{-8}$. The effect of uncertainties in the known theoretical corrections to the tritium $\\beta$-decay spectrum were investigated, and found not to affect the sensitivity significantly. It is demonstrated that controlling uncorrelated systematic effects will be one of the main challenges in such an experiment.

  14. On the determination of anti-neutrino spectra from nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Huber

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the effect of, well-known, higher order corrections to the allowed beta decay spectrum on the determination of anti-neutrino spectra resulting from the decays of fission fragments. In particular, we try to estimate the associated theory errors and find that induced currents like weak magnetism may ultimately limit our ability to improve the current accuracy and under certain circumstance could even largely increase the theoretical errors. We also perform a critical evaluation of the errors associated with our method to extract the anti-neutrino spectrum using synthetic beta spectra. It turns out, that a fit using only virtual beta branches with a judicious choice of the effective nuclear charge provides results with a minimal bias. We apply this method to actual data for U235, Pu239 and Pu241 and confirm, within errors, recent results, which indicate a net 3% upward shift in energy averaged anti-neutrino fluxes. However, we also find significant shape differences which can in principle be tested by high statistics anti-neutrino data samples.

  15. Probing long-range leptonic forces with solar and reactor neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González-Garciá, M C; Massó, E; Zukanovich-Funchal, R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study the phenomenological consequences of the existence of long-range forces coupled to lepton flavour numbers in solar neutrino oscillations. We study electronic forces mediated by scalar, vector or tensor neutral bosons and analyze their effect on the propagation of solar neutrinos as a function of the force strength and range. Under the assumption of one mass scale dominance, we perform a global analysis of solar and KamLAND neutrino data which depends on the two standard oscillation parameters, \\Delta m^2_{21} and \\tan^2\\theta_{12}, the force coupling constant, its range and, for the case of scalar-mediated interactions, on the neutrino mass scale as well. We find that, generically, the inclusion of the new interaction does not lead to a very statistically significant improvement on the description of the data in the most favored MSW LMA (or LMA-I) region. It does, however, substantially improve the fit in the high-\\Delta m^2 LMA (or LMA-II) region which can be allowed for vector and scal...

  16. A road map to solar neutrino fluxe, neutrino oscillation parameters, and tests for new physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, J N; Bahcall, John N.; Peńa-Garay, Carlos

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze all available solar and related reactor neutrino experiments, as well as simulated future ^7Be, p-p, pep, and ^8B solar neutrino experiments. We treat all solar neutrino fluxes as free parameters subject to the condition that the total luminosity represented by the neutrinos equals the observed solar luminosity (the `luminosity constraint'). Existing experiments show that the p-p solar neutrino flux is 1.01 + - 0.02 (1 sigma) times the flux predicted by the BP00 standard solar model; the ^7Be neutrino flux is 0.97^{+0.28}_{-0.54} the predicted flux; and the ^8B flux is 1.01 + - 0.06 the predicted flux. The oscillation parameters are: Delta m^2 = 7.3^{+0.4}_{-0.6} 10^{-5} eV^2 and tan^2 theta_{12} = 0.42^{+0.08}_{-0.06}. We evaluate how accurate future experiments must be to determine more precisely neutrino oscillation parameters and solar neutrino fluxes, and to elucidate the transition from vacuum-dominated to matter-dominated oscillations. A future ^7Be nu-e scattering experiment accurate to + -...

  17. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  18. Evaluation of the neutron background in an HPGe target for WIMP direct detection when using a reactor neutrino detector as a neutron veto system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Xiangpan; Xu, Ye, E-mail: xuye76@nankai.edu.cn; Lin, Junsong; Feng, Yulong; Li, Haolin [Nankai University, School of Physics (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct WIMP (weakly interacting massive particle) detector with a neutron veto system is designed to better reject neutrons. The experimental configuration is studied in this paper involves 984 Ge modules placed inside a reactor-neutrino detector. The neutrino detector is used as a neutron veto device. The neutron background for the experimental design is estimated using the Geant4 simulation. The results show that the neutron background can decrease to O(0.01) events per year per tonne of high-purity germanium and it can be ignored in comparison with electron recoils.

  19. Solar Neutrinos and the Decaying Neutrino Hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey M. Berryman; Andre de Gouvea; Daniel Hernandez

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore, mostly using data from solar neutrino experiments, the hypothesis that the neutrino mass eigenstates are unstable. We find that, by combining $^8$B solar neutrino data with those on $^7$Be and lower-energy solar neutrinos, one obtains a mostly model-independent bound on both the $\

  20. Decommissioning of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment: A technical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Notz, K.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report completes a technical evaluation of decommissioning planning for the former Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, which was shut down in December, 1969. The key issues revolve around the treatment and disposal of some five tons of solid fuel salt which contains over 30 kg of fissionable uranium-233 plus fission products and higher actinides. The chemistry of this material is complicated by the formation of elemental fluorine via a radiolysis reaction under certain conditions. Supporting studies carried out as part of this evaluation include (a) a broad scope analysis of possible options for storage/disposal of the salts, (b) calculation of nuclide decay in future years, (c) technical evaluation of the containment facility and hot cell penetrations, (d) review and update of surveillance and maintenance procedures, (e) measurements of facility groundwater radioactivity and sump pump operation, (f) laboratory studies of the radiolysis reaction, and (g) laboratory studies which resulted in finding a suitable getter for elemental fluorine. In addition, geologic and hydrologic factors of the surrounding area were considered, and also the implications of entombment of the fuel in-place with concrete. The results of this evaluation show that the fuel salt cannot be left in its present form and location permanently. On the other hand, extended storage in its present form is quite acceptable for 20 to 30 years, or even longer. For continued storage in-place, some facility modifications are recommended. 30 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deitrich, L. W.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop.

  2. Neutrino physics at accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Fernandez

    2006-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Present and future neutrino experiments at accelerators are mainly concerned with understanding the neutrino oscillation phenomenon and its implications. Here a brief account of neutrino oscillations is given together with a description of the supporting data. Some current and planned accelerator neutrino experiments are also explained.

  3. Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Weinheimer; Kai Zuber

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The various experiments on neutrino oscillation evidenced that neutrinos have indeed non-zero masses but cannot tell us the absolute neutrino mass scale. This scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing constraints on the sum of all neutrino masses from cosmological observations two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double $\\beta$-decay and the direct neutrino mass search by investigating single $\\beta$-decays or electron captures. The former method is not only sensitive to neutrino masses but also probes the Majorana character of neutrinos and thus lepton number violation with high sensitivity. Currently quite a few experiments with different techniques are being constructed, commissioned or are even running, which aim for a sensitivity on the neutrino mass of {\\cal O}(100) meV. The principle methods and these experiments will be discussed in this short review.

  4. A New Interpretation of Alpha-Particle-Driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A New Interpretation of Alpha-Particle-Driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  5. Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sinev

    2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  6. Reactor transient control in support of PFR/TREAT TUCOP experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, D.R.; Larsen, G.R.; Harrison, L.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unique energy deposition and experiment control requirements posed bythe PFR/TREAT series of transient undercooling/overpower (TUCOP) experiments resulted in equally unique TREAT reactor operations. New reactor control computer algorithms were written and used with the TREAT reactor control computer system to perform such functions as early power burst generation (based on test train flow conditions), burst generation produced by a step insertion of reactivity following a controlled power ramp, and shutdown (SCRAM) initiators based on both test train conditions and energy deposition. Specialized hardware was constructed to simulate test train inputs to the control computer system so that computer algorithms could be tested in real time without irradiating the experiment.

  7. Realistic Earth matter effects and a method to acquire information about small ?_{13} in the detection of supernova neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we first calculate the realistic Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos at the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment which is currently under construction. It is found that the Earth matter effects depend on the neutrino incident angle $\\theta$, the neutrino mass hierarchy $\\Delta m_{31}^{2}$, the crossing probability at the high resonance region inside the supernova, $P_{H}$, the neutrino temperature, $T_{\\alpha}$, and the pinching parameter in the neutrino spectrum, $\\eta_{\\alpha}$. We also take into account the collective effects due to neutrino-neutrino interactions inside the supernova. With the expression for the dependence of $P_H$ on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$, we obtain the relations between $\\theta_{13}$ and the event numbers for various reaction channels of supernova neutrinos. Using these relations, we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$. Such a sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment which has a sensitivity of the order of $\\theta_{13}\\sim 3^\\circ$. Furthermore, we apply this method to other neutrino experiments, i.e. Super-K, SNO, KamLAND, LVD, MinBooNE, Borexino, and Double-Chooz. We also study the energy spectra of the differential event numbers, ${\\rm d}N/{\\rm d}E$.

  8. A study of quasi-elastic muon (anti)neutrino scattering in he NOMAD experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyubushkin, Vladimir [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the muon neutrino and antineutrino quasi-elastic (QEL) scattering reactions (v{sub {mu}}n{yields}{mu}{sup -}p and v-bar{sub {mu}}p{yields}{mu}{sup +}n using a set of experimental data collected by the NOMAD collaboration. We have performed measurements of the cross-section of these processes on a nuclear target (mainly Carbon) normalizing it to the total v{sub {mu}} (v-bar{sub {mu}}) charged current cross-section. The results for the flux averaged QEL cross-sections in the (anti)neutrino energy interval 3-100 GeV are <{sigma}{sub qel}>v{sub {mu}} = (0.92{+-}0.02(stat){+-}0.06(syst))x10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} and <{sigma}{sub qel}>v-bar{sub {mu}} = (0.81{+-}0.05(stat){+-}0.09(syst))x10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} for neutrino and antineutrino, respectively. The axial mass parameter MA was extracted from the measured quasi-elastic neutrino cross-section. The corresponding result is M{sub A} = 1.05{+-}0.02(stat){+-}0.06(syst) GeV. It is consistent with the axial mass values recalculated from the antineutrino cross-section and extracted from the pure Q{sup 2} shape analysis of the high purity sample of v{sub {mu}} quasi-elastic 2-track events, but has smaller systematic error and should be quoted as the main result of this work. Our measured MA is found to be in good agreement with the world average value obtained in previous deuterium filled bubble chamber experiments. The NOMAD measurement of M{sub A} is lower than those recently published by K2K and MiniBooNE collaborations. However, within the large errors quoted by these experiments on M{sub A}, these results are compatible with the more precise NOMAD value.

  9. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  10. Neutrino Physics with JUNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Fengpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Avanzini, Margherita Buizza; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Herve; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Goger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cecile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Mollenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M; McDonough, William F; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Bjorn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frederic; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. Neutrino burst from a typical cor...

  11. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ODonnell, Thomas Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    default and new reactor-spectra calculations are given inusing the default reactor-spectrum calculation presented incores for reactor neutrino flux calculations for the KamLAND

  12. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    default and new reactor-spectra calculations are given inusing the default reactor-spectrum calculation presented incores for reactor neutrino flux calculations for the KamLAND

  13. Inverse Beta Decay in a Nonequilibrium Antineutrino Flux from a Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Kopeikin; L. A. Mikaelyan; V. V. Sinev

    2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of the reactor antineutrino spectrum toward equilibrium above the inverse beta-decay threshold during the reactor operating period and the decay of residual antineutrino radiation after reactor shutdown are considered. It is found that, under certain conditions, these processes can play a significant role in experiments seeking neutrino oscillations.

  14. Experience with automatic reactor control at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.; Christensen, L.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satisfactory operation of the ACRDS has extended the capabilities of EBR-II to a transient test facility, achieving automatic transient control. Test assemblies can now be irradiated in transient conditions overlapping the slower transient capability of the TREAT reactor.

  15. Constraints on Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions and Unparticle Physics with Neutrino-Electron Scattering at the Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Deniz er al.; TEXONO Collaboration

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino-electron scatterings are purely leptonic processes with robust Standard Model (SM) predictions. Their measurements can therefore provide constraints to physics beyond SM. The $\

  16. Are solar neutrino oscillations robust?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. G. Miranda; M. A. Tortola; J. W. F. Valle

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The robustness of the large mixing angle (LMA) oscillation (OSC) interpretation of the solar neutrino data is considered in a more general framework where non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) are present. Such interactions may be regarded as a generic feature of models of neutrino mass. The 766.3 ton-yr data sample of the KamLAND collaboration are included in the analysis, paying attention to the background from the reaction ^13C(\\alpha,n) ^16O. Similarly, the latest solar neutrino fluxes from the SNO collaboration are included. In addition to the solution which holds in the absence of NSI (LMA-I) there is a 'dark-side' solution (LMA-D) with sin^2 theta_Sol = 0.70, essentially degenerate with the former, and another light-side solution (LMA-0) allowed only at 97% CL. More precise KamLAND reactor measurements will not resolve the ambiguity in the determination of the solar neutrino mixing angle theta_Sol, as they are expected to constrain mainly Delta m^2. We comment on the complementary role of atmospheric, laboratory (e.g. CHARM) and future solar neutrino experiments in lifting the degeneracy between the LMA-I and LMA-D solutions. In particular, we show how the LMA-D solution induced by the simplest NSI between neutrinos and down-type-quarks-only is in conflict with the combination of current atmospheric data and data of the CHARM experiment. We also mention that establishing the issue of robustness of the oscillation picture in the most general case will require further experiments, such as those involving low energy solar neutrinos.

  17. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Batra, P.; /Columbia U.; Bugel, Leonard G.; /Columbia U.; Camilleri, Leslie Loris; /Columbia U.; Conrad, Janet Marie; /MIT; de Gouvea, A.; /Northwestern U.; Fisher, Peter H.; /MIT; Formaggio, Joseph Angelo; /MIT; Jenkins, J.; /Northwestern U.; Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; /MIT; Kobilarcik, T.R.; /Fermilab /Texas U.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parameterized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of 'Beyond the Standard Model' physics.

  18. Neutrino Physics: Fundamentals of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. Kim

    1996-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this lecture we review some of the basic properties of neutrinos, in particular their mass and the oscillation behavior. First we discuss how to describe the neutrino mass. Then, under the assumption that neutrinos are massive and mixed, the fundamentals of the neutrino oscillations are discussed with emphasis on subtle aspects which have been overlooked in the past. We then review the terrestrial neutrino oscillation experiments in the framework of three generations of neutrinos with the standard mass hierarchy. Finally, a brief summary of the current status of the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems will be given.

  19. Completion of the first NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiment, AGR-1, in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover; John Maki; David Petti

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and completed a very successful irradiation in early November 2009. The design of AGR-1 test train and support systems used to monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed and the results of the experiment will be presented. The second experiment (AGR-2) is currently being assembled, and the status as well as the new fuel and irradiation conditions for that experiment will also be discussed.

  20. Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, T.

    This article presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering

  1. Experiments illustrating the importance of automated reasoning in spacecraft reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, J.A. (Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany Street Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA)); Wyant, F.J. (Nuclear Technology Projects Division, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA))

    1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of automated reasoning to the control of spacecraft nuclear reactors is discussed. Presented are results from experiments that demonstrate the role of planning, prediction, and assessment in the realization of autonomous control. These experiments were performed under closed-loop conditions on the Annular Core Research Reactor that is operated by the Sandia National Laboratories. Automated diagnostics is identified as an area that requires much further research.

  2. The Ongoing Impact of the U.S. Fast Reactor Integral Experiments Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Michael A. Pope; Harold F. McFarlane

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The creation of a large database of integral fast reactor physics experiments advanced nuclear science and technology in ways that were unachievable by less capital intensive and operationally challenging approaches. They enabled the compilation of integral physics benchmark data, validated (or not) analytical methods, and provided assurance of future rector designs The integral experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) represent decades of research performed to support fast reactor design and our understanding of neutronics behavior and reactor physics measurements. Experiments began in 1955 with the Zero Power Reactor No. 3 (ZPR-3) and terminated with the Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR, originally the Zero Power Plutonium Reactor) in 1990 at the former ANL-West site in Idaho, which is now part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Two additional critical assemblies, ZPR-6 and ZPR-9, operated at the ANL-East site in Illinois. A total of 128 fast reactor assemblies were constructed with these facilities [1]. The infrastructure and measurement capabilities are too expensive to be replicated in the modern era, making the integral database invaluable as the world pushes ahead with development of liquid metal cooled reactors.

  3. On application of the time-energy uncertainty relation to Mossbauer neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Evgeny Kh; Lindner, Manfred

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the implications of the time-energy uncertainty relation to recoillessly emitted and captured neutrinos (Mossbauer neutrinos) and show that it does not preclude oscillations of these neutrinos, contrary to a recent claim (arXiv:0803.0527).

  4. Search for sterile neutrino mixing in the MINOS long baseline experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; /Fermilab; Andreopoulos, C.; /Rutherford; Auty, D.J.; /Sussex U.; Ayres, D.S.; /Argonne; Backhouse, C.; /Oxford U.; Barnes Jr., P.D.; /LLNL, Livermore; Barr, G.; /Oxford U.; Barrett, W.L.; /Western Washington U.; Bishai, M.; /Brookhaven; Blake, A.; /Cambridge U.; Bock, G.J.; /Fermilab /Fermilab

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for depletion of the combined flux of active neutrino species over a 735 km baseline is reported using neutral-current interaction data recorded by the MINOS detectors in the NuMI neutrino beam. Such a depletion is not expected according to conventional interpretations of neutrino oscillation data involving the three known neutrino flavors. A depletion would be a signature of oscillations or decay to postulated noninteracting sterile neutrinos, scenarios not ruled out by existing data. From an exposure of 3.18 x 10{sup 20} protons on target in which neutrinos of energies between {approx}500 MeV and 120 GeV are produced predominantly as {nu}{sub {mu}}, the visible energy spectrum of candidate neutral-current reactions in the MINOS far-detector is reconstructed. Comparison of this spectrum to that inferred from a similarly selected near-detector sample shows that of the portion of the {nu}{sub {mu}} flux observed to disappear in charged-current interaction data, the fraction that could be converting to a sterile state is less than 52% at 90% confidence level (C.L.). The hypothesis that active neutrinos mix with a single sterile neutrino via oscillations is tested by fitting the data to various models. In the particular four-neutrino models considered, the mixing angles {theta}{sub 24} and {theta}{sub 34} are constrained to be less than 11{sup o} and 56{sup o} at 90% C.L., respectively. The possibility that active neutrinos may decay to sterile neutrinos is also investigated. Pure neutrino decay without oscillations is ruled out at 5.4 standard deviations. For the scenario in which active neutrinos decay into sterile states concurrently with neutrino oscillations, a lower limit is established for the neutrino decay lifetime {tau}{sub 3}/m{sub 3} > 2.1 x 10{sup -12} s/eV at 90% C.L.

  5. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In addition, the purpose and differences between the two experiments will be compared and the irradiation results to date on the first experiment will be presented.

  6. Underground Neutrino Detectors for Particle and Astroparticle Science: the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment (GLACIER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rubbia

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focus of the CERN program is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), however, CERN is engaged in long baseline neutrino physics with the CNGS project and supports T2K as recognized CERN RE13, and for good reasons: a number of observed phenomena in high-energy physics and cosmology lack their resolution within the Standard Model of particle physics; these puzzles include the origin of neutrino masses, CP-violation in the leptonic sector, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe. They will only partially be addressed at LHC. A positive measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}>0.01$ would certainly give a tremendous boost to neutrino physics by opening the possibility to study CP violation in the lepton sector and the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy with upgraded conventional super-beams. These experiments (so called ``Phase II'') require, in addition to an upgraded beam power, next generation very massive neutrino detectors with excellent energy resolution and high detection efficiency in a wide neutrino energy range, to cover 1st and 2nd oscillation maxima, and excellent particle identification and $\\pi^0$ background suppression. Two generations of large water Cherenkov detectors at Kamioka (Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande) have been extremely successful. And there are good reasons to consider a third generation water Cherenkov detector with an order of magnitude larger mass than Super-Kamiokande for both non-accelerator (proton decay, supernovae, ...) and accelerator-based physics. On the other hand, a very massive underground liquid Argon detector of about 100 kton could represent a credible alternative for the precision measurements of ``Phase II'' and aim at significantly new results in neutrino astroparticle and non-accelerator-based particle physics (e.g. proton decay).

