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1

STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Mossbauer Spectroscopic Study of Gamma Irradiation on the Structural Properties of Hematite, Magnetite and Limonite Concrete for Nuclear Reactor Shielding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on a heavy type of concrete, constructed for nuclear reactor shield. The effect of gamma irradiation was...

N.A. Eissa; M.S.I. Kany; A.S. Mohamed; A.A. Sallam; M.H. El Fouly

3

Zircaloy-4 cladding deformation during power reactor irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Axial elongation, circumferential creep, ovalization and ridging in Zircaloy fuel cladding were investigated for fuel irradiated in four modern PWR's. For fueled rods, only fluence and stress were found to influence elongation, while for nonfueled rods the texture was also important. Time and flux had weaker than linear influence on circumferential creep strain in nonfueled rods, while the influence of the stress was stronger than linear. The strain rate was almost athermal. The creep strain clearly increased with preirradiation yield strength. The creep rate decreased with an increase in the angle between the basal poles and the radial direction. Ovalization of fueled and nonfueled rods was observed. Clad ridging developed in fueled rods, usually in a time period between one and two reactor cycles and almost always after three cycles. 29 refs.

Franklin, D.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Design and Status of RERTR Irradiation Tests in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation testing of U-Mo based fuels is the central component of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program fuel qualification plan. Several RERTR tests have recently been completed or are planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, ID. Four mini-plate experiments in various stages of completion are described in detail, including the irradiation test design, objectives, and irradiation conditions. Observations made during and after the in-reactor RERTR-7A experiment breach are summarized. The irradiation experiment design and planned irradiation conditions for full-size plate test are described. Progress toward element testing will be reviewed.

Daniel M. Wachs; Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray Chang; Mitchell K. Meyer

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Mechanical Strength, Swelling and Weight Loss of Inorganic Fusion Magnet Insulation Systems Following Reactor Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Superconducting fusion magnets require a high electrical and mechanical ... were irradiated at ambient temperature in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna, Austria) up to neutron fluences...21, 1022 and 5x1022 m?2...(E>0.1 ...

K. Humer; P. Rosenkranz; H. W. Weber…

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Irradiation research capabilities at HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) and ANS (Advanced Neutron Source)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of materials irradiation facilities exist in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and are planned for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. In 1986 the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement (HIFI) project began modifications to the HFIR which now permit the operation of two instrumented capsules in the target region and eight capsules of 46-mm OD in the RB region. Thus, it is now possible to perform instrumented irradiation experiments in the highest continuous flux of thermal neutrons available in the western world. The new RB facilities are now large enough to permit neutron spectral tailoring of experiments and the modified method of access to these facilities permit rotation of experiments thereby reducing fluence gradients in specimens. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities in HFIR is presented. The ANS is being designed to provide the highest thermal neutron flux for beam facilities in the world. Additional design goals include providing materials irradiation and transplutonium isotope production facilities as good, or better than, HFIR. The reference conceptual core design consists of two annular fuel elements positioned one above the other instead of concentrically as in the HFIR. A variety of materials irradiation facilities with unprecedented fluxes are being incorporated into the design of the ANS. These will include fast neutron irradiation facilities in the central hole of the upper fuel element, epithermal facilities surrounding the lower fuel element, and thermal facilities in the reflector tank. A summary of characteristics of irradiation facilities presently planned for the ANS is presented. 2 tabs.

Thoms, K.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Displacement damage induce degradation of COTS array \\{CCDs\\} irradiated by neutron beams from a nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The experiments of displacement damage effects on COTS array charge coupled devices (CCDs) induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The charge transfer inefficiency (CTI), saturation output signal voltage (VS), dynamic range (DR), dark signal, and camera imaging quality versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of the \\{CCDs\\} irradiated by reactor neutron beams are also analyzed. The CTI increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The experiments show that VS degradation induced by neutron irradiation is much less than that induced by gamma irradiation. The dark images from the \\{CCDs\\} irradiated by neutrons are given to investigate dark signal degradation. The degradation forms and mechanisms of the camera imaging quality are very different between the reactor neutron displacement damage and the gamma total ionization dose damage. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron-equivalent fluences of 1×1011, 5×1011, and 1×1012 n/cm2, respectively. A sample was exposed by 1 MeV neutron-equivalent fluences up to 2×1013 n/cm2, and the CCD is a functional failure after irradiation.

Wang Zujun; Chen Wei; Xiao Zhigang; Liu Minbo; Huang Shaoyan; He Baoping; Luo Tongding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Advanced neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). By increasing the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy, the neutron spectra were shifted into lower energies by the scattering interactions of fast...

Jang, Si Young

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Monte Carlo estimation of the dose and heating of cobalt adjuster rods irradiated in the CANDU 6 reactor core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cobalt adjuster rods irradiated in the CANDU 6 reactor core Daniela Gugiu Ion Dumitrache...adjuster rods with cobalt assemblies in the CANDU 6 reactor core. The 60Co produced by 59Co...the cobalt adjusters. INTRODUCTION In CANDU reactors, one has the facility to replace......

Daniela Gugiu; Ion Dumitrache

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

Blaine Grover

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Modelling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic and oxide fuels for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A robust and reliable code to model the irradiation behavior of metal and oxide fuels in sodium cooled fast reactors is developed. Modeling capability was enhanced by adopting a non-empirical mechanistic approach to the ...

Karahan, Aydin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Computational Nuclear Forensics Analysis of Weapons-grade Plutonium Separated from Fuel Irradiated in a Thermal Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have been irradiated to the desired burnup in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory- High Flux Isotope Reactor (ORNL-HFIR), and then separated using the PUREX process to experimentally determine the intrinsic signature of the fuel. The experimental data...

Coles, Taylor Marie

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Treatment of Irradiated Graphite from French Bugey Reactor - 13424  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in 2009, in order to determine an alternative to direct disposal for decommissioned irradiated graphite from EDF's Bugey NPP, Studsvik and EDF began a test program to determine if graphite decontamination and destruction were practicable using Studsvik's thermal organic reduction (THOR) technology. The testing program focused primarily on the release of C-14, H-3, and Cl-36 and also monitored graphite mass loss. For said testing, a bench-scale steam reformer (BSSR) was constructed with the capability of flowing various compositions of gases at temperatures up to 1300 deg. C over uniformly sized particles of graphite for fixed amounts of time. The BSSR was followed by a condenser, thermal oxidizer, and NaOH bubbler system designed to capture H-3 and C-14. Also, in a separate series of testing, high concentration acid and peroxide solutions were used to soak the graphite and leach out and measure Cl-36. A series of gasification tests were performed to scope gas compositions and temperatures for graphite gasification using steam and oxygen. Results suggested higher temperature steam (1100 deg. C vs. 900 deg. C) yielded a practicable gasification rate but that lower temperature (900 deg. C) gasification was also a practicable treatment alternative if oxygen is fed into the process. A series of decontamination tests were performed to determine the release behavior of and extent to which C-14 and H-3 were released from graphite in a high temperature (900-1300 deg. C), low flow roasting gas environment. In general, testing determined that higher temperatures and longer roasting times were efficacious for releasing H-3 completely and the majority (80%) of C-14. Manipulating oxidizing and reducing gas environments was also found to limit graphite mass loss. A series of soaking tests was performed to measure the amount of Cl-36 in the samples of graphite before and after roasting in the BSSR. Similar to C-14 release, these soaking tests revealed that 70-80% Cl-36 is released during roasting tests. (authors)

Brown, Thomas [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States); Poncet, Bernard [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)] [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Performance Analysis of the Reactor Pattern in Network Services Swapna Gokhale Aniruddha Gokhale Jeff Gray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Analysis of the Reactor Pattern in Network Services Swapna Gokhale Aniruddha Gokhale into a reusable pattern, such as the Reactor pattern. In order to enable performance analysis of event by software applications places a high premium on the reliable and efficient operation of these applications

Gray, Jeffrey G.

17

Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a particular batch scheme). The volume of test space in IPTs is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. In addition to the IPTs, the Cylindrical MATRIX concept features test spaces at the centers of fuel assemblies where very high fast flux can be achieved. This magnitude of fast flux is similar to that achieved in the ATR A-positions, however, the available volume having these conditions is greater in the MATRIX design than in the ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the Cylindrical MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this statement must be qualified by acknowledging that this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design matures. Also, some of the requirements were not strictly met, but are believed to be achievable once features to be added later are designed.

Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Accelerator-Based Irradiation Creep of Pyrolytic Carbon Used in TRISO Fuel Particles for the (VHTR) Very Hight Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the important structural materials in the TRISO fuel particles which will be used in the next generation of gas-cooled very-high-temperature reactors (VHTR). When the TRISO particles are under irradiation at high temperatures, creep of the PyC layers may cause radial cracking leading to catastrophic particle failure. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the creep behavior of PyC during irradiation is required to predict the overall fuel performance.

Lumin Wang; Gary Was

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Method to Assess the Radionuclide Inventory of Irradiated Graphite from Gas-Cooled Reactors - 13072  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 17,000 t of irradiated graphite waste will be produced from the decommissioning of the six French gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Determining the radionuclide (RN) content of this waste is of relevant importance for safety reasons and in order to determine the best way to manage them. For many reasons the impurity content that gave rise to the RNs in irradiated graphite by neutron activation during operation is not always well known and sometimes actually unknown. So, assessing the RN content by the use of traditional calculation activation, starting from assumed impurity content, leads to a false assessment. Moreover, radiochemical measurements exhibit very wide discrepancies especially on RN corresponding to precursor at the trace level such as natural chlorine corresponding to chlorine 36. This wide discrepancy is unavoidable and is due to very simple reasons. The level of impurity is very low because the uranium fuel used at that very moment was not enriched, so it was a necessity to have very pure nuclear grade graphite and the very low size of radiochemical sample is a simple technical constraint because device size used to get mineralization product for measurement purpose is limited. The assessment of a radionuclide inventory only based on few number of radiochemical measurements lead in most cases, to a gross over or under-estimation that is detrimental for graphite waste management. A method using an identification calculation-measurement process is proposed in order to assess a radiological inventory for disposal sizing purpose as precise as possible while guaranteeing its upper character. This method present a closer approach to the reality of the main phenomenon at the origin of RNs in a reactor, while also incorporating the secondary effects that can alter this result such as RN (or its precursor) release during reactor operation. (authors)

Poncet, Bernard [EDF-CIDEN, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, F-69458 LYON cedex 06 (France)] [EDF-CIDEN, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, F-69458 LYON cedex 06 (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tritium trapping in silicon carbide in contact with solid breeder under high flux isotope reactor irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trapping of tritium in silicon carbide (SiC) injected from ceramic breeding materials was examined via tritium measurements using imaging plate (IP) techniques. Monolithic SiC in contact with ternary lithium oxide (lithium titanate and lithium aluminate) as a ceramic breeder was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The distribution of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) of tritium in SiC was successfully obtained, which separated the contribution of 14C ß-rays to the PSL. The tritium incident from ceramic breeders was retained in the vicinity of the SiC surface even after irradiation at 1073 K over the duration of ~3000 h, while trapping of tritium was not observed in the bulk region. The PSL intensity near the SiC surface in contact with lithium titanate was higher than that obtained with lithium aluminate. The amount of the incident tritium and/or the formation of a Li2SiO3 phase on SiC due to the reaction with lithium aluminate under irradiation likely were responsible for this observation.

H. Katsui; Y. Katoh; A. Hasegawa; M. Shimada; Y. Hatano; T. Hinoki; S. Nogami; T. Tanaka; S. Nagata; T. Shikama

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support the growth of nuclear science and technology in the United States (US). By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this initial review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR, and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program’s strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. Since 2009, annual reports have been issued to provide updates on the program strategy and the progress made on implementing the strategy. This report provides an update reflecting progress as of January 2014.

J. Rempe; D. Knudson; J. Daw; T. Unruh; B. Chase; R. Schley; J. Palmer; K. Condie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Review of In-Service Inspection and Repair Technique Developments for French Liquid Metal Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-service monitoring of nuclear plants is indispensable for both the Operator and the Regulator. The notion of in-service monitoring ranges from the continuous monitoring of the reactor in operation to the thorough in-service reactor inspection during programmed shutdowns. However, the highly specific environment found in French liquid metal fast reactor plants - Phenix and Superphenix - makes monitoring and inspection complicated because of the use of a sodium coolant that is hot, opaque, and difficult to drain.The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, in collaboration with its traditional French partners, Electricite de France utilities and FRAMATOME/Novatome Engineering, decided to conduct a 6-yr research and development program (1994-2000) to explore this problem vis-a-vis Superphenix, as well as the possibilities of intervening within the reactor block or on components in a sodium environment. Furthermore, the safety reevaluation of Phenix, conducted between 1994 and 2003, represented an excellent 'test bench' during which the limits of inspection processes - applied to an integrated reactor concept - were surpassed using techniques such as fuel subassembly head scanning, ultrasonic examination of the core support, and visual inspection of the cover-gas plenum following a partial sodium draining. Repair techniques were investigated for cleaning of sodium wet structure surfaces, cutting of damaged parts, and welding in sodium aerosol atmosphere. Both conventional and laser processes were tested.

Baque, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Irradiation Effect on the Interface of the Composites Used as the Insulation Materials in the Nuclear Fusion Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the insulation materials containing polymeric matrix are the most radiation-sensitive among the materials constituting the superconducting magnet in the nuclear fusion reactor. Insulation materials are fabricated by impregnating the polymeric material into the stacks of alternating layers of polyimide films and glass cloth. There are a lot of studies about irradiation property of each constituent material, whereas few studies are reported about the irradiation effect on the resin -glass cloth and the resin –polyimide film boundary. In this study, we focused on the degradation of the resin-glass cloth boundary. The influence of the surface treatment and the weaving density of the glass cloth on the boundary degradation was evaluated by the mechanical properties before and after irradiation. The composite material specimens were prepared using the glass cloth with different surface treatment, and with different weaving density. The inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) test was conducted to examine the influence of the boundary on the radiation effect. In addition, the fracture mechanism were evaluated by optical micro-scope. Based on the results, it was indicated that the weaving density of the glass cloth is small influence on the irradiation effect and the radiation resistance was improved by the surface treatment.

M. Hayashi; Y. Nakata; F. Mishima; Y. Akiyama; S. Nishijima

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Effects of thermomechanical processing on in-reactor corrosion and post-irradiation mechanical properties of Zircaloy-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest continues to be high in the effects of irradiation on the microstructure and microchemistry of Zircaloy and on the resultant effects on performance of Zircaloy components in-reactor. In this study, the authors have investigated the behavior of material prepared to have excellent resistance to nodular corrosion in a BWR. Coupon specimens of Zircaloy-2 were prepared having a range of critical microstructural parameters by varying the thermomechanical processing history. Irradiation was conducted in a BWR at 561 K to fluences between 1.3 and 8.5 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. As expected, nodular corrosion was absent in these materials, and, at low fluence, corrosion and hydriding of all materials was very low. At the highest fluences, patch-type uniform corrosion developed, with oxide thickness increasing with decreasing initial precipitate size. Detailed STEM investigation revealed that precipitates dissolved and decreased in size continuously until at the highest fluence no precipitates remained for material having the smallest initial precipitate size. Post-irradiation mechanical property tests showed strength somewhat higher than expected. The results indicate that corrosion resistance and mechanical properties change as the microstructure evolves during irradiation. However, at the highest fluence tested, strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance ensure excellent performance of BWR components.

Huang, P.Y.; Mahmood, S.T.; Adamson, R.B. [GE Nuclear Energy, Pleasanton, CA (United States). Vallecitos Nuclear Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone. A radiation annealing model was developed based on the elimination of dislocation loops by vacancy absorption. Results showed that there were indeed, time-temperature annealing combinations that leave the radiation induced segregation profile largely unaltered while the dislocation microstructure is significantly reduced. Proton irradiation of 304 stainless steel irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons to 1.0 or 2.5 dpa resulted in grain boundary depletion of chromium and enrichment of nickel and a radiation damaged microstructure. Post irradiation annealing at temperatures of 500 ? 600°C for times of up to 45 min. removed the dislocation microstructure to a greater degree with increasing temperatures, or times at temperature, while leaving the radiation induced segregation profile relatively unaltered. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments in 288°C water containing 2 ppm O2 and with a conductivity of 0.2 mS/cm and at a strain rate of 3 x 10-7 s-1 showed that the IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the crack length per unit strain, decreased with very short anneals and was almost completely removed by an anneal at 500°C for 45 min. This annealing treatment removed about 15% of the dislocation microstructure and the irradiation hardening, but did not affect the grain boundary chromium depletion or nickel segregation, nor did it affect the grain boundary content of other minor impurities. These results indicate that RIS is not the sole controlling feature of IASCC in irradiated stainless steels in normal water chemistry. The isolation of the irradiated microstructure was approached using low temperature irradiation or combinations of low and high temperature irradiations to achieve a stable, irradiated microstructure without RIS. Experiments were successful in achieving a high degree of irradiation hardening without any evidence of RIS of either major or minor elements. The low temperature irradiations to doses up to 0.3 dpa at T<75°C were also very successful in producing hardening to levels considerably above that for irradiations conducted under nominal conditions of 1 dpa at 360°C. However, the microstructure consisted of an extremely fine dispersion of defect clusters of sizes that are not resolvable by either transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The microstructure was not stable at the 288°C IASCC test temperature and resulted in rapid reduction of hardening and presumably, annealing of the defect clusters at this temperature as well. Nevertheless, the annealing studies showed that treatments that resulted in significant decreases in the hardening produced small changes in the dislocation microstructure that were confined to the elimination of the finest of loops (~1 nm). These results substantiate the importance of the very fine defect microstructure in the IASCC process. The results of this program provide the first definitive evidence that RIS is not the sole controlling factor in the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stain

Gary S. Was; Michael Atzmon; Lumin Wang

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effects of 50/degree/C surveillance and test reactor irradiations on ferritic pressure vessel steel embrittlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of surveillance tests on the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory revealed that a greater than expected embrittlement had taken place after about 17.5 effective full-power years of operation and an operational assessment program was undertaken to fully evaluate the vessel condition and recommend conditions under which operation could be resumed. A research program was undertaken that included irradiating specimens in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Specimens of the A212 grade B vessel shell material were included, along with specimens from a nozzle qualification weld and a submerged-arc weld fabricated at ORNL to reproduce the vessel seam weld. The results of the surveillance program and the materials research program performed in support of the evaluation of the HFIR pressure vessel are presented and show the welds to be more radiation resistant than the A212B. Results of irradiated tensile and annealing experiments are described as well as a discussion of mechanisms which may be responsible for enhanced hardening at low damage rates. 20 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Corwin, W.R.; Odette, G.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

Lund, A.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Design of central irradiation facilities for the MITR-II research reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design analysis studies have been made for various in-core irradiation facility designs which are presently used, or proposed for future use in the MITR-II. The information obtained includes reactivity effects, core flux ...