  7. Underground Neutrino Detectors for Particle and Astroparticle Science the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment (GLACIER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubbia, A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focus of the CERN program is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), however, CERN is engaged in long baseline neutrino physics with the CNGS project and supports T2K as recognized CERN RE13, and for good reasons: a number of observed phenomena in high-energy physics and cosmology lack their resolution within the Standard Model of particle physics; these puzzles include the origin of neutrino masses, CP-violation in the leptonic sector, and baryon asymmetry of the Universe. They will only partially be addressed at LHC. A positive measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}>0.01$ would certainly give a tremendous boost to neutrino physics by opening the possibility to study CP violation in the lepton sector and the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy with upgraded conventional super-beams. These experiments (so called ``Phase II'') require, in addition to an upgraded beam power, next generation very massive neutrino detectors with excellent energy resolution and high detection efficiency in a wide neutrin...

  8. Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chad Pope

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day operations as well as obtaining historical information. Over 12,000 driver fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2500 kg of 20% enriched uranium. Also, over one thousand blanket fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2400 kg of depleted uranium. These operations required over 35,000 fissile material transfers between zones and over 6000 transfers between containers. Throughout all of these movements, no mass limit violations occurred. Numerous lessons were learned over the ten year operating history. From a criticality safety perspective, the most important lesson learned was the involvement of a criticality safety practitioner in daily operations. A criticality safety engineer was assigned directly to facility operations, and was responsible for implementation of limits and controls including upkeep of the associated computerized tracking files. The criticality safety engineer was also responsible for conducting fuel handler training activities including serving on fuel handler qualification oral boards, and continually assessing operations from a criticality control perspective. The criticality safety engineer also attended bimonthly project planning meetings to identify upcoming process changes that would require criticality safety evaluation. Finally, the excellent criticality safety record was due in no small part to the continual support, involvement, trust, and confidence of project and operations mana

  9. Corrections to Scaling Neutrino Mixing: Non-zero $?_{13}, ?_{CP}$ and Baryon Asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupam Kalita; Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a very specific type of neutrino mass and mixing structure based on the idea of Strong Scaling Ansatz (SSA) where the ratios of neutrino mass matrix elements belonging to two different columns are equal. There are three such possibilities, all of which are disfavored by the latest neutrino oscillation data. We focus on the specific scenario which predicts vanishing reactor mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ and inverted hierarchy with vanishing lightest neutrino mass. Motivated by several recent attempts to explain non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ by incorporating corrections to a leading order neutrino mass or mixing matrix giving $\\theta_{13}=0$, here we study the origin of non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ as well as leptonic Dirac CP phase $\\delta_{CP}$ by incorporating two different corrections to scaling neutrino mass and mixing: one where type II seesaw acts as a correction to scaling neutrino mass matrix and the other with charged lepton correction to scaling neutrino mixing. Although scaling neutrino mass matrix originating from type I seesaw predicts inverted hierarchy, the total neutrino mass matrix after type II seesaw correction can give rise to either normal or inverted hierarchy. However, charged lepton corrections do not disturb the inverted hierarchy prediction of scaling neutrino mass matrix. We further discriminate between neutrino hierarchies, different choices of lightest neutrino mass and Dirac CP phase by calculating baryon asymmetry and comparing with the observations made by the Planck experiment.

  10. Impact of approximate oscillation probabilities in the analysis of three neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cogswell, B K; Ernst, D J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As neutrino oscillation data becomes ever more precise, the use of approximate formulae for the oscillation probabilities ${\\mathcal P}_{\\alpha\\beta}$ must be examined to ensure that the approximation is adequate. Here, the oscillation probability ${\\mathcal P}_{ee}$ is investigated in the context of the Daya Bay experiment; the oscillation probability ${\\mathcal P}_{\\mu\\mu}$ is investigated in terms of the T2K disappearance experiment; and the probability ${\\mathcal P}_{\\mu e}$ is investigated in terms of the T2K appearance experiment. Daya Bay requires ${\\mathcal P}_{ee}$ in vacuum and thus the simple analytic formula negates the need for an approximate formula. However, improved data from T2K will soon become sensitive to the hierarchy, and thus require a more careful treatment of that aspect. For the other cases, we choose an expansion by Akhmedov et al. which systematically includes all terms through second order in $\\sin\\theta_{13}$ and in $\\alpha =: \\Delta_{21}/\\Delta_{31}$ ($\\Delta_{jk} =: m^2_j - m^2...

  11. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Huaiyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  12. Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments using DRAGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. B. Ma; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; W. L. Zhong; F. P. An

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulation to predict reactor rates. First, DRAGON was developed to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions,235U,238U,239Pu and141Pu, and it was validated for PWRs using the Takahama benchmark. The fission fraction calculation function was validated through comparing our calculation results with MIT's results. we calculate the fission fraction of the Daya Bay reactor core, and compare its with those calculated by the commercial reactor simulation program SCIENCE, which is used by the Daya Bay nuclear power plant, and the results was consist with each other. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was studied, and the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric neutrino experiments Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the electron antineutrino e was discovered, neutrinos... results on the neutrinoless double beta decay is given in 19. From ... Source: Magiera, Andrzej - Instytut Fizyki,...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne--purdue neutrino experiment Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the electron antineutrino e was discovered, neutrinos... results on the neutrinoless double beta decay is given in 19. From ... Source: Magiera, Andrzej - Instytut Fizyki,...

  15. ccsd-00016511,version1-5Jan2006 Neutrino Physics/Physique des neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ccsd-00016511,version1-5Jan2006 Neutrino Physics/Physique des neutrinos Reactor Neutrinos Thierry the possibility of doing "neutrino physics". This opened the door to the use of neutrinos as a sensitive probe of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575, USA

  16. Results from the Cuoricino (Zero-Neutrino Double Beta) Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnaboldi, C; Artusa, D R; Avignone, F T; Balata, M; Bandac, I; Barucci, M; Beeman, J W; Bellini, F; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Capelli, S; Carbone, L; Cebrian, S; Clemenza, M; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; de Ward, A; Didomizio, S D; Dolinski, M J; Farach, H A; Fiorini, E; Frossati, G; Giachero, A; Giuliani, A; Gorla, P; Guardincerri, E; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Maruyama, R H; McDonald, R J; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; Olivieri, E; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, E; Pasca, E; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pirro, S; Previtali, E; Risegari, L; Rosenfeld, C; Sangiorgio, S; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Torres, L; Ventura, G; Vignati, M

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from the CUORICINO {sup 130}Te zero-neutrino double-beta (0v{beta}{beta}) decay experiment are reported. CUORICINO is an array of 62 tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) bolometers with an active mass of 40.7 kg. It is cooled to {approx}8 mK by a dilution refrigerator shielded from environmental radioactivity and energetic neutrons. It is running in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Assergi, Italy. These data represent 11.83 kg y or 90.77 mole-years of {sup 130}Te. No evidence for 0v{beta}{beta}-decay was observed and a limit of T{sub 1/2}{sup 0v} ({sup 130}Te) {ge} 3.0 x 10{sup 24} y (90% C.L.) is set. This corresponds to upper limits on the effective mass, , between 0.19 and 0.68eV when analyzed with the many published nuclear structure calculations. In the context of these nuclear models, the values fall within the range corresponding to the claim of evidence of 0v{beta}{beta}-decay by H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus and his co-workers. The experiment continues to acquire data.

  17. A Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment After Four Years of Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanaugh, Steven; /Harvard U.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work attempts to measure or set a limit on sin{sub 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}), the parameter which describes {nu}{mu} {yields} {nu}e oscillations. The MINOS detectors at Fermilab are used to perform a search for the oscillations utilizing a beam of {nu}{mu} neutrinos created in the NuMI beamline by the collisions of 120 GeV protons with a carbon target. These collisions create ?{sup {+-}} and K{sup {+-}} which are focused with magnetic horns, are allowed to decay, and result in a beam of {nu}{mu} in the energy range of 1 to 30 GeV. Two functionally identical steel-scintillator calorimetric detectors are utilized to measure the interactions of the generated neutrinos. A detector close to the NuMI beam, located 104 m underground and 1040 m from the target, is used to measure the properties of the neutrino beam, including the flux, composition, and energy spectrum. This information is used in part to generate a predicted spectrum of neutrinos in absence of {nu}{mu} {yields} {nu}e oscillations in the detector located far from the target, at a distance of 705 m underground and 735.5 km from the target. An excess of predicted {nu}e charged current events in this far detector will be interpreted as {nu}{mu} {yields} {nu}e oscillations, and a measurement of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) will be made using a Feldman-Cousins analysis. The measurement of {nu}{mu} {yields} {nu}e requires the separation of {nu}e candidates from background events. New reconstruction software was developed with a focus on identifying {nu}e candidate events in order to reduce systematic errors. The event parameters measured by this software were used as an input to an artificial neutral network event discriminator. The details of this reconstruction software and the other steps of the analysis necessary to making the measurement will be discussed. This work builds on a previous measurement made with this experiment. After two years of running with 3.14 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT), a limit was set at {delta}CP = 0 for the normal (inverted) hierarchy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) < 0.29 (0.42) at 90% C.L. This study finds after four years of data with an accumulated intensity of 7 x 10{sup 20} POT that sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) < 0.12 (0.20) with {delta}CP = 0 at 90% C.L. for the normal (inverted) hierarchy.

  18. Double Beta Decay Constraints on Neutrino Masses and Mixing; Reanalysis with KamLAND Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroaki Sugiyama

    2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of KamLAND data just released, we reanalyze and update the constraints on neutrino masses and mixing parameters, the most general ones that can be derived in three-flavor mixing scheme of neutrinos with use of the bounds imposed by neutrinoless double beta decay search and reactor experiments. We point out that with KamLAND data and assuming Majorana neutrinos one can derive, for the first time, an upper bound on neutrino contribution to the cosmological \\Omega parameter, \\Omega_{\

  19. A cost-Effective Design for a Neutrino Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, J.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments. The physics case for a Neutrino Factory willsurprises, the physics case for a Neutrino Factory willAstrophysics, Physics of Beams (2004). [6] The Neutrino

  20. Falling through spacetime : four studies in neutrino astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Chad T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 Neutrino Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1Experimental neutrino physics and observational cosmologyExperiments in neutrino physics have not only discerned that

  1. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating corium crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented is an analysis of the results of the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten corium initially at 3080/sup 0/K was directed downward upon a stainless steel plate. The experiments are a continuation of a program of reactor material tests investigating LWR severe accident phenomena. Objective of the present analysis is to determine the existence or nonexistence of a corium crust during impingement from comparison of the measured heatup of the plate (as measured by thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the steel surface) with model calculations assuming alternately the presence and absence of a stable crust during impingement.

  2. Neutrino oscillations and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zuber

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance of light massive neutrinos as hot dark matter is outlined. The power of neutrino oscillation experiments with respect to detect such neutrinos in the eV-region is discussed. Present hints for neutrino oscillations in solar, atmospheric and LSND data are reviewed as well as future experiments and their potential.

  3. SUPERCONDUCTING COMBINED FUNCTION MAGNET SYSTEM FOR J-PARC NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OGITSU, T.; AJIMA, Y.; ANERELLA, M.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; GUPTA, R.; HAGEDOM, D.; HARRISON, M.; HIGASHI, N.; IWAMOTO, Y.; ICHIKAWA, A.; JAIN, A.; KIMURA, N.; KOBAYASHI, T.; MAKIDA, Y.; MURATORE, J.; NAKAMOTO, T.; OHHATA, H.; TAKASAKI, N.; TANAKA, K.; TERASHIMA, A.; YAMOMOTO, A.; OBANA, T.; PARKER, B.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The J-PARC Neutrino Experiment, the construction of which starts in JFY 2004, will use a superconducting magnet system for its primary proton beam line. The system, which bends the 50 GeV 0.75 MW proton beam by about 80 degrees, consists of 28 superconducting combined function magnets. The magnets utilize single layer left/right asymmetric coils that generate a dipole field of 2.6 T and a quadrupole field of 18.6 T/m with the operation current of about 7.35 kA. The system also contains a few conduction cooled superconducting corrector magnets that serve as vertical and horizontal steering magnets. All the magnets are designed to provide a physical beam aperture of 130 mm in order to achieve a large beam acceptance. Extensive care is also required to achieve safe operation with the high power proton beam. The paper summarizes the system design as well as some safety analysis results.

  4. Neutrinos from STORed Muons - nuSTORM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan [Fermilab

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of LSND and MiniBooNE, along with the recent papers on a possible reactor neutrino flux anomaly, give tantalizing hints of new physics. Models beyond the nSM have been developed to explain these results and involve one or more additional neutrinos that are non-interacting or “sterile." Neutrino beams produced from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring provide a powerful way to study this potential new physics. In this talk, I will describe the facility, nuSTORM, and an appropriate far detector for neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline. I will present sensitivity plots that indicate that this experimental approach can provide well over 5 s confirmation or rejection of the LSND/MinBooNE results. In addition I will explain how the facility can be used to make neutrino interaction cross section measurements important to the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and, in general, add significantly to the study of neutrino interactions. The unique n beam available at the nuSTORM facility has the potential to be transformational in our approach to n interaction physics, offering a “n light source” to physicists from a number of disciplines. Finally, I will describe how nuSTORM can be used to facilitate accelerator R&D for future muon-based accelerator facilities.

  5. PROPOSAL FOR AN EXPERIMENT PROGRAM IN NEUTRINO PHYSICS AND PROTON DECAY IN THE HOMESTAKE LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIWAN, M.; KETTELL, S.; LITTENBERG, W.; MARIANO, W.; PARSA, Z.; SAMIOS, N.; WHITE, S.; ET AL.

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to describe first, the principal physics reasons for an ambitious experimental program in neutrino physics and proton decay based on construction of a series of massive water Cherenkov detectors located deep underground (4850 ft) in the Homestake Mine of the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority (SDSTA); and second, the engineering design of the underground chambers to house the Cherenkov detector modules; and third, the conceptual design of the water Cherenkov detectors themselves for this purpose. In this proposal we show the event rates and physics sensitivity for beams from both FNAL (1300 km distant from Homestake) and BNL (2540 km distant from Homestake). The program we propose will benefit with a beam from FNAL because of the high intensities currently available from the Main Injector with modest upgrades. The possibility of tuning the primary proton energy over a large range from 30 to 120 GeV also adds considerable flexibility to the program from FNAL. On the other hand the beam from BNL over the larger distance will produce very large matter effects, and consequently a hint of new physics (beyond CP violation) can be better tested with that configuration. In this proposal we focus on the CP violation physics. Included in this document are preliminary costs and time-to-completion estimates which have been exposed to acknowledged experts in their respective areas. This presentation is not, however, to be taken as a technical design report with the extensive documentation and contingency costs that a TDR usually entails. Nevertheless, some contingency factors have been included in the estimates given here. The essential ideas expressed here were first laid out in a letter of intent to the interim director of the Homestake Laboratory on July 26, 2001. Since that time, the prospect of a laboratory in the Homestake Mine has been realized, and the design of a long baseline neutrino experiment has been refined. The extrapolation contained in this proposal is within the common domain of thinking in the area of physics discussed here. It needs now only the encouragement of the funding agencies, NSF and DOE.

  6. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations at delta(m^2)>0.1 eV^2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Ryan Benton; /Princeton U.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evidence is compelling that neutrinos undergo flavor change as they propagate. In recent years, experiments have observed this phenomenon of neutrino oscillations using disparate neutrino sources: the sun, fission reactors, accelerators, and secondary cosmic rays. The standard model of particle physics needs only simple extensions - neutrino masses and mixing - to accommodate all neutrino oscillation results to date, save one. The 3.8{sigma}-significant {bar {nu}}{sub e} excess reported by the LSND collaboration is consistent with {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields}{bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations with a mass-squared splitting of {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2}. This signal, which has not been independently verified, is inconsistent with other oscillation evidence unless more daring standard model extensions (e.g. sterile neutrinos) are considered.

  7. The second and third NGNP advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, S. B.; Petti, D. A. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Dept. of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is currently scheduled to irradiate a total of five low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The irradiations are being accomplished to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas cooled reactors. The experiments will each consist of at least six separate capsules, and will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The effluent sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and completed a very successful irradiation in early November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010, and the third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single larger irradiation (AGR-3/4) that is currently being assembled. The design and status of the second through fourth experiments as well as the irradiation results of the second experiment to date are discussed. (authors)

  8. Non standard neutrino interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, O G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations have become well-known phenomenon; the measurements of neutrino mixing angles and mass squared differences are continuously improving. Future oscillation experiments will eventually determine the remaining unknown neutrino parameters, namely, the mass ordering, normal or inverted, and the CP-violating phase. On the other hand, the absolute mass scale of neutrinos could be probed by cosmological observations, single beta decay as well as by neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Furthermore, the last one may shed light on the nature of neutrinos, Dirac or Majorana, by measuring the effective Majorana mass of neutrinos. However, the neutrino mass generation mechanism remains unknown. A well-motivated phenomenological approach to search for new physics, in the neutrino sector, is that of non-standard interactions. In this short review, the current constraints in this picture, as well as the perspectives from future experiments, are discussed.

  9. High poloidal beta long-pulse experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    High poloidal beta long-pulse experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor* J. Kesner+ Plasma stability and confinement. As the current profile evolved, a significantly reduced beta limit was observed after the current ramp-down carried negative current. At later times in lower flN discharges, beta

  10. New Limits on the Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANITA collaboration; P. Gorham; P. Allison; S. Barwick; J. Beatty; D. Besson; W. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. Clem; A. Connolly; P. Dowkontt; M. DuVernois; R. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. Learned; K. Liewer; J. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. Naudet; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; L. Ruckman; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. Varner; D. Walz; Y. Wang; F. Wu

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of 3 EeV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultra-high energy extensive air showers.

  11. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  12. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  13. Acquiring information about neutrino parameters by detecting supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Young, Bing-Lin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 5001 (United States); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the supernova shock effects, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the collective effects, and the Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos on the Earth. It is found that the event number of supernova neutrinos depends on the neutrino mass hierarchy, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, and neutrino masses. Therefore, we propose possible methods to identify the mass hierarchy and acquire information about {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino masses by detecting supernova neutrinos. We apply these methods to some current neutrino experiments.

  14. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Niki Saoulidou

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  15. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  16. Measuring Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivone F. M. Albuquerque; George F. Smoot

    2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino telescopes with large detection volumes can demonstrate that the current indications of neutrino oscillation are correct or if a better description can be achieved with non-standard alternatives. Observations of contained muons produced by atmospheric neutrinos can better constrain the allowed region for oscillations or determine the relevant parameters of non-standard models. We analyze the possibility of neutrino telescopes measuring atmospheric neutrino oscillations. We suggest adjustments to improve this potential. An addition of four densely-instrumented strings to the AMANDA II detector makes observations feasible. Such a configuration is competitive with current and proposed experiments.

  17. Preparation of Gd Loaded Liquid Scintillator for Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yayun; Zhang Zhiyong [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) is an excellent target material for reactor antineutrino experiments. Ideal Gd-LS should have long attenuation length, high light yield, long term stability, low toxicity, and should be compatible with the material used to build the detector. We have developed a new Gd-LS recipe in which carboxylic acid 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoic acid is used as the complexing ligand to gadolinium, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl]benzene (bis-MSB) are used as primary fluor and wavelength shifter, respectively. The scintillator base is linear alkyl benzene (LAB). Eight hundred liters of Gd-LS has been synthesized and tested in a prototype detector. Results show that the Gd-LS has high quality and is suitable for underground experiments in large quantity. Large scale production facility has been built. A full batch production of 4 t Gd-LS has been produced and monitored for several months. The production of 180 t Gd-LS will be carried out in the near future.

  18. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, RT

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

  19. Energy Dependence of Solar Neutrino Suppression and Bounds on the Neutrino Magnetic Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joao Pulido; Ana M. Mourao

    1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of neutrino electron scattering as applied to the SuperKamiokande solar neutrino experiment with the data from the Homestake experiment leads to an upper bound on the neutrino magnetic moment in the range $\\mu_{\

  20. FLOWSHEET EVALUATION FOR THE DISSOLVING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, W. E.; Hansen, E. K.; Shehee, T. C.

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes the literature review, hydrogen off-gas calculations, and hydrogen generation tests to determine that H-Canyon can safely dissolve the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE; thorium fuel), Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR; aluminum alloy fuel), and Denmark Reactor (DR-3; silicide fuel, aluminum alloy fuel, and aluminum oxide fuel) assemblies in the L-Bundles with respect to the hydrogen levels in the projected peak off-gas rates. This is provided that the number of L-Bundles charged to the dissolver is controlled. Examination of SRE dissolution for potential issues has aided in predicting the optimal batching scenario. The calculations detailed in this report demonstrate that the FNR, SRE, and DR-3 used nuclear fuel (UNF) are bounded by MURR UNF and may be charged using the controls outlined for MURR dissolution in a prior report.

  1. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  2. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, W.C.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past several years, a number of experiments have searched for neutrino oscillations, where a neutrino of one type (say {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}) spontaneously transforms into a neutrino of another type (say {bar {nu}}{sub e}). For this phenomenon to occur, neutrinos must be massive and the apparent conservation law of lepton families must be violated. In 1995 the LSND experiment published data showing candidate events that are consistent with {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations. Additional data are reported here which provide stronger evidence for neutrino oscillations.

  3. Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

  4. Results and analysis of reactor-material experiments on ex-vessel corium quench and dispersal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, B.W.; McUmber, L.M.; Sienicki, J.J.; Squarer, D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of reactor-material experiments and related analysis are described in which molten corium is injected into a mock-up of the reactor cavity region of a PWR. The experiments address ex-vessel interactions such as steam generation (for those cases in which water is present), water and corium dispersal from the cavity, hydrogen generation, direct atmosphere heating by dispersed corium, and debris characterization. Test results indicate efficiencies of steam generation by corium quench ranging up to 65%. Corium sweepout of up to 62% of the injected material was found for those conditions in which steam generation flowrate was augmented by vessel blowdown. The dispersed corium caused very little direct heating of the atmosphere for the configuration employing a trap at the exit of the cavity-to-containment pathway. Corium sweepout phenomena were modeled for high-pressure blowdown conditions, and the results applied to the full-size reactor system predict essentially complete sweepout of corium from the reactor cavity.

  5. DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING COMBINED FUNCTION MAGNETS FOR THE 50 GEV PROTON BEAM LINE FOR THE J-PARC NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANDERER,P.; ET AL.

    2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting combined function magnets will be utilized for the 50GeV-750kW proton beam line for the J-PARC neutrino experiment and an R and D program has been launched at KEK. The magnet is designed to provide a combined function with a dipole field of 2.59 T and a quadrupole field of 18.7 T/m in a coil aperture of 173.4 mm. A single layer coil is proposed to reduce the fabrication cost and the coil arrangement in the 2-D cross-section results in left-right asymmetry. This paper reports the design study of the magnet.

  6. Fission-product aerosol sampling system for LWR experiments in the TREAT reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, P.F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work summarizes the design and collection characteristics of a fission-product aerosol sampling system that was developed for a series of light water reactor (LWR) source-term experiments under consideration for performance in 1984 at Argonne National Laboratory's TREAT reactor. These tests would be performed using a bundle of four preirradiated, Zircaloy-clad LWR fuel pins. In these tests, fuel pin integrity would be breached under various simulated accident conditions. The aerosol sampling system was designed to efficiently extract and collect these aerosols such that time-averaged aerosol size distributions, number concentrations and mass loadings could be determined accurately for each experiment, using a combination of real-time and time-interval measurements and post-test analytical techniques. The entire system also was designed to be disassembled remotely because of potentially high levels of radioactivity.

  7. Removal of uranium and salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, F.J.; Rushton, J.E.; Faulkner, R.L.; Walker, K.L.; Del Cul, G.D.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1994, migration of {sup 233}U was discovered to have occurred at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper describes the actions now underway to remove uranium from the off-gas piping and the charcoal bed, to remove and stabilize the salts, and to convert the uranium to a stable oxide for long-term storage.

  8. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  9. INTRODUCTION TO THE NEUTRINO PROPERTIES LISTINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of neutrino oscillation searches show that the mixing matrix contains two large mixing angles. We cannot is determined and the study of neutrino oscillations provides us with the values of all neutrino mass neutrino oscillation experiments can be consistently described using three active neutrino flavors, i

  10. Nonstandard neutrino interactions and transition magnetic moments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Healey, Kristopher J.; Petrov, Alexey A.; Zhuridov, Dmitry

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain generic nonstandard neutrino interactions with existing experimental data on neutrino transition magnetic moments and derive strong bounds on tensorial couplings of neutrinos to charged fermions. We also discuss how some of these tensorial couplings can be constrained by other experiments, e.g., on neutrino-electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  11. EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment Project (LBNF/DUNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois and the Sanford Underground Research Facility, Lead, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of using the existing Main Injector Accelerator at Fermilab to produce a pure beam of muon neutrinos. The neutrinos would be examined at a "near detector" proposed to be constructed at Fermilab, and at a "far detector," at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota. NOTE: This Project was previously designated (DOE/EA-1799).

  12. B-L Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Cahill

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino masses and mixings are analyzed in terms of left-handed fields and a 6x6 complex symmetric mass matrix whose singular values are the neutrino masses. An angle theta_nu characterizes the kind of the neutrinos, with theta_nu=0 for Dirac neutrinos and theta_nu=pi/2 for Majorana neutrinos. At theta_nu = 0 baryon-minus-lepton number is conserved. If theta_nu is approximately zero, the six neutrino masses coalesce into three nearly degenerate pairs. Thus the tiny mass differences exhibited in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments are naturally explained by the approximate conservation of B-L. Neutrinos are nearly Dirac fermions. This B-L model leads to these predictions: neutrinos oscillate mainly between flavor eigenfields and sterile eigenfields, and so the appearance of neutrinos and antineutrinos is suppressed; neutrinos may well be of cosmological importance; in principle the disappearance of the tau neutrino should be observable; and neutrinoless double-beta decay is suppressed by an extra factor of 10^(-5) and so will not be seen in the Heidelberg/Moscow, IGEX, GENIUS, or CUORE experiments.

  13. Cosmological Neutrino Mass Detection: The Best Probe of Neutrino Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States)

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence, on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi)massless particles as in Majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way out to explain a discrepancy < or approx. 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and lab data.

  14. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  15. Rapidly pulsed TRIGA reactor: an intense source for neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, William L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for ever increasing intensities of thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering experiments has stimulated the development of intense steady state research reactors such as the 53-MW ILL reactor at Grenoble. The source flux at the reactor end of the beam ports is typically 10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}.s for its thermal neutron beams. To achieve still higher source fluxes of neutrons, the family of pulsing IBR was developed. In this type of facility the pulse repetition rate is low ({approx}5/sec) typically but the instantaneous peak fluxes are high, ranging up to 5 x 10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}.s at the surface of the moderator. Another type of intense neutron source is that exemplified by the proton synchrotron accelerators with their spallation targets. The first of these has been the IPNS at Argonne National laboratory. This neutron source produces 30 pulses per second with an individual peak thermal neutron intensity of 4 x 10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}.s from the moderator. An equivalent, alternative intense neutron source can be based on a rapidly pulsed TRIGA reactor. With a pulsed thermal neutron intensity of more than 10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}.s occurring 50 times per second at the source end of beam ports, the rapidly pulsed TRIGA reactor combines some of the best features of the pulsed fast reactors such as IBR-2 and the spallation neutron sources but with the safety of a thermal neutron reactor with a large, prompt, negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. The initial concept of the rapidly pulsed TRIGA reactor was developed and initially reported in 1966. Subsequently, the standard fuel format for U-ZrH{sub x} fuel has been developed to include a small diameter fuel particularly well suited for the rapidly pulsed application. This fuel is LEU, satisfying all the requirements for non proliferation, and has a very long core life time. In the proposed application, the peak fuel temperature does not vary more than 1 deg. C from the average peak fuel temperatures during each pulse. Hence long term metallurgical stability is thus assured. With a core lifetime that can be designed for up to 10,000 MWD, operation at an average power of 10 MW (with peak pulsed powers of {approx}50 MW) with an equilibrium core can be conducted for 1000 full power days. (author)

  16. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP will be discussed in the full paper, selected benchmarks that have been added to the ICSBEP Handbook will be highlighted, and a preview of the new benchmarks that will appear in the September 2011 edition of the Handbook will be provided. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP will also be highlighted and the future of both projects will be discussed. REFERENCES (1) International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03/I-IX, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), September 2010 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99140-8. (2) International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(2006)1, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), March 2011 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99141-5.

  17. The Use of experiments on a single fuel element to determine the nuclear parameters of reactor lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilat, E. E., 1937-

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear parameters of a reactor lattice may be determined by critical experiments on that lattice, by theoretical calculations in which only cross sections are used as input, or by methods which combine theory and ...

  18. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Walter

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It's been a remarkable decade in neutrino physics. Ten years ago this summer, at the 1998 neutrino conference in Takayama, the Super-Kamiokande collaboration reported the observation of neutrinos changing flavor, thereby establishing the existence of neutrino mass. A few years later, the SNO experiment solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem demonstrating that it too was due to neutrino oscillation. Just a few years after that, these effects were confirmed and the oscillation parameters were measured with man-made neutrino sources. Now, just in this last year, the same neutrinos which were the source of the 30 year old solar neutrino problem were measured for the first time in a real-time experiment. In this talk, I will explain how a set of experiments, especially ones in the last few years, have established a consistent framework of neutrino physics and also explain some outstanding questions. Finally, I will cover how a set of upcoming experiments hope to address these questions in the coming decade.

  19. Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor: Stainless steel, carbon steel and nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simoes de; Jerez, Rogerio; Liambos Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242 - CEP 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New experiments devoted to the measurements of physical parameters of a light water core surrounded by a heavy reflector were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. These experiments comprise three sets of heavy reflector (SS-304, Carbon Steel, and Nickel) in a form of laminates around 3 mm thick. Each set was introduced individually in the west face of the core of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The aim here is to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check for the SS-304 reflector experiment. The experimental results comprise critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. Particularly to the case of Nickel, the experimental data are unique of its kind. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this nuclear data library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

  20. New Revelation of Lightning Ball Observation and Proposal for a Nuclear Reactor Fusion Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domokos Tar

    2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the author brings further details regarding his Lightning Ball observation that were not mentioned in the first one (Ref.1-2). Additionally, he goes more into detail as the three forces that are necessary to allow the residual crescent form the hydrodynamic vortex ring to shrink into a sphere.Further topics are the similarities and analogies between the Lightning Ball formation's theory and the presently undertaken Tokamak-Stellarator-Spheromak fusion reactor experiments. A new theory and its experimental realisation are proposed as to make the shrinking of the hot plasma of reactors into a ball possible by means of the so called long range electromagnetic forces. In this way,the fusion ignition temperature could possibly atteined.

  1. New Revelation of Lightning Ball Observation and Proposal for a Nuclear Reactor Fusion Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tar, Domokos

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the author brings further details regarding his Lightning Ball observation that were not mentioned in the first one (Ref.1-2). Additionally, he goes more into detail as the three forces that are necessary to allow the residual crescent form the hydrodynamic vortex ring to shrink into a sphere.Further topics are the similarities and analogies between the Lightning Ball formation's theory and the presently undertaken Tokamak-Stellarator-Spheromak fusion reactor experiments. A new theory and its experimental realisation are proposed as to make the shrinking of the hot plasma of reactors into a ball possible by means of the so called long range electromagnetic forces. In this way,the fusion ignition temperature could possibly atteined.

  2. Overview of the 2014 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is a widely recognized world class program. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Integral data from the IRPhEP Handbook is used by reactor safety and design, nuclear data, criticality safety, and analytical methods development specialists, worldwide, to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques. The IRPhEP Handbook is among the most frequently quoted reference in the nuclear industry and is expected to be a valuable resource for future decades.

  3. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N.G. [ed.] [ed.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  4. Sterile Neutrino Fits to Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, J. M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews short-baseline oscillation experiments as interpreted within the context of one, two, and three sterile neutrino models associated with additional neutrino mass states in the ~1?eV range. Appearance and ...

  5. GENIUS project, neutrino oscillations and Cosmology: neutrinos reveal their nature?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Czakon; J. Studnik; M. Zralek; J. Gluza

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrinoless double beta decay as well as any other laboratory experiment has not been able to answer the question of the neutrino's nature. Hints on the answer are available when neutrino oscillations and $(\\beta\\beta)_{0 \

  6. First Evidence For Atmospheric Neutrino-Induced Cascades with the IceCube Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Agostino, Michelangelo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The BAIKAL neutrino experiment - physics results andal. The Baikal neutrino telescope: Selected physics results.twentieth-century physics thought neutrino detection would

  7. B-L Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, K E

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino masses and mixings are analyzed in terms of left-handed fields and a 6x6 complex symmetric mass matrix whose singular values are the neutrino masses. An angle theta_nu characterizes the kind of the neutrinos, with theta_nu=0 for Dirac neutrinos and theta_nu=pi/2 for Majorana neutrinos. At theta_nu = 0 baryon-minus-lepton number is conserved. If theta_nu is approximately zero, the six neutrino masses coalesce into three nearly degenerate pairs. Thus the tiny mass differences exhibited in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments are naturally explained by the approximate conservation of B-L. Neutrinos are nearly Dirac fermions. This B-L model leads to these predictions: neutrinos oscillate mainly between flavor eigenfields and sterile eigenfields, and so neither KARMEN, nor SNO, nor BooNE will detect the appearance of neutrinos or antineutrinos; neutrinos may well be of cosmological importance; in principle the disappearance of the tau neutrino should be observable; and neutrinoless double-beta d...

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  9. Neutrino Oscillations and the Solar Neutrino Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton

    2000-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the current status of the solar neutrino problem, summarizing the arguments that its resolution will require new particle physics. The phenomenon of matter-enhanced neutrino oscillations is reviewed. I consider the implications of current experiments -- including the SuperKamiokande atmospheric and LSND measurements -- and the need for additional constraints from SNO and other new detectors.

  10. Solar Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson

    2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental work with solar neutrinos has illuminated the properties of neutrinos and tested models of how the sun produces its energy. Three experiments continue to take data, and at least seven are in various stages of planning or construction. In this review, the current experimental status is summarized, and future directions explored with a focus on the effects of a non-zero theta-13 and the interesting possibility of directly testing the luminosity constraint. Such a confrontation at the few-percent level would provide a prediction of the solar irradiance tens of thousands of years in the future for comparison with the present-day irradiance. A model-independent analysis of existing low-energy data shows good agreement between the neutrino and electromagnetic luminosities at the +/- 20 % level.

  11. A New Neutrino Oscillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting in the late 1960s, neutrino detectors began to see signs that neutrinos, now known to come in the flavors electron ({nu}{sub e}), muon ({nu}{sub {mu}}), and tau ({nu}{sub {tau}}), could transform from one flavor to another. The findings implied that neutrinos must have mass, since massless particles travel at the speed of light and their clocks, so to speak, don't tick, thus they cannot change. What has since been discovered is that neutrinos oscillate at two distinct scales, 500 km/GeV and 15,000 km/GeV, which are defined by the baseline (L) of the experiment (the distance the neutrino travels) divided by the neutrino energy (E). Neutrinos of one flavor can oscillate into neutrinos of another flavor at both L/E scales, but the amplitude of these oscillations is different for the two scales and depends on the initial and final flavor of the neutrinos. The neutrino states that propogate unchanged in time, the mass eigenstates {nu}1, {nu}2, {nu}3, are quantum mechanical mixtures of the electron, muon, and tau neutrino flavors, and the fraction of each flavor in a given mass eigenstate is controlled by three mixing angles and a complex phase. Two of these mixing angles are known with reasonable precision. An upper bound exists for the third angle, called {theta}{sub 13}, which controls the size of the muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at an L/E of 500 km/GeV. The phase is completely unknown. The existence of this phase has important implications for the asymmetry between matter and antimatter we observe in the universe today. Experiments around the world have steadily assembled this picture of neutrino oscillation, but evidence of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at 500 km/GeV has remained elusive. Now, a paper from the T2K (Tokai to Kamioka) experiment in Japan, reports the first possible observation of muon neutrinos oscillating into electron neutrinos at 500 km/GeV. They see 6 candidate signal events, above an expected background of 1.5 events. The probability that the 6 events are all background is only about 0.7%. Stated differently, this is a 2.7{sigma} indication that the parameter that controls the oscillation, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, is nonzero, just shy of the 3{sigma} requirement to claim 'evidence for.' Nevertheless, this experiment provides the strongest indication to date that this oscillation actually occurs in nature.

  12. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 17 P HY S I CA L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 APRIL 2000 Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors F. Boehm, 3 J. Busenitz, 1 B. Cook, 3 G. Gratta, 4 H. Henrikson at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using.15.+g, 14.60.Lm, 25.30.Pt Nuclear reactors have been used as intense sources of â?˘ n e in experiments

  13. Neutrino Oscillations With Recently Measured Sterile-Active Neutrino Mixing Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief report is an extension of a prediction of neutrino oscillation with a sterile neutrino using parameters of the sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle recently extracted from experiment.

  14. Neutrino Oscillations With Recently Measured Sterile-Active Neutrino Mixing Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kisslinger, Leonard S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief report is an extension of a prediction of neutrino oscillation with a sterile neutrino using parameters of the sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle recently extracted from experiment.

  15. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. B. Grover

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing.1,2 The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and will serve as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed.

  16. Double beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    nuclear laboratory for spectroscopic studies of neutrinos Neutrinos are key particles for new frontiers) are sensitive and realistic experiments for studying the Majorana nature of the neutrino and the absolute massDouble beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 Mo ­MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)­ May 24, 2005

  17. Extraction of Physics Signals Near Threshold with Germanium Detectors in Neutrino and Dark Matter Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The TEXONO Collaboration; A. K. Soma; G. Kiran Kumar; F. K. Lin; M. K. Singh; H. Jiang; S. K. Liu; L. Singh; Y. C. Wu; L. T. Yang; W. Zhao; M. Agartioglu; G. Asryan; Y. C. Chuang; M. Deniz; C. L. Hsu; Y. H. Hsu; T. R. Huang; H. B. Li; J. Li; F. T. Liao; H. Y. Liao; C. W. Lin; S. T. Lin; J. L. Ma; V. Sharma; Y. T. Shen; V. Singh; J. Su; V. S. Subrahmanyam; C. H. Tseng; J. J. Wang; H. T. Wong; Y. Xu; S. W. Yang; C. X. Yu; X. C. Yuan; Q. Yue; M. Zeyre

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Germanium ionization detectors with sensitivities as low as 100 eVee open new windows for the studies of neutrino and dark matter physics. The physics motivations of sub-keV germanium detectors are summarized. The amplitude of physics signals is comparable to those due to fluctuations of the pedestal electronic noise. Various experimental issues have to be attended before the promises of this new detector technique can be fully exploited. These include quenching factors, energy definition and calibration, signal triggering and selection together with their associated inefficiencies derivation. The efforts and results of an R&D program to address these challenges are presented.

  18. Neutrino oscillations refitted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forero, D V; Valle, J W F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we update our previous global fit of neutrino oscillations by including the recent results which have appeared since the Neutrino-2012 conference. These include the measurements of reactor anti-neutrino disappearance reported by Daya Bay and RENO, together with latest T2K and MINOS data including both disappearance and appearance channels. We also include the revised results from the third solar phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-III, as well as new solar results from the fourth phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-IV. We find that the preferred global determination of the atmospheric angle $\\theta_{23}$ is consistent with maximal mixing. We also determine the impact of the new data upon all the other neutrino oscillation parameters with emphasis on the increasing sensitivity to the CP phase, thanks to the interplay between accelerator and reactor data.