Meagher, Paul Christopher

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Calculation of damage function of Al2O3 in irradiation facilities for fusion reactor applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A rigorous material testing program is essential for the development of the nuclear fusion world program. In particular, it is very important to predict the generation of the displacement damage in materials, because the irradiation intensity expected in fusion conditions is such that the performance of materials and components under these extreme conditions is unknown. To study the damage produced by neutrons in materials of interest for fusion, a specific computational methodology was developed. Neutron fluxes expected in different irradiation facilities (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility [IFMIF] and DEMO-HCLL) and in different irradiation spots were obtained with particles transport codes (McDeLicious, MCNP). The energy differential cross sections of primary knock-on atoms were calculated using the NJOY code. Resulting data were input into the Monte Carlo code MARLOWE to calculate the corresponding displacements (i.e., interstitials (I) and vacancies (V)). However, the number of Frenkel pairs created during irradiation strongly depends on the recombination radius between interstitials and vacancies. This parameter corresponds to the minimum distance below which instantaneous recombination occurs. Mainly, the influence of such parameter on the damage function in Al2O3 was assessed in this report. The displacements per atom values calculated as a function of the recombination radius considered are compared to experimental data to determine the most appropriate capture radius. In addition, the damage function and damage dose generated at different experimental irradiation facilities are compared with those expected in DEMO. The conclusion is that both IFMIF and TechnoFusión (future triple beam ion accelerator to emulate fusion neutron irradiation effects in materials) facilities are suited to perform relevant irradiation experiments for the design of DEMO.

F. Mota; C.J. Ortiz; R. Vila; N. Casal; A. García; A. Ibarra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Status of the Norwegian thorium light water reactor (LWR) fuel development and irradiation test program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thorium based fuels offer several benefits compared to uranium based fuels and should thus be an attractive alternative to conventional fuel types. In order for thorium based fuel to be licensed for use in current LWRs, material properties must be well known for fresh as well as irradiated fuel, and accurate prediction of fuel behavior must be possible to make for both normal operation and transient scenarios. Important parameters are known for fresh material but the behaviour of the fuel under irradiation is unknown particularly for low Th content. The irradiation campaign aims to widen the experience base to irradiated (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel and (Th,U)O{sub 2} with low Th content and to confirm existing data for fresh fuel. The assumptions with respect to improved in-core fuel performance are confirmed by our preliminary irradiation test results, and our fuel manufacture trials so far indicate that both (Th,U)O{sub 2} and (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuels can be fabricated with existing technologies, which are possible to upscale to commercial volumes.

Drera, S.S.; Bjork, K.I.; Kelly, J.F.; Asphjell, O. [Thor Energy AS: Sommerrogaten 13-15, Oslo, NO255 (Norway)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Calculated and measured gas formation in beryllium samples irradiated in the high flux materials testing reactor BR2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beryllium samples have been irradiated in BR2, the materials testing reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN at Mol, Belgium, up to fission fluence values of 5.2 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} at low temperature. The gas formation (helium, tritium), as measured by SCK/CEN, as well as the induced swelling of the beryllium samples and the enhancement of the swelling due to annealing have been presented at the 17th SOFT Conference (Rome, 14--18 Sept., 1992). Since this conference, helium measurements on the same samples have been carried out at RI and calculations of the gas production have been performed, taking into account the various formation schemes. The experimental results from SCK/CEN and from RI are compared with the calculated gas formations.

De Raedt, C.M.; Sannen, L.F.; Vanmechelen, P.J. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium); Oliver, B.M. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

The effects of reactor irradiation on Santowax OMP at 610°F and 750°F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Santowax OMP has been irradiated in the M.I.T. In-Pile Loop Facility at 610°F and at 750°F. At both temperatures the loop was operated in a transient phase and a steady-state-HB phase. In the transient phase, unirradiated ...

Sawyer, Craig D. (Craig Delany)

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Numerical and experimental determination of neutron characteristics in irradiation rigs operated in LVR-15 research reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......standard single-cell CHOUCA rigs or...dedicated multi-cell rigs. The temperature...reflector and in fuel will be provided...dedicated to material degradation evaluation. IRRADIATION...evaluation of material degradation induced by radiation...averaged over cell) has to be modified...reflects actual fuel burnup distribution......

Michal Koleska; Ladislav Viererbl; Zdena Lahodova; Jaroslav Ernest; Jelena Zmitkova; Milan Marek

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Multiscale Simulation of Thermo-mechancial Processes in Irradiated Fission-reactor Materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work funded from this project has been published in six papers, with two more in draft form, with submission planned for the near future. The papers are: (1) Kinetically-Evolving Irradiation-Induced Point-Defect Clusters in UO{sub 2} by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation; (2) Kinetically driven point-defect clustering in irradiated MgO by molecular-dynamics simulation; (3) Grain-Boundary Source/Sink Behavior for Point Defect: An Atomistic Simulation Study; (4) Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic structure calculations; (5) Thermodynamics of fission products in UO{sub 2{+-}x}; and (6) Atomistic study of grain boundary sink strength under prolonged electron irradiation. The other two pieces of work that are currently being written-up for publication are: (1) Effect of Pores and He Bubbles on the Thermal Transport Properties of UO2 by Molecular Dynamics Simulation; and (2) Segregation of Ruthenium to Edge Dislocations in Uranium Dioxide.

Simon R. Phillpot

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

Design, construction, commissioning and use of a new cadmium-lined in-core irradiation tube for the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of several requests from reactor users, it was recently decided to install a new cadmium-lined in-core irradiation tube (CLICIT) in the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR). As the title implies, this paper will describe the complete sequence of this process, from the design, and design constraints through manufacture to the actual use of the tube. The design is such that it offers a significant degree of flexibility in use, while still strictly adhering to ALARA concepts. In order to keep costs down, the facility was designed, installed and commissioned by the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) staff and fabricated locally. As this facility is relatively cheap (about $2,000), and will fit all non-conversion TRIGAs other reactor owners may be interested in copying the OSTR tube design. (author)

Dodd, B.; Anderson, T.V

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Mechanical property testing of irradiated zircaloy cladding under reactor transient conditions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specimen geometries have been developed to determine the mechanical properties of irradiated Zircaloy cladding subjected to the mechanical conditions and temperatures associated with reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA) and loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA). Miniature ring-stretch specimens were designed to induce both uniaxial and plane-strain states of stress in the transverse (hoop) direction of the cladding. Also, longitudinal tube specimens were also designed to determine the constitutive properties in the axial direction. Finite-element analysis (FEA) and experimental parameters and results were closely coupled to optimize an accurate determination of the stress-strain response and to induce fracture behavior representative of accident conditions. To determine the constitutive properties, a procedure was utilized to transform measured values of load and displacement to a stress-strain response under complex loading states. Additionally, methods have been developed to measure true plastic strains in the gauge section and the initiation of failure using real-time data analysis software. Strain rates and heating conditions have been selected based on their relevance to the mechanical response and temperatures of the cladding during the accidents.

Daum, R. S.; Majumdar, S.; Tsai, H.; Bray, T. S.; Billone, M. C.; Koss, D. A.; Motta, A. T.

2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Numerical analysis of hydrogen production via methane steam reforming in porous media solar thermochemical reactor using concentrated solar irradiation as heat source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The calorific value of syngas can be greatly upgraded during the methane steam reforming process by using concentrated solar energy as heat source. In this study, the Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) and Finite Volume Method (FVM) coupling method is developed to investigate the hydrogen production performance via methane steam reforming in porous media solar thermochemical reactor which includes the mass, momentum, energy and irradiative transfer equations as well as chemical reaction kinetics. The local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) model is used to provide more temperature information. The modified P1 approximation is adopted for solving the irradiative heat transfer equation. The MCRT method is used to calculate the sunlight concentration and transmission problems. The fluid phase energy equation and transport equations are solved by Fluent software. The solid phase energy equation, irradiative transfer equation and chemical reaction kinetics are programmed by user defined functions (UDFs). The numerical results indicate that concentrated solar irradiation on the fluid entrance surface of solar chemical reactor is highly uneven, and temperature distribution has significant influence on hydrogen production.

Fuqiang Wang; Jianyu Tan; Yong Shuai; Liang Gong; Heping Tan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today's nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Comparison of MCNP calculation and measurement of neutron fluence in a channel for short-time irradiation in the LVR-15 reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the neutron energy distribution in a channel of the LVR-15 reactor used mostly for short-time neutron activation analysis. Twenty types of activation monitors were irradiated in this channel equipped with a pneumatic facility with a transport time of 3.5 s. The activities measured and the corresponding reaction rates were used to determinate the neutron spectrum. The reaction rates were compared with MCNP calculations to confirm the results. The second purpose of this work was to verify our nuclear data library used for the reaction rate calculations. The experiment results were also incorporated into our database system of neutron energy distribution at the reactor core. (authors)

Lahodova, Z.; Flibor, S.; Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Inst. Rez Plc, Reactor Services Div., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Marek, M.; Viererbl, L. [Nuclear Research Inst. Rez Plc, Reactor Services Div., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Principle of a Liquid Nitrogen Irradiation Device and Its Realization for Use in a Swimming-Pool Type Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interesting characteristics of liquid nitrogen irradiation loops need not be demonstrated; but their use up to now has been largely limited by the occurrence of explosions in the liquid nitrogen submitted ...

L. Bochirol; J. Doulat; L. Weil

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Radiation Resistance of Structural Materials of Nuclear Reactors on Irradiation with High-Energy Hydrogen and Helium Ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Basic principles of determination of the radiation resistance of structural materials of nuclear reactors with implantation of high-energy hydrogen and helium atoms have been presented. ... them with hydrogen and...

F. F. Komarov; A. F. Komarov; Vl. V. Pil?ko…

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

THE MATERIALS OF FAST BREEDER REACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) concern the behavior ofmetal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Despite the simplicityinduced by irradiation. LMFBR funding is the largest single

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Modular Inspection System for a Complete IN-Service Examination of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel, Including Beltline Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report for a DOE Phase II Contract Describing the design and fabrication of a reactor inspection modular rover prototype for reactor vessel inspection.

David H. Bothell

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Services  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Management provides many of the services that keep the Department of Energy Headquarters offices operational.  Other Program Offices also provide services to the employees at...

47

Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services Engineering Services The Network OSCARS Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools The ESnet Engineering Team Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet...

48

Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services Services Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Services ESnet provides interoperable, effective, reliable, and high performance network communications infrastructure, and certain collaboration services, in support of the Office of Science (SC)'s large-scale, collaborative science programs. ESnet provides users with high bandwidth access to DOE sites and DOE's primary science collaborators including Research and

49

Fossil-fuel processing technical/professional services: comparison of Fischer-Tropsch reactor systems. Phase I, final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch reaction was commercialized in Germany and used to produce military fuels in fixed bed reactors. It was recognized from the start that this reactor system had severe operating and yield limitations and alternative reactor systems were sought. In 1955 the Sasol I complex, using an entrained bed (Synthol) reactor system, was started up in South Africa. Although this reactor was a definite improvement and is still operating, the literature is filled with proponents of other reactor systems, each claiming its own advantages. This report provides a summary of the results of a study to compare the development potential of three of these reactor systems with the commercially operating Synthol-entrained bed reactor system. The commercial Synthol reactor is used as a benchmark against which the development potential of the other three reactors can be compared. Most of the information on which this study is based was supplied by the M.W. Kellogg Co. No information beyond that in the literature on the operation of the Synthol reactor system was available for consideration in preparing this study, nor were any details of the changes made to the original Synthol system to overcome the operating problems reported in the literature. Because of conflicting claims and results found in the literature, it was decided to concentrate a large part of this study on a kinetic analysis of the reactor systems, in order to provide a theoretical analysis of intrinsic strengths and weaknesses of the reactors unclouded by different catalysts, operating conditions and feed compositions. The remainder of the study considers the physical attributes of the four reactor systems and compares their respective investment costs, yields, catalyst requirements and thermal efficiencies from simplified conceptual designs.

Thompson, G.J.; Riekena, M.L.; Vickers, A.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Services  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Human Capital Office offers benefit, new employee orientation and some learning & development related services to all DOE employees. Additionally the Office supplies employee and labor...

51

Irradiation Embritlement in Alloy HT-­9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HT-9 steel is a candidate structural and cladding material for high temperature lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors. In typical advanced fast reactor designs fuel elements will be irradiated for an extended period of time, reaching up to 5-7 years. Significant displacement damage accumulation in the steel is expected (> 200 dpa) when exposed to dpa-rates of 20-30 dpa{sub Fe}/y and high fast flux (E > 0.1 MeV) {approx}4 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}s. Core temperatures could reach 400-560 C, with coolant temperatures at the inlet as low as 250 C, depending on the reactor design. Mechanical behavior in the presence of an intense fast flux and high dose is a concern. In particular, low temperature operation could be limited by irradiation embrittlement. Creep and corrosion effects in liquid metal coolants could set a limit to the upper operating temperature. In this report, we focus on the low temperature operating window limit and describe HT-9 embrittlement experimental findings reported in the literature that could provide supporting information to facilitate the consideration of a Code Case on irradiation effects for this class of steels in fast reactor environments. HT-9 has an extensive database available on irradiation performance, which makes it the best choice as a possible near-term candidate for clad, and ducts in future fast reactors. Still, as it is shown in this report, embrittlement data for very low irradiation temperatures (< 200 C) and very high radiation exposure (> 150 dpa) is scarce. Experimental findings indicate a saturation of DBTT shifts as a function of dose, which could allow for long lifetime cladding operation. However, a strong increase in DBTT shift with decreasing irradiation temperature could compromise operation at low service temperatures. Development of a deep understanding of the physics involved in the radiation damage mechanisms, together with multiscale computer simulation models of irradiation embrittlement will provide the basis to derive trendlines and quantitative engineering predictions.

Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

Safety evaluation report related to the Department of Energy`s proposal for the irradiation of lead test assemblies containing tritium-producing burnable absorber rods in commercial light-water reactors. Project Number 697  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NRC staff has reviewed a report, submitted by DOE to determine whether the use of a commercial light-water reactor (CLWR) to irradiate a limited number of tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) in lead test assemblies (LTAs) raises generic issues involving an unreviewed safety question. The staff has prepared this safety evaluation to address the acceptability of these LTAs in accordance with the provision of 10 CFR 50.59 without NRC licensing action. As summarized in Section 10 of this safety evaluation, the staff has identified issues that require NRC review. The staff has also identified a number of areas in which an individual licensee undertaking irradiation of TPBAR LTAs will have to supplement the information in the DOE report before the staff can determine whether the proposed irradiation is acceptable at a particular facility. The staff concludes that a licensee undertaking irradiation of TPBAR LTAs in a CLWR will have to submit an application for amendment to its facility operating license before inserting the LTAs into the reactor.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Geiger M., Diabat L., Mnard L., Wald L., 2002. A web service for controlling the quality of measurements of global solar irradiation. Solar Energy, Vol. 73, No 6, pp. 475-480  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive sensors measure the downward solar radiation flux on a horizontal surface during a given time of measurements of global solar irradiation. Solar Energy, Vol. 73, No 6, pp. 475-480 Copyright Ecole des Mines de Paris -Armines - UFAE 1 A WEB SERVICE FOR CONTROLLING THE QUALITY OF MEASUREMENTS OF GLOBAL SOLAR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

Radiation Resistance of XLPE Nano-dielectrics for Advanced Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently there has been renewed interest in nuclear reactor safety, particularly as commercial reactors are approaching 40 years service and lifetime extensions are considered, as well as for new reactor building projects around the world. The materials that are currently used in cabling for instrumentation, reactor control, and communications include cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), ethylene propylene rubber (EPR), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), neoprene, and chlorosulfonated polyethylene. While these materials show suitable radiation tolerance in laboratory tests, failures before their useful lifetime occur due to the combined environmental effects of radiation, temperature and moisture, or operation under abnormal conditions. In addition, the extended use of commercial reactors beyond their original service life places a greater demand on insulating materials to perform beyond their current ratings in these nuclear environments. Nanocomposite materials that are based on XLPE and other epoxy resins incorporating TiO2, MgO, SiO2, and Al2O3 nanoparticles are being fabricated using a novel in-situ method established at ORNL to demonstrate materials with increased resistance to radiation. As novel nanocomposite dielectric materials are developed, characterization of the non-irradiated and irradiated nanodielectrics will lead to a knowledge base that allow for dielectric materials to be engineered with specific nanoparticle additions for maximum benefit to wide-variety of radiation environments found in nuclear reactors. This paper presents the initial findings on the development of XLPE-based SiO2 nano-composite dielectrics in the context of electrical performance and radiation degradation.

Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

Collin Blaise

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials Aging and Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Components serving in a nuclear reactor plant must withstand a very harsh environment including extended time at temperature, neutron irradiation, stress, and/or corrosive media. The many modes of degradation are complex and vary depending on location and material. However, understanding and managing materials degradation is a key for the continued safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. Extending reactor service to beyond 60 years will increase the demands on materials and components. Therefore, an early evaluation of the possible effects of extended lifetime is critical. The recent NUREG/CR-6923 gives a

57

Irradiation Creep in Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nuclear Reactor (atomic reactor)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor splits Uranium or Plutonium nuclei, and the...235 is fissionable but more than 99% of the naturally occurring Uranium is U238 that makes enrichment mandatory. In some reactors U238 and Thorium23...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Application of an internally circulating fluidized bed for windowed solar chemical reactor with direct irradiation of reacting particles - article no. 014504  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar thermochemical processes require the development of a high-temperature solar reactor operating at 1000-1500{sup o}C, such as solar gasification of coal and the thermal reduction of metal oxides as part of a two-step water splitting cycle. Here, we propose to apply 'an internally circulating fluidized bed' for a windowed solar chemical reactor in which reacting particles are directly illuminated. The prototype reactor was constructed in a laboratory scale and demonstrated on CO{sub 2} gasification of coal coke using solar-simulated, concentrated visible light from a sun simulator as the energy source. About 12% of the maximum chemical storage efficiency was obtained by the solar-simulated gasification of the coke.

Kodama, T.; Enomoto, S.I.; Hatamachi, T.; Gokon, N. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Monte Carlo determination of the neutron-gamma spectrum behind cadmium loaded polyethylene slabs irradiated by the Sandia Pulse Reactor III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Horizontal View) the other ha 1 f the oppos 1 te s 1 de of the reactor from the test conf fguration. These sub-divisions el low greater eff 1 c iency by increasing the biasing parameters in the regions farther from the detector. The floor was mode) led... the neutron ? gamma spectrum behind slabs with different thicknesses, different cadmium loadings within the poly- ethylene, and various detector geometries. This work is being done for the Sandia Pulse Reactor I I I because one of the uses for the SPR-3...

Sartor, Raymond Francis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

63

Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

P. Delmolino

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RNSD Home RNSD Home Research Groups Advanced Reactor Systems & Safety Nuclear Data & Criticality Safety Nuclear Security Modeling Radiation Safety Information Computational Center Radiation Transport Reactor Physics Thermal Hydraulics & Irradiation Engineering Used Fuel Systems Staff Details (CV/Bios) Publications Org Chart Contact Us ORNL Staff Only Research Groups Advanced Reactor Systems & Safety Nuclear Data & Criticality Safety Nuclear Security Modeling Radiation Safety Information Computational Center Radiation Transport Reactor Physics Thermal Hydraulics & Irradiation Engineering Used Fuel Systems Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division News Highlights U.S. Rep. Fleischmann touts ORNL as national energy treasure Martin Peng wins Fusion Power Associates Leadership Award

65

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer’s physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user’s technical needs. The current NSUF partners are shown in Figure 1. This article describes the ATR as well as the expanded capabilities, partnerships, and services that allow researchers to take full advantage of this national resource.

Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Lithium carbide is prospective material for breeder of fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that lithium carbide is a prospective material for breeder of fusion reactor. The lithium carbide equivalent dose rate reaches...?5...Sv/h) one minute after the irradiation with fusion reactor neutron...

M. V. Alenina; V. P. Kolotov; Yu. M. Platov

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

System Definition Document: Reactor Data Necessary for Modeling Plutonium Disposition in Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has contracted with Duke Engineering and Services, Cogema, Inc., and Stone and Webster (DCS) to provide mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services in support of USDOE's mission to dispose of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. The nuclear station units currently identified as mission reactors for this project are Catawba Units 1 and 2 and McGuire Units 1 and 2. This report is specific to Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2, but the details and materials for the McGuire reactors are very similar. The purpose of this document is to present a complete set of data about the reactor materials and components to be used in modeling the Catawba reactors to predict reactor physics parameters for the Catawba site. Except where noted, Duke Power Company or DCS documents are the sources of these data. These data are being used with the ORNL computer code models of the DCS Catawba (and McGuire) pressurized-water reactors.

Ellis, R.J.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Irradiation Performance - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Testing > Materials Testing > Irradiation Performance Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Irradiated Materials Overview Light Water Reactor Materials Other Current Activities Future Directions Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Irradiation Performance Bookmark and Share The activities of the Irradiation Performance Section (IPS) are aimed at determining and assessing normal-operation and accident behavior of neutron-irradiated material throughout the life cycle of the materials. The conditions of interest are normal in-reactor operation, design-basis accidents, intermediate storage in pools and dry casks, and ultimate

69

AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT, REV 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

Collin, Blaise

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

Blaise Collin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 3, Site team reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A self assessment was conducted of those Hanford facilities that are utilized to store Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Material, (RINM). The objective of the assessment is to identify the Hanford inventories of RINM and the ES & H concerns associated with such storage. The assessment was performed as proscribed by the Project Plan issued by the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group. The Project Plan is the plan of execution intended to complete the Secretary`s request for information relevant to the inventories and vulnerabilities of DOE storage of spent nuclear fuel. The Hanford RINM inventory, the facilities involved and the nature of the fuel stored are summarized. This table succinctly reveals the variety of the Hanford facilities involved, the variety of the types of RINM involved, and the wide range of the quantities of material involved in Hanford`s RINM storage circumstances. ES & H concerns are defined as those circumstances that have the potential, now or in the future, to lead to a criticality event, to a worker radiation exposure event, to an environmental release event, or to public announcements of such circumstances and the sensationalized reporting of the inherent risks.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

PROPERTY CHANGES OF CYANATE ESTER/EPOXY INSULATION SYSTEMS CAUSED BY AN ITER-LIKE DOUBLE IMPREGNATION AND BY REACTOR IRRADIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the double pancake design of the ITER TF coils the insulation will be applied in several steps. As a consequence, the conductor insulation as well as the pancake insulation will undergo multiple heat cycles in addition to the initial curing cycle. In particular the properties of the organic resin may be influenced, since its heat resistance is limited. Two identical types of sample consisting of wrapped R-glass/Kapton layers and vacuum impregnated with a cyanate ester/epoxy blend were prepared. The build-up of the reinforcement was identical for both insulation systems; however, one system was fabricated in two steps. In the first step only one half of the reinforcing layers was impregnated and cured. Afterwards the remaining layers were wrapped onto the already cured system, before the resulting system was impregnated and cured again. The mechanical properties were characterized prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of 1 and 2x10{sup 22} m{sup -2}(E>0.1 MeV) in tension and interlaminar shear at 77 K. In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. The results do not show any evidence for reduced mechanical strength caused by the additional heat cycle.

Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, 1020 Wien (Austria)

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Using reactor operating experience to improve the design of a new Broad Application Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing regulatory demands and effects of plant aging are limiting the operation of existing test reactors. Additionally, these reactors have limited capacities and capabilities for supporting future testing missions. A multidisciplinary team of experts developed sets of preliminary safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor design concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). Anticipated missions for the new reactor include fuels and materials irradiation testing, isotope production, space testing, medical research, fusion testing, intense positron research, and transmutation doping. The early BATR design decisions have benefited from operating experiences with existing reactors. This paper discusses these experiences and highlights their significance for the design of a new BATR.

Fletcher, C.D.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Drexler, R.L.; Leyse, C.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

RERTR-12 Insertion 2 Irradiation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-12 was designed to provide comprehensive information on the performance of uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) based monolithic fuels for research reactor applications.1 RERTR-12 insertion 2 includes the capsules irradiated during the last three irradiation cycles. These capsules include Z, Y1, Y2 and Y3 type capsules. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-12 insertion 2 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

D. M. Perez; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely

77

Safety Assurance for ATR Irradiations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the world’s premiere test reactor for performing high fluence, large volume, irradiation test programs. The ATR has many capabilities and a wide variety of tests are performed in this truly one of a kind reactor, including isotope production, simple self-contained static capsule experiments, instrumented/controlled experiments, and loop testing under pressurized water conditions. Along with the five pressurized water loops, ATR may also have gas (temperature controlled) lead experiments, fuel boosted fast flux experiments, and static sealed capsules all in the core at the same time. In addition, any or all of these tests may contain fuel or moderating materials that can affect reactivity levels in the ATR core. Therefore the safety analyses required to ensure safe operation of each experiment as well as the reactor itself are complex. Each test has to be evaluated against stringent reactor control safety criteria, as well as the effects it could have on adjacent tests and the reactor as well as the consequences of those effects. The safety analyses of each experiment are summarized in a document entitled the Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP). The ESAP references and employs the results of the reactor physics, thermal, hydraulic, stress, seismic, vibration, and all other analyses necessary to ensure the experiment can be irradiated safely in the ATR. The requirements for reactivity worth, chemistry compatibilities, pressure limitations, material issues, etc. are all specified in the Technical Safety Requirements and the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) for the ATR. This paper discusses the ESAP process, types of analyses, types of safety requirements and the approvals necessary to ensure an experiment can be safely irradiated in the ATR.

S. Blaine Grover

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Microsoft Word - ORNL-TM-2014-513 Status of SiC Joint Irradiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

513 STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDESILICON CARBIDE JOINTS Yutai Katoh Takaaki Koyanagi Jim Kiggans Nesrin Cetiner Joel McDuffee September 2014...

79

HTGR-SC/C program baseline review meeting, Session IIC: circulators, C and I, and helium service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning main and auxiliary circulators; reactor service equipment; and control and instrumentation systems.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Reactor Core Assembly - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home › Facilities › HFIR › Reactor Core Assembly Home › Facilities › HFIR › Reactor Core Assembly Reactor Core Assembly The reactor core assembly is contained in an 8-ft (2.44-m)-diameter pressure vessel located in a pool of water. The top of the pressure vessel is 17 ft (5.18 m) below the pool surface, and the reactor horizontal mid-plane is 27.5 ft (8.38 m) below the pool surface. The control plate drive mechanisms are located in a subpile room beneath the pressure vessel. These features provide the necessary shielding for working above the reactor core and greatly facilitate access to the pressure vessel, core, and reflector regions. In-core irradiation and experiment locations (cross section at horizontal midplane) Reactor core assembly Reactor core assembly: (1) in-core irradiation and experiment locations,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information on the GCFR reactor is presented concerning the Core Flow Test Loop; shielding and physics; pressure vessel and closure studies; and irradiation program.

Gat, U.; Kasten, P.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from 40y to 80y implies a doubling of the neutron exposure for the RPV. Thus,

83

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents September 30, 2011 Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement

84

RERTR-13 Irradiation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-13 was designed to assess performance of different types of neutron absorbers that can be potentially used as burnable poisons in the low enriched uranium-molybdenum based dispersion and monolithic fuels.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-13 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

RERTR-6 Irradiation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-6 was designed to evaluate several modified fuel designs that were proposed to address the possibility of breakaway swelling due to porosity within the (U. Mo) Al interaction product observed in the full-size plate tests performed in Russia and France1. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-6 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analyses, thermal analyses and hydraulic testing results.

D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain… (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Sensitivity of ultrasonic nonlinearity to irradiated, annealed, and re-irradiated microstructure changes in RPV steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The planned life extension of nuclear reactors throughout the US and abroad will cause reactor vessel and internals materials to be exposed to more neutron irradiation than was originally intended. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method to monitor radiation damage would enable safe and cost-effective continued operation of nuclear reactors. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes microstructural changes that leave the material in an embrittled state. Nonlinear ultrasound is an NDE technique quantified by the measurable acoustic nonlinearity parameter, which is sensitive to microstructural changes in metallic materials such as dislocations, precipitates and their combinations. Recent research has demonstrated the sensitivity of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing neutron fluence in representative RPV steels. The current work considers nonlinear ultrasonic experiments conducted on similar RPV steel samples that had a combination of irradiation, annealing, re-irradiation, and/or re-annealing to a total neutron fluence of 0.5 5 1019 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 290 C. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter generally increased with increasing neutron fluence, and consistently decreased from the irradiated to the annealed state over different levels of neutron fluence. Results of the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter are compared with those from previous measurements on other RPV steel samples. This comprehensive set of results illustrates the dependence of the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter on neutron fluence, material composition, irradiation temperature and annealing.

Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Kim, J-Y. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Wall, J.J. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)] [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Jacobs, L.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A Neural Network Model for the Tomographic Analysis of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tomographic method based on a multilayer feed-forward artificial neural network is proposed for the reconstruction of gamma-radioactive fission product distribution in irradiated nuclear fuel rods. The quality of the method is investigated as compared to a conventional technique on experimental results concerning a Canada deuterium uranium reactor (CANDU)-type fuel rod irradiated in a TRIGA reactor.

Craciunescu, Teddy [National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering (Romania)

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) program: A progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1985, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1986 are reviewed. The second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was expanded and its irradiation continued. Postirradiation examinations of several of these miniplates and of six previously irradiated U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al full-size elements were completed with excellent results. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ is well under way and due for completion before the end of 1987. DOE removed an important barrier to conversions by announcing that the new LEU fuels will be accepted for reprocessing. New DOE prices for enrichment and reprocessing services were calculated to have minimal effect on HEU reactors, and to reduce by about 8 to 10% the total fuel cycle costs of LEU reactors. New program activities include preliminary feasibility studies of LEU use in DOE reactors, evaluation of the feasibility to use LEU targets for the production of fission-product /sup 99/Mo, and responsibility for coordinating safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors, as required by NRC. Achievement of the final program goals is projected for 1990. This progress could not have been achieved without close international cooperation, whose continuation and intensification are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR Program.

Travelli, A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 °C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

John T. Maki

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Irradiation is known to have a significant impact on the properties and performance of Zircaloy cladding and structural materials (material degradation processes, e.g., effects of hydriding). This UFD study examines the behavior and performance of unirradiated cladding and actual irradiated cladding through testing and simulation. Three capsules containing hydrogen-charged Zircaloy-4 cladding material have been placed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Irradiation of the capsules was conducted for post-irradiation examination (PIE) metallography. Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of

94

Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, June 1962  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details activities of the Irradiation Processing Department during the month of June, 1962. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; and NPR Project.

Not Available

1992-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

naval reactors  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

After operating for 34 years and training over 14,000 sailors, the Department of Energy S1C Prototype Reactor Site in Windsor, Connecticut, was returned to "green field"...

96

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 52-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) ESAP issued in June 2002). The purpose of this revision is to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to 52 GWd/MT burnup [as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code The last ESAP provided basis for irradiation, at a linear heat generation rate (LHGR) no greater than 9 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly to 50 GWd/MT. This ESAP extends the basis for irradiation, at a LHGR no greater than 5 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly from 50 to 52 GWd/MT.

S. T. Khericha; R. C. Pedersen

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fracture and tensile properties of irradiated zircaloy-2 pressure tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical properties of nuclear reactor components degrade as a result of long service exposure in high-temperature, irradiation, and corrosive environments. Fracture toughness and tensile testing are conducted on the pressure tubes of Zircaloy-2 to evaluate the effects of neutron fluence, hydrogen content, and temperature on the mechanical properties. Tensile tests are performed on the base metal, and fracture toughness tests are performed on both the base and weld metals. Neutron irradiation increases the strength, reduces ductility, and significantly degrades fracture toughness. The postirradiation fracture toughness increases substantially as the test temperature is increased from room temperature to 250 C. Hydrogen levels up to 250 ppm are found to have little or no effect on the postirradiation fracture toughness. Because of its anisotropic nature, Zircaloy-2 displays different fracture resistances, depending on crack orientation. In the base metal, the fracture toughness in the longitudinal orientation is higher than that for the circumferential orientation, and this difference is enhanced at higher temperatures. The weld exhibits lower toughness in the longitudinal direction.

Huang, F.H.; Mills, W.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessment of typical BWR (boiling water reactor) vessel configurations and examination coverage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Even though boiling water reactors (BWRs) are not susceptible to the kind of incident known as pressurized thermal shock that must be considered in the design and operation of pressurized water reactors, BWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) have experienced higher than expected embrittlement caused by fast neutron irradiation. This has required the vessel to be at a higher temperature than originally projected before the plant can be taken to power operation. In addition, many BWR plants have received exemption from the 10-year volumetric nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the vessel as required by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B PV) Code Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,'' because NDE access is severely restricted. Since many RPV welds have not been examined after being placed in service and the potential for service-induced flaws exists, regulatory authorities are looking closely at examination relief requests. BWR reactor vessel examination coverage is typically limited by plant design. Most BWR plants were designed when inservice examination codes were in the early stages of development, and very little consideration was give to designing for NDE access. Consequently, there is restricted access for many areas of the RPV. Since an increase in examination requirements has been placed in ASME B PV Code Section XI in these areas, efforts have begun on a thorough analysis of the vessel weld volumes examined during inservice examination and an evaluation of possibility expanding the RPV examination coverage. Because of these concerns, an investigation of the accessibility of the reactor vessel for NDE was performed to define the present status and to determine the improvements in coverage that can be accomplished in the near future. 7 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Walker, S.M. (EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center, Charlotte, NC (USA)); Feige, E.J.; Ingamells, J.R. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Calhoun, G.L.; Davis, J.; Kapoor, A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) was initially designed and constructed to permit the safe handling of increasing levels of radiation in the chemical, physical, and metallurgical examination of nuclear reactor fuel elements and reactor parts. The IFEL was constructed in 1963 and is a two-story brick building with a partial basement. The front or northern-most section is a single-story office area. The two story area to the immediate rear houses the cell complex, the operating areas, and other supporting activities. The office area is isolated from the main part of the building, so the office area can be excluded from the secondary containment zone. The facility has a gross floor area of about 27,000 ft2.

100

Irradiation creep of vanadium-base alloys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of irradiation creep in vanadium-base alloys is underway with experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the US. Test specimens are thin-wall sealed tubes with internal pressure loading. The results from the initial ATR irradiation at low temperature (200-300 C) to a neutron damage level of 4.7 dpa show creep rates ranging from {approx}0 to 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}5}/dpa/MPa for a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. These rates were generally lower than reported from a previous experiment in BR-10. Because both the attained neutron damage levels and the creep strains were low in the present study, however, these creep rates should be regarded as only preliminary. Substantially more testing is required before a data base on irradiation creep of vanadium alloys can be developed and used with confidence.

Tsai, H.; Matsui, H.; Billone, M. C.; Strain, R. V.; Smith, D. L.

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Unique features of space reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Buden, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cloud Services Cloud Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

103

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

105

The little reactor that could AECLs flexible, versatile CANDU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are 34 CANDU-type power reactors in service around the world, with at least four more scheduled to come on-line with in the next three years. These reactors have an unparalled safety record and offer customers the benefit of generating nuclear power without having to manufacture or import enriched uranium fuel. This paper presents a discussion on the CANDU reactor, construction and reactor maintenance, fuel cycle, and market.

Nixon, R.; Morden, R.; Kugler, G.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a<100> and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

Library Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services Library Services The Research Library provides many services to LANL employees. We also offer limited services to members of the public. The Research Library is open to...

110

Photoneutron effects on pulse reactor kinetics for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is a swimming-pool type pulsed reactor that maintains an epithermal neutron flux and a nine-inch diameter central dry cavity. One of its uses is neutron and gamma-ray irradiation damage studies on electronic components under transient reactor power conditions. In analyzing the experimental results, careful attention must be paid to the kinetics associated with the reactor to ensure that the transient behavior of the electronic device is understood. Since the ACRR fuel maintains a substantial amount of beryllium, copious quantities of photoneutrons are produced that can significantly alter the expected behavior of the reactor power, especially following a reactor pulse. In order to understand these photoneutron effects on the reactor kinetics, the KIFLE transient reactor-analysis code was modified to include the photoneutron groups associated with the beryllium. The time-dependent behavior of the reactor power was analyzed for small and large pulses, assuming several initial conditions including following several pulses during the day, and following a long steady-state power run. The results indicate that, for these types of initial conditions, the photoneutron contribution to the reactor pulse energy can have a few to tens of percent effect.

Parma, Edward J., Jr.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

University Services Management Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system U Services Finance organized a workforce planning process resulting in a team with better capacity > 3 Primary Services Human Resources Workforce Planning Recruitment and Selection Employee and Labor, and strategic planning efforts. In addition to supporting the University Services enterprise, the Management

Webb, Peter

112

Safer Food with Irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication answers questions about food irradiation and how it helps prevent foodborne illnesses. Included are explanations of how irradiation works and its benefits. Irradiation is a safe method of preserving food quality and ensuring its...

Thompson, Britta; Vestal, Andy; Van Laanen, Peggy

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance November 16, 2009 - 1:12pm Addthis As part of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program, the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program has achieved a new international record for irradiation testing of next-generation particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). The AGR Fuel Development Program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 2002 to develop the advanced fabrication and characterization technologies, and provide irradiation and safety performance data required to license TRISO particle fuel for the NGNP and future HTGRs. The AGR

115

Light Water Reactors [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Air Oxidation Kinetics for Zr-based Alloys Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Light Water Reactors Bookmark and Share To continue safe operation of current LWRs, the aging degradation of the

116

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

117

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II. Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started operating in August 1950. In the next 18 years, an estimated 25,000 scientific experiments were carried out at the BGRR using neutrons produced in the facility's 700-ton graphite core, made up of more than 60,000 individual graphite blocks. The BGRR was placed on standby in 1968 and then permanently shut down as the next-generation reactor, the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), was

118

NSLS Services | Postal Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Postal Services Postal Services U.S. Postal Service BNL has a full-service U.S. Postal Service Office (Upton branch) located in Staff Services, Building 179, x2539. BNL Mail Service Mail is delivered and picked up twice a day from each building on site. Users should leave internal lab mail (brown envelopes, no stamps needed) and U.S. Mail (regular envelopes, stamps required) in the outgoing mail boxes at NSLS mail stop 725A, located in the lobby by the elevator. Receiving Mail During regular working hours, packages and other special deliveries are brought to the Stockroom while regular mail is taken to the mailstops around the building. Each beam port is assigned a mail slot at NSLS mail stop 725A near the elevator in the lobby. The beamline number should be on all mail addressed to users. Mail to users should be addressed as follows

119

An autonomous long-term fast reactor system and the principal design limitations of the concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Actinides MOX Mixed OXide MSR Molten-Salt Reactors NERI Nuclear Energy Research Initiative vii PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RGPu Reactor-Grade Plutonium SCNES Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System STAR Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor... of LWR?s, the drastic increase of Am and Cm inventories are observed after uranium fuel irradiation and the second recycling of MOX fuel.1 Therefore, partitioning and transmutation of the recovered MA?s could significantly reduce the long...

Tsvetkova, Galina Valeryevna

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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121

Fusion reactor theory and conceptual design. January 1982-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1982-May 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical and conceptual aspects of fusion reactor physics and designs. Conceptual design studies for a wide variety of fusion reactors are covered. Some experimental and demonstrational results of studies are considered. (This updated bibliography contains 290 citations, 189 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Microsoft Word - 911135_0 SSC-4a Reactor Core Test Plan_rel.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan for the Reactor Core Assembly Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle Energy...

123

Microsoft Word - 911136_0 SSC-4b Reactor Graphite Test Plan_rel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) with Hydrogen Production Test Plan for Reactor Graphite Elements Prepared by General Atomics for the Battelle Energy...