  19. First Test of Lorentz Violation with a Reactor-based Antineutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, Y; Anjos, J C dos; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bezerra, T J C; Bezrukhov, L; Blucher, E; Bowden, N S; Buck, C; Busenitz, J; Cabrera, A; Caden, E; Camilleri, L; Carr, R; Cerrada, M; Chang, P -J; Chimenti, P; Classen, T; Collin, A P; Conover, E; Conrad, J M; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Crum, K; Cucoanes, A; D'Agostino, M V; Damon, E; Dawson, J V; Dazeley, S; Dietrich, D; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Durand, V; Ebert, J; Efremenko, Y; Elnimr, M; Erickson, A; Fallot, M; Fechner, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Felde, J; Fischer, V; Franco, D; Franke, A J; Franke, M; Furuta, H; Gama, R; Gil-Botella, I; Giot, L; Göger-Neff, M; Gonzalez, L F G; Goodman, M C; Goon, J TM; Greiner, D; Haag, N; Habib, S; Hagner, C; Hara, T; Hartmann, F X; Haser, J; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayakawa, T; Hofmann, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Ishitsuka, M; Jochum, J; Jollet, C; Jones, C L; Kaether, F; Kalousis, L N; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Katori, T; Kawasaki, T; Keefer, G; Kemp, E; de Kerret, H; Konno, T; Kryn, D; Kuze, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lane, C E; Lasserre, T; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Lima, H P; Lindner, M; López-Castanő, J M; LoSecco, J M; Lubsandorzhiev, B K; Lucht, S; McKee, D; Maeda, J; Maesano, C N; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Martino, J; Matsubara, T; Mention, G; Meregaglia, A; Meyer, M; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Miyata, H; Mueller, Th A; Nagasaka, Y; Nakajima, K; Novella, P; Obolensky, M; Oberauer, L; Onillon, A; Osborn, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Palomares, C; Pepe, I M; Perasso, S; Perrin, P; Pfahler, P; Porta, A; Potzel, W; Pronost, G; Reichenbacher, J; Reinhold, B; Remoto, A; Röhling, M; Roncin, R; Roth, S; Rybolt, B; Sakamoto, Y; Santorelli, R; Sato, F; Schönert, S; Schoppmann, S; Schwetz, T; Shaevitz, M H; Shrestha, D; Sida, J -L; Sinev, V; Skorokhvatov, M; Smith, E; Spitz, J; Stahl, A; Stancu, I; Stokes, L F F; Strait, M; Stüken, A; Suekane, F; Sukhotin, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Sun, Y; Terao, K; Tonazzo, A; Toups, M; Thi, H H Trinh; Valdiviesso, G; Veyssiere, C; Wagner, S; Watanabe, H; White, B; Wiebusch, C; Winslow, L; Worcester, M; Wurm, M; Yanovitch, E; Yermia, F; Zimmer, V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Lorentz violation with 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events taken by the Double Chooz experiment in 227.9 live days of running. This analysis, featuring a search for a sidereal time dependence of the events, is the first test of Lorentz invariance using a reactor-based antineutrino source. No sidereal variation is present in the data and the disappearance results are consistent with sidereal time independent oscillations. Under the Standard-Model Extension (SME), we set the first limits on fourteen Lorentz violating coefficients associated with transitions between electron and tau flavor, and set two competitive limits associated with transitions between electron and muon flavor.

  20. Theta 13 Determination with Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Dalnoki-Veress

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a lot of interest around the world in the use of nuclear reactors to measure theta 13, the last undetermined angle in the 3-neutrino mixing scenario. In this paper the motivations for theta 13 measurement using short baseline nuclear reactor experiments are discussed. The features of such an experiment are described in the context of Double Chooz, which is a new project planned to start data-taking in 2008, and to reach a sensitivity of sinsq(2 theta 13) < 0.03.

  1. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  2. Predicting Reactor Antineutrino Emissions Using New Precision Beta Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wootan, David W.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors are currently vital to the study of neutrino oscillations. The observed antineutrino rates at reactors are typically lower than model expectations. This observed deficit is called the “reactor neutrino anomaly”. A new understanding of neutrino physics may be required to explain this deficit, though model estimation uncertainties may also play a role in the apparent discrepancy. PNNL is currently investigating an experimental technique that promises reduced uncertainties for measured data to support these hypotheses and interpret reactor antineutrino measurements. The experimental approach is to 1) direct a proton accelerator beam on a metal target to produce a source of neutrons, 2) use spectral tailoring to modify the neutron spectrum to closely simulate the energy distribution of a power reactor neutron spectrum, 3) irradiate isotopic fission foils (235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu) in this neutron spectrum so that fissions occur at energies representative of a reactor, 4) transport the beta particles released by the fission products in the foils to a beta spectrometer, 5) measure the beta energy spectrum, and 6) invert the measured beta energy spectrum to an antineutrino energy spectrum. A similar technique using a beta spectrometer and isotopic fission foils was pioneered in the 1980’s at the ILL thermal reactor. Those measurements have been the basis for interpreting all subsequent antineutrino measurements at reactors. A basic constraint in efforts to reduce uncertainties in predicting the antineutrino emission from reactor cores is any underlying limitation of the original measurements. This may include beta spectrum energy resolution, the absolute normalization of beta emission to number of fission, statistical counting uncertainties, lack of 238U data, the purely thermal nature of the IIL reactor neutrons used, etc. An accelerator-based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra (i.e. "in the reactor core") affects the resulting fission product beta spectrum. Furthermore, the 238U antineutrino spectrum, which has not been measured, can be studied directly because of the enhanced 1 MeV fast neutron flux available at the accelerator source. A facility such as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) 30 MeV proton linear accelerator at Fermilab is being considered for this experiment. The hypothesis is that a new approach utilizing the flexibility of an accelerator neutron source with spectral tailoring coupled with a careful design of an isotopic fission target and beta spectrometer and the inversion of the beta spectrum to the neutrino spectrum will allow further reduction in the uncertainties associated with prediction of the reactor antineutrino spectrum.

  3. Critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories : technical meeting on low-power critical facilities and small reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Barber, Allison Delo

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted radiation effects testing for the Department of Energy (DOE) and other contractors supporting the DOE since the 1960's. Over this period, the research reactor facilities at Sandia have had a primary mission to provide appropriate nuclear radiation environments for radiation testing and qualification of electronic components and other devices. The current generation of reactors includes the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), a water-moderated pool-type reactor, fueled by elements constructed from UO2-BeO ceramic fuel pellets, and the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR-III), a bare metal fast burst reactor utilizing a uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. The SPR-III is currently defueled. The SPR Facility (SPRF) has hosted a series of critical experiments. A purpose-built critical experiment was first operated at the SPRF in the late 1980's. This experiment, called the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Critical Experiment (CX), was designed to explore the reactor physics of a nuclear thermal rocket motor. This experiment was fueled with highly-enriched uranium carbide fuel in annular water-moderated fuel elements. The experiment program was completed and the fuel for the experiment was moved off-site. A second critical experiment, the Burnup Credit Critical Experiment (BUCCX) was operated at Sandia in 2002. The critical assembly for this experiment was based on the assembly used in the CX modified to accommodate low-enriched pin-type fuel in water moderator. This experiment was designed as a platform in which the reactivity effects of specific fission product poisons could be measured. Experiments were carried out on rhodium, an important fission product poison. The fuel and assembly hardware for the BUCCX remains at Sandia and is available for future experimentation. The critical experiment currently in operation at the SPRF is the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX). This experiment is designed to provide benchmark reactor physics data to support validation of the reactor physics codes used to design commercial reactor fuel elements in an enrichment range above the current 5% enrichment cap. A first set of critical experiments in the 7uPCX has been completed. More experiments are planned in the 7uPCX series. The critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are currently funded by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). The NCSP has committed to maintain the critical experiment capability at Sandia and to support the development of a critical experiments training course at the facility. The training course is intended to provide hands-on experiment experience for the training of new and re-training of practicing Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers. The current plans are for the development of the course to continue through the first part of fiscal year 2011 with the development culminating is the delivery of a prototype of the course in the latter part of the fiscal year. The course will be available in fiscal year 2012.

  4. Neutrino oscillations refitted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Forero; M. Tortola; J. W. F. Valle

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we update our previous global fit of neutrino oscillations by including the recent results which have appeared since the Neutrino-2012 conference. These include the measurements of reactor anti-neutrino disappearance reported by Daya Bay and RENO, together with latest T2K and MINOS data including both disappearance and appearance channels. We also include the revised results from the third solar phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-III, as well as new solar results from the fourth phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-IV. We find that the preferred global determination of the atmospheric angle $\\theta_{23}$ is consistent with maximal mixing. We also determine the impact of the new data upon all the other neutrino oscillation parameters with emphasis on the increasing sensitivity to the CP phase, thanks to the interplay between accelerator and reactor data. In the appendix we present the updated results obtained after the inclusion of new reactor data presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference. We discuss their impact on the global neutrino analysis.

  5. Massive neutrinos and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Lesgourgues; Sergio Pastor

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present experimental results on neutrino flavour oscillations provide evidence for non-zero neutrino masses, but give no hint on their absolute mass scale, which is the target of beta decay and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Crucial complementary information on neutrino masses can be obtained from the analysis of data on cosmological observables, such as the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background or the distribution of large-scale structure. In this review we describe in detail how free-streaming massive neutrinos affect the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We summarize the current bounds on the sum of neutrino masses that can be derived from various combinations of cosmological data, including the most recent analysis by the WMAP team. We also discuss how future cosmological experiments are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses well into the sub-eV range.

  6. Spectroscopy of Solar Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Wurm; Franz von Feilitzsch; Marianne Goeger-Neff; Tobias Lachenmaier; Timo Lewke; Quirin Meindl; Randoplh Moellenberg; Lothar Oberauer; Walter Potzel; Marc Tippmann; Christoph Traunsteiner; Juergen Winter

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years, liquid-scintillator detectors have opened a new window for the observation of low-energetic astrophysical neutrino sources. In 2007, the solar neutrino experiment Borexino began its data-taking in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. High energy resolution and excellent radioactive background conditions in the detector allow the first-time spectroscopic measurement of solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV energy regime. The experimental results of the Beryllium-7 neutrino flux measurements as well as the prospects for the detection of solar Boron-8, pep and CNO neutrinos are presented in the context of the currently discussed ambiguities in solar metallicity. In addition, the potential of the future SNO+ and LENA experiments for high-precision solar neutrino spectroscopy will be outlined.

  7. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  8. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Fritzsch

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  9. The MINOS Experiment: Results and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Justin [University of Manchester] (ORCID:0000000346973337)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Minos experiment has used the world's most powerful neutrino beam to make precision neutrino oscillation experiments. By observing the disappearance of muon neutrinos, MINOS has made the world's most precise measurement of the larger neutrino mass splitting....

  10. Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Keith C. Bledsoe; Bradley T. Rearden

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

  11. Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bess, John [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

  12. Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a particular batch scheme). The volume of test space in IPTs is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. In addition to the IPTs, the Cylindrical MATRIX concept features test spaces at the centers of fuel assemblies where very high fast flux can be achieved. This magnitude of fast flux is similar to that achieved in the ATR A-positions, however, the available volume having these conditions is greater in the MATRIX design than in the ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the Cylindrical MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this statement must be qualified by acknowledging that this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design matures. Also, some of the requirements were not strictly met, but are believed to be achievable once features to be added later are designed.

  13. UV Degradation of the Optical Properties of Acrylic for Neutrino and Dark Matter Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryce Littlejohn; K. M. Heeger; T. Wise; E. Gettrust; M. Lyman

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    UV-transmitting (UVT) acrylic is a commonly used light-propagating material in neutrino and dark matter detectors as it has low intrinsic radioactivity and exhibits low absorption in the detectors' light producing regions, from 350 nm to 500 nm. Degradation of optical transmittance in this region lowers light yields in the detector, which can affect energy reconstruction, resolution, and experimental sensitivities. We examine transmittance loss as a result of short- and long-term UV exposure for a variety of UVT acrylic samples from a number of acrylic manufacturers. Significant degradation peaking at 343 nm was observed in some UVT acrylics with as little as three hours of direct sunlight, while others exhibited softer degradation peaking at 310 nm over many days of exposure to sunlight. Based on their measured degradation results, safe time limits for indoor and outdoor UV exposure of UVT acrylic are formulated.

  14. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogler, Laura

    2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2{nu}{beta}{beta}). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO{sub 2} crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of #24;10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with {sup 130}Te and 2 with {sup 128}Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of #24;350 g {sup 130}Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2{nu}{beta}{beta} half-life was measured to be T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = [9.81{+-} #6;0.96(stat){+-} 0.49(syst)]#2;x10{sup 20} y.

  15. Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino at Daya Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. P. An; A. B. Balantekin; H. R. Band; W. Beriguete; M. Bishai; S. Blyth; I. Butorov; G. F. Cao; J. Cao; Y. L. Chan; J. F. Chang; L. C. Chang; Y. Chang; C. Chasman; H. Chen; Q. Y. Chen; S. M. Chen; X. Chen; X. Chen; Y. X. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. P. Cheng; J. J. Cherwinka; M. C. Chu; J. P. Cummings; J. de Arcos; Z. Y. Deng; Y. Y. Ding; M. V. Diwan; E. Draeger; X. F. Du; D. A. Dwyer; W. R. Edwards; S. R. Ely; J. Y. Fu; L. Q. Ge; R. Gill; M. Gonchar; G. H. Gong; H. Gong; M. Grassi; W. Q. Gu; M. Y. Guan; X. H. Guo; R. W. Hackenburg; G. H. Han; S. Hans; M. He; K. M. Heeger; Y. K. Heng; P. Hinrichs; Y. K. Hor; Y. B. Hsiung; B. Z. Hu; L. M. Hu; L. J. Hu; T. Hu; W. Hu; E. C. Huang; H. Huang; X. T. Huang; P. Huber; G. Hussain; Z. Isvan; D. E. Jaffe; P. Jaffke; K. L. Jen; S. Jetter; X. P. Ji; X. L. Ji; H. J. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; R. A. Johnson; L. Kang; S. H. Kettell; M. Kramer; K. K. Kwan; M. W. Kwok; T. Kwok; W. C. Lai; K. Lau; L. Lebanowski; J. Lee; R. T. Lei; R. Leitner; A. Leung; J. K. C. Leung; C. A. Lewis; D. J. Li; F. Li; G. S. Li; Q. J. Li; W. D. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. F. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; C. J. Lin; G. L. Lin; P. Y. Lin; S. K. Lin; Y. C. Lin; J. J. Ling; J. M. Link; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; D. W. Liu; H. Liu; J. L. Liu; J. C. Liu; S. S. Liu; Y. B. Liu; C. Lu; H. Q. Lu; K. B. Luk; Q. M. Ma; X. Y. Ma; X. B. Ma; Y. Q. Ma; K. T. McDonald; M. C. McFarlane; R. D. McKeown; Y. Meng; I. Mitchell; J. Monari Kebwaro; Y. Nakajima; J. Napolitano; D. Naumov; E. Naumova; I. Nemchenok; H. Y. Ngai; Z. Ning; J. P. Ochoa-Ricoux; A. Olshevski; S. Patton; V. Pec; J. C. Peng; L. E. Piilonen; L. Pinsky; C. S. J. Pun; F. Z. Qi; M. Qi; X. Qian; N. Raper; B. Ren; J. Ren; R. Rosero; B. Roskovec; X. C. Ruan; B. B. Shao; H. Steiner; G. X. Sun; J. L. Sun; Y. H. Tam; X. Tang; H. Themann; K. V. Tsang; R. H. M. Tsang; C. E. Tull; Y. C. Tung; B. Viren; V. Vorobel; C. H. Wang; L. S. Wang; L. Y. Wang; M. Wang; N. Y. Wang; R. G. Wang; W. Wang; W. W. Wang; X. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. M. Wang; D. M. Webber; H. Y. Wei; Y. D. Wei; L. J. Wen; K. Whisnant; C. G. White; L. Whitehead; T. Wise; H. L. H. Wong; S. C. F. Wong; E. Worcester; Q. Wu; D. M. Xia; J. K. Xia; X. Xia; Z. Z. Xing; J. Y. Xu; J. L. Xu; J. Xu; Y. Xu; T. Xue; J. Yan; C. C. Yang; L. Yang; M. S. Yang; M. T. Yang; M. Ye; M. Yeh; Y. S. Yeh; B. L. Young; G. Y. Yu; J. Y. Yu; Z. Y. Yu; S. L. Zang; B. Zeng; L. Zhan; C. Zhang; F. H. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; Q. M. Zhang; Q. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; Y. C. Zhang; Y. M. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. X. Zhang; Z. J. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; Y. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; L. Zheng; W. L. Zhong; L. Zhou; Z. Y. Zhou; H. L. Zhuang; J. H. Zou

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for light sterile neutrino mixing was performed with the first 217 days of data from the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment. The experiment's unique configuration of multiple baselines from six 2.9~GW$_{\\rm th}$ nuclear reactors to six antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512~m and 561~m) and one far (1579~m) underground experimental halls makes it possible to test for oscillations to a fourth (sterile) neutrino in the $10^{\\rm -3}~{\\rm eV}^{2} < |\\Delta m_{41}^{2}| < 0.3~{\\rm eV}^{2}$ range. The relative spectral distortion due to electron antineutrino disappearance was found to be consistent with that of the three-flavor oscillation model. The derived limits on $\\sin^22\\theta_{14}$ cover the $10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}^{2} \\lesssim |\\Delta m^{2}_{41}| \\lesssim 0.1~{\\rm eV}^{2}$ region, which was largely unexplored.

  16. Neutrino Masses in Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Raffelt

    2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The case for small neutrino mass differences from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation experiments has become compelling, but leaves the overall neutrino mass scale m_nu undetermined. The most restrictive limit of m_nu neutrinos. If solar neutrino oscillations indeed correspond to the favored large mixing angle MSW solution, then big-bang nucleosynthesis gives us a restrictive limit on all neutrino chemical potentials, removing the previous uncertainty of n_nu. Therefore, a possible future measurement of m_nu will directly establish the cosmic neutrino mass fraction Omega_nu. Cosmological neutrinos with sub-eV masses can play an interesting role for producing the highest-energy cosmic rays (Z-burst scenario). Sub-eV masses also relate naturally to leptogenesis scenarios of the cosmic baryon asymmetry. Unfortunately, the time-of-flight dispersion of a galactic or local-group supernova neutrino burst is not sensitive in the sub-eV range.

  17. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the experiment. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in September 2008, and the fabrication and assembly of the experiment test train as well as installation and testing of the control and support systems that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation are being completed in early calendar 2009. The first experiment is scheduled to be ready for insertion in the ATR by April 30, 2009. This paper will discuss the design of the experiment including the test train and the temperature and compressive load monitoring, control, and data collection systems.

  18. Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; Patrick Huber; Danny Marfatia

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric neutrino and K2K data and with reactor antineutrino data at short and long baselines (from CHOOZ and KamLAND). We find that the survival probability of solar MaVaNs is independent of how the suppression of neutrino mass caused by the acceleron-matter couplings varies with density. Measurements of MeV and lower energy solar neutrinos will provide a rigorous test of the idea.

  19. Probing the absolute mass scale of neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is the next generation tritium beta decay experiment with sub-eV sensitivity to make a direct, model independent measurement of the neutrino mass. The principle of the ...

  20. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koskinen, David Jason; /University Coll. London

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} V{sub {tau}} transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  1. Identifying and resolving the degeneracies in neutrino oscillation parameters in current experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Monojit; Goswami, Srubabati; Nath, Newton; Raut, Sushant K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three major unknown neutrino oscillation parameters at the present juncture are the mass hierarchy, the octant of the mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ and the CP phase $\\delta_{CP}$. It is well known that the presence of hierarchy$-\\delta_{CP}$ and octant degeneracies affects the unambiguous determination of these parameters. In this paper we show a comprehensive way to study the remaining parameter degeneracies is in the form of generalized hierarchy$- \\theta_{23} - \\delta_{CP}$ degeneracy. This is best depicted as contours in the test ($\\theta_{23} - \\delta_{CP}$) plane for different representative true values of parameters. We show that depending on whether the wrong-hierarchy and/or wrong-octant solutions occur in this plane with wrong or right value of $\\delta_{CP}$, a total of eight different possibilities can exist. These multiple solutions, apart from affecting the determination of the true hierarchy and octant, also affect the accurate estimation of $\\delta_{CP}$. We identify which of these eight diffe...

  2. Solar neutrino detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  3. Neutrino Physics and Astronomy with MACRO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bernardini

    2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    MACRO experiment operated in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. Neutrino events collected by this detector are used in order to study the atmospheric neutrino flux. Different measurements in different energy samples are in full agreement and show evidence of neutrino oscillation phenomenon. Also the search for neutrino astrophysical sources is reported.

  4. Neutrino and Anti-neutrino Cross Sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan [University of Alabama Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuscaloosa, AL-35487 (United States)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  5. Neutrino mass limit from tritium beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. W. Otten; C. Weinheimer

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews recent experiments on tritium beta spectroscopy searching for the absolute value of the electron neutrino mass $m(\

  6. EXPERIMENT OPERATIONS PLAN FOR A LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACCIDENT SIMULATION IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Cannon, L. W.; Goodman, R. L.; Hesson, G. M.; King, L. L.; McDuffie, P. N.; Marshall, R. K.; Nealley, C.; Pilger, J. P.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship between the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. This document contains both experiment proposal and assembly proposal information. The intent of this document is to supply information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and to identify the planned procedures and data that will be used both to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to operate the experiment. Operating control settings and limits are provided for both experimenter systems and CRNL systems. A hazards review summarizes safety issues that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  7. Analysis of Rod Removal Transient Experiments in VVER Reactors at Zero Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Difillippo, F.C.