124

Fracture of irradiated zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a series of investigations to evaluate the fracture behavior of Zircaloy-2 as influenced by BWR and PWR conditions. The results show that the response of the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2 to various combinations of cold work, hydrogen content and neutron fluence in hot pressurized water is characterized by embrittlement to a point where saturation in the fracture toughness is attained. Further in-reactor exposure beyond this saturation point appears to have no effect on toughness although other mechanical properties such as flow stress continue to change. In addition, anisotropy in the toughness of rolled plate material, evident in the unirradiated condition, is retained during in-reactor exposure and after increases in hydrogen content. Several processes are thought to be contributing to the toughness of Zircaloy-2 during irradiation. The reduction in toughness at low exposures must result from defect interactions with the deformation modes and the formation of the brittle hydride phase. However, the occurrence of saturation is not explained by these mechanisms in view of data on other mechanical properties and corrosion rates. It is suggested that the difference in the conditions for initiation of slip and twinning would indicate that the twinning component of deformation is not reduced by irradiation damage as much as the slip component. Saturation is, therefore, interprétable on the basis that twinning plays a major role in the crack tip plastic zone after irradiation. Additional study of the importance of twinning in determining the toughness of Zircaloy-2 was attempted by examining the relationship between texture and the anisotropy in fracture toughness. A correlation is shown to exist between the crack tip shear stresses resolved on the 1121 twin system and the toughness anisotropy.

R.G. Hoagland; R.G. Rowe

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Irradiation damage in multicomponent equimolar alloys and high entropy alloys (HEAs)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and improve the safety and efficiency of nuclear reactors, development of new and advanced nuclear materials with superior resistance to irradiation damage is necessary. Recently, a new generation of structural materials, termed as multicomponent......

Takeshi Nagase; Philip D. Rack; Takeshi Egami

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

Student Services Student Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Services _______________ 1.9 Page 1 Student Services DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS Office for Student Affairs The Division of Student Affairs seeks to create a campus environment that fully engages students in the integration of their academic and personal development through quality programs

128

Student Services Student Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Services Student Services DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS Office in the Administration Building, Room 201 (970) 491-5312 studentaffairs.colostate.edu Blanche Hughes, Vice President for Student Affairs The Division of Student Affairs seeks to create a campus environment that fully engages students

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

129

Post-irradiation Examination Plan for ORNL and University of California Santa Barbara Assessment of UCSB ATR-2 Irradiation Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New and existing databases will be combined to support development of physically based models of transition temperature shifts (TTS) for high fluence-low flux (? < 10{sup 11}n/cm{sup 2}-s) conditions, beyond the existing surveillance database, to neutron fluences of at least 1×10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). All references to neutron flux and fluence in this report are for fast neutrons (>1 MeV). The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) task of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is working with various organizations to obtain archival surveillance materials from commercial nuclear power plants to allow for comparisons of the irradiation-induced microstructural features from reactor surveillance materials with those from similar materials irradiated under high flux conditions in test reactors

Nanstad, R. K. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Yamamoto, T. [University of California Santa Barbara; Sokolov, M. A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2014-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of irradiation effects on concrete structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In assessing the soundness of irradiated concrete of nuclear power plants operated for more than 30 years, reference levels are employed: 1x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} for fast neutrons and 2x10{sup 10} rad (2x10{sup 5} kGy) for gamma rays. Concrete structures are regarded as sound when the estimated irradiance levels after 60 years of operation are less than the reference levels. The reference levels were obtained from a paper by Hilsdorf. It was found, however, that the test conditions in which data were obtained by the researchers referred in that paper are very different from the irradiation and heat conditions usually found in a Light Water Reactor (LWR), and therefore aren't appropriate for assessing the soundness of irradiated concrete of an LWR. This paper investigates the interactions between radiation and concrete and presents the results of gamma ray irradiation tests on cement paste samples in order to provide a better understanding of the irradiation effects on concrete. (authors)

Kontani, O.; Ishizawa, A. [Kajima Corporation, Nuclear Power Dept., 6-5-11 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 107-8348 (Japan); Maruyama, I. [Nagoya Univ., Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Furocho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya , 464-8603 (Japan); Takizawa, M.; Sato, O. [Mitsubishi Research Inst. Inc., Science and Safety Policy Research Div., Nuclear Energy Systems Group, 2-10-3 Nagatacho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8141 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Simplified Shuttle Irradiation Facility for ATR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past fifteen years there has been a steady increase in the demand for radioisotopes in nuclear medicine and a corresponding decline in the number of reactors within the U.S. capable of producing them. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the largest operating test reactor in the U.S., but its isotope production capabilities have been limited by the lack of an installed isotope shuttle irradiation system. A concept for a simple "low cost" shuttle irradiation facility for ATR has been developed. Cost were reduced (in comparison to previous ATR designs) by using a shielded trough of water installed in an occupiable cubicle as a shielding and contamination control barrier for the send and receive station. This shielding concept also allows all control valves to be operated by hand and thus the need for an automatic control system was eliminated. It was determined that 4-5 ft of water would be adequate to shield the isotopes of interest while shuttles are transferred to a small carrier. An additional feature of the current design is a non-isolatable by-pass line, which provides a minimum coolant flow to the test region regardless of which control valves are opened or closed. This by-pass line allows the shuttle facility to be operated without bringing reactor coolant water into the cubicle except for send and receive operations.

A. J. Palmer; S. T. Laflin

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

LWRS ATR Irradiation Testing Readiness Status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors. The LWRS Program is divided into four R&D Pathways: (1) Materials Aging and Degradation; (2) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels; (3) Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems; and (4) Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization. This report describes an irradiation testing readiness analysis in preparation of LWRS experiments for irradiation testing at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) under Pathway (2). The focus of the Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuels Pathway is to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental performance of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding in nuclear power plants during both nominal and off-nominal conditions. This information will be applied in the design and development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels with improved safety, cladding integrity, and improved nuclear fuel cycle economics

Kristine Barrett

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development of microstructure and irradiation hardening of Zircaloy during low dose neutron irradiation at nominally 358 C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wrought Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 were neutron irradiated at nominally 358 C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at relatively low neutron fluences between 5.8 1022 and 2.9 1025 n/m2 (E > 1 MeV). The irradiation hardening and change in microstructure were characterized following irradiation using tensile testing and examinations of microstructure using Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM). Small increments of dose (0.0058, 0.11, 0.55, 1.08, and 2.93 1025 n/m2) were used in the range where the saturation of irradiation hardening is typically observed so that the role of microstructure evolution and hai loop formation on irradiation hardening could be correlated. An incubation dose between 5.8 1023 and 1.1 1024 n/m2 was needed for loop nucleation to occur that resulted in irradiation hardening. Increases in yield strength were consistent with previous results in this temperature regime, and as expected less irradiation hardening and lower hai loop number density values than those generally reported in literature for irradiations at 260 326 C were observed. Unlike previous lower temperature data, there is evidence in this study that the irradiation hardening can decrease with dose over certain ranges of fluence. Irradiation induced voids were observed in very low numbers in the Zircaloy-2 materials at the highest fluence.

Cockeram, Brian V [Bechtel-Bettis, Inc.; Smith, Richard W [Bechtel-Bettis, Inc.; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

GEN-IV Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation-IV reactors are a set of nuclear reactors currently being developed under international collaborations targeting ... economics, proliferation resistance, and physical protection of nuclear energy. Nuclear

Taek K. Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Netherlands Reactor Centre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Two illustrated brochures in English have recently J. been issued by the Netherlands Reactor Centre ( ... Centre (Reactor Centrum Nederland). The first* gives a general survey of the ...

S. WEINTROUB

1964-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microstructure and mechanical behavior of neutron irradiated ultrafine grained ferritic steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron irradiation effects on ultra-fine grain (UFG) low carbon steel prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) has been examined. Counterpart samples with conventional grain (CG) sizes have been irradiated alongside with the UFG ones for comparison. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to 1.24 dpa. Atom probe tomography revealed manganese, silicon-enriched clusters in both ECAP and CG steel after neutron irradiation. X-ray quantitative analysis showed that dislocation density in CG increased after irradiation. However, no significant change was observed in UFG steel revealing better radiation tolerance.

Ahmad Alsabbagh; Apu Sarkar; Brandon Miller; Jatuporn Burns; Leah Squires; Douglas Porter; James I. Cole; K. L. Murty

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the

140

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The integral fast reactor fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid-metal reactor (LMR) has the potential to extend the uranium resource by a factor of 50 to 100 over current commercial light water reactors (LWRs). In the integral fast reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system - reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process - is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. A key feature of the IFR concept is the metallic fuel. The lead irradiation tests on the new U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II have surpassed 185000 MWd/t burnup, and its high burnup capability has now been fully demonstrated. The metallic fuel also allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Pyroprocessing, which utilizes high temperatures and molten salt and molten metal solvents, can be advantageously utilized for processing metal fuels because the product is metal suitable for fabrication into new fuel elements. Direct production of a metal product avoids expensive and cumbersome chemical conversion steps that would result from use of the conventional Purex solvent extraction process. The key step in the IFR process is electrorefining, which provides for recovery of the valuable fuel constituents, uranium and plutonium, and for removal of fission products. A notable feature of the IFR process is that the actinide elements accompany plutonium through the process. This results in a major advantage in the high-level waste management.

Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Simplified Shuttle Irradiation Facility for ATR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past fifteen years there has been a steady increase in the demand for radioisotopes in nuclear medicine and a corresponding decline in the number of reactors within the U.S. capable of producing them. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the largest operating test reactor in the U.S., but its isotope production capabilities have been limited by the lack of an installed isotope shuttle irradiation system. A concept for a simple “low cost” shuttle irradiation facility for ATR has been developed. Costs were reduced (in comparison to previous ATR designs) by using a shielded trough of water installed in an occupiable cubicle as a shielding and contamination control barrier for the send and receive station. This shielding concept also allows all control valves to be operated by hand and thus the need for an automatic control system was eliminated. It was determined that 4 – 5 ft of water would be adequate to shield the isotopes of interest while shuttles are transferred to a small carrier. An additional feature of the current design is a non-isolatable by-pass line, which provides a minimum coolant flow to the test region regardless of which control valves are opened or closed. This by-pass line allows the shuttle facility to be operated without bringing reactor coolant water into the cubicle except for send and receive operations. The irradiation position selected for this concept is a 1.5 inch “B” hole (B-11). This position provides neutron fluxes of approximately: 1.6 x 1014 (<0.5 eV) and 4.0 x 1013 (>0.8 MeV) n/cm2*sec.

Palmer, Alma Joseph; Laflin, S. T.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

RERTR-7 Irradiation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-7A, was designed to test several modified fuel designs to target fission densities representative of a peak low enriched uranium (LEU) burnup in excess of 90% U-235 at peak experiment power sufficient to generate a peak surface heat flux of approximately 300 W/cm2. The RERTR-7B experiment was designed as a high power test of 'second generation' dispersion fuels at peak experiment power sufficient to generate a surface heat flux on the order of 230 W/cm2.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-7A and RERTR-7B experiments through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analyses, thermal analyses and hydraulic testing results.

D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Transportation Services | Staff Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transportation Services The BNL Transportation Office, located at 20 Brookhaven Avenue, Building 400A, is available to assist BNL employees, guests and visitors with transportation needs in support of Laboratory programs. The hours of operation are 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. To contact the Transportation Office call (631) 344-2535. Stony Brook Parking Passes The Transportation Office has a limited number of parking passes for the three (3) parking garages at Stony Brook University. The passes are available to and are intended for use by BNL employees/scientific staff on official business only. Passes may be used at the Administration, University Hospital and Health Services Center garages on the Stony Brook campus when visiting SBU on official business.

148

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR • the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel and four (4) spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data, such as the uncertainty in fuel exposure impact on reactivity and the pulse neutron data evaluation methodology, failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements supply useful information to analysts evaluating spent fuel subcriticality. The original purpose of the subcritical measurements was to validate computer model predictions that spent N Reactor fuel of a particular, typical exposure (2740 MWd/t) had a critical mass equal to twice that of unexposed fuel of the same type. The motivation for performing this work was driven by the need to increase spent fuel storage limits. These subcritical measurements confirmed the computer model predictions.

TOFFER, H.

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Manhattan Project: F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX Hanford Engineer Works, 1945 Resources > Photo Gallery Plutonium production area, Hanford, ca. 1945 The F Reactor plutonium production complex at Hanford. The "boxy" building between the two water towers on the right is the plutonium production reactor; the long building in the center of the photograph is the water treatment plant. The photograph was reproduced from Henry DeWolf Smyth, Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb under the Auspices of the United States Government, 1940-1945 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1945). The Smyth Report was commissioned by Leslie Groves and originally issued by the Manhattan Engineer District. Princeton University Press reprinted it in book form as a "public service" with "reproduction in whole or in part authorized and permitted."

152

Safety of CANDU reactors utilizing plutonium-enriched mixed-oxide fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantial quantities of plutonium have become available as a result of nuclear arms reduction agreements. Irradiation of plutonium enriched fuel in Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) heavy water moderated and cooled reactors, of which there are 22 in operation in Canada, has been evaluated as a means of managing it. This paper summarizes the results of a study of reactor safety.

Chan, P.; Feinroth, H.; Luxat, J.; Pendergast, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Integral Fast Reactor: A practical approach to waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses development of the method for pyroprocessing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (or Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor). The technology demonstration phase, in which recycle will be demonstrated with irradiated fuel from the EBR-II reactor has been reached. Methods for recovering actinides from spent LWR fuel are at an earlier stage of development but appear to be technically feasible at this time, and a large-scale demonstration of this process has begun. The utilization of fully compatible processes for recycling valuable spent fuel materials promises to provide substantial economic incentives for future applications of the pyroprocessing technology.

Laidler, J.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [Materials Technology Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Karim, Julia Abdul [Reactor Physics Section, Nuclear Power Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmentally Assisted Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Air Oxidation Kinetics for Zr-based Alloys Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Light Water Reactors Bookmark and Share

156

Materials irradiation subpanel report to BESAC neutron sources and research panel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The future success of the nuclear power option in the US (fission and fusion) depends critically on the continued existence of a healthy national materials-irradiation program. Consideration of the requirements for acceptable materials-irradiation systems in a new neutron source has led the subcommittee to identify an advanced steady-state reactor (ANS) as a better choice than a spallation neutron source. However, the subcommittee also hastens to point out that the ANS cannot stand alone as the nation`s sole high-flux mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation source in the next century. It must be incorporated in a broader program that includes other currently existing neutron irradiation facilities. Upgrading and continuing support for these facilities must be planned. In particular, serious consideration should be given to converting the HFIR into a dedicated materials test reactor, and long-term support for several university reactors should be established.

Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Goland, A.N. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Lott, R. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Odette, G.R. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

1992-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Removal of {sup 14}C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the research presented here was to identify the checmical from of {sup 14}C inirradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approimately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 ({sup 14}C), with a half-life of 5730 years.

Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

A. C. Hayes; Gerard Jungman

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

JOYO-1 Irradiation Test Campaign Technical Close-out, For Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The JOYO-1 irradiation testing was designed to screen the irradiation performance of candidate cladding, structural and reflector materials in support of space reactor development. The JOYO-1 designation refers to the first of four planned irradiation tests in the JOYO reactor. Limited irradiated material performance data for the candidate materials exists for the expected Prometheus-1 duration, fluences and temperatures. Materials of interest include fuel element cladding and core materials (refractory metal alloys and silicon carbide (Sic)), vessel and plant structural materials (refractory metal alloys and nickel-base superalloys), and control and reflector materials (BeO). Key issues to be evaluated were long term microstructure and material property stability. The JOYO-1 test campaign was initiated to irradiate a matrix of specimens at prototypical temperatures and fluences anticipated for the Prometheus-1 reactor [Reference (1)]. Enclosures 1 through 9 describe the specimen and temperature monitors/dosimetry fabrication efforts, capsule design, disposition of structural material irradiation rigs, and plans for post-irradiation examination. These enclosures provide a detailed overview of Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) progress in specific areas; however, efforts were in various states of completion at the termination of NRPCT involvement with and restructuring of Project Prometheus.

G. Borges

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Phase transformations in neutron-irradiated Zircaloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural evolution in Zircaloy-2 and -4 spent-fuel cladding specimens after approx.3 years of irradiation in commercial power reactors has been investigated by TEM and HVEM. Two kinds of precipitates induced by the fast-neutron irradiation in the reactors have been identified, i.e., Zr/sub 3/O and cubic-ZrO/sub 2/ particles approximately 2 to 10 nm in size. By means of a weak-beam dark-field ''2-1/2D-microscopy'' technique, the bulk nature of the precipitates and the surficial nature of artifact oxide and hydride phases could be discerned. The Zr(Fe/sub x/,Cr/sub 1-x/)/sub 2/ and Zr/sub 2/(Fe/sub x/,Ni/sub 1-x/) intermetallic precipitates normally present in the as-fabricated material virtually dissolved in the spent-fuel cladding specimens after a fast-neutron fluence of approx.4 x 10/sup 21/ ncm/sup -2/ in the power reactors. The observed radiation-induced phase transformations are compared with predictions based on the currently available understanding of the alloy characteristics. 29 refs.

Chung, H.M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

162

Neutron capture therapy at the MEPhI reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article discusses the results of the creation and development of the irradiation base for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) at the MEPhI Reactor, development and studies of boron- and gadolinium-containing compounds, and presents the results of pre-clinical NCT studies in large laboratory animals â?? dogs with spontaneous melanoma.

K.N. Zaitsev; A.A. Portnov; O.V. Mishcherina; V.N. Kulakov; V.F. Khokhlov; I.N. Sheino; V.V. Meshcherikova; V.N. Mitin; N.G. Kozlovskaya; I.A. Shikunova

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Wade, Gentry E. (Saratoga, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Wade, Gentry E. (Saratoga, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mo-99 production at the Annular Core Research Reactor - recent calculative results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made over the past year in understanding the chemistry and processing challenges associated with {sup 99}Mo production using Cintichem type targets. Targets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been successfully irradiated in fuel element locations at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and processed at the Sandia Hot Cell Facility. The next goal for the project is to remove the central cavity experiment tube from the reactor core, allowing for the irradiation of up to 37 targets. After the in-core work is complete, the reactor will be capable of producing significant quantities of {sup 99}Mo.

Parma, E.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Copy Service, Production Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Copy Service Copy Service Copying in color or black-and-white from hard copy or electronic files. Paper size up to 13" x 19" in a variety of stocks and colors. Larger Documents (up to 36" wide and 100" long) can be reproduced in Black & White from prints or files and can be saved in a variety of electronic format Variable Data Printing - personalized document production Tab Printing Forms CD/DVD Duplication CD/DVD direct printing Binding Collate documents, insert tab dividers, punch holes for binding Stapling documents up to 1 inch thick Spiral, adhesive and perfect binding. Hard covers also available upon request Folding & Mailing Print and apply mailing addresses and labels Machine fold documents and insert into envelopes for mailing Laminate printed items up to 35" wide.

167

Ancillary services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC identified six ancillary services reactive power and voltage control, loss compensation, scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, and energy imbalance. Our earlier work identified 19 ancillary services Here we offer a revised set of seven ancillary services and mention several other services that merit consideration. In preparing its final rule on open-access transmission service, we suggest that FERC consider splitting its system-protection service into its two primary pieces, reliability reserve and supplemental-operating reserve. We also suggest that FERC define more sharply all of the ancillary services. especially load-following reserve and energy imbalance. Finally, we suggest that FERC consider other services and their provision in a restructured electricity industry; these services include black-start capability, time correction, standby service. planning reserve, redispatch. transmission services, power quality, and planning and engineering services.

Hirst, E.; Kirby, B

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

169

Elementary Reactor Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THERE are few subjects which have developed at the rate at which reactor physics and ... physics and reactor theory have done. This, of course, is largely due to the circumstances in ...

J. F. HILL

1962-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker–Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are ... the rec...

Norman Rostoker; Artan Qerushi; Michl Binderbauer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Piezoelectric material for use in a nuclear reactor core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In radiation environments ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation has great potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects and materials. In both nuclear power plants and materials test reactors, elevated temperatures and high levels of radiation present challenges to ultrasonic NDE methodologies. The challenges are primarily due to the degradation of the ultrasonic sensors utilized. We present results from the operation of a ultrasonic piezoelectric transducer, composed of bulk single crystal AlN, in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWHrs. The transducer was coupled to an aluminum cylinder and operated in pulse echo mode throughout the irradiation. In addition to the pulse echo testing impedance data were obtained. Further, the piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 33} was measured prior to irradiation and found to be 5.5 pC/N which is unchanged from as-grown samples, and in fact higher than the measured d{sub 33} for many as-grown samples.

Parks, D. A.; Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, B. R. [EES Department, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Lifetime Analysis of First wall Materials Exposed to High Temperature and High Energy Neutrons in a Fusion Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At first wall of a fusion power reactor will be subjected to neutrons, charged particles and radiation, leading to neutron irradiation damage, decrease of thickness by physical sputtering, and high heat flux, ...

K. Miya; H. Hashizume; H. Oomura; M. Akiyama

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF MATERIALS PROPERTIES FOR FLAW STABILITY ANALYSIS IN EXTREME ENVIRONMENT SERVICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discovery of aging phenomena in the materials of a structure may arise after its design and construction that impact its structural integrity. This condition can be addressed through a demonstration of integrity with the material-specific degraded conditions. Two case studies of development of fracture and crack growth property data, and their application in development of in-service inspection programs for nuclear structures in the defense complex are presented. The first case study covers the development of fracture toughness properties in the form of J-R curves for rolled plate Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel filler in the application to demonstrate the integrity of the reactor tanks of the heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The fracture properties for the base, weld, and heat-affected zone of the weldments irradiated at low temperatures (110-150 C) up to 6.4 dpa{sub NRT} and 275 appm helium were developed. An expert group provided consensus for application of the irradiated properties for material input to acceptance criteria for ultrasonic examination of the reactor tanks. Dr. Spencer H. Bush played a lead advisory role in this work. The second case study covers the development of fracture toughness for A285 carbon steel in high level radioactive waste tanks. The approach in this case study incorporated a statistical experimental design for material testing to address metallurgical factors important to fracture toughness. Tolerance intervals were constructed to identify the lower bound fracture toughness for material input to flaw disposition through acceptance by analysis.

Sindelar, R; Ps Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Bruce Wiersma, B; Karthik Subramanian, K; James Elder, J

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

Distributed computing and nuclear reactor analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale scientific and engineering calculations for nuclear reactor analysis can now be carried out effectively in a distributed computing environment, at costs far lower than for traditional mainframes. The distributed computing environment must include support for traditional system services, such as a queuing system for batch work, reliable filesystem backups, and parallel processing capabilities for large jobs. All ANL computer codes for reactor analysis have been adapted successfully to a distributed system based on workstations and X-terminals. Distributed parallel processing has been demonstrated to be effective for long-running Monte Carlo calculations.

Brown, F.B.; Derstine, K.L.; Blomquist, R.N.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Prospects for spheromak fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactor study of Hagenson and Krakowski demonstrated the attractiveness of the spheromak as a compact fusion reactor, based on...

T. K. Fowler; D. D. Hua

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab.

Alexander, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor to produce tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

178

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear Archeology for CANDU Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is the development of so-called 'nuclear archeology' techniques to predict the irradiation history of both fuel-related and non-fuel-related materials irradiated in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) family of nuclear reactors. In this application to CANDU-type reactors, two different scenarios for the collection of the appropriate data for use in these procedures will be assumed: the first scenario is the removal of the pressure tubes, calandria tubes, or fuel cladding and destructive analysis of the activation products contained in these structural materials; the second scenario is the nondestructive analysis (NDA) of the same hardware items via high-resolution gamma ray scans. There are obvious advantages and disadvantages for each approach; however, the NDA approach is the central focus of this work because of its simplicity and lack of invasiveness. The use of these techniques along with a previously developed inverse capability is expected to allow for the prediction of average flux levels and irradiation time, and the total fluence for samples where the values of selected isotopes can be measured.

Broadhead, Bryan L [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC- based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response (ZrC) by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation-induced microstructures mapped spatially and temporally, microstructural evolution during post-irradiation annealing, and atomistic modeling of defect formation and transport energetics will provide new, critical understanding about property changes in ZrC. The behavior of materials under irradiation is determined by the balance between damage production, defect clustering, and lattice response. In order to predict those effects at high temperatures so targeted testing can be expanded and extrapolated beyond the known database, it is necessary to determine the defect energetics and mobilities as these control damage accumulation and annealing. In particular, low-temperature irradiations are invaluable for determining the regions of defect mobility. Computer simulation techniques are particularly useful for identifying basic defect properties, especially if closely coupled with a well-constructed and complete experimental database. The close coupling of calculation and experiment in this project will provide mutual benchmarking and allow us to glean a deeper understanding of the irradiation response of ZrC, which can then be applied to the prediction of its behavior in reactor conditions.

Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Argonaut Reactor - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Training Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

184

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 565568 Bistable damage in neutron-irradiated silicon diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 565­568 Bistable damage in neutronE15 kO cm) diodes was irradiated at room temperature with neutrons from a nuclear reactor to fluences about neutron spectrum, dosimetry and irradiation facility can be found elsewhere [9]. After

Zavrtanik, Marko

185

In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded by the flaw density and size distribution values used in the PTS technical basis. Under a contract with the NRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been working on a program to assess the ability of current inservice inspection (ISI)-ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques, as qualified through ASME Code, Appendix VIII, Supplements 4 and 6, to detect small fabrication or inservice-induced flaws located in RPV welds and adjacent base materials. As part of this effort, the investigators have pursued an evaluation, based on the available information, of the capability of UT to provide flaw density/distribution inputs for making RPV weld assessments in accordance with §50.61a. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of data from the 1993 Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Unit 3, Spirit of Appendix VIII reactor vessel examination, a comparison of the flaw density/distribution from this data with the distribution in §50.61a, possible reasons for differences, and plans and recommendations for further work in this area.

Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Procurable Products, Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility construction and architecturalengineering Construction services; architecturalengineering services; real property Support services and staff augmentation Services for...

188

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

Snoj, L. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactor, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology/Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Test plan for the Parallex CANDU-MOX irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of several options being considered by the United States and the Russian Federation for the disposition of excess plutonium from dismantled weapons is to convert it to mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for use in Canadian uranium-deuterium (CANDU) reactors. This report describes an irradiation test demonstrating the feasibility of this concept with laboratory quantities of MOX fuel placed in the pressurized loops of the National Research Universal test reactor at the Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories. The objective of the Parallex (for parallel experiment) test is to simultaneously test laboratory-produced quantities of US and R.F. MOX fuel in a test reactor under heat generation rates representing those expected in the CANDU reactors. The MOX fuel will be produced with plutonium from disassembled weapons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and at the Bochvar Institute in the Russian Federation. Thus, the test will serve to demonstrate the accomplishment of many parts of the disposition mission: disassembly of weapons, conversion of the plutonium to oxide, fabrication of MOX fuel, assembly of fuel elements and bundles, shipment to a reactor, irradiation, and finally, storage of the spent fuel elements awaiting eventual disposition in a geologic repository in Canada.

Copeland, G.L.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fuel qualification issues and strategies for reactor-based surplus plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed irradiation of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial reactors as a disposition method for surplus plutonium from the weapons program. The burning of MOX fuel in reactors is supported by an extensive technology base; however, the infrastructure required to implement reactor-based plutonium disposition does not exist domestically. This report identifies and examines the actions required to qualify and license weapons-grade (WG) plutonium-based MOX fuels for use in domestic commercial light-water reactors (LWRs).

Cowell, B.S.; Copeland, G.L.; Moses, D.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Austenitic alloy and reactor components made thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An austenitic stainless steel alloy is disclosed, having excellent fast neutron irradiation swelling resistance and good post irradiation ductility, making it especially useful for liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications. The alloy contains: about 0.04 to 0.09 wt. % carbon; about 1.5 to 2.5 wt. % manganese; about 0.5 to 1.6 wt. % silicon; about 0.030 to 0.08 wt. % phosphorus; about 13.3 to 16.5 wt. % chromium; about 13.7 to 16.0 wt. % nickel; about 1.0 to 3.0 wt. % molybdenum; and about 0.10 to 0.35 wt. % titanium.

Bates, John F. (Ogden, UT); Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Neutron damage reduction in a traveling wave reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traveling wave reactors are envisioned to run on depleted or natural uranium with no need for enrichment or reprocessing, and in a manner which requires little to no operator intervention. If feasible, this type of reactor has significant advantages over conventional nuclear power systems. However, a practical implementation of this concept is challenging as neutron irradiation levels many times greater than those in conventional reactors appear to be required for a fission wave to propagate. Radiation damage to the fuel and cladding materials presents a significant obstacle to a practical design. One possibility for reducing damage is to soften the neutron energy spectrum. Here we show that using a uranium oxide fuel form will allow a shift in the neutron spectrum that can result in at least a three fold decrease in dpa levels for fuel cladding and structural steels within the reactor compared with the dpa levels expected when using a uranium metal fuel. (authors)

Osborne, A. G.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Production Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

197

Microstructural Characterization of Irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si Dispersion to High Fission Density  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fuel development program for research and test reactors calls for improved knowledge on the effect of microstructure on fuel performance in reactors. This work summarizes the recent TEM microstructural characterization of an irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plate (R3R050) irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory to 5.2×1021 fissions/cm3. While a large fraction of the fuel grains is decorated with large bubbles, there is no evidence showing interlinking of these large bubbles at the specified fission density. The attachment of solid fission product precipitates to the bubbles is likely the result of fission product diffusion into these bubbles. The process of fission gas bubble superlattice collapse appears through bubble coalescence. The results are compared with the previous TEM work of the dispersion fuels irradiated to lower fission density from the same fuel plate.

J. Gan; B. D. Miller; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; A. B. Robinson; J. W. Madden; P. G. Medvedev; D. M. Wachs

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

199

Power Reactor Progress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Argonne kicks off EBWR; Allis-Chalmers plans power reactor using both nuclear and conventional fuels ... NUCLEAR POWER took two giant steps last week. ... Just as the first nuclear power system in the U. S. designed and built solely for the generation of electric power went into full operation at Argonne, Allis-Chalmers came up with a new twist in power reactors—a controlled recirculation boiling reactor (CRBR) using both nuclear and conventional fuels (C&EN, Feb. 18, page 7). ...

1957-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

200

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors ... Project Sherwood, as the study program is called, began in 1951-52 soon after the first successful thermonuclear explosion in the Pacific. ...

1955-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

irradiance | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

irradiance irradiance Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude Tilt Irradiance NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005) Parameter: Latitude Tilt Radiation (kWh/m^2/day) Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections online Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords GIS global irradiance latitude mapping NASA renewable energy solar solar PV SWERA TILT UNEP Data text/csv icon Latitude Tilt Radiation (kWh/m^2/day) (csv, 11.8 MiB) application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 5 MiB)

205

Irradiation-induced effects of proton irradiation on zirconium carbides with different stoichiometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in deep burn TRISO fuel particles for hightemperature, gas-cooled reactors. Zirconium carbide has a cubic B1 type crystal structure along with a very high melting point (3420 ?C), exceptional hardness and good thermal and electrical conductivities. Understanding the ZrC irradiation response is crucial for establishing ZrC as an alternative component in TRISO fuel. Until now, very few studies on irradiation effects on ZrC have been released and fundamental aspects of defect evolution and kinetics are not well understood although some atomistic simulations and phenomenological studies have been performed. This work was carried out to understand the damage evolution in float-zone refined ZrC with different stoichiometries. Proton irradiations at 800 ?C up to doses of 3 dpa were performed on ZrCx (where x ranges from 0.9 to 1.2) to investigate the damage evolution. The irradiation-induced defects, such as density of dislocation loops, at different stoichiometries and doses which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented and discussed.

Y. Huang; B.R. Maier; T.R. Allen

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Modifications to the NRAD Reactor, 1977 to present  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory-West, operated by the University of Chicago, is located near Idaho Falls, ID, on the Idaho National Engineering laboratory Site. ANL-West performs work in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program (LMFBR) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. The NRAD reactor is located at the Argonne Site within the Hot Fuel Examination Facility/North, a large hot cell facility where both non-destructive and destructive examinations are performed on highly irradiated reactor fuels and materials in support of the LMFBR program. The NRAD facility utilizes a 250-kW TRIGA reactor and is completely dedicated to neutron radiography and the development of radiography techniques. Criticality was first achieved at the NRAD reactor in October of 1977. Since that time, a number of modifications have been implemented to improve operational efficiency and radiography production. This paper describes the modifications and changes that significantly improved operational efficiency and reliability of the reactor and the essential auxiliary reactor systems.

Weeks, A.A.; Pruett, D.P.; Heidel, C.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Transportation Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transporting nuclear materials within the United States and throughout the world is a complicated and sometimes highly controversial effort requiring...

208

Validation of a Monte Carlo Based Depletion Methodology Using HFIR Post-Irradiation Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Post-irradiation uranium isotopic atomic densities within the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were calculated and compared to uranium mass spectrographic data measured in the late 1960s and early 70s [1]. This study was performed in order to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology for calculating the burn-up dependent nuclide inventory, specifically the post-irradiation uranium

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1994-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor Design and Feasibility Problem Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Rosen, M. A.; Coburn, D. B.; Flynn, T....

211

IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

M.K. Meyer; J. Gan; J.-F. Jue; D.D. Keiser; E. Perez; A. Robinson; D.M. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G.L. Hofman; Y.-S. Kim

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

USE OF SILICON CARBIDE MONITORS IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. For example, silicon carbide (SiC) monitors are now available to detect peak irradiation temperatures between 200°C and 800°C. Using a resistance measurement approach, specialized equipment installed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) and specialized procedures were developed to ensure that accurate peak irradiation temperature measurements are inferred from SiC monitors irradiated at the ATR. Comparison examinations were completed by INL to demonstrate this capability, and several programs currently rely on SiC monitors for peak temperature detection. This paper discusses the use of SiC monitors at the ATR, the process used to evaluate them at the HTTL, and presents representative measurements taken using SiC monitors.

K. L. Davis; B. Chase; T. Unruh; D. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of irradiation facility options for fusion materials research and development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful development of fusion energy will require the design of high-performance structural materials that exhibit dimensional stability and good resistance to fusion neutron degradation of mechanical and physical properties. The high levels of gaseous (H, He) transmutation products associated with deuterium–tritium (D–T) fusion neutron transmutation reactions, along with displacement damage dose requirements up to 50–200 displacements per atom (dpa) for a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), pose an extraordinary challenge. One or more intense neutron source(s) are needed to address two complementary missions: (1) scientific investigations of radiation degradation phenomena and microstructural evolution under fusion-relevant irradiation conditions (to provide the foundation for designing improved radiation resistant materials), and (2) engineering database development for design and licensing of next-step fusion energy machines such as a fusion DEMO. A wide variety of irradiation facilities have been proposed to investigate materials science phenomena and to test and qualify materials for a DEMO reactor. Some of the key technical considerations for selecting the most appropriate fusion materials irradiation source are summarized. Currently available and proposed facilities include fission reactors (including isotopic and spectral tailoring techniques to modify the rate of H and He production per dpa), dual- and triple-ion accelerator irradiation facilities that enable greatly accelerated irradiation studies with fusion-relevant H and He production rates per dpa within microscopic volumes, D–Li stripping reaction and spallation neutron sources, and plasma-based sources. The advantages and limitations of the main proposed fusion materials irradiation facility options are reviewed. Evaluation parameters include irradiation volume, potential for performing accelerated irradiation studies, capital and operating costs, similarity of neutron irradiation spectrum to fusion reactor conditions, temperature and irradiation flux stability/control, ability to perform multiple-effect tests (e.g., irradiation in the presence of a flowing coolant, or in the presence of complex applied stress fields), and technical maturity/risk of the concept. Ultimately, it is anticipated that heavy utilization of ion beam and fission neutron irradiation facilities along with sophisticated materials models, in addition to a dedicated fusion-relevant neutron irradiation facility, will be necessary to provide a comprehensive and cost-effective understanding of anticipated materials evolution in a fusion DEMO and to therefore provide a timely and robust materials database.

Steven J. Zinkle; Anton Möslang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Portfolio for fast reactor collaboration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the LMFBR type reactor in the United Kingdom is reviewed. Design characteristics of a commercial demonstration fast reactor are presented and compared with the Super Phenix reactor.

Rippon, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Handbook of Reactor Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THIS handbook is one volume in a series sponsored by the United States Atomic Energy Commission with ... data and reference information in the field of reactors. The volume is devoted to reactor physics and radiation shielding, the latter subject occupying approximately a quarter of the book.

PETER W. MUMMERY

1956-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fast reactor safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR, - In his article on fast reactor safety (26 July, page 270) Norman Dombey claims to introduce to non-specialists ... , page 270) Norman Dombey claims to introduce to non-specialists some features of fast reactors that are not available outside the technical literature. The non-specialist would do well ...

R.D. SMITH

1979-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

217

Instrumentation of Nuclear Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... s Lecture Theatre on January 8, a symposium of papers on the instrumentation of nuclear reactors was organized, at which about five hundred members and visitors attended, including guests from ... the Institution, took the chair and introduced Sir John Cockcroft, whose lecture on "Nuclear Reactors and their Applications" provided a general background for the three specialized papers which followed. ...

1953-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Nuclear Research Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... their countries for the advent of nuclear power. A few countries had built large research reactors for the production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but ... production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but the small training reactor had not been developed. Since then, research ...

T. E. ALLIBONE

1963-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor May 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL (509) 376-6773 Andre_l_Armstrong@rl.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Two locomotives that hauled irradiated fuel around the Hanford Site for a half-century will reach their final stop this week when they are delivered to the Historic B Reactor for preservation and public display. The two locomotives are among 16 railcars from Hanford's 200 North Area being removed by Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL).

220

Canadian university research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Canada there are seven university research reactors: one medium-power (2-MW) swimming pool reactor at McMaster University and six low-power (20-kW) SLOWPOKE reactors at Dalhousie University, Ecole Polytechnique, the Royal Military College, the University of Toronto, the University of Saskatchewan, and the University of Alberta. This paper describes primarily the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR), which operates on a wider scale than the SLOWPOKE reactors. The MNR has over a hundred user groups and is a very broad-based tool. The main applications are in the following areas: (1) neutron activation analysis (NAA); (2) isotope production; (3) neutron beam research; (4) nuclear engineering; (5) neutron radiography; and (6) nuclear physics.

Ernst, P.C.; Collins, M.F.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Irradiation behavior of miniature experimental uranium silicide fuel plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium silicides, because of their relatively high uranium density, were selected as candidate dispersion fuels for the higher fuel densities required in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Irradiation experience with this type of fuel, however, was limited to relatively modest fission densities in the bulk from, on the order of 7 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/, far short of the approximately 20 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/ goal established for the RERTR program. The purpose of the irradiation experiments on silicide fuels on the ORR, therefore, was to investigate the intrinsic irradiation behavior of uranium silicide as a dispersion fuel. Of particular interest was the interaction between the silicide particles and the aluminum matrix, the swelling behavior of the silicide particles, and the maximum volume fraction of silicide particles that could be contained in the aluminum matrix.