    2000-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the context of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program of the U.S. Department of Energy we analyzed rod removal transient experiments performed at the Kurchatov Institute in a full-scale mockup of VVER reactors, The transients were started (via water inlet) in slightly (few cents) supercritical configurations with all the control rods withdrawn. After a few minutes, control rods banks or individual control rods were f and t inserted and later withdrawn (returning to the initial state). Available experimental data include the relative time profiles of nine incore and excore detectors. Because of the mild nature of the transients (very low power and no more than 2 $ reactivities) we decided to use a quasistatic approach. The time-dependent flux is factorized into two terms: a function of phase space, given by the solution of the static equation with parametric excitation; and a function of time, given by the solution of the point kinetic equations with time-dependent kinetics para meters. Due to the nature of the experiment, cold conditions, control rods withdrawn and critical state with water level, the power distributions, measured and calculated, are quite unusual, with the inner part of the core heavily shielded. Measured power levels at the center of the reactor are almost 20 times smaller than similar regions at the periphery. Transport and diffusion calculations of the power distributions are in reasonable agreement, so the division code BOLD-VENTURE was used to calculate the kinetics parameters and the relative changes of the detector field of view. The numerical integration of the time-dependent part of the solution was made with the LSODE package using ENDFIB-V and VI delayed neutron data. Very good results were obtained for the nine lime profiles.

  8. Large-scale experiments on aerosol behavior in light water reactor containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, W.; Bunz, H.; Adams, R.E.; Tobias, M.L.; Rahn, F.J.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, three large-scale experimental programs were carried out dealing with the behavior of aerosols during core-melt accidents in light water reactors (LWRs). In the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) program, the principal behaviors of different insoluble aerosols and of mixed aerosols were measured in dry air atmospheres and in condensing steam-air atmospheres contained in a 38-m/sup 3/ steel vessel. The Demonstration of Nuclear Aerosol Behavior (DEMONA) program used a 640-m/sup 3/ concrete containment model to simulate typical accident sequence conditions, and measured the behavior of different insoluble aerosols and mixed aerosols in condensing and transient atmospheric conditions. Part of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) program was also devoted to aerosol behavior in containment; and 852-m/sup 3/ steel vessel was used, and the aerosols were composed of mixtures of insoluble and soluble species. The results of these experiments provide a suitable data base for validation of aerosol behavior codes. Fundamental insight into details of aerosol behavior in condensing environments has been gained through the results of the NSPP tests. Code comparisons have been and are being performed in the DEMONA and LACE experiments.

  9. Analysis of Reactor Physics Experiment for the Irradiated LWR MOX Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsuyuki; Kawashima; Toru, Yamamoto; Katsuichiro, Kamimura [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Tokyu Reit Toranomon Bldg. 7F, 3-17-1, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an important part to validate the LWR core neutronics analysis methods, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) has been participating in the REBUS international program and performing analyses and evaluations of the reactor physics experiment data including the irradiated fuels. In REBUS program, physics experiments were performed at the VENUS critical test facility in SCK/CEN, Belgium, in which the five core configurations were tested. In each core configuration, the central part of the 3.3%- and 4%-enriched UO{sub 2} fuel core was replaced by the test bundle of (1)fresh MOX fuel, (2)medium-burnup MOX fuel, (3)high-burnup MOX fuel, (4)fresh UO{sub 2} fuel, and (5)irradiated UO{sub 2} fuel. Measured parameters are critical water level, water level reactivity, fission rate distributions, and neutron flux distributions. In this paper, the results of the fresh MOX and medium-burnup MOX core critical experiments and analysis are presented. The medium-burnup MOX fuel used in this test is 6.9% in initial fissile enrichment and the burnup averaged over the fuel rods is 20 GWd/t. In the core critical analysis, a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP was used with the JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library as well as a deterministic analysis code SRAC. The calculated results are compared with the experimental ones. (authors)

  10. Measuring the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy with Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. F. Cowen; T. DeYoung; D. Grant; D. A. Dwyer; S. R. Klein; K. B. Luk; D. R. Williams; for the IceCube/PINGU Collaboration

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed PINGU experiment to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy is presented, in the context of long-range planning by the U.S. nuclear physics community.

  11. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  12. Waste Stream Generated and Waste Disposal Plans for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghighi, M. H.; Szozda, R. M.; Jugan, M. R.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site is located in Tennessee, on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), south of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant across Haw Ridge in Melton Valley. The MSRE was run by ORNL to demonstrate the desirable features of the molten-salt concept in a practical reactor that could be operated safely and reliably. It introduced the idea of a homogeneous reactor using fuel salt media and graphite moderation for power and breeder reactors. The MSRE reactor and associated components are located in cells beneath the floor in the high-bay area of Building 7503 (Figure 1). The reactor was operated from June 1965 to December 1969. When the reactor was shut down, fuel salt was drained from the reactor circuit to two drain tanks. A ''clean'' salt was then circulated through the reactor as a decontamination measure and drained to a third drain tank. When operations ceased, the fuel and flush salts were allowed t o cool and solidify in the drain tanks. At shutdown, the MSRE facility complex was placed in a surveillance and maintenance program. As a result of the S&M program, it was discovered in 1994 that gaseous uranium (233U/232U) hexafluoride (UF6) had moved throughout the MSRE process systems. The UF6 was generated when radiolysis of the fluorine salts caused the individual constituents to dissociate to their component atoms, including free fluorine.Some of the free fluorine combined with uranium fluorides (UF4) in the salt to form UF6. UF6 is gaseous at slightly above ambient temperatures; thus, periodic heating of the fuel salts (which was intended to remedy the radiolysis problems) and simple diffusion had allowed the UF6 to move out of the salt and into the process systems of MSRE.

  13. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  14. Why understanding neutrino interactions is important for oscillation physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. Walter

    2007-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in knowledge of neutrino interactions directly impact the ability to measure the parameters of neutrino oscillation. Experiments which make use of differing technologies and neutrino beams are sensitive to different uncertainties. Several experimental and theoretical issues are reviewed.

  15. Task I: Dark Matter Search Experiments with Cryogenic Detectors: CDMS-I and CDMS-II Task II: Experimental Study of Neutrino Properties: EXO and KamLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabrera, Blas [Professor, Stanford University] [Professor, Stanford University; Gratta, Giorgio [Professor, Stanford University] [Professor, Stanford University

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark Matter Search - During the period of performance, our group continued the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. As a key member of the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) collaboration, we completed the CDMS II experiment which led the field in sensitivity for more than five years. We fabricated all detectors, and participated in detector testing and verification. In addition, we participated in the construction and operation of the facility at the Soudan Underground Laboratory and played key roles in the data acquisition and analysis. Towards the end of the performance period, we began operating the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment, which consists of 15 advanced Ge (9 kg) detectors. The advanced detector design called iZIP grew out of our earlier DOE Particle Detector R&D program which demonstrated the rejection of surface electrons to levels where they are no longer the dominant source of background. Our group invented this advanced design and these larger detectors were fabricated on the Stanford campus in collaboration with the SLAC CDMS group and the Santa Clara University group. The sensitivity reach is expected to be up to 5 times better than CDMS II after two years of operation. We will check the new limits on WIMPs set by XENON100, and we expect improved sensitivity for light mass WIMPs beyond that of any other existing experiment. Our group includes the Spokesperson for SuperCDMS and continues to make important contributions to improvements in the detector technology which are enabling the very low trigger thresholds used to explore the low mass WIMP region. We are making detailed measurements of the charge transport and trapping within Ge crystals, measuring the diffusive trapping distance of the quasiparticle excitations within the Al phonon collector fins on the detector surface, and we are contributing to the development of much improved detector Monte Carlos which are essential to guide the detector design and optimize the analysis. Neutrino Physics – In the period of performance the neutrino group successfully completed the construction of EXO-200 and commissioned the detector. Science data taking started on Jun 1, 2011. With the discovery of the 2-neutrino double-beta decay in 136-Xe and the first measurement of the 0-neutrino mode resulting in the most stringent limit of Majorana masses, our group continues to be a leading innovator in the field of neutrino physics which is central to DOE-HEP Intensity Frontier program. The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations, in part elucidated by our earlier efforts with the Palo Verde and KamLAND experiments, provides the crucial information that neutrino masses are non-zero and, yet, it contains no information on the value of the neutrino mass scale. In recent times our group has therefore shifted its focus to a high sensitivity 0-neutrino double beta decay program, EXO. The 0-neutrino double beta decay provides the best chance of extending the sensitivity to the neutrino mass scale below 10 meV but, maybe more importantly, it tests the nature of the neutrino wave function, providing the most sensitive probe for Majorana particles and lepton number violation. The EXO program, formulated by our group several years ago, plans to use up to tonnes of the isotope 136-Xe to study the 0-neutrino double beta decay mode. The EXO-200 detector is the first step in this program and it represents the only large US-led and based experiment taking data. The EXO-200 isotope enrichment program broke new grounds for the enterprise of double beta decay. The detector design and material selection program paid off, resulting in a background that is among the very best in the field. The “first light" of EXO-200 was very exciting with the discovery -in the first month of data- of the rarest 2-neutrino double beta decay mode ever observed. The lower limit on the 0-neutrino double beta decay half-life, published in Phys. Rev. Lett. and based on the first 120 days of data is the second best but, when translated into a Majorana mass scale, it

  16. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  17. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  18. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control and monitoring systems are very similar. The purpose and design of this experiment will be discussed followed by its progress and status to date.

  19. OECD MCCI project enhancing instrumentation for reactor materials experiments, Rev. 0 September 3, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor safety experiments for studying the reactions of a molten core (corium) with water and/or concrete involve materials at extremely high temperature. Such high temperature severely restricts the types of sensors that can be employed to measure characteristics of the corium itself. Yet there is great interest in improving instrumentation so that the state of the melt can be established with more precision. In particular, it would be beneficial to increase both the upper range limit and accuracy of temperature measurements. The poor durability of thermocouples at high temperature is also an important issue. For experiments involving a water-quenched melt, direct measurements of the growth rate of the crust separating the melt and water would be of great interest. This is a key element in determining the nature of heat transfer between the melt and coolant. Despite its importance, no one has been able to directly measure the crust thickness during such tests. This paper considers three specialized sensors that could be introduced to enhance melt characterization: (1) A commercially fabricated, single point infrared temperature measurement with the footprint of a thermowell. A lens assembly and fiber optic cable linked to a receiver and amplifier measures the temperature at the base of a tungsten thermowell. The upper range limit is 3000 C and accuracy is {+-}0.25% of the reading. (2) In-house development of an ultrasonic temperature sensor that would provide multipoint measurements at temperatures up to {approx}3000 C. The sensors are constructed from tungsten rods and have a high temperature durability that is superior to that of thermocouples. (3) In-house development of an ultrasonic probe to measure the growth rate of the corium crust. This ultrasonic sensor would include a tungsten waveguide that transmits ultrasonic pulses up through the corium melt towards the crust and detects reflections from the melt/crust interface. A measurement of the echo time delay would provide the location of the interface. These three sensors would provide a considerable upgrade of the instrumentation used in our reactor materials tests. The infracouple is a commercial product that could provide an immediate improvement in temperature measurements. The sensor could also serve to corroborate thermocouple data by providing a measurement based upon a different physical principle. The ultrasonic temperature sensor would involve a greater investment and longer time frame than the infracouple, but offers all the advantages of the infracouple along with miniaturization and the ability to measure at multiple locations. In addition, the UTS is the platform from which we would begin development of the crust detector. Of the three sensors, the crust detector requires the most effort and entails the greatest uncertainty. However, a real-time crust thickness measurement has never before been made and such data would be unique and of great benefit to reactor materials experiments.

  20. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangano, Salvatore [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificio Institutos de Investigatión, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  1. Neutrino Physics Neutrinos rarely interact despite their vast abundance in nature. To give a sense of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1 Neutrino Physics Neutrinos rarely interact despite their vast abundance in nature later in 1933, Enrico Fermi devised a theory for beta decays which 1 #12;Chapter 1: Neutrino Physics 2 indicated oscillations [6]. This chapter will describe neutrino physics and some of the experiments

  2. Research in Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busenitz, Jerome [The University of Alabama

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in Neutrino Physics We describe here the recent activities of our two groups over the first year of this award (effectively November 2010 through January 2012) and our proposed activities and associated budgets for the coming grant year. Both of our groups are collaborating on the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment and are playing major roles in calibration and analysis. A major milestone was reached recently: the collaboration obtained the first result on the search for 13 based on 100 days of data from the far detector. Our data indicates that 13 is not zero; specifically the best fit of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to our data gives sin2 (2 13) = 0.086 ± 0.041 (stat) ± 0.030 (syst) The null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at the 94.6% C.L. This result1 has been submitted to Physical Review Letters. As we continue to take data with the far detector in the coming year, in parallel with completing the construction of the near lab and installing the near detector, we expect the precision of our measurement to improve as we gather significantly more statistics, gain better control of backgrounds through use of partial power data and improved event selection, and better understand the detector energy scale and detection efficiency from calibration data. With both detectors taking data starting in the second half of 2013, we expect to further drive down the uncertainty on our measurement of sin2 (2 13) to less than 0.02. Stancu’s group is also collaborating on the MiniBooNE experiment. Data taking is scheduled to continue through April, by which time 1.18 × 1021 POT is projected. The UA group is playing a leading role in the measurement of antineutrino cross sections, which should be the subject of a publication later this year as well as of Ranjan Dharmapalan’s Ph.D. thesis, which he is expected to defend by the end of this year. It is time to begin working on projects which will eventually succeed Double Chooz and MiniBooNE as the main foci of our efforts. The Stancu group plans to become re–involved in LBNE and possibly also to join NO A, and the Busenitz group has begun to explore joining a direct dark matter search.

  3. LOCA simulation in the national research universal reactor program: postirradiation examination results for the third materials experiment (MT-3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rausch, W.N.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. The third materials experiment (MT-3) was the sixth in the series of thermal-hydraulic and materials deformation/rutpure experiments conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The main objective of the experiment was to evaluate ballooning and rupture during active two-phase cooling in the temperature range from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F (1030 to 1090 K). The 12 test rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 550 psi (3.8 MPa) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 of the rods ruptured, with an average peak bundle strain of approx. 55%. The UKAEA also funded destructive postirradiation examination (PIE) of several of the ruptured rods from the MT-3 experiment. This report describes the work performed and presents the PIE results. Information obtained during the PIE included cladding thickness measurements metallography, and particle size analysis of the cracked and broken fuel pellets.

  4. Low Energy Neutrino Cross Sections: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This large collection of low-energy (less than 30 GEV) neutrino cross sections is extracted from the results of many experiments from 1973 through 2002. The experiments, facilities, and collaborations include ANL, BNL, and FNAL in the U.S., along with CERN, Gargamelle, SKAT, LSND, and others. The data are presented in both tabular and plotted formats. The Durham High Energy Physics Database Group makes these data available in one place, easy to access and compare. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  5. Four-Neutrino Oscillations at SNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; C. Peńa-Garay

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the potential of SNO to constraint the four-neutrino mixing schemes favoured by the results of all neutrino oscillations experiments. These schemes allow simultaneous transitions of solar $\

  6. Off-shell OPERA neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim R. Morris

    2011-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In the OPERA experiment, superluminal propagation of neutrinos can occur if one of the neutrino masses is extremely small. However the effect only has appreciable amplitude at energies of order this mass and thus has negligible overlap with the multi-GeV scale of the experiment.

  7. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chris Walter

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I will review how a set of experiments in the last decade has given us our current understanding of neutrino properties.  I will show how experiments in the last year or two have clarified this picture, and will discuss how new experiments about to start will address remaining questions.  I will particularly emphasize the relationship between various experimental techniques.

  8. Do the Kamiokande results need neutrino oscillations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baillon, Paul

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations are a delicate and important subject. One needs to be sure that every aspect of it is well understood. The recent results of the Kamiokande experiment [1], indicate the possibility of -- neutrino oscillations. The period of oscillation observed by Kamiokande is not compatible with what one may deduce from the solar neutrino experiments [2]. In this letter, we examine if another mechanism could fake neutrino oscillations and could be measurement dependent

  9. Neutrino and Antineutrino Cross sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; /Alabama U.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH2). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  10. Recent Atmospheric Neutrino Results from Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himmel, Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Super-Kamiokande experiment has collected more than 11 live-years of atmospheric neutrino data. Atmospheric neutrinos cover a wide phase space in both energy and distance travelled, the parameters relevant for studying neutrino oscillations. We present here recent measurements of the three-flavor neutrino oscillation parameters using this atmospheric neutrino data, as well as new limits on mixing with a fourth sterile neutrino state.

  11. Light Sterile Neutrinos and Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JiJi Fan; Paul Langacker

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study two possible explanations for short baseline neutrino oscillation anomalies, such as the LSND and MiniBooNE anti-neutrino data, and for the reactor anomaly. The first scenario is the mini-seesaw mechanism with two eV-scale sterile neutrinos. We present both analytic formulas and numerical results showing that this scenario could account for the short baseline and reactor anomalies and is consistent with the observed masses and mixings of the three active neutrinos. We also show that this scenario could arise naturally from an effective theory containing a TeV-scale VEV, which could be related to other TeV-scale physics. The minimal version of the mini-seesaw relates the active-sterile mixings to five real parameters and favors an inverted hierarchy. It has the interesting property that the effective Majorana mass for neutrinoless double beta decay vanishes, while the effective masses relevant to tritium beta decay and to cosmology are respectively around 0.2 and 2.4 eV. The second scenario contains only one eV-scale sterile neutrino but with an effective non-unitary mixing matrix between the light sterile and active neutrinos. We find that though this may explain the anomalies, if the non-unitarity originates from a heavy sterile neutrino with a large (fine-tuned) mixing angle, this scenario is highly constrained by cosmological and laboratory observations.

  12. Neutrino-induced pion production at energies relevant for the MiniBooNE and K2K experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate charged and neutral current neutrino induced incoherent pion production off nuclei at MiniBooNE and K2K energies within the GiBUU model. We assume impulse approximation and treat the nucleus as a local Fermi gas of nucleons bound in a mean-field potential. In-medium spectral functions are also taken into account. The outcome of the initial neutrino nucleon reaction undergoes complex hadronic final state interactions. We present results for neutral current {pi}{sup 0} and charged current {pi}{sup +} production and compare to MiniBooNE and K2K data.

  13. Conceptual Design of Molten Salt Loop Experiment for MIT Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Malcolm K.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten salt is a promising coolant candidate for Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) Gen-IV designs. The low neutron absorption, high thermal capacity, chemical inertness, and high boiling point at low pressure of ...

  14. Prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux for the Double Chooz experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Christopher LaDon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis benchmarks the deterministic lattice code, DRAGON, against data, and then applies this code to make a prediction for the antineutrino flux from the Chooz BI and B2 reactors. Data from the destructive assay of ...

  15. SNEWS: A Neutrino Early Warning System for Galactic SN II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alec Habig; for the SNEWS Collaboration

    1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of neutrinos from SN1987A confirmed the core-collapse nature of SN II, but the neutrinos were not noticed until after the optical discovery. The current generation of neutrino experiments are both much larger and actively looking for SN neutrinos in real time. Since neutrinos escape a new SN promptly while the first photons are not produced until the photospheric shock breakout hours later, these experiments can provide an early warning of a coming galactic SN II. A coincidence network between neutrino experiments has been established to minimize response time, eliminate experimental false alarms, and possibly provide some pointing to the impending event from neutrino wave-front timing.

  16. Neutrinoless double beta decay in four-neutrino models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Kalliomaki; Jukka Maalampi

    2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The most stringent constraint on the so-called effective electron neutrino mass from the present neutrinoless double beta decay experiments is |M_{ee}| < 0.2 eV, while the planned next generation experiment GENIUS is anticipated to reach a considerably more stringent limit |M_{ee}|< 0.001 eV. We investigate the constraints these bounds set on the neutrino masses and mixings of neutrinos in four-neutrino models where there exists a sterile neutrino along with the three ordinary neutrinos. We find that the GENIUS experiment would be sensitive to the electron neutrino masses down to the limit m_{\

  17. Advancements in solar neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vito Antonelli; Lino Miramonti

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the results of solar neutrino physics, with particular attention to the data obtained and the analyses performed in the last decades, which were determinant to solve the solar neutrino problem (SNP), proving that neutrinos are massive and oscillating particles and contributing to refine the solar models. We also discuss the perspectives of the presently running experiments in this sector and of the ones planned for the near future and the impact they can have on elementary particle physics and astrophysics.

  18. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticle Identification Performance

  19. Progress in the physics of massive neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; D. Marfatia; K. Whisnant

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The current status of the physics of massive neutrinos is reviewed with a forward-looking emphasis. The article begins with the general phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and matter and documents the experimental evidence for oscillations of solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos. Both active and sterile oscillation possibilities are considered. The impact of cosmology (BBN, CMB, leptogenesis) and astrophysics (supernovae, highest energy cosmic rays) on neutrino observables and vice versa, is evaluated. The predictions of grand unified, radiative and other models of neutrino mass are discussed. Ways of determining the unknown parameters of three-neutrino oscillations are assessed, taking into account eight-fold degeneracies in parameters that yield the same oscillation probabilities, as well as ways to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale (from beta-decay, neutrinoless double-beta decay, large scale structure and Z-bursts). Critical unknowns at present are the amplitude of \

  20. Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This prepares the way for a Neutrino Factory (NF) in which high energy muons decay within the straight sections of a storage ring to produce a beam of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. The NF concept was proposed in 1997 at a time when the discovery that the three known types of neutrino ({nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}) can change their flavor as they propagate through space (neutrino oscillations) was providing a first glimpse of physics beyond the Standard Model. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source: a Neutrino Factory. This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for a Neutrino Factory.

  1. The DF-4 fuel damage experiment in ACRR (Annual Core Research Reactor) with a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) control blade and channel box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.; Ott, L.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DF-4 test was an experimental investigation into the melt progression behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) core components under high temperature severe core damage conditions. In this study 14 zircaloy clad UO{sub 2} fuel rods, and representations of the zircaloy fuel canister and stainless steel/B{sub 4}C control blade were assembled into a 0.5 m long test bundle. The test bundle was fission heated in a flowing steam environment, using the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia Laboratories, simulating the environmental conditions of an uncovered BWR core experiencing high temperature damage as a result residual fission product decay heating. The experimental results provide information on the thermal response of the test bundle components, the rapid exothermic oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding and canister, the production of hydrogen from metal-steam oxidation, and the failure behavior of the progressively melting bundle components. This information is provided in the form of thermocouple data, steam and hydrogen flow rate data, test bundle fission power data and visual observation of the damage progression. In addition to BWR background information, this document contains a description of the experimental hardware with details on how the experiment was instrumented and diagnosed, a description of the test progression, and a presentation of the on-line measurements. Also in this report are the results of a thermal analysis of the fueled test section of the fueled test section of the experiment demonstrating an overall consistency in the measurable quantities from the test. A discussion of the results is provided. 38 refs., 72 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Evidence for neutrino mass: A decade of discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino mass and mixing are amongst the major discoveries of recent years. From the observation of flavor change in solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments to the measurements of neutrino mixing with terrestrial neutrinos, recent experiments have provided consistent and compelling evidence for the mixing of massive neutrinos. The discoveries at Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND have solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem and demand that we make the first significant revision of the Standard Model in decades. Searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay probe the particle nature of neutrinos and continue to place limits on the effective mass of the neutrino. Possible signs of neutrinoless double-beta decay will stimulate neutrino mass searches in the next decade and beyond. I review the recent discoveries in neutrino physics and the current evidence for massive neutrinos.

  3. Improved measurements of the neutrino mixing angle $?_{13}$ with the Double Chooz detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Abe; J. C. dos Anjos; J. C. Barriere; E. Baussan; I. Bekman; M. Bergevin; T. J. C. Bezerra; L. Bezrukov; E. Blucher; C. Buck; J. Busenitz; A. Cabrera; E. Caden; L. Camilleri; R. Carr; M. Cerrada; P. -J. Chang; E. Chauveau; P. Chimenti; A. P. Collin; E. Conover; J. M. Conrad; J. I. Crespo-Anadón; K. Crum; A. S. Cucoanes; E. Damon; J. V. Dawson; J. Dhooghe; D. Dietrich; Z. Djurcic; M. Dracos; M. Elnimr; A. Etenko; M. Fallot; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Felde; S. M. Fernandes; V. Fischer; D. Franco; M. Franke; H. Furuta; I. Gil-Botella; L. Giot; M. Göger-Neff; L. F. G. Gonzalez; L. Goodenough; M. C. Goodman; C. Grant; N. Haag; T. Hara; J. Haser; M. Hofmann; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Hourlier; M. Ishitsuka; J. Jochum; C. Jollet; F. Kaether; L. N. Kalousis; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; T. Kawasaki; E. Kemp; H. de Kerret; D. Kryn; M. Kuze; T. Lachenmaier; C. E. Lane; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; H. P. Lima Jr; M. Lindner; J. M. López-Castańo; J. M. LoSecco; B. Lubsandorzhiev; S. Lucht; J. Maeda; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; J. Martino; T. Matsubara; G. Mention; A. Meregaglia; T. Miletic; R. Milincic; A. Minotti; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nikitenko; P. Novella; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; A. Onillon; A. Osborn; C. Palomares; I. M. Pepe; S. Perasso; P. Pfahler; A. Porta; G. Pronost; J. Reichenbacher; B. Reinhold; M. Röhling; R. Roncin; S. Roth; B. Rybolt; Y. Sakamoto; R. Santorelli; A. C. Schilithz; S. Schönert; S. Schoppmann; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Sharankova; S. Shimojima; D. Shrestha; V. Sibille; V. Sinev; M. Skorokhvatov; E. Smith; J. Spitz; A. Stahl; I. Stancu; L. F. F. Stokes; M. Strait; A. Stüken; F. Suekane; S. Sukhotin; T. Sumiyoshi; Y. Sun; R. Svoboda; K. Terao; A. Tonazzo; H. H. Trinh Thi; G. Valdiviesso; N. Vassilopoulos; C. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Wagner; N. Walsh; H. Watanabe; C. Wiebusch; L. Winslow; M. Wurm; G. Yang; F. Yermia; V. Zimmer

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Double Chooz experiment presents improved measurements of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ using the data collected in 467.90 live days from a detector positioned at an average distance of 1050 m from two reactor cores at the Chooz nuclear power plant. Several novel techniques have been developed to achieve significant reductions of the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties with respect to previous publications, whereas the efficiency of the $\\bar\

  4. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Tests 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Wilson, C. L.; Marshall, R, K.; King, L. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Hesson, G. M.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects of LOCA conditions on pressurized water reactor test fuel bundles. This experiment operation plan for the second and third experiments of the program will provide peak fuel cladding temperatures of up to 1172K (1650{degree}F) and 1061K (1450{degree}) respectively. for a long enough time to cause test fuel cladding deformation and rupture in both. Reflood coolant delay times and the reflooding rates for the experiments were selected from thermal-hydraulic data measured in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor facilities and test train assembly during the first experiment.

  5. White paper report on using nuclear reactors to search for a value of theta13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.; Anjos, J.C.; Ayres, D.; Beacom, J.; Bediaga, I.; de Bellefon, A.; Berger, B.E.; Bilenky, S.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T.; Buck, C.; Bugg, W.; Busenitz, J.; Choubey, S.; Conrad, J.; Cribier, M.; Dadoun, O.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Decowski, M.; de Gouvea, Andre; Demutrh, D.; Dessages-Ardellier, F.; Efremenko, Y.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Finley, D.; Formaggio, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Garbini, M.; Giusti, P.; Goger-Neff, M.; Goodman, M.; Gray, F.; Grieb, C.; Grudzinski, J.J.; Guarino, V.J.; Hartmann, F.; Hagner, C.; Heeger, K.M.; Hofmann, W.; Horton-Smith, G.; Huber, P.; Inzhechik, L.; Jochum, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kadel, R.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D.; Kasper, P.; de Kerret, H.; Kersten, J.; Klein, J.; Knopfle, K.T.; Kopeikin, V.; Kozlov, Yu.; Kryn, D.; Kuchler, V.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laughton, C.; Lendvai, C.; Li, J.; Lindner, M.; Link, J.; Longo, M.; Lu, Y.S.; Luk, K.B.; Ma, Y.Q.; Martemyanov, V.P.; Mauger, C.; Manghetti, H.; McKeown, R.; Mention, G.; Meyer, J.P.; Mikaelyan, L.; Minakata, H.; Naples, D.; Nunokawa, H.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Parke, S.; Petcov, S.T.; Peres, O.L.G.; Potzel, W.; Pilcher, J.; Plunkett, R.; Raffelt, G.; Rapidis, P.; Reyna, D.; Roe, B.; Rolinec, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sartorelli, G.; Schonert, S.; Schwertz, T.; Selvi, M.; Shaevitz, M.; Shellard, R.; Shrock, R.; Sidwell, R.; Sims, J.; Sinev, V.; Stanton, N.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R.; Seukane, F.; Sugiyama, H.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Svoboda, R.; Talaga, R.; Tamura, N.; Tanimoto, M.; Thron, J.; von Toerne, E.; Vignaud, D.; Wagner, C.; Wang, Y.F.; Wang, Z.; Winter, W.; Wong, H.; Yakushev, E.; Yang, C.G.; Yasuda, O.

    2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been superb progress in understanding the neutrino sector of elementary particle physics in the past few years. It is now widely recognized that the possibility exists for a rich program of measuring CP violation and matter effects in future accelerator {nu} experiments, which has led to intense efforts to consider new programs at neutrino superbeams, off-axis detectors, neutrino factories and beta beams. However, the possibility of measuring CP violation can be fulfilled only if the value of the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} is such that sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 13}) greater than or equal to on the order of 0.01. The authors of this white paper are an International Working Group of physicists who believe that a timely new experiment at a nuclear reactor sensitive to the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} in this range has a great opportunity for an exciting discovery, a non-zero value to {theta}{sub 13}. This would be a compelling next step of this program. We are studying possible new reactor experiments at a variety of sites around the world, and we have collaborated to prepare this document to advocate this idea and describe some of the issues that are involved.

  6. The Phase of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giunti

    2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an analogy with the well-known double-slit experiment, we show that the standard phase of neutrino oscillations is correct, refuting recent claims of a factor of two correction. We also improve the wave packet treatment of neutrino oscillations taking into account explicitly the finite coherence time of the detection process.

  7. Gauge Trimming of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine; de Gouvea, Andre; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under a new U(1) gauge symmetry, which is non-anomalous in the presence of one ''right-handed neutrino'' per generation and consistent with the standard model Yukawa couplings, the most general fermion charges are determined in terms of four rational parameters. This generalization of the B-L symmetry with generation-dependent lepton charges leads to neutrino masses induced by operators of high dimensionality. Neutrino masses are thus naturally small without invoking physics at energies above the TeV scale, whether neutrinos are Majorana or Dirac fermions. This ''Leptocratic'' Model predicts the existence of light quasi-sterile neutrinos with consequences for cosmology, and implies that collider experiments may reveal the origin of neutrino masses.

  8. Physics Potential of Future Atmospheric Neutrino Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of future high statistics atmospheric neutrino experiments is considered, having in mind currently discussed huge detectors of various technologies (water Cerekov, magnetized iron, liquid Argon). I focus on the possibility to use atmospheric data to determine the octant of $\\theta_{23}$ and the neutrino mass hierarchy. The sensitivity to the $\\theta_{23}$-octant of atmospheric neutrinos is competitive (or even superior) to long-baseline experiments. I discuss the ideal properties of a fictitious atmospheric neutrino detector to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  9. Citation: J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), PR D86, 010001 (2012) (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov) Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accelerator µ experiments. Some neutrino oscillation experiments compare the flux in two or more detectors://pdg.lbl.gov) Neutrino Mixing A REVIEW GOES HERE ­ Check our WWW List of Reviews (A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios(A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios(A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios(A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios

  10. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Girardin, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  11. Debris dispersal in reactor material experiments on corium-water thermal interactions in ex-vessel geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Squarer, D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis has been performed of corium sweepout behavior in the ANL/EPRI CWTI-series reactor material experiments involving the gas pressure-driven injection of molten corium into the reactor cavity region of a 1:30 scale mockup of a PWR containment. A computer model was developed to calculate the sweepout versus retention of corium and water from the cavity. The model consists of hydrodynamics and freezing calculations describing the pressure-driven two-phase flow of corium, water, steam and gas out of the cavity, freezing of corium upon structural surfaces, and levitation of corium within the cavity by the vessel blowdown gas jet. The model has had good success predicting the disposition of corium for the available CWTI tests, indicating retention in the cavity of between 40 and 70% of the injected corium masses. For conditions representative of the TMLB' sequence in the reactor system, the model predicts essentially complete sweepout of corium from the full-scale cavity region before the dispersive forces arising from the blowdown of the primary system have decayed. However, this large sweepout does not imply that the swept out material would deliver its energy directly to the containment atmosphere.

  12. Disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts from the Molten Salt Reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) is an 8 MW reactor that was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1965 through 1969. The reactor used a unique liquid salt fuel, composed of a mixture of LIF, BeF{sub 2}, ZrF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}, and operated at temperatures above 600{degrees}C. The primary fuel salt circulation system consisted of the reactor vessel, a single fuel salt pump, and a single primary heat exchanger. Heat was transferred from the fuel salt to a coolant salt circuit in the primary heat exchanger. The coolant salt was similar to the fuel salt, except that it contains only LiF (66%) and BeF, (34%). The coolant salt passed from the primary heat exchanger to an air-cooled radiator and a coolant salt pump, and then returned to the primary heat exchanger. Each of the salt loops was provided with drain tanks, located such that the salt could be drained out of either circuit by gravity. A single drain tank was provided for the non-radioactive coolant salt. Two drain tanks were provided for the fuel salt. Since the fuel salt contained radioactive fuel, fission products, and activation products, and since the reactor was designed such that the fuel salt could be drained immediately into the drain tanks in the event of a problem in the fuel salt loop, the fuel salt drain tanks were provided with a system to remove the heat generated by radioactive decay. A third drain tank connected to the fuel salt loop was provided for a batch of flush salt. This batch of salt, similar in composition to the coolant salt, was used to condition the fuel salt loop after it had been exposed to air and to flush the fuel salt loop of residual fuel salt prior to accessing the reactor circuit for maintenance or experimental activities. This report discusses the disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salt.

  13. Constraints on the Sum of Neutrino Masses from Cosmology and their impact on world neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Melchiorri; G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. I. Silk

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive upper limits on the sum of neutrino masses from an updated combination of data from Cosmic Microwave Background experiments and Galaxy Redshifts Surveys. The results are discussed in the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing and compared with neutrino oscillation data, with upper limits on the effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments and with the claimed lower bound on the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment.

  14. Zero Power Reactor simulation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zero Power Reactor simulation Share Description Ever wanted to see a nuclear reactor core in action? Here's a detailed simulation of the Zero Power Reactor experiment, run by...

  15. Decommissioning Small Research and Training Reactors; Experience on Three Recent University Projects - 12455

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Thomas [LVI Services Inc. (United States); DeWitt, Corey; Miller, Dustin; Colborn, Kurt [Enercon Services, Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning small reactors within the confines of an active University environment presents unique challenges. These range from the radiological protection of the nearby University population and grounds, to the logistical challenges of working in limited space without benefit of the established controlled, protected, and vital areas common to commercial facilities. These challenges, and others, are discussed in brief project histories of three recent (calendar year 2011) decommissioning activities at three University training and research reactors. These facilities include three separate Universities in three states. The work at each of the facilities addresses multiple phases of the decommissioning process, from initial characterization and pre-decommissioning waste removal, to core component removal and safe storage, through to complete structural dismantlement and site release. The results of the efforts at each University are presented, along with the challenges that were either anticipated or discovered during the decommissioning efforts, and results and lessons learned from each of the projects. (authors)

  16. Operational experience with and post-irradiation examinations on boiling water reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eickelpash, N.; Mullauer, J.; Seepolt, R.W.; Spalthoff, W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control rods of the KRB-I 250-MW (electric) boiling water reactor contain Vipac B/sub 4/C powder in Type 304 stainless steel tubes as a neutron-absorbing material. Because of an increase in the reactor coolant /sup 3/H activity, defective control rods were suspected. The hot cell examination of a highly exposed control rod revealed B/sub 4/C losses. The mechanism of failure was shown to be B/sub 4/C swelling and stress corrosion cracking of the absorber tubes, followed by B/sub 4/C washout. The B/sub 4/C volume swelling is given. The tube cracking starts at 30 to 35% and the B/sub 4/C washout at 50 to 55% local /sup 10/B burnup in the tubes.

  17. Status of three-neutrino oscillation parameters, circa 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Capozzi; G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard three-neutrino (3nu) oscillation framework is being increasingly refined by results coming from different sets of experiments, using neutrinos from solar, atmospheric, accelerator and reactor sources. At present, each of the known oscillation parameters [the two squared mass gaps (delta m^2, Delta m^2) and the three mixing angles (theta_12}, theta_13, theta_23)] is dominantly determined by a single class of experiments. Conversely, the unknown parameters [the mass hierarchy, the theta_23 octant and the CP-violating phase delta] can be currently constrained only through a combined analysis of various (eventually all) classes of experiments. In the light of recent new results coming from reactor and accelerator experiments, and of their interplay with solar and atmospheric data, we update the estimated N-sigma ranges of the known 3nu parameters, and revisit the status of the unknown ones. Concerning the hierarchy, no significant difference emerges between normal and inverted mass ordering. A slight overall preference is found for theta_23 in the first octant and for nonzero CP violation with sin delta < 0; however, for both parameters, such preference exceeds 1 sigma only for normal hierarchy. We also discuss the correlations and stability of the oscillation parameters within different combinations of data sets.

  18. aplicacion al reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these...

  19. Constraints on Neutrino Velocities Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunjie Huo; Tianjun Li; Yi Liao; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Yonghui Qi

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With a minimally modified dispersion relation for neutrinos, we reconsider the constraints on superluminal neutrino velocities from bremsstrahlung effects in the laboratory frame. Employing both the direct calculation approach and the virtual Z-boson approach, we obtain the generic decay width and energy loss rate of a superluminal neutrino with general energy. The Cohen-Glashow's analytical results for neutrinos with a relatively low energy are confirmed in both approaches. We employ the survival probability instead of the terminal energy to assess whether a neutrino with a given energy is observable or not in the OPERA experiment. Moreover, using our general results we perform systematical analyses on the constraints arising from the Super-Kamiokande and IceCube experiments.

  20. High energy neutrino telescopes as a probe of the neutrino mass mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kfir Blum; Anson Hook; Kohta Murase

    2014-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that measurements of the spectral shape and flavor ratios of high energy astrophysical neutrinos at neutrino telescopes can be sensitive to the details of the neutrino mass mechanism. We propose a simple model for Majorana neutrino mass generation that realizes the relevant parameter space, in which small explicit lepton number violation is mediated to the Standard Model through the interactions of a light scalar. IceCube, with about ten years of exposure time, could reveal the presence of anomalous neutrino self-interactions. Precision electroweak and lepton flavor laboratory experiments and a determination of the total neutrino mass from cosmology would provide consistency checks on the interpretation of a signal.

  1. Sterile neutrino searches in MiniBooNE and MicroBooNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignarra, Christina M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tension among recent short baseline neutrino experiments has pointed toward the possible need for the addition of one or more sterile (non-interacting) neutrino states into the existing neutrino oscillation framework. This ...

  2. The sensitivity of the ICAL detector at India-based Neutrino Observatory to neutrino oscillation parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Daljeet; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) will host a 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector that will be able to detect muon tracks and hadron showers produced by Charged-Current muon neutrino interactions in the detector. The ICAL experiment will be able to determine the precision of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters and neutrino mass hierarchy using atmospheric muon neutrinos through earth matter effect. In this paper, we report on the sensitivity for the atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters ($\\sin^{2}\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^{2}_{32}|$) for the ICAL detector using the reconstructed neutrino energy and muon direction as observables. We apply realistic resolutions and efficiencies obtained by the ICAL collaboration with a GEANT4-based simulation to reconstruct neutrino energy and muon direction. Our study shows that using neutrino energy and muon direction as observables for a $\\chi^{2}$ analysis, ICAL detector can measure $\\sin^{2}\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^{2}_{32}|$ with 13% and 4%...