Hofman, G.L.; Neimark, L.A.; Mattas, R.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications...

223

Service Contracts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Guidelines for Obtaining Guidelines for Obtaining Best-Practice Contracts for Commercial Buildings Operation and Maintenance Service Contracts Prepared with funding from the U.S. EPA December 1997 PECI Acknowledgements Special thanks to the following people for their ongoing contributions and careful review of the document: Byron Courts, Director of Engineering Services, and Dave Rabon, Chief Engineer, Melvin Mark Pete Degan, Director of Customer Marketing, Landis/Staefa David Fanning, HVAC Coordinator, EXPRESS Bil Pletz, Facility Manager, Intel Mike Sanislow, Service Channel Development Leader, Honeywell Home and Building Karl Stum, Director of Technical Services, PECI Tom Walton, President, United Service Alliance For additional copies of this guidebook, contact: Portland Energy Conservation Inc. (PECI)

224

Facilities Services Overview & Discussion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Finance Facilities Services Director: Jeff Butler Human Resources Administrative Services Engineering) Environmental Services Morrison (3) Admin Services Evans (1) Human Resources Engineering (4) ·EngineeringFacilities Services Overview & Discussion Jeff Butler Director ­ Facilities Services November 2011

Maxwell, Bruce D.

225

Investigation of Effects of Neutron Irradiation on Tantalum Alloys for Radioisotope Power System Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. A number of tantalum alloys have been developed over the years to increase high-temperature strength (Ta-10%W) and to reduce creep strain (T-111). These tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive the increasing high pressures of the RTG's operating environment resulting from the alpha decay of the 238-plutonium dioxide fuel. However, 238-plutonium is also a powerful neutron source. Therefore, the RTG operating environment produces large amounts of 3-helium and neutron displacement damage over the 30 year life of the RTG. The literature to date shows that there has been very little work focused on the mechanical properties of irradiated tantalum and tantalum alloys and none at the fluence levels associated with a RTG operating environment. The minimum, reactor related, work that has been reported shows that these alloys tend to follow trends seen in the behavior of other BCC alloys under irradiation. An understanding of these mechanisms is important for the confident extrapolation of mechanical-property trends to the higher doses and gas levels corresponding to actual service lifetimes. When comparing the radiation effects between samples of Ta-10%W and T-111 (Ta-8%W-2%Hf) subjected to identical neutron fluences and environmental conditions at temperatures <0.3Tm ({approx}700 deg. C), evidence suggests the possibility that T-111 will exhibit higher levels of internal damage accumulation and degradation of mechanical properties compared to Ta-10%W.

Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park Dayton OH 45469-0102 (United States); Talnagi, Joseph [Ohio State University Research Reactor, 1298 Kinnear Road, Columbus, OH 43212 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evaluation of irradiation facility options for fusion materials research and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful development of fusion energy will require the design of high-performance structural materials that exhibit dimensional stability and good resistance to fusion neutron degradation of mechanical and physical properties. The high levels of gaseous (H, He) transmutation products associated with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion neutron transmutation reactions, along with displacement damage dose requirements up to 50-200 displacements per atom (dpa) for a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), pose an extraordinary challenge. The intense neutron source(s) is needed to address two complimentary missions: 1) Scientific investigations of radiation degradation phenomena and microstructural evolution under fusion-relevant irradiation conditions (to provide the foundation for designing improved radiation resistant materials), and 2) Engineering database development for design and licensing of next-step fusion energy machines such as a fusion DEMO. A wide variety of irradiation facilities have been proposed to investigate materials science phenomena and to test and qualify materials for a DEMO reactor. Currently available and proposed facilities include fission reactors (including isotopic and spectral tailoring techniques to modify the rate of H and He production per dpa), dual- and triple-ion accelerator irradiation facilities that enable greatly accelerated irradiation studies with fusion-relevant H and He production rates per dpa within microscopic volumes, D-Li stripping reaction and spallation neutron sources, and plasma-based sources. The advantages and limitations of the main proposed fusion materials irradiation facility options are reviewed. Evaluation parameters include irradiation volume, potential for performing accelerated irradiation studies, capital and operating costs, similarity of neutron irradiation spectrum to fusion reactor conditions, temperature and irradiation flux stability/control, ability to perform multiple-effect tests (e.g., irradiation in the presence of a flowing coolant, or in the presence of complex applied stress fields), and technical maturity/risk of the concept. Ultimately, it is anticipated that heavy utilization of ion beam and fission neutron irradiation facilities along with sophisticated materials models, in addition to a dedicated fusion-relevant neutron irradiation facility, will be necessary to provide a comprehensive and cost-effective understanding of anticipated materials evolution in a fusion DEMO and to therefore provide a timely and robust materials database.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Möslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The determination of neutron energy spectrum in reactor core C1 of reactor VR-1 Sparrow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution overviews neutron spectrum measurement, which was done on training reactor VR-1 Sparrow with a new nuclear fuel. Former nuclear fuel IRT-3M was changed for current nuclear fuel IRT-4M with lower enrichment of 235U (enrichment was reduced from former 36% to 20%) in terms of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Neutron spectrum measurement was obtained by irradiation of activation foils at the end of pipe of rabit system and consecutive deconvolution of obtained saturated activities. Deconvolution was performed by computer iterative code SAND-II with 620 groups' structure. All gamma measurements were performed on Canberra HPGe. Activation foils were chosen according physical and nuclear parameters from the set of certificated foils. The Resulting differential flux at the end of pipe of rabit system agreed well with typical spectrum of light water reactor. Measurement of neutron spectrum has brought better knowledge about new reactor core C1 and improved methodology of activation measurement. (author)

Vins, M. [Department of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vinsmiro@seznam.cz

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

AGC-2 Irradiation Data Qualification Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Graphite Technology Development Program will run a series of six experiments to quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear grade graphite. The second Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment (AGC-2) began with Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 149A on April 12, 2011, and ended with ATR Cycle 151B on May 5, 2012. The purpose of this report is to qualify AGC-2 irradiation monitoring data following INL Management and Control Procedure 2691, Data Qualification. Data that are Qualified meet the requirements for data collection and use as described in the experiment planning and quality assurance documents. Data that do not meet the requirements are Failed. Some data may not quite meet the requirements, but may still provide some useable information. These data are labeled as Trend. No Trend data were identified for the AGC-2 experiment. All thermocouples functioned throughout the AGC-2 experiment. There was one instance where spurious signals or instrument power interruption resulted in a recorded temperature value being well outside physical reality. This value was identified and labeled as Failed data. All other temperature data are Qualified. All helium and argon gas flow data are within expected ranges. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during reactor shutdown. All gas flow data are Qualified. At the start of the experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line increased to 200 ppmv then declined to less than 10 ppmv over a period of 5 days. This increase in moisture coincides with the initial heating of the experiment and drying of the system. Moisture slightly exceeded 10 ppmv three other times during the experiment. While these moisture values exceed the 10 ppmv threshold value, the reported measurements are considered accurate and to reflect moisture conditions in the capsule. All moisture data are Qualified. Graphite creep specimens are subjected to one of three loads, 393 lbf, 491 lbf, or 589 lbf. Loads were consistently within 5% of the specified values throughout the experiment. Stack displacement increased consistently throughout the experiment with total displacement ranging from 1 to 1.5 inches. No anomalous values were identified. During reactor outages, a set of pneumatic rams are used to raise the stacks of graphite creep specimens to ensure the specimens have not become stuck within the test train. This stack raising was performed after all cycles when the capsule was in the reactor. All stacks were raised successfully after each cycle. The load and displacement data are Qualified

Laurence C. Hull

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Novell Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CIS Department CIS Department Novell Services If you don't see the answer to your question here, contact the help desk at 486-HELP or submit a Help Request. Novell Netware is the labs main method of providing file and print services for the PC and Macintosh platforms. Novell end user services are free and include a backed up home directory and access to all distributed printers at LBL. Request a Novell account Request a new Novell printer Request a Novell file restore (choose PC for platform and Backups/Restores for problem) Novell iPrint Accessing Novell File Services Download the LBL Netware client Novell Server Information Novell Departmental Administrative Contacts Novell FAQ: How do I login to the Novell network? 9x | NT4/2000/XP Do I have the Netware client installed? 9x | NT4/2000/XP

234

Wildlife Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Services, part of Texas Cooperative Extension, is an agency created to assist the public in managing the problems sometimes caused by wildlife. Its objectives are to protect wildlife, crops, livestock, property and human health...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and post accident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Deformation and Fracture Properties in Neutron Irradiated Pure Mo and Mo Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of select molybdenum materials, pure low carbon arc-cast (LCAC) Mo, Mo-0.5% Ti-0.1% Zr (TZM) alloy, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Mo alloy, was characterized by analyzing the temperature dependence of mechanical properties. This study assembles the tensile test and analysis data obtained through multiple series of irradiation and post-irradiation experiments. Tensile specimens in stress-relieved conditions with longitudinal (LSR) and transverse (TSR) directions were irradiated in high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at temperatures ranging 270 to 1100oC to 0.6 -13.1 dpa. Also, the recrystallized LCAC Mo specimens in the longitudinal direction (LR) were also irradiated up to 0.28 dpa at ~80oC. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures ranging from -194 oC to 1400oC. Analysis results indicate that the irradiation at temperatures below 700oC increased strength significantly, up to 170%, while the increase of yield stress by irradiations at higher temperature was not significant. The plastic instability stress was strongly dependent on test temperature but was nearly independent of irradiation dose and temperature. The true fracture stress was dependent on test temperature to a lesser degree than was the yield stress and plastic instability stress. It was also slightly impacted by irradiation, depending on both irradiation and test temperatures. Brittle fracture often occurred in the LSR specimens tested at room temperature or lower after low temperature irradiation, while it was observed in many irradiated TSR specimens over the whole test temperature range. The ODS-LSR specimens showed the highest resistance to irradiation embrittlement due to relatively higher fracture stress. The critical temperature for shear failure (CTSF) was defined and evaluated for the materials, and the CTSF values were compared with the ductile to brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) based on ductility data.

Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Li, Meimei [ORNL; Cockeram, Brian V [Bechtel-Bettis, Inc.; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion species at various energies...

Aitkaliyeva, Assel

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Method to predict relative hydriding within a group of zirconium alloys under nuclear irradiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An out-of-reactor method for screening to predict relative in-reactor hydriding behavior of zirconium-bsed materials is disclosed. Samples of zirconium-based materials having different composition and/or fabrication are autoclaved in a relatively concentrated (0.3 to 1.0M) aqueous lithium hydroxide solution at constant temperatures within the water reactor coolant temperature range (280.degree. to 316.degree. C.). Samples tested by this out-of-reactor procedure, when compared on the basis of the ratio of hydrogen weight gain to oxide weight gain, accurately predict the relative rate of hyriding for the same materials when subject to in-reactor (irradiated) corrision.

Johnson, Jr., A. Burtron (Richland, WA); Levy, Ira S. (Kennewick, WA); Trimble, Dennis J. (Kennewick, WA); Lanning, Donald D. (Kennewick, WA); Gerber, Franna S. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Method to predict relative hydriding within a group of zirconium alloys under nuclear irradiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An out-of-reactor method for screening to predict relative in-reactor hydriding behavior of zirconium-based materials is disclosed. Samples of zirconium-based materials having different compositions and/or fabrication methods are autoclaved in a relatively concentrated (0.3 to 1.0M) aqueous lithium hydroxide solution at constant temperatures within the water reactor coolant temperature range (280 to 316 C). Samples tested by this out-of-reactor procedure, when compared on the basis of the ratio of hydrogen weight gain to oxide weight gain, accurately predict the relative rate of hydriding for the same materials when subject to in-reactor (irradiated) corrosion. 1 figure.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Levy, I.S.; Trimble, D.J.; Lanning, D.D.; Gerber, F.S.

1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reactor hot spot analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Vilim, R.B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fabrication and Characterization of Uranium-based High Temperature Reactor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fabrication and Characterization of Uranium-based High Temperature Reactor Fabrication and Characterization of Uranium-based High Temperature Reactor Fuel June 01, 2013 The Uranium Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern R&D scale lab for the fabrication and characterization of uranium-based high temperature reactor fuel. A laboratory-scale coater manufactures tri-isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles (CFPs), state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, and the CFPs are then pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation testing, all under a NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance Program. After fuel kernel size and shape are measured by optical shadow imaging, the TRISO coatings are deposited via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition in a 50-mm diameter conical chamber within the coating furnace. Computer control of temperature and gas composition ensures reproducibility

243

NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

John D. Bess

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Molten metal reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

F Reactor Inspection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

F Reactor Inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

Irradiation-induced composition patterns in binary solid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical/computational model for the irradiation-driven compositional instabilities in binary solid solutions has been developed. The model is suitable for investigating the behavior of structural alloys and metallic nuclear fuels in a reactor environment as well as the response of alloy thin films to ion beam irradiation. The model is based on a set of reaction-diffusion equations for the dynamics of vacancies, interstitials, and lattice atoms under irradiation. The dynamics of these species includes the stochastic generation of defects by collision cascades as well as the defect reactions and diffusion. The atomic fluxes in this model are derived based on the transitions of lattice defects. The set of reaction-diffusion equations are stiff, hence a stiffly stable method, also known as the Gear method, has been used to numerically approximate the equations. For the Cu-Au alloy in the solid solution regime, the model results demonstrate the formation of compositional patterns under high-temperature particle irradiation, with Fourier space properties (Fourier spectrum, average wavelength, and wavevector) depending on the cascade damage characteristics, average composition, and irradiation temperature.

Dubey, Santosh; El-Azab, Anter [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)] [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)

2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radiochemical Transformation of High Pressure Methane under Gamma, Electron, and Neutron Irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) at an activity of 400 Ci. The electron source was a 10 MeV, 15 kW, linear accelerator at the National Center for Electron Beam Research. The neutron source was the NSC reactor running at 1 MWth. The in-core positions were used for the neutron irradiations had...

Clemens, Jeffrey Tyler

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Comparison of a microstructure evolution model with experiments on irradiated vanadium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of a microstructure evolution model with experiments on irradiated vanadium S. Sharafat vacancy ¯ux to grow matrix and precipitate-axed bubbles. The direct formation of vacancy and interstitial and its alloys are now considered as candidate structural materials in fu- sion reactors, because

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

250

Simulator platform for fast reactor operation and safety technology demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simulator platform for visualization and demonstration of innovative concepts in fast reactor technology is described. The objective is to make more accessible the workings of fast reactor technology innovations and to do so in a human factors environment that uses state-of-the art visualization technologies. In this work the computer codes in use at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the design of fast reactor systems are being integrated to run on this platform. This includes linking reactor systems codes with mechanical structures codes and using advanced graphics to depict the thermo-hydraulic-structure interactions that give rise to an inherently safe response to upsets. It also includes visualization of mechanical systems operation including advanced concepts that make use of robotics for operations, in-service inspection, and maintenance.

Vilim, R. B.; Park, Y. S.; Grandy, C.; Belch, H.; Dworzanski, P.; Misterka, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

AGC-3 Irradiation Data Qualification Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Graphite Technology Development Program will run a series of six experiments to quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear grade graphite. The third experiment, Advanced Graphite Creep 3 (AGC 3), began with Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 152B on November 27, 2012, and ended with ATR Cycle 155B on April 23, 2014. This report documents qualification of AGC 3 experiment irradiation monitoring data for use by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Program for research and development activities required to design and license the first VHTR nuclear plant. Qualified data meet the requirements for data collection and use as described in the experiment planning and quality assurance documents. Failed data do not meet the requirements. Trend data may not meet the requirements, but may still provide some useable information. All thermocouples (TCs) functioned throughout the AGC 3 experiment. There was one interval between December 18, 2012, and December 20, 2012, where 10 NULL values were reported for various TCs. These NULL values were deleted from the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System database. All temperature data are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program. Argon, helium, and total gas flow data were within expected ranges and are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the AGC 3 experiment capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during ATR shutdowns. At the start of the AGC 3 experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line was stuck at a constant value of 335.6174 ppmv for the first cycle (Cycle 152B). When the AGC 3 experiment capsule was reinstalled in ATR for Cycle 154B, a new moisture filter was installed. Moisture data from Cycle 152B are Failed. All moisture data from the final three cycles (Cycles 154B, 155A, and 155B) are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program.

Laurence Hull

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Exposure conditions of reactor internals of Rovno VVER-440 NPP units 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of determination of irradiation conditions for vessel internals of VVER-440 reactor No. 1 and 2 at Rovno Nuclear Power Plant, obtained by specialists at Inst. for Nuclear Research Kyiv (Ukraine)), and Nuclear Research Inst. Rez (Czech Republic)), are presented. To calculate neutron transport, detailed calculation models of these reactors were prepared. Distribution of neutron flux functionals on the surface of reactor VVER-440 baffle and core barrel for different core loads was studied. Agreement between results obtained by specialists at Inst. for Nuclear Research and at Nuclear Research Inst. is shown. (authors)

Grytsenko, O.V.; Pugach, S.M.; Diemokhin, V.L.; Bukanov, V.N. [Inst. for Nuclear Research, Kyiv, 03680 (Ukraine); Marek, M.; Vandlik, S. [Nuclear Research Inst. Rez Plc., Rez, 25068 (Czech Republic)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Design and Testing of a Boron Carbide Capsule for Spectral Tailoring in Mixed-Spectrum Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A boron carbide capsule has been designed and used for spectral-tailoring experiments at the TRIGA reactor at Washington State University. Irradiations were conducted in pulsed mode and in continuous operation for up to 4 hours. A cadmium cover was used to reduce thermal heating. The neutron spectrum calculated with MCNP was found to be in good agreement with reactor dosimetry measurements using the STAY'SL computer code. The neutron spectrum resembles that of a fast reactor. Design of a capsule using boron carbide enriched in {sup 10}B shows that it is possible to produce a neutron spectrum similar to {sup 235}U fission.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wittman, Richard S.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Finn, Erin C.; Friese, Judah I.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Advanced Test Reactor Safety Basis Upgrade Lessons Learned Relative to Design Basis Verification and Safety Basis Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The reactor also provides other irradiation services such as radioisotope production. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). An audit conducted by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (DOE OA) raised concerns that design conditions at the ATR were not adequately analyzed in the safety analysis and that legacy design basis management practices had the potential to further impact safe operation of the facility.1 The concerns identified by the audit team, and issues raised during additional reviews performed by ATR safety analysts, were evaluated through the unreviewed safety question process resulting in shutdown of the ATR for more than three months while these concerns were resolved. Past management of the ATR safety basis, relative to facility design basis management and change control, led to concerns that discrepancies in the safety basis may have developed. Although not required by DOE orders or regulations, not performing design basis verification in conjunction with development of the 10 CFR 830 Subpart B upgraded safety basis allowed these potential weaknesses to be carried forward. Configuration management and a clear definition of the existing facility design basis have a direct relation to developing and maintaining a high quality safety basis which properly identifies and mitigates all hazards and postulated accident conditions. These relations and the impact of past safety basis management practices have been reviewed in order to identify lessons learned from the safety basis upgrade process and appropriate actions to resolve possible concerns with respect to the current ATR safety basis. The need for a design basis reconstitution program for the ATR has been identified along with the use of sound configuration management principles in order to support safe and efficient facility operation.

G. L. Sharp; R. T. McCracken

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) OBJECTIVE QA-1: The RRD QA program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, and sufficient numbers of qualified QA personnel are provided to ensure services are adequate to support reactor operation. The QA functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. QA personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and the associated hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. The level of knowledge of QA personnel related to reactor

256

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

User Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contacts for Users Contacts for Users User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m.

258

User Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Contact Home Contact User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m.

259

Gamma Irradiation | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gamma Irradiation Gamma Irradiation Gamma Irradiation Facility Gamma irradiation chamber Gamma irradiation chamber. The HFIR Gamma Irradiation Facility is an experimental facility designed to irradiate materials with gamma radiation from spent fuel elements. The facility chamber is stainless steel and is made of 0.065-thick tubing to maximize the internal dimensions of the chamber. This allows for the largest samples possible that can still fit inside the cadmium post of the spent fuel loading station positions. The interior chamber is approximately 3.75 inches inside diameter and accommodates samples up to 25 inches long. There are two configurations for the chamber assembly, with the only difference being the plugs. The uninstrumented configuration has a top plug that is used for installation of the samples, to support the inert gas

260

B Reactor | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » B Reactor B Reactor B Reactor Completed in September 1944, the B Reactor was the world's first large-scale plutonium production reactor. As at Oak Ridge, the need for labor turned Hanford into an atomic boomtown, with the population reaching 50,000 by summer 1944. Similar to the X-10 Graphite Reactor at Oak Ridge in terms of loading and unloading fuel, the B Reactor was built on a much larger scale and used water rather than air as a coolant. Whereas the X-10 had an initial design output of 1,000 kilowatts, the B Reactor was designed to operate at 250,000 kilowatts. Consisting of a 28- by 36-foot, 1,200-ton graphite cylinder lying on its side, the reactor was penetrated through its

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261

High conduction neutron absorber to simulate fast reactor environment in an existing test reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new metal matrix composite material has been developed to serve as a thermal neutron absorber for testing fast reactor fuels and materials in an existing pressurized water reactor. The performance of this material was evaluated by placing neutron fluence monitors within shrouded and unshrouded holders and irradiating for up to four cycles. The monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and X-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. Adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins—thermal, epithermal, and fast—to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. A comparison of shrouded and unshrouded fluence monitors shows a thermal fluence decrease of ~11 % for the shielded monitors. Radioisotope activity and mass for each of the major activation products is given to provide insight into the evolution of thermal absorption cross-section during irradiation. The thermal neutron absorption capability of the composite material appears to diminish at total neutron fluence levels of ~8 × 1025 n/m2. Calculated values for dpa in excess of 2.0 were obtained for two common structural materials (iron and nickel) of interest for future fast flux experiments.

Donna Post Guillen; Larry R. Greenwood; James R. Parry

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Pre- and post-irradiation characterization and properties measurements of ZrC coated surrogate TRISO particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconium carbide is a candidate to either replace or supplement silicon carbide as a coating material in TRISO fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels. Six sets of ZrC coated surrogate microsphere samples, fabricated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency using the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition method, were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developmental samples available for the irradiation experiment were in conditions of either as-fabricated coated particles or particles that had been heat-treated to simulate the fuel compacting process. Five sets of samples were composed of nominally stoichiometric compositions, with the sixth being richer in carbon (C/Zr = 1.4). The samples were irradiated at 800 and 1250 C with fast neutron fluences of 2 and 6 dpa. Post-irradiation, the samples were retrieved from the irradiation capsules followed by microstructural examination performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis Laboratory. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor program as part of International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative collaboration with Japan. This report includes progress from that INERI collaboration, as well as results of some follow-up examination of the irradiated specimens. Post-irradiation examination items included microstructural characterization, and nanoindentation hardness/modulus measurements. The examinations revealed grain size enhancement and softening as the primary effects of both heat-treatment and irradiation in stoichiometric ZrC with a non-layered, homogeneous grain structure, raising serious concerns on the mechanical suitability of these particular developmental coatings as a replacement for SiC in TRISO fuel. Samples with either free carbon or carbon-rich layers dispersed in the ZrC coatings experienced negligible grain size enhancement during both heat treatment and irradiation. However, these samples experienced irradiation induced softening similar to stoichiometric ZrC samples.

Vasudevamurthy, Gokul [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Microstructure of RERTR DU-Alloys Irradiated with Krypton Ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel development for reduced enrichment research and test reactor (RERTR) program is tasked with the development of new low enrichment uranium fuels that can be employed to replace existing high enrichment uranium fuels currently used in many research and test reactors worldwide. Radiation stability of the interaction product formed at fuel-matrix interface has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted uranium alloys are cast that consist of the following 5 phases of interest to be investigated: U(Si,Al)3, (U,Mo)(Si,Al)3, UMo2Al20, U6Mo4Al43 and UAl4. Irradiation of TEM disc samples with 500 keV Kr ions at 200?C to high doses up to ~100 dpa were conducted using an intermediate voltage electron microscope equipped with an ion accelerator. The irradiated microstructure of the 5 phases is characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The results will be presented and the implication of the observed irradiated microstructure on the fuel performance will be discussed.

J. Gan; D. Keiser; D. Wachs; B. Miller; T. Allen; M. Kirk; J. Rest

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

User Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

266

User Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

267

User Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

268

User Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

269

User Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services Print Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

270

User Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services Print Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

271

EVALUATION OF U10MO FUEL PLATE IRRADIATION BEHAVIOR VIA NUMERICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article analyzes dimensional changes due to irradiation of monolithic plate-type nuclear fuel and compares results with finite element analysis of the plates during fabrication and irradiation. Monolithic fuel plates tested in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab (INL) are being used to benchmark proposed fuel performance for several high power research reactors. Post-irradiation metallographic images of plates sectioned at the midpoint were analyzed to determine dimensional changes of the fuel and the cladding response. A constitutive model of the fabrication process and irradiation behavior of the tested plates was developed using the general purpose commercial finite element analysis package, Abaqus. Using calculated burn-up profiles of irradiated plates to model the power distribution and including irradiation behaviors such as swelling and irradiation enhanced creep, model simulations allow analysis of plate parameters that are either impossible or infeasible in an experimental setting. The development and progression of fabrication induced stress concentrations at the plate edges was of primary interest, as these locations have a unique stress profile during irradiation. Additionally, comparison between 2D and 3D models was performed to optimize analysis methodology. In particular, the ability of 2D and 3D models account for out of plane stresses which result in 3-dimensional creep behavior that is a product of these components. Results show that assumptions made in 2D models for the out-of-plane stresses and strains cannot capture the 3-dimensional physics accurately and thus 2D approximations are not computationally accurate. Stress-strain fields are dependent on plate geometry and irradiation conditions, thus, if stress based criteria is used to predict plate behavior (as opposed to material impurities, fine micro-structural defects, or sharp power gradients), unique 3D finite element formulation for each plate is required.

Samuel J. Miller; Hakan Ozaltun

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

In-reactor corrosion performance of ZIRLO{trademark}4 and Zircaloy-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-reactor and long-term autoclave corrosion data have been obtained on ZIRCLO and three variants of Zircaloy-4: conventional (1.5% tin), low-tin, and beta-treated. In-reactor data from demonstration assemblies irradiated in the Virginia Power Company`s North Anna Unit 1 reactor demonstrate the superiority of ZIRLO and, to a lesser extent, low-tin Zircaloy-4 over conventional Zircaloy-4. After two cycles of irradiation to an assembly burnup of 37.8 GWD/MTU, the average axial peak corrosion of ZIRLO was 32% that of conventional Zircaloy-4. Low-tin and beta-treated materials displayed average peak oxides 76% and 150% of that formed on conventional Zircaloy-4, respectively. Autoclave corrosion tests of archive tubing have been performed in 633 K water, 672 K, 700 K, and 727 K steam, and in 633 K water containing 70 and 210 ppm lithium as the hydroxide. Correlation of the in-reactor data with the autoclave data indicates that the 633 K pure water test is the best qualitative indicator of in-reactor corrosion performance, and the 672 K steam test the poorest. Differences in in-reactor corrosion between ZIRLO and the Zircaloy-4 materials are consistent with the relative behavior of these materials in lithium hydroxide solutions. The relationships among the in-reactor and autoclave corrosion data, the microstructures, and the processing are discussed. In addition to improved corrosion resistance, ZIRLO exhibits improved dimensional stability over Zircaloy-4. The in-reactor creep of ZIRLO is confirmed to be about 80% of that of Zircaloy-4, and irradiation growth is observed to be about 50% that of Zircaloy-4. These data are also presented and discussed.

Sabol, G.P.; Weiner, R.A.; Stanutz, R.N. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Manufacturing Division; Comstock, R.J.; Larouere, P. [Virginia Power, Glen Allen, VA (United States). Innsbrook Technical Center

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

274

Reactor for exothermic reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

Schock, Alfred

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development of a technique for ex-reactor heating of electrodes and for obtaining voltage-current characteristics of multi-cell thermionic fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of development of a technique for ex-reactor heating with simultaneous recording of voltage-current characteristics of multi-cell thermionic fuel elements (TFE). Heating pulses were applied to electrodes of a thermionic energy converter (TIC), and between these pulses in the antiphase to them there were applied shorter pulses. The TIC emitter was heated by energy of an electric current flowing from the collector (back current heating). Comparison of TIC voltage-current characteristics, obtained for direct (using electric heater) and back current (current from the collector) heating, shows that for the same conditions they differ only slightly. Significant difference may be observed in the case of different profiles along the collector working surface. Results are given of the investigation of multi-cell thermionic fuel assemblies conducted using this technique. The developed technique of the TFE diagnostics can be successfully employed to assess the device quality. Pre-loop testing of multi-cell TFE by the method of back currents allows for cost effective and expeditious thermovacuum treatment of the TFE on thermal stands and for checking of its serviceability prior to its mounting into an irradiation loop or reactor-converter, enables improvements to the TFE design, monitoring of its electric parameters, for example, after vibration testing, and TFE accelerated testing in the most arduous conditions (thermocycling, loss of vacuum, etc.).

Kalandarishvili, A.G.; Mailov, G.M.; Igumnov, B.N.; Bisko, V.A. [I.N. Vekua Sukhumi Inst. for Physics and Engineering, Tbilisi (Georgia)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Diagnostics for hybrid reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

Orsitto, Francesco Paolo [ENEA Unita' Tecnica Fusione , Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla Fusione C R Frascati v E Fermi 45 00044 Frascati (Italy)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Structural materials for fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion Reactors will require specially engineered structural materials, which ... on safety considerations. The fundamental differences between fusion and other nuclear reactors arise due to the 14MeV neutronics ...

P. M. Raole; S. P. Deshpande

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

Blaise P. Collin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank from the Shippingport reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The irradiation embrittlement of neutron shield tank (NST) material (A212 Grade B steel) from the Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Irradiation increases the Charpy transition temperature (CTT) by 23--28{degrees}C (41--50{degrees}F) and decreases the upper-shelf energy. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) surveillance specimens. However, the actual value of the CTT is higher than that for the HFIR data. The increase in yield stress is 51 MPa (7.4 ksi), which is comparable to HFIR data. The NST material is weaker in the transverse orientation than in the longitudinal orientation. Some effects of position across the thickness of the wall are also observed; the CTT shift is slightly greater for specimens from the inner region of the wall. Annealing studies indicate complete recovery from embrittlement after 1 h at 400{degrees}C (752{degrees}F). Although the weld metal is significantly tougher than the base metal, the shifts in CTT are comparable. The shifts in CTT for the Shippingport NST are consistent with the test and Army reactor data for irradiations at <232{degrees}C (<450{degrees}F) and show very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR). The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence rate, and neutron flux spectrum are discussed. The results indicate that fluence rate has no effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s and at the low operating temperatures of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C (130{degrees}F). This suggests that the accelerated embrittlement of HFIR surveillance samples is most likely due to the relatively higher proportion of thermal neutrons in the HFIR spectrum compared to that for the test reactors. 28 refs., 25 figs.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reactor Materials | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Benefits Crosscutting Technology Development Reactor Materials Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment Advanced Methods for Manufacturing...

283

Reactor operation safety information document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fault-tolerant grid services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Oriented Architecture..Service Oriented Architectures..Durability for Service Oriented Architecture,” by Xianan

Zhang, Xianan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods Sub Categories String representation "vehicle service ... ng shop;...

286

Support Services Specialist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is located in Printing and Mail Services, Operations and Planning, Workplace Services, Internal Business Services. Additional vacancies may be filled through this vacancy announcement...

287

A Review of Irradiation Effects on Organic-Matrix Insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review assesses the data base on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation to determine whether organic electric insulation systems can be used in the toroidal field (TF) magnets of next generation fusion devices such as ITER* and TPX*. Owing to the difficulties of testing insulation under fusion reactor conditions, there is a considerable mismatch between the ITER requirements and the data that are currently available. For example, nearly all of the high-dose (5 x 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 8} Gy) data obtained on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation employed gamma irradiation, electron irradiation, or reactor irradiation with a fast neutron fluence far below 10{sup 23}/m{sup 2}, the fluence expected for the insulation at the TF magnets, as set forth in ITER conceptual design documents. Also, the neutron spectrum did not contain a very high energy (E {ge} 5 MeV) component. Such data underestimate the actual damage that would be obtained with the neutron fluence and spectrum expected at a TF magnet. Experiments on a polyimide (Kapton) indicate that gamma or electron doses or mixed gamma and neutron reactor doses would have to be downgraded by a factor of up to ten to simulate fusion neutron doses. Even when neutrons did constitute a significant portion of the total dose, B-containing E-glass reinforcement was often used; therefore, excess damage from the {sup 10}B + n {yields} {sup 7}Li + {alpha} reaction occurred near the glass-epoxy interface. This problem can easily be avoided by substituting B-free glass (R, S, or T types).

Simon, N.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Transport reactor development status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is part of METC`s Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located at Wilsonville, Alabama. The primary objective of the Advanced Gasifier module is to produce vitiated gases for intermediate-term testing of Particulate Control Devices (PCDs). The Transport reactor potentially allows particle size distribution, solids loading, and particulate characteristics in the off-gas stream to be varied in a number of ways. Particulates in the hot gases from the Transport reactor will be removed in the PCDs. Two PCDs will be initially installed in the module; one a ceramic candle filter, the other a granular bed filter. After testing of the initial PCDs they will be removed and replaced with PCDs supplied by other vendors. A secondary objective is to verify the performance of a Transport reactor for use in advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IG-FC), and Pressurized Combustion Combined Cycle (PCCC) power generation units. This paper discusses the development of the Transport reactor design from bench-scale testing through pilot-scale testing to design of the Process Development Unit (PDU-scale) facility at Wilsonville.

Rush, R.E.; Fankhanel, M.O.; Campbell, W.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

TEM Examination of Advanced Alloys Irradiated in ATR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful development of materials is critical to the deployment of advanced nuclear power systems. Irradiation studies of candidate materials play a vital role for better understanding materials performance under various irradiation environments of advanced system designs. In many cases, new classes of materials have to be investigated to meet the requirements of these advanced systems. For applications in the temperature range of 500 800ºC which is relevant to the fast neutron spectrum burner reactors for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and ferritic martensitic steels (e.g., MA957 and others) are candidates for advanced cladding materials. In the low temperature regions of the core (<600ºC), alloy 800H, HCM12A (also called T 122) and HT 9 have been considered.

Jian Gan, PhD

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples in Target Capsules and Initiation of Bending Fatigue Testing for Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigations FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples in Target Capsules and Initiation of Bending Fatigue Testing for Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigations The R&D objective for this work is to conduct the separate effects tests (SET) and small-scale tests that have been identified in the Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Data Gap Prioritization (FCRD-USED-2012-000109). R&D activities conducted during fiscal year 2013 are provided and include information derived from: 1) irradiation of hydrogen-doped zircaloy cladding in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); 2)

293

Application of dosimetry measurements to analyze the neutron activation of a stainless steel sample in a training nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract All materials present in the core of a nuclear reactor are activated by neutron irradiation. The activity so generated produces a dose around the material. This dose is a potential risk for workers in the surrounding area when materials are withdrawn from the reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the activity generated and the dose produced. In previous works, neutron activation of control rods and doses around the storage pool where they are placed have been calculated for a Boiling Water Reactor using the MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method. Most of the activation is produced indeed in stainless steel components of the nuclear reactor core not only control rods. In this work, a stainless steel sample is irradiated in the Training Reactor AKR-2 of the Technical University Dresden. Dose measurements around the sample have been performed for different times after the irradiation. Experimental dosimetric values are compared with results of Monte Carlo simulation of the irradiation. Comparison shows a good agreement. Hence, the activation Monte Carlo model can be considered as validated.

J. Ródenas; S. Gallardo; F. Weirich; W. Hansen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Enhanced in-pile instrumentation at the advanced test reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper reports results from this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and realtime flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted. (authors)

Rempe, J. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Daw, J. E.; Unruh, T.; Chase, B. M.; Palmer, J.; Condie, K. G.; Davis, K. L. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

DOE-STD-0100T; DOE Standard Licensed Reactor Nuclear Safety Criteria Applicable to DOE Reactors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

00T 00T November 1993 Superseding DOE/NE-0100T April 1991 DOE STANDARD LICENSED REACTOR NUCLEAR SAFETY CRITERIA APPLICABLE TO DOE REACTORS U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 AREA SAFT DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly frorn the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE94005221 CONTENTS

297

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fusion reactor systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this review we consider deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactors based on four different plasma-confinement and heating approaches: the tokamak, the theta-pinch, the magnetic-mirror, and the laser-pellet system. We begin with a discussion of the dynamics of reacting plasmas and basic considerations of reactor power balance. The essential plasma physical aspects of each system are summarized, and the main characteristics of the corresponding conceptual power plants are described. In tokamak reactors the plasma densities are about 1020 m-3, and the ? values (ratio of plasma pressure to confining magnetic pressure) are approximately 5%. Plasma burning times are of the order of 100-1000 sec. Large superconducting dc magnets furnish the toroidal magnetic field, and 2-m thick blankets and shields prevent heat deposition in the superconductor. Radially diffusing plasma is diverted away from the first wall by means of null singularities in the poloidal (or transverse) component of the confining magnetic field. The toroidal theta-pinch reactor has a much smaller minor diameter and a much larger major diameter, and operates on a 10-sec cycle with 0.1-sec burning pulses. It utilizes shock heating from high-voltage sources and adabatic-compression heating powered by low-voltage, pulsed cryogenic magnetic or inertial energy stores, outside the reactor core. The plasma has a density of about 1022 m-3 and ? values of nearly unity. In the power balance of the reactor, direct-conversion energy obtained by expansion of the burning high-? plasma against the containing magnetic field is an important factor. No divertor is necessary since neutral-gas flow cools and replaces the "spent" plasma between pulses. The open-ended mirror reactor uses both thermal conversion of neutron energy and direct conversion of end-loss plasma energy to dc electrical power. A fraction of this direct-convertor power is then fed back to the ioninjection system to sustain the reaction and maintain the plasma. The average ion energy is 600 keV, plasma diameter 6 m, and the plasma beta 85%. The power levels of the three magnetic-confinement devices are in the 500-2000 MWe range, with the exception of the mirror reactor, for which the output is approximately 200 MWe. In Laser-Pellet reactors, frozen D-T pellets are ignited in a cavity which absorbs the electromagnetic, charged particle, and neutron energy from the fusion reaction. The confinement is "inertial," since the fusion reaction occurs during the disassembly of the heated pellet. A pellet-cavity unit would produce about 200 MWt in pulses with a repetition rate of the order of 10 sec-1. Such units could be clustered to give power plants with outputs in the range of 1000 MWe.