  3. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  4. Constraints on Neutrino Oscillations from Big Bang Nucleosynethesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Shi; D. N. Schramm; B. D. Fields

    1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss in detail the effect of neutrino oscillations in Big Bang nucleosynthesis, between active and sterile neutrinos, as well as between active and active neutrinos. We calculate the constraints on mixings between active and sterile neutrinos from the present observation of the primordial helium abundance and discuss the potential implications on various astrophysical and cosmological problems of such oscillations. In particular, we show that large angle sterile neutrino mixing seems to be excluded as a MSW solution to the solar neutrino situation or a solution to the atmospheric neutrino mixing hinted at in some underground experiments. We show how with this constraint, the next generation of solar neutrino experiments should be able to determine the resolution of the solar neutrino problem. It is also shown how sterile neutrinos remain a viable dark matter candidate.

  5. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

  6. A new anti-neutrino detection technique based on positronium tagging with plastic scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consolati, G; Jollet, C; Meregaglia, A; Minotti, A; Perasso, S; Tonazzo, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main signature for anti-neutrino detection in reactor and geo-neutrino experiments based on scintillators is provided by the space-time coincidence of positron and neutron produced in the Inverse Beta Decay reaction. Such a signature strongly suppresses backgrounds and allows for measurements performed underground with a relatively high signal-to-background ratio. In an aboveground environment, however, the twofold coincidence technique is not sufficient to efficiently reject the high background rate induced by cosmogenic events. Enhancing the positron-neutron twofold coincidence efficiency has the potential to pave the way future aboveground detectors for reactor monitoring. We propose a new detection scheme based on a threefold coincidence, between the positron ionization, the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) decay, and the neutron capture, in a sandwich detector with alternated layers of plastic scintillator and aerogel powder. We present the results of a set of dedicated measurements on the achievable light y...

  7. Effect of non-standard interaction for radiative neutrino mass model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konishi, Y.; Sato, J.; Shimomura, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Shimo-okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama, 338-8570 (Japan); Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata, 950-2181 (Japan)

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined effects of non-standard interactions (NSIs) in a radiative neutrino mass model. The radiative neutrino mass model suggested by Kraus Nasri and Trodden can explain not only neutrino flavor mixing and neutrino masses, but also dark matter relic abundance. Although the NSI effects of the model are too small to be detected by present neutrino oscillation experiments, we might observe the small effects in future experiments such as neutrino factory.

  8. Neutrino Physics with Thermal Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nucciotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of fundamental neutrino properties like its mass and its nature calls for the design of a new generation of experiments. High sensitivity, high energy resolution, and versatility together with the possibility of a simple multiplexing scheme are the key features of future detectors for these experiments. Thermal detectors can combine all these features. This paper reviews the status and the perspectives for what concerns the application of this type of detectors to neutrino physics, focusing on direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

  9. Phenomenological relations for neutrino masses and mixing parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khruschov, V. V., E-mail: khru@imp.kiae.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomenological relations for masses, angles, and CP phases in the neutrino mixing matrix are proposed with allowance for available experimental data. For the case of CP violation in the lepton sector, an analysis of the possible structure of the neutrino mass matrix and a calculation of the neutrino mass features and the Dirac CP phase for the bimodal-neutrino model are performed. The values obtained in this way can be used to interpret and predict the results of various neutrino experiments.

  10. Operational experience with and postirradiation examinations on boiling water reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eickelpasch, N.; Seepolt, R.W.; Muellauer, J.; Spalthoff, W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control rods of the KRBI-I 250-MW(electric) boiling water reactor contain Vipac B/sub 4/C powder in Type 304 stainless steel tubes as a neutron-absorbing material. Because of an increase in the reactor coolant /sup 3/H activity, defective control rods were suspected. The hot cell examination of a highly exposed control rod revealed B/sub 4/C losses. The mechanism of failure was shown to be B/sub 4/C swelling and stress corrosion cracking of the absorber tubes, followed by B/sub 4/C washout. The B/sub 4/C volume swelling is ..delta..V(%) = 0.851x + 0.0449x/sup 2/ (x = /sup 10/B decays in 10/sup 21/(n,..cap alpha..)/cm/sup 3/). The tube cracking starts at 30 to 35% and the B/sub 4/C washout at 50 to 55% local /sup 10/B burnup in the tubes.

  11. La Thuile 2014: Theoretical premises to neutrino round table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Vissani

    2014-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk, dedicated to the memory of G. Giacomelli, introduced the round table on neutrinos held in February 2014. The topics selected for the discussion are: 1) the neutrinoless double beta decay rate (interpretation in terms of light neutrinos, nuclear uncertainties); 2) the physics in the gigantic water Cherenkov detectors (proton decay, atmospheric neutrinos); 3) the study of neutrino oscillations (mass hierarchy and CP violation; other neutrino states); 4) the neutrino astronomy at low and high energies (solar, supernova, cosmic neutrinos). The importance of an active interplay between theory and experiment is highlighted.

  12. Neutrinos: in and out of the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle physics Standard Model has been tremendously successful in predicting the outcome of a large number of experiments. In this model Neutrinos are massless. Yet recent evidence points to the fact that neutrinos are massive particles with tiny masses compared to the other particles in the Standard Model. These tiny masses allow the neutrinos to change flavor and oscillate. In this series of Lectures, I will review the properties of Neutrinos In the Standard Model and then discuss the physics of Neutrinos Beyond the Standard Model. Topics to be covered include Neutrino Flavor Transformations and Oscillations, Majorana versus Dirac Neutrino Masses, the Seesaw Mechanism and Leptogenesis.

  13. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Test 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; Wilson, C. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Cunningham, M. E.; Marshall, R. K.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects on pressurized water reactor (PWR) test fuel bundles. This Experiment Operation Plan (EOP) Addendum 2, together with the referenced EOP, describes the desired operating conditions and additional hazards review associated with the four-part MT-2 experiment. The primary portions of the experiment, MT-2.2 and MT-2.3, will evaluate the following: 1) the mechanical deformation of pressurized fuel rods subjected to a slow LOCA, using reflood water for temperature control, that is designed to produce cladding temperatures in the range from 1033 to 1089K (1400 to 1500°F) for an extended time, and 2) the effects of the deformed and possibly failed cladding on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the test assembly during simulated LOCA heating and reflooding. The secondary portions of the experiment, MT-2.1 and MT-2.4, are intended to provide thermal-hydraulic calibration information during two-stage reflood conditions for 1) relatively low cladding temperatures, <839K (1050°F), on nondeformed rods, and 2) moderately high cladding temperatures, <1089K (1500°F), on deformed rods.

  14. Neutrino masses and solar neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfenstein, L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been pointed out by Bahcall and Bethe and others that all solar neutrino data can be explained by MSW oscillations with m([nu][sub [mu

  15. active neutrino masses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained in tritium beta decay experiments, cosmological observations and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Carlo Giunti 2005-11-10 17 Neutrino masses and mixing HEP -...

  16. absolute neutrino mass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained in tritium beta decay experiments, cosmological observations and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Carlo Giunti 2005-11-10 3 Absolute neutrino mass from...

  17. absolute neutrino masses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained in tritium beta decay experiments, cosmological observations and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Carlo Giunti 2005-11-10 3 Absolute neutrino mass from...

  18. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M [Yale University

    2014-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This reports presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  19. IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting Magnet). Current user: LBNE ­ materials for Project X. · Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment ­ Abandoned gold mine

  20. Last CPT-Invariant Hope for LSND Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giunti

    2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the 99% confidence limits from the analyses of the data of cosmological and neutrino experiments imply a small marginally allowed region in the space of the neutrino oscillation parameters of 3+1 four-neutrino mixing schemes. This region can be confirmed or falsified by experiments in the near future.

  1. First test of Lorentz violation with a reactor-based antineutrino experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, J. M.

    We present a search for Lorentz violation with 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events taken by the Double Chooz experiment in 227.9 live days of running. This analysis, featuring a search for a sidereal time dependence ...

  2. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal, part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Steven Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keY of 65.4{sup +3.1}{sub 3.0} (stat) {sup +2.6}{sub -2.8} (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neUlrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1 {+-} 3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced {sup 37}Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior {sup 51}Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.88 {+-} 0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in {sup 71}Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63--67 SNU with an uncertainly of about 5%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the pp neutrino flux produced in the Sun to be {phi}{sup {circle_dot}}{sub pp} = (6.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 10}/(cm{sup 2} s), which agrees well with the flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  3. Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training.

  4. Quality assurance plan for the molten salt reactor experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description, Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., 1995) and Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities Work Smart Standards. This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRE Remediation Project. This QAP will be periodically reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan.

  5. Early Neutrino Data in the NO$\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betancourt, M.; /Minnesota U.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NO{nu}A is a long-baseline neutrino experiment using an off-axis neutrino beam produced by the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The NO{nu}A experiment will study neutrino {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations. A short term goal for the NO{nu}A experiment is to develop a good understanding of the response of the detector. These studies are being carried out with the full Near Detector installed on the surface (NDOS) at Fermilab. This detector is currently running and will acquire neutrino data for a year. Using beam muon neutrino data, quasi-elastic charged-current interactions will be studied. Status of the NDOS running and early data will be shown.

  6. Spontaneous breaking of spatial symmetries in collective neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huaiyu Duan; Shashank Shalgar

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A dense neutrino medium can experience collective oscillations or self-induced flavor transformation through nonlinear neutrino-neutrino refraction. To make the problem of collective neutrino oscillations more tractable, all previous studies on this subject have assumed some spatial symmetry or symmetries in the neutrino medium (e.g., translation symmetries in the early universe and spherical symmetry in core-collapse supernovae). We point out that the collective oscillation modes studied in such models are very special. Using a simple toy model we show that spatial symmetries can be broken spontaneously in collective neutrino oscillations. We also show that the spatial-symmetry-breaking (SSB) modes of neutrino oscillations can exist for both neutrino mass hierarchies and even in the regimes where collective neutrino oscillations were previously thought to be suppressed. This finding calls for study of collective neutrino oscillations in multi-dimensional models.

  7. Spontaneous breaking of spatial symmetries in collective neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dense neutrino medium can experience collective oscillations or self-induced flavor transformation through nonlinear neutrino-neutrino refraction. To make the problem of collective neutrino oscillations more tractable, all previous studies on this subject have assumed some spatial symmetry or symmetries in the neutrino medium (e.g., translation symmetries in the early universe and spherical symmetry in core-collapse supernovae). We point out that the collective oscillation modes studied in such models are very special. Using a simple toy model we show that spatial symmetries can be broken spontaneously in collective neutrino oscillations. We also show that the spatial-symmetry-breaking (SSB) modes of neutrino oscillations can exist for both neutrino mass hierarchies and even in the regimes where collective neutrino oscillations were previously thought to be suppressed. This finding calls for study of collective neutrino oscillations in multi-dimensional models.

  8. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  9. Neutrino Cross Section Measurements @ SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariani, C.; /Columbia U.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of cross sections of neutrinos of 0.7 GeV average energy scattering off a carbon target cross sections with by the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab. These measurements are important inputs for current and future accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments in the interpretation of neutrino oscillation signals. The measurement of neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} is one of the most important goals in current neutrino experiments. For the current and next generation of long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K, NOvA and LBNE, the precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus cross sections in the few GeV energy range is an essential ingredient in the interpretation of neutrino oscillation signals.

  10. Neutrino SuperBeams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I will give a brief description of long baseline neutrino physics, the LBNE experiment and Project X at Fermilab. A brief outline of the physics of long baseline neutrino experiments, LBNE and Project X at Fermilab is given in this talk.

  11. Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Joseph A. Formaggio

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

  12. Near Maximal Atmospheric Neutrino Mixing in Neutrino Mass Models with Two Texture Zeros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dev; Radha Raman Gautam; Lal Singh; Manmohan Gupta

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The implications of a large value of the effective Majorana neutrino mass for a class of two texture zero neutrino mass matrices have been studied in the flavor basis. It is found that these textures predict near maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing angle in the limit of large effective Majorana neutrino mass. It is noted that this prediction is independent of the values of solar and reactor neutrino mixing angles. We present the symmetry realization of these textures using the discrete cyclic group $Z_3$. It is found that the texture zeros realised in this work remain stable under renormalization group running of the neutrino mass matrix from the seesaw scale to the electroweak scale, at one loop level.

  13. How secret interactions can reconcile sterile neutrinos with cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannestad, Steen; Tram, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments have shown hints of the existence of additional sterile neutrinos in the eV mass range. However, such neutrinos seem incompatible with cosmology because they have too large an impact on cosmic structure formation. Here we show that new interactions in the sterile neutrino sector can prevent their production in the early Universe and reconcile short baseline oscillation experiments with cosmology.

  14. Collective neutrino oscillations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations in a hot and dense astrophysical environment such as a core-collapse supernova pose a challenging, seven-dimensional flavor transport problem. To make the problem even more difficult (and interesting), neutrinos can experience collective oscillations through nonlinear refraction in the dense neutrino medium in this environment. Significant progress has been made in the last decade towards the understanding of collective neutrino oscillations in various simplified neutrino gas models with imposed symmetries and reduced dimensions. However, a series of recent studies seem to have "reset" this progress by showing that these models may not be compatible with collective neutrino oscillations because the latter can break the symmetries spontaneously if they are not imposed. We review some of the key concepts of collective neutrino oscillations by using a few simple toy models. We also elucidate the breaking of spatial and directional symmetries in these models because of collective oscillation...

  15. Searching for sterile neutrinos in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebur Razzaque; A. Yu. Smirnov

    2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillation interpretation of the results from the LSND, MiniBooNE and some other experiments requires existence of sterile neutrino with mass $\\sim 1$ eV and mixing with the active neutrinos $|U_{\\mu 0}|^2 \\sim (0.02 - 0.04)$. It has been realized some time ago that existence of such a neutrino affects significantly the fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos in the TeV range which can be tested by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. In view of the first IceCube data release we have revisited the oscillations of high energy atmospheric neutrinos in the presence of one sterile neutrino. Properties of the oscillation probabilities are studied in details for various mixing schemes both analytically and numerically. The energy spectra and angular distributions of the $\

  16. Experimental signatures of cosmological neutrino condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mofazzal Azam; Jitesh R. Bhatt; Utpal Sarkar

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Superfluid condensation of neutrinos of cosmological origin at a low enough temperature can provide simple and elegant solution to the problems of neutrino oscillations and the accelerated expansion of the universe. It would give rise to a late time cosmological constant of small magnitude and also generate tiny Majorana masses for the neutrinos as observed from their flavor oscillations. We show that carefully prepared beta decay experiments in the laboratory would carry signatures of such a condensation, and thus, it would be possible to either establish or rule out neutrino condensation of cosmological scale in laboratory experiments.

  17. Technical Design Report for large-scale neutrino detectors prototyping and phased performance assessment in view of a long-baseline oscillation experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Bonis, I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2012, an Expression of Interest for a long-baseline experiment (LBNO, CERN-SPSC-EOI-007) has been submitted to the CERN SPSC and is presently under review. LBNO considers three types of neutrino detector technologies: a double-phase liquid argon (LAr) TPC and a magnetised iron detector as far detectors. For the near detector, a high-pressure gas TPC embedded in a calorimeter and a magnet is the baseline design. A mandatory milestone in view of any future long baseline experiment is a concrete prototyping effort towards the envisioned large-scale detectors, and an accompanying campaign of measurements aimed at assessing the systematic errors that will be affecting their intended physics programme. Following an encouraging feedback from 108th SPSC on the technology choices, we have defined as priority the construction and operation of a $6\\times 6\\times 6$m$^3$ (active volume) double-phase liquid argon (DLAr) demonstrator, and a parallel development of the technologies necessary for large magnetised MI...

  18. Probing non-standard decoherence effects with solar and KamLAND neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

    2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been speculated that quantum gravity might induce a "foamy" space-time structure at small scales, randomly perturbing the propagation phases of free-streaming particles (such as kaons, neutrons, or neutrinos). Particle interferometry might then reveal non-standard decoherence effects, in addition to standard ones (due to, e.g., finite source size and detector resolution.) In this work we discuss the phenomenology of such non-standard effects in the propagation of electron neutrinos in the Sun and in the long-baseline reactor experiment KamLAND, which jointly provide us with the best available probes of decoherence at neutrino energies E ~ few MeV. In the solar neutrino case, by means of a perturbative approach, decoherence is shown to modify the standard (adiabatic) propagation in matter through a calculable damping factor. By assuming a power-law dependence of decoherence effects in the energy domain (E^n with n = 0,+/-1,+/-2), theoretical predictions for two-family neutrino mixing are compared with the data and discussed. We find that neither solar nor KamLAND data show evidence in favor of non-standard decoherence effects, whose characteristic parameter gamma_0 can thus be significantly constrained. In the "Lorentz-invariant" case n=-1, we obtain the upper limit gamma_0density fluctuations in the Sun, which we improve by a factor of ~ 2 with respect to previous analyses.

  19. Large-Mass Ultra-Low Noise Germanium Detectors: Performance and Applications in Neutrino and Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Barbeau; J. I. Collar; O. Tench

    2007-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of radiation detector, a p-type modified electrode germanium diode, is presented. The prototype displays, for the first time, a combination of features (mass, energy threshold and background expectation) required for a measurement of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering in a nuclear reactor experiment. The device hybridizes the mass and energy resolution of a conventional HPGe coaxial gamma spectrometer with the low electronic noise and threshold of a small x-ray semiconductor detector, also displaying an intrinsic ability to distinguish multiple from single-site particle interactions. The present performance of the prototype and possible further improvements are discussed, as well as other applications for this new type of device in neutrino and astroparticle physics (double-beta decay, neutrino magnetic moment and WIMP searches).

  20. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  1. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating oxide fuel crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis is presented of the crust stability and heat transfer behavior in the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten oxide fuel at approx. 160/sup 0/K above its freezing temperature was impinged normally upon stainless steel plates initially at 300 and 385 K. The major issue is the existence of nonexistence of a stable solidified layer of fuel, or crust, interstitial to the flowing hot fuel and the steel substrate, tending to insulate the steel from the hot molten fuel. A computer model was developed to predict the heatup of thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the surface of the plate for both of the cases in which a stable crust is assumed to be either present or absent during the impingement phase. Comparison of the model calculations with the measured thermocouple temperatures indicates that a protective crust was present over nearly all of the plate surface area throughout the impingement process precluding major melting of the plate steel. However, the experiments also show evidence for very localized and isolated steel melting as revealed by localized and isolated pitting of the steel surface and the response of thermocouples located within the pitted region.

  2. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in an Average Power Position (I-24) in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M . Ryskamp; R. C. Howard; R. C. Pedersen; S. T. Khericha

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fissile Material Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan details a series of test irradiations designed to investigate the use of weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel for light water reactors (LWR) (Cowell 1996a, Cowell 1997a, Thoms 1997a). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons-derived test fuel contains small amounts of gallium (about 2 parts per million). A concern exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel and into the clad, inducing embrittlement. For preliminary out-of-pile experiments, Wilson (1997) states that intermetallic compound formation is the principal interaction mechanism between zircaloy cladding and gallium. This interaction is very limited by the low mass of gallium, so problems are not expected with the zircaloy cladding, but an in-pile experiment is needed to confirm the out-of-pile experiments. Ryskamp (1998) provides an overview of this experiment and its documentation. The purpose of this Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP) is to demonstrate the safe irradiation and handling of the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) Fuel Average Power Test (APT) experiment as required by Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) 3.9.1 (LMITCO 1998). This ESAP addresses the specific operation of the MOX Fuel APT experiment with respect to the operating envelope for irradiation established by the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO 1997a). Experiment handling activities are discussed herein.

  3. Electron Neutrinos at T2K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melissa George

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Tokai-to-Kamioka T2K is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, looking for sub-dominant muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations. One of the primary aims of the T2K experiment is to narrow down the current limit on the value of theta13 (which if this value large enough, suggests CP violation in the neutrino sector) and to find whether theta23 is maximal, which is crucial for constraining neutrino mass models. T2K produces a high power neutrino beam at the J-PARC facility on the east coast of Japan, and this beam is then characterised by the near detector ND280 280 m from the start of the beam, the far detector (Super-Kamiokande), a 50 kton water Cherenkov detector, then detects the beam at the oscillation maximum of 295 km on Japan's west coast. T2K will be the first experiment to really study the electron neutrino appearance measurement - whose result will be sensitive to theta13 arguably the main physics goal of T2K. The ND280 detector is imperative to this measurement and will be used to understand the electron neutrino appearance background. The status of the T2K experiment and the predicted performance for the electron neutrino appearance measurement is presented here.