F. L. Ribe

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

University Services Pamela Wheelock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering Jerome Malmquist open position Business Services * Bruce Gritters September 2013 Public SafetyUniversity Services Pamela Wheelock Vice President MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS University Services Human Resources Linda Bjornberg Director open position CIO OPERATIONS Auxiliary Services Laurie Scheich

Amin, S. Massoud

300

Method of Fission Product Beta Spectra Measurements for Predicting Reactor Anti-neutrino Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron anti-neutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to current precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent re-considerations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

D. M. Asner; K. Burns; L. W. Campbell; B. Greenfield; M. S. Kos; J. L. Orrell; M. Schram; B. VanDevender; 1 L. S. Wood; D. W. Wootan

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Service Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ASSIGNMENTS ASSIGNMENTS Pamela Arias-Ortega - Administrative and judicial litigation; and personnel law and workforce discipline mailto:parias-ortega@doeal.gov Celina Baca - Research and special projects for litigation and general law group mailto:cbaca@doeal.gov Dick Blakely - Designated Agency Ethics Advisor - Administrative litigation and mediation services; and ethics mailto:rblakely@doeal.gov Jonathan Buckner - Administrative review hearings; and administrative hearings before EEOC and MSPB mailto:jbuckner@doeal.gov Sean Counce - Administrative review hearings; and administrative hearings before EEOC and MSPB mailto:scounce@doeal.gov Diana Cruz - Copyright program; intellectual property databases; support for IP issues; and time and attendance mailto:dcruz@doeal.gov

303

Low temperature irradiation tests on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discharge machining in KEK Keep defects by cold-work Size: 1mmx1mmx70mm Voltage taps with 45mm spacing 4 irradiated) Wire EDM Irradiation sample · 5N aluminum + Cu, Mg with 10 % cold work · RRR=450 ·1.35m@RT, 3 @10

McDonald, Kirk

304

STUDENT SERVICES SATISFACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT SERVICES SATISFACTION To perform an assessment of student services in order to inform students of services and to bring awareness to areas of improvement to both STUDENT SERVICES SATISFACTION PROJECT To perform an assessment of student services in order to inform students of services and to bring

Kostic, Milivoje M.

305

Irradiation response in weldment and HIP joint of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work investigates irradiation response in the joints of F82H employed for a fusion breeding blanket. The joints, which were prepared using welding and diffusion welding, were irradiated up to 6 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Post-irradiation tests revealed hardening in weldment (WM) and base metal (BM) greater than 300 MPa. However, the heat affected zones (HAZ) exhibit about half that of WM and BM. Therefore, neutron irradiation decreased the strength of the HAZ, leaving it in danger of local deformation in this region. Further the hardening in WM made with an electron beam was larger than that in WM made with tungsten inert gas welding. However the mechanical properties of the diffusion-welded joint were very similar to those of BM even after the irradiation.

Hirose, Takanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL] [ORNL; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Stoller, Roger E [ORNL] [ORNL; Odette, G.R. [University of California, Santa Barbara] [University of California, Santa Barbara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Definition: Irradiance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Irradiance Irradiance Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Irradiance The direct, diffuse, and reflected solar radiation that strikes a surface. Usually expressed in kilowatts per square meter. Irradiance multiplied by time equals insolation.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Irradiance is the power of electromagnetic radiation per unit area incident on a surface. Radiant emittance or radiant exitance is the power per unit area radiated by a surface. The SI units for all of these quantities are watts per square meter (W/m), while the cgs units are ergs per square centimeter per second (erg·cm·s, often used in astronomy). These quantities are sometimes called intensity, but this usage leads to confusion with radiant intensity, which has different units. All of these

307

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear divisional reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear divisional reactor including a reactor core having side and top walls, a heat exchanger substantially surrounding the core, the heat exchanger including a plurality of separate fluid holding and circulating chambers each in contact with a portion of the core, control rod means associated with the core and external of the heat exchanger including control rods and means for moving said control rods, each of the chambers having separate means for delivering and removing fluid therefrom, separate means associated with each of the delivering and removing means for producing useable energy external of the chambers, each of the means for producing useable energy having separate variable capacity energy outputs thereby making available a plurality of individual sources of useable energy of varying degrees.

Administratrix, A.P.; Rugh, J.L.

1982-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

Jassby, D.L.

1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Design for a fusion materials irradiation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fusion materials irradiation facility is required for the timely and cost-effective development of economical fusion power. Our conceptual machine provides sufficient neutron fluence for accelerated lifetime material tests in a time span of 1--2 y while producing less than 1 MW of fusion power. Neutral deuterium beams at 150 keV are injected into the center of a high-density warm tritium plasma housed in a 12-m-long cylindrical vessel. Superconducting magnets hold the plasma, which transfers the power to each end of the solenoid. The stainless steel end sections absorb the beam power and are externally cooled by high-pressure water to maintain the plasma-side wall temperature below 740 K. A service loop separates tritium from deuterium in the plasma effluent. Tritium is reinjected at each end. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Walter, C.E.; Coensgen, F.H.

1988-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

311

CONTROLLER'S OFFICE CAMPUS LIFE SERVICES RETAIL SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 of 3 CONTROLLER'S OFFICE CAMPUS LIFE SERVICES ­ RETAIL SERVICES CATERING CHARGE PROGRAM DEPARTMENT AGREEMENT 1. BY SIGNING THIS AGREEMENT AS THE DEPARTMENT HEAD, I APPLY for the CLS Retail Services in their records a Retail Services Catering Charge Form for each transaction. The department insures the original

Klein, Ophir

312

CONTROLLER'S OFFICE CAMPUS LIFE SERVICES RETAIL SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 of 3 CONTROLLER'S OFFICE CAMPUS LIFE SERVICES ­ RETAIL SERVICES CATERING CHARGE PROGRAM POLICY 1 obtain o A charge receipt o An original itemized receipt o A CLS Retail Services Catering Charge Form ! Complete the CLS Retail Services Catering Charge Form ! Obtain appropriate approval signature

Yamamoto, Keith

313

CONTROLLER'S OFFICE CAMPUS LIFE SERVICES RETAIL SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 of 3 CONTROLLER'S OFFICE CAMPUS LIFE SERVICES ­ RETAIL SERVICES CATERING CHARGE PROGRAM DEPARTMENT AGREEMENT 1. BY SIGNING THIS AGREEMENT AS THE DEPARTMENT HEAD, I APPLY for the CLS Retail Services Keeping: The department will prepare and retain in their records a Retail Services Catering Charge Form

Yamamoto, Keith

314

Optimizing Neutron Thermal Scattering Effects in very High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project aims to develop a holistic understanding of the phenomenon of neutron thermalization in the VHTR. Neutron thermaliation is dependent on the type and structure of the moderating material. The fact that the moderator (and reflector) in the VHTR is a solid material will introduce new and interesting considerations that do not apply in other (e.g. light water) reactors. The moderator structure is expected to undergo radiation induced changes as the irradiation (or burnup) history progresses. In this case, the induced changes in structure will have a direct impact on many properties including the neutronic behavior. This can be easily anticipated if one recognizes the dependence of neutron thermalization on the scattering law of the moderator. For the pebble bed reactor, it is anticipated that the moderating behavior can be tailored, e.g. using moderators that consist of composite materials, which could allow improved optimization of the moderator-to-fuel ratio.

Hawari, Ayman; Ougouag, Abderrafi

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

Helium effects on the mechanical properties of neutron-irradiated Cr-Mo ferritic steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first wall of a fusion rector, large amounts of transmutation helium will be produced simultaneously with the displacement damage caused by high-energy neutrons from the fusion reaction. One method used to simulate irradiation effects for ferritic steels is to add nickel to the steels and irradiate them in a mixed-spectrum reactor. Fast neutrons in the spectrum produce displacement damage, while transmutation helium is produced by a two-step reaction of {sup 58}Ni with thermal neutrons. This technique has been used to investigate the effect of helium on tensile properties and toughness. Results from these studies are summarized.

Klueh, R.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Characterization of decommissioned reactor internals: Direct-assay method assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study describes the direct-assay technique for measuring activation levels of irradiated reactor component hardware. It also compares the direct-assay technique with calculational analysis methods that predict activation levels. Direct assay is performed in four steps: (a) planning and component selection, (b) onsite measurements, (c) radiochemical analysis, and (d) data analysis and classification. Uncertainties are estimated for each step of this process, and an overall uncertainty in the classification accuracy is calculated as about {plus_minus}35%. Numerous research ideas are identified to help reduce the uncertainty level; many of these ideas would improve activation determinations performed by either direct assay or by calculational analysis methods.

Cline, J.E.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

2007 international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Abstracts and available papers presented at the meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Meeting papers discuss research and test reactor fuel performance, manufacturing and testing. Some of the main topics are: conversion from HEU to LEU in different reactors and corresponding problems and activities; flux performance and core lifetime analysis with HEU and LEU fuels; physics and safety characteristics; measurement of gamma field parameters in core with LEU fuel; nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel; thermal hydraulic analysis; fuel interactions; transient analyses and thermal hydraulics for HEU and LEU cores; microstructure research reactor fuels; post irradiation analysis and performance; computer codes and other related problems.

NONE

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 260 Naa-ri Yangnam-myeon Gyeongju-si, Gyeonasangbuk-do, 780-815 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1960's and early 70's the author performed extensive design studies, analyses, and tests aimed at thermionic reactor concepts that differed significantly from those pursued by other investigators. Those studies, like most others under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC and DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsorship, were terminated in the early 1970's. Some of this work was previously published, but much of it was never made available in the open literature. U.S. interest in thermionic reactors resumed in the early 80's, and was greatly intensified by reports about Soviet ground and flight tests in the late 80's. This recent interest resulted in renewed U.S. thermionic reactor development programs, primarily under Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. Since most current investigators have not had an opportunity to study all of the author's previous work, a review of the highlights of that work may be of value to them. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling. Where the author's concepts differed from the later Topaz-2 design was in the relative location of the emitter and the collector. Placing the fueled emitter on the outside of the cylindrical diodes permits much higher axial conductances to reduce ohmic losses in the electrodes of full-core-height diodes. Moreover, placing the fuel on the outside of the diode makes possible reactors with much higher fuel volume fractions, which enable power-flattened fast reactors scalable to very low power levels without the need for life-limiting hydride moderators or the use of efficiency-limiting driver fuel. In addition, with the fuel on the outside its swelling does not increase the emitter diameter or reduce the interelectrode gap. This should permit long lifetimes even with closer spacings, which can significantly improve the system efficiences. This was confirmed by coupled neutronic, thermal, thermionic, and electrical system analyses - some of which are presented in this paper - and by subsequent experiments. A companion paper presented next describes the fabrication and testing of full-scale converter elements, both fueled and unfueled, and summarizes the test results obtained. There is a duplicate copy in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

German concept and status of the disposal of spent fuel elements from German research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eight research reactors with a power {>=} 100 kW are currently being operated in the Federal Republic of Germany. These comprise three TRIGA-type reactors (power 100 kW to 250 kW), four swimming-pool reactors (power 1 MW to 10 MW) and one DIDO type reactor (power 23 MW). The German research reactors are used for neutron scattering for basic research in the field of solid state research, neutron metrology, for the fabrication of isotopes and for neutron activation analysis for medicine and biology, for investigating the influence of radiation on materials and for nuclear fuel behavior. It will be vital to continue current investigations in the future. Further operation of the German research reactors is therefore indispensable. Safe, regular disposal of the irradiated fuel elements arising now and in future operation is of primary importance. Furthermore, there are several plants with considerable quantities of spent fuel, the safe disposal of which is a matter of urgency. These include above all the VKTA facilities in Rossendorf and also the TRIGA reactors, where disposal will only be necessary upon decommissioning. The present paper report is concerned with the disposal of fuel from the German research reactors. It briefly deals with the situation in the USA since the end of 1988, describes interim solutions for current disposal requirements and then mainly concentrates on the German disposal concept currently being prepared. This concept initially envisages the long-term (25--50 years) dry interim storage of fuel elements in special containers in a central German interim store with subsequent direct final disposal without reprocessing of the irradiated fuel.

Komorowski, K. [Bundesministerium fuer Bildung Wissenschaft, Bonn (Germany); Storch, S.; Thamm, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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321

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford's 300 Area Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed...

322

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

323

Kr ion irradiation study of the depleted-uranium alloys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel development for the reduced enrichment research and test reactor (RERTR) program is tasked with the development of new low enrichment uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing high enrichment uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel-cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted-uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel-cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Al, Si){sub 3}, (U, Mo)(Al, Si){sub 3}, UMo{sub 2}Al{sub 20}, U{sub 6}Mo{sub 4}Al{sub 43} and UAl{sub 4}. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200 C to ion doses up to 2.5 x 10{sup 19} ions/m{sup 2} ({approx}10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}/s ({approx}4.0 x 10{sup -3} dpa/s). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Kirk, M. A.; Rest, J.; Allen, T. R.; Wachs, D. M. (Materials Science Division); (INL); (Univ. of Wisconsin)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Kr Ion Irradiation Study of the Depleted-Uranium Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel development for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor program is tasked with the development of new low-enriched uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing highly enriched uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion-type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel/cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel/cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Si, Al)3, (U, Mo)(Si, Al)3, UMo2Al20, U6Mo4Al43, and UAl4. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200ºC to ion doses up to 2.5 × 1015 ions/cm2 (~ 10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 1012 ions/cm2-sec (~ 4.0 × 10-3 dpa/sec). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

J. Gan; D. Keiser; B. Miller; M. Kirk; J. Rest; T. Allen; D. Wachs

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chemical Characterization and Removal of Carbon-14 from Irradiated Graphite II - 13023  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (C-14), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates C-14 is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented last year and updated here is to identify the chemical form of C-14 in irradiated graphite and develop a practical method by which C-14 can be removed. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam{sup R}, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of C-14 precursor) and neutron-irradiated (10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}/s). Finer grained NBG-25 was not exposed to liquid nitrogen prior to irradiation at a neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 14} /cm{sup 2}/s. Characterization of pre- and post-irradiation graphite was conducted to determine the chemical environment and quantity of C-14 and its precursors via the use of surface sensitive characterization techniques. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the morphological features of graphite samples. The concentration, chemical composition, and bonding characteristics of C-14 and its precursors were determined through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis Spectroscopy (EDX). Results of post-irradiation characterization of these materials indicate a variety of surface functional groups containing carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During thermal treatment, irradiated graphite samples are heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon were performed at 900 deg. C and 1400 deg. C to evaluate the selective removal of C-14. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 volume % oxygen at temperatures 700 deg. C and 1400 deg. C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of C-14. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient C-14 removal. (authors)

Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Cleaver, James; LaBrier, Daniel; McCrory, Shilo; Smith, Tara E. [Idaho State University: 1776 Science Center Dr., Idaho Falls, ID, 83401 (United States)] [Idaho State University: 1776 Science Center Dr., Idaho Falls, ID, 83401 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor materials and fuels can be classified into six categories: Nuclear fuel materials Nuclear clad materials Nuclear coolant materials Nuclear poison materials Nuclear moderator materials

Dr. James S. Tulenko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hydraulics software RELAP-7 (which is under development in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability LWRS Program). A novel interaction between the probabilistic part (i.e., RAVEN)...

329

Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically ``identical`` values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic. 16 figs.

Gaubatz, D.C.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Determination of Light Water Reactor Fuel Burnup with the Isotope Ratio Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the current project to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be extended to zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies we report new analyses on irradiated samples obtained from a reactor. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers new measurements done on irradiated and unirradiated zirconium alloys, Unirradiated zircaloy samples serve as reference samples and indicate starting values or natural values for the Ti isotope ratio measured. New measurements of irradiated samples include results for 3 samples provided by AREVA. New results indicate: 1. Titanium isotope ratios were measured again in unirradiated samples to obtain reference or starting values at the same time irradiated samples were analyzed. In particular, 49Ti/48Ti ratios were indistinguishably close to values determined several months earlier and to expected natural values. 2. 49Ti/48Ti ratios were measured in 3 irradiated samples thus far, and demonstrate marked departures from natural or initial ratios, well beyond analytical uncertainty, and the ratios vary with reported fluence values. The irradiated samples appear to have significant surface contamination or radiation damage which required more time for SIMS analyses. 3. Other activated impurity elements still limit the sample size for SIMS analysis of irradiated samples. The sub-samples chosen for SIMS analysis, although smaller than optimal, were still analyzed successfully without violating the conditions of the applicable Radiological Work Permit

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hydrogen uptake in Zircaloy-2 reactor fuel claddings studied with elastic recoil detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent trend towards a high burn-up discharge spent nuclear fuel necessitates a thorough understanding of hydrogen uptake in Zr-based cladding materials that encapsulate spent nuclear fuel. Although it is challenging to experimentally replicate exact conditions in a nuclear reactor that lead to hydrogen uptake in claddings in this study we have attempted to understand the kinetics of hydrogen uptake by first electrolytically charging Zircaloy-2 (Zr-2) cladding material for various durations (100 to 2 600 s) and subsequently examining hydrogen ingress with elastic recoil detection (ERD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To understand the influence of irradiation damage defects on hydrogen uptake an analogous study was performed on ion - irradiated (0.1 1 and 25 dpa) Zr-2. Analysis of ERD data from the un-irradiated Zr-2 suggests that the growth of the hydride layer is diffusion controlled and preliminary TEM results support this assertion. In un-irradiated Zr-2 the diffusivity of hydrogen in the hydride phase was found to be approximately 1.1 × 10?11 cm2/s while the diffusivity in the hydride phase for lightly irradiated (0.1 and 1 dpa) Zr-2 is an order of magnitude lower. Irradiation to 25 dpa results in a hydrogen diffusivity that is comparable to the un-irradiated Zr-2. These results are compared with existing literature on hydrogen transport in Zr - based materials.

B. L. Doyle; D. G. Enos; B. G. Clark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENGINEERING (ENG) ENGINEERING (ENG) OBJECTIVE ENG-1: The engineering program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified engineering personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure engineering services are adequate to support reactor and CS operations. The engineering functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. Engineering personnel exhibit awareness of the applicable requirements pertaining to reactor operation with the CS and with CS operations and hazards. Through their actions, they have demonstrated a high-priority commitment

333

Reactor coolant pump flywheel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

335

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

Duran, I. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v. v. i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, 182 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Bolshakova, I.; Holyaka, R. [Magnetic Sensor Laboratory, Lviv Polytechnic National University, 790 31 Lviv (Ukraine); Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z. [Nuclear Research Institute plc., 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Sentkerestiova, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Bem, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, v. v. i., 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor Andrew C Kadak Massachusetts Institute For 1150 MW Combined Heat and Power Station Oil Refinery Hydrogen Production Desalinization Plant VHTR/Graphite Discrimination system Damaged Sphere ContainerGraphiteReturn FuelReturn Fresh Fuel Container Spent Fuel Tank #12

339

Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leics (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 C). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

Walter G. Luscher; David J. Senor; Keven K. Clayton; Glen R. Longhurst

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Irradiation data for the MFA-1 and MFA-2 tests in the FFTF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides key information on the irradiation environment of the MONJU fuel tests MFA-1 and MFA-2 in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This information includes the fission powers, neutron fluxes, sodium temperatures and sodium flow rates in MFA-I, MFA-2 and adjacent assemblies. It also includes MFA-1 and MFA-2 compositions as a function of exposure. The work was performed at the request of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuels Corporation (PNC) of Japan.

Nelson, J.V.

1997-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle Plates to the Baffle Former Plates. The FaST is designed to remove the Baffle Former Plates from the Core Barrel. The VRS further volume reduces segmented components using multiple configurations of the 38i and horizontal reciprocating saws. After the successful removal and volume reduction