  4. Recent Results in Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. L. Sarma

    1994-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a survey of the current experimental information on some of the interesting issues in neutrino physics: neutrino species, neutrino masses, neutrino magnetic moments, solar neutrinos, and the atmospheric neutrino anomaly.

  5. Qualification of JEFF3.1.1 library for high conversion reactor calculations using the ERASME/R experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidal, J. F.; Noguere, G.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC/LEPh, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With its low CO{sub 2} production, Nuclear Energy appears to be an efficient solution to the global warming due to green-house effect. However, current LWR reactors are poor uranium users and, pending the development of Fast Neutron Reactors, alternative concepts of PWR with higher conversion ratio (HCPWR) are being studied again at CEA, first studies dating from the middle 80's. In these French designs, low moderation ratio has been performed by tightening the lattice pitch, achieving a conversion ratio of 0.8-0.9 with a MOX fuel coming from PWR UOX recycling. Theses HCPWRs are characterized by a harder neutron spectrum and the calculation uncertainties on the fundamental neutronics parameters are increased by a factor 3 regarding a standard PWR lattice, due to the major contribution of the Plutonium isotopes and of the epithermal energy range to the reaction rates. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a 3-year experimental validation program called ERASME has been performed by CEA from 1984 to 1986 in the EOLE reactor. Monte Carlo analysis of the ERASME/R experiments with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI4 allowed the qualification of the recommended JEFF.3.1.1 library for major neutronics parameters. K{sub eff} of the MOX under-moderated lattice is over-predicted by 440 {+-} 830 pcm (2{sigma}); the conversion ratio, indicator of the good use of uranium, is also slightly over-predicted: 2 % {+-} 4 % (2{sigma}) and the same for B4C absorber rods worth and soluble boron worth, over-predicted by 2 %, both in the 2 standard deviations range. The radial fission maps of heterogeneities (water-holes, B4C and fertile rods) are well reproduced: maximal (C-E)/E dispersion is 1.3 %, maximal power peak error is 2.7 %. The void reactivity worth is the only parameter poorly calculated with an overprediction of +12.4% {+-} 1.5%. ERASME/R analysis of MOX reactivity, void effect and spectral indexes will contribute to the reevaluation of {sup 241}Am and Plutonium isotopes nuclear data for the next library JEFF3.2. (authors)

  6. Dealing with Historical Discrepancies: The Recovery of National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor Fuel Rods at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) - 13324

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickerd, Meggan [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J 1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the 1952 National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor accident, fuel rods which had short irradiation histories were 'temporarily' buried in wooden boxes at the 'disposal grounds' during the cleanup effort. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), strategically retrieves legacy waste and restores lands affected by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) early operations. Thus under this program the recovery of still buried NRX reactor fuel rods and their relocation to modern fuel storage was identified as a priority. A suspect inventory of NRX fuels was compiled from historical records and various research activities. Site characterization in 2005 verified the physical location of the fuel rods and determined the wooden boxes they were buried in had degraded such that the fuel rods were in direct contact with the soil. The fuel rods were recovered and transferred to a modern fuel storage facility in 2007. Recovered identification tags and measured radiation fields were used to identify the inventory of these fuels. During the retrieval activity, a discrepancy was discovered between the anticipated number of fuel rods and the number found during the retrieval. A total of 32 fuel rods and cans of cut end pieces were recovered from the specified site, which was greater than the anticipated 19 fuel rods and cans. This discovery delayed the completion of the project, increased the associated costs, and required more than anticipated storage space in the modern fuel storage facility. A number of lessons learned were identified following completion of this project, the most significant of which was the potential for discrepancies within the historical records. Historical discrepancies are more likely to be resolved by comprehensive historical record searches and site characterizations. It was also recommended that a complete review of the wastes generated, and the total affected lands as a result of this historic 1952 NRX accident be undertaken. These lessons and recommendations have lead to changes in how the NLLP is executed in the CRL waste management areas. (authors)

  7. Short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance, tritium beta decay, and neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giunti, Carlo; Laveder, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica G. Galilei, Universita di Padova, and INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the interpretation of the MiniBooNE low-energy anomaly and the gallium radioactive source experiments anomaly in terms of short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance in the framework of 3+1 four-neutrino mixing schemes. The separate fits of MiniBooNE and gallium data are highly compatible, with close best-fit values of the effective oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}2{theta}. The combined fit gives {Delta}m{sup 2}(greater-or-similar sign)0.1 eV{sup 2} and 0.11(less-or-similar sign)sin{sup 2}2{theta}(less-or-similar sign)0.48 at 2{sigma}. We consider also the data of the Bugey and Chooz reactor antineutrino oscillation experiments and the limits on the effective electron antineutrino mass in {beta} decay obtained in the Mainz and Troitsk tritium experiments. The fit of the data of these experiments limits the value of sin{sup 2}2{theta} below 0.10 at 2{sigma}. Considering the tension between the neutrino MiniBooNE and gallium data and the antineutrino reactor and tritium data as a statistical fluctuation, we perform a combined fit which gives {Delta}m{sup 2}{approx_equal}2 eV and 0.01(less-or-similar sign)sin{sup 2}2{theta}(less-or-similar sign)0.13 at 2{sigma}. Assuming a hierarchy of masses m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}, m{sub 3}<neutrino masses in {beta} decay and neutrinoless double-{beta} decay are, respectively, between about 0.06 and 0.49 and between about 0.003 and 0.07 eV at 2{sigma}. We also consider the possibility of reconciling the tension between the neutrino MiniBooNE and gallium data and the antineutrino reactor and tritium data with different mixings in the neutrino and antineutrino sectors. We find a 2.6{sigma} indication of a mixing angle asymmetry.

  8. Highlights of the TEXONO Research Program on Neutrino and Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. T. Wong; J. Li; Z. Y. Zhou

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the research program and efforts for the TEXONO Collaboration on neutrino and astro-particle physics. The ``flagship'' program is on reactor-based neutrino physics at the Kuo-Sheng (KS) Power Plant in Taiwan. A limit on the neutrino magnetic moment of $\\munuebar physics topics at KS, as well as the various R&D program, are discussed

  9. Neutrino Physics, Superbeams, and the Neutrino Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Kayser

    2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize what has been learned about the neutrino mass spectrum and neutrino mixing, identify interesting open questions that can be answered by accelerator neutrino facilities of the future, and discuss the importance and physics of answering them.

  10. Cosmic neutrino cascades from secret neutrino interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny C. Y. Ng; John F. Beacom

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first detection of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube provides new opportunities for tests of neutrino properties. The long baseline through the Cosmic Neutrino Background (C$\

  11. Velocity Induced Neutrino Oscillation and its Possible Implications for Long Baseline Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banik, Amit Dutta

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the three types of active neutrinos possess different maximum attainable velocities and the neutrino eigenstates in the velocity basis are different from those in the flavour (and mass) basis then this will induce a flavour oscillation in addition to the normal mass flavour oscillation. Here we study such an oscillation scenario in three neutrino framework including also the matter effect and apply our results to demonstrate its consequences for long baseline neutrinos. We also predict the possible signatures in terms of yields in a possible long baseline neutrino experiment.

  12. Neutrino Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operators in the Lagrangian (Majorana mass terms), or both. The ongoing neutrinoless double-beta decay searches may be able to shine light on the matter. But the neutrino sector...

  13. Four-Way Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; T. J. Weiler; K. Whisnant

    1997-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a four-neutrino model with three active neutrinos and one sterile neutrino which naturally has maximal $\

  14. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  15. A bound on neutrino masses from baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Buchmüller; P. Di Bari; M. Plümacher

    2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of neutrinos, the lightest of all elementary particles, may be the origin of the entire matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe. This requires that neutrinos are Majorana particles, which are equal to their antiparticles, and that their masses are sufficiently small. Leptogenesis, the theory explaining the cosmic matter-antimatter asymmetry, predicts that all neutrino masses are smaller than 0.2 eV, which will be tested by forthcoming laboratory experiments and by cosmology.

  16. Reactor Measurement of theta_12; Principles, Accuracies and Physics Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Minakata; H. Nunokawa; W. J. C. Teves; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss reactor measurement of \\theta_{12} which has a potential of reaching the ultimate sensitivity which surpasses all the methods so far proposed. The key is to place a detector at an appropriate baseline distance from the reactor neutrino source to have an oscillation maximum at around a peak energy of the event spectrum in the absence of oscillation. By a detailed statistical analysis the optimal distance is estimated to be \\simeq (50-70) km x [8 x 10^{-5} eV^2/\\Delta m^2_{21}], which is determined by maximizing the oscillation effect in the event number distribution and minimizing geo-neutrino background contamination. To estimate possible uncertainty caused by surrounding nuclear reactors in distance of \\sim 100 km, we examine a concrete example of a detector located at Mt. Komagatake, 54 km away from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Japan, the most powerful reactor complex in the world. The effect turns out to be small. Under a reasonable assumption of systematic error of 4% in the experiment, we find that sin^2{\\theta_{12}} can be determined to the accuracy of \\simeq 2% (\\simeq 3%), at 68.27% CL for 1 degree of freedom, for 60 GW_th kton yr (20 GW_th kton yr) operation. We also discuss implications of such an accurate measurement of \\theta_{12}.

  17. Letter of Intent for KASKA: High Accuracy Neutrino Oscillation Measurements with anti-nu_es from Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Aoki; K. Akiyama; Y. Fukuda; A. Fukui; Y. Funaki; H. Furuta; T. Hara; T. Haruna; N. Ishihara; T. Iwabuchi; M. Katsumata; T. Kawasaki; M. Kuze; J. Maeda; T. Matsubara; T. Matsumoto; H. Minakata; H. Miyata; Y. Nagasaka; T. Nakagawa; N. Nakajima; H. Nakano; K. Nitta; M. Nomachi; K. Sakai; Y. Sakamoto; K. Sakuma; M. Sasaki; F. Suekane; H. Sugiyama; T. Sumiyoshi; H. Tabata; N. Tamura; M. Tanimoto; Y. Tsuchiya; R. Watanabe; O. Yasuda

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the current most-demanded experiments in neutrino physics is to measure the last mixing angle theta_13. KASKA is an experiment to detect new type of reactor neutrino oscillation and to measure sin^2 2theta_13 accurately using the world's most powerful nuclear reactor complex; Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station. KASKA utilizes near and far detectors of identical structure at nearly optimized baselines and underground depths to cancel most of the systematics and reduce backgrounds. The expected sensitivity is sin^2 2theta_13~0.015, which is 10 times better sensitivity than the current upper limit measured by CHOOZ reactor experiment. Extension of KASKA project has potential to accurately measure other anti-nu_e oscillation parameters. Intense and precisely known neutrino flux measured by the KASKA-theta_13 phase can be used to pin down sin^2 2theta_12 at a baseline ~50km and to measure Dm^2_13 for the first time at a baseline ~5km. This Letter of Intent describes physics motivation, detector system and expected performance of the KASKA experiment.

  18. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material - There are likely multiple phases of material in the salt (metal or compound), either suspended through the salt matrix, layered in the bottom of the tank, or both. These phases may contribute to plugging during any planned transfer. There is not enough data to know for sure. (4) Probe heat trace - The alternate transfer method does not include heat tracing of the bottom of the probe. There is a concern that this may cool the salt and other phases of materials present enough to block the flow of salt. (5) Stress-corrosion cracking - Additionally, there is a concern regarding moisture that may have been introduced into the tanks. Due to time constraints, this concern was not validated. However, if moisture was introduced into the tanks and not removed during heating the tanks before HF and F2 sparging, there would be an additional concern regarding the potential for stress-corrosion cracking of the tank walls.

  19. Aging assessment of reactor instrumentation and protection system components. Aging-related operating experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, A.C.; Hagen, E.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the aging-related operating experiences throughout a five-year period (1984--1988) of six generic instrumentation modules (indicators, sensors, controllers, transmitters, annunciators, and recorders) was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The effects of aging from operational and environmental stressors were characterized from results depicted in Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The data are graphically displayed as frequency of events per plant year for operating plant ages from 1 to 28 years to determine aging-related failure trend patterns. Three main conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) Instrumentation and control (I&C) modules make a modest contribution to safety-significant events: 17% of LERs issued during 1984--1988 dealt with malfunctions of the six I&C modules studied, and 28% of the LERs dealing with these I&C module malfunctions were aging related (other studies show a range 25--50%); (2) Of the six modules studied, indicators, sensors, and controllers account for the bulk (83%) of aging-related failures; and (3) Infant mortality appears to be the dominant aging-related failure mode for most I&C module categories (with the exception of annunciators and recorders, which appear to fail randomly).

  20. Neutrinos: an Open Window on Fundamental Physics and the Evolution of the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pascoli, Silvia (IPPP, Durham University) [IPPP, Durham University

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past ten years, a series of experiments has confirmed that neutrinos can oscillate between different types ('flavors') and have mass. These results are the first solid evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics, with profound implications for the Universe and the laws that govern it. Thanks to a broad experimental program, including accelerator- and reactor-based experiments such as MINOS, MiniBooNE, T2K, Double-CHOOZ, Daya Bay, NOvA, LBNE, and searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, we have just entered the 'precision era' in neutrino physics. I will review the status of experimental results, their implications for our understanding of neutrino properties, and the questions that must be addressed. I will give an overview of the exciting experimental program that is underway and I will discuss how neutrino physics will help in opening a new window on the fundamental laws of Nature, its fundamental constituents, and the evolution of the Universe.

  1. Low-energy neutral-current neutrino scattering on nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakstara, V. [Theoretical Physics Section, University of Ioannina, GR 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kosmas, T. S.; Wambach, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt and GSI, Theoretical Physics Division, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic cross-sections of neutral current neutrino scattering on the {sup 40}Ar isotope, detector-medium of the ongoing ICARUS experiment, are computed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation by utilizing realistic two-nucleon forces. ICARUS is a multipurpose neutrino physics experiment that includes in its objectives low-energy neutrino detection. The incoming neutrino energy range adopted in our calculations ({epsilon}{sub {nu}}{<=}100 MeV), covers the laboratory low-energy beta-beam-neutrinos and pion-muon stopped neutrino-beams operating or planned to be conducted at future neutron spallation sources. One of the main goals of these neutrino beams is to measure neutrino-nucleus cross sections at low-energies.

  2. On the description of non-unitary neutrino mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Escrihuela; D. V. Forero; O. G. Miranda; M. Tortola; J. W. F. Valle

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations are well established and the relevant parameters determined with good precision, except for the CP phase, in terms of a unitary lepton mixing matrix. Seesaw extensions of the Standard Model predict unitarity deviations due to the admixture of heavy isosinglet neutrinos. We provide a complete description of the unitarity and universality deviations in the light neutrino sector. Neutrino oscillation experiments involving electron or muon neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are fully described in terms of just three new real parameters and a new CP phase, in addition to the ones describing oscillations with unitary mixing. Using this formalism we describe the implications of non-unitarity for neutrino oscillations and summarize the model-independent constraints on heavy neutrino couplings that arise from current experiments.

  3. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of $10^{20}$ and $10^{13}$ eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos.

  4. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by neutrinos with energies similar to those of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  5. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the delta m**2 about equals 1-eV**2 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, David W.; /Columbia U.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  6. Unveiling neutrino mixing and leptonic CP violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, Olga; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the present understanding of neutrino masses and mixings, discussing what are the unknowns in the three family oscillation scenario. Despite the anticipated success coming from the planned long baseline neutrino experiments in unraveling the leptonic mixing sector, there are two important unknowns which may remain obscure: the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the CP-phase {delta}. The measurement of these two parameters has led us to consider the combination of superbeams and neutrino factories as the key to unveil the neutrino oscillation picture.

  7. CP violation in neutrino mass matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utpal Sarkar; Santosh K. Singh

    2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed rephasing invariant measures of CP violation with elements of the neutrino mass matrix, in the basis in which the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal. We discuss some examples of neutrino mass matrices with texture zeroes, where the present approach is applicable and demonstrate how it simplifies an analysis of CP violation. We applied our approach to study CP violation in all the phenomenologically acceptable 3-generation two-zero texture neutrino mass matrices and shown that in any of these cases there is only one CP phase which contributes to the neutrino oscillation experiment and there are no Majorana phases.

  8. Non-Oscillation Probes of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster Institut fuer Kernphysik, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing statements on the neutrino mass from cosmological observations, two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and the direct neutrino mass search. For both methods currently experiments with a sensitivity of O(100) meV are being set up or commissioned.

  9. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redi, Martha H.

    on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor M. H. Redia , S. H. Batha, R. V. Budny, D. S. Darrow, F. M. Levinton, D. C. Mc Test Reactor [Phys. Plas. 5, 1577 (1998)] are found to be in good agreement with measurements includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first-principles model for stochastic ripple loss

  10. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor M. H. Redi a , S. H. Batha, M. G. Bell, R. V. Budny, D. S. Darrow, F. M on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plas. 5 , 1577 (1998)] are found to be in good agreement code which includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first­principles model

  11. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor M. H. Redia , S. H. Batha, M. G. Bell, R. V. Budny, D. S. Darrow, F. M on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plas. 5, 1577 (1998)] are found to be in good agreement code which includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first-principles model

  12. Reed Reactor Facility Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, Stephen G.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the report of the operations, experiments, modifications, and other aspects of the Reed Reactor Facility for the year.

  13. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  14. Can we learn something more on oscillations from atmospheric neutrinos?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that for long-baseline experiments using a Mt water Cerenkov detector atmospheric neutrino data provide a powerful method to resolve parameter degeneracies. In particular, the combination of long-baseline and atmospheric data increases significantly the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy and the octant of $\\theta_{23}$. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility to use $\\mu$-like atmospheric neutrino data from a big magnetized iron calorimeter to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  15. Super-Kamiokande data and atmospheric neutrino decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; G. Scioscia

    1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino decay has been proposed as a possible solution to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, in the light of the recent data from the Super-Kamiokande experiment. We investigate this hypothesis by means of a quantitative analysis of the zenith angle distributions of neutrino events in Super-Kamiokande, including the latest (45 kTy) data. We find that the neutrino decay hypothesis fails to reproduce the observed distributions of muons.

  16. Pontecorvo neutrino-antineutrino oscillations: theory and experimental limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Esposito; N. Tancredi

    1997-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study Pontecorvo neutrino-antineutrino oscillations both in vacuum and in matter within a field theoretic approach, showing that this phenomenon can occur only if neutrinos have a Dirac-Majorana mass term. We find that matter effects suppress these oscillations and cannot explain the solar neutrino problem. On the contrary, a vacuum neutrino-antineutrino oscillations solution to this problem exists. We analyze this solution and available data from laboratory experiments giving stringent limits on $\

  17. Everything Under the Sun: A Review of Solar Neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gann, G D Orebi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar neutrinos offer a unique opportunity to study the interaction of neutrinos with matter, a sensitive search for potential new physics effects, and a probe of solar structure and solar system formation. This paper describes the broad physics program addressed by solar neutrino studies, presents the current suite of experiments programs, and describes several potential future detectors that could address the open questions in this field. This paper is a summary of a talk presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference in Boston.

  18. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  19. Large neutrino asymmetries from neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Foot; M. J. Thomson; R. R. Volkas

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine neutrino oscillations in the early universe. Contrary to previous studies, we show that large neutrino asymmetries can arise due to oscillations between ordinary neutrinos and sterile neutrinos. This means that the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) bounds on the mass and mixing of ordinary neutrinos with sterile neutrinos can be evaded. Also, it is possible that the neutrino asymmetries can be large (i.e. $\\stackrel{>}{\\sim} 10\\%$), and hence have a significant effect on BBN through nuclear reaction rates.

  20. 32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 On neutrino oscillations searches with ANTARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 On neutrino oscillations searches guillard@in2p3.fr Abstract: Although the first evidence for neutrino oscillations came from measurements on atmospheric neutrinos in underground experiments, neutrino oscillations have yet to be demonstrated in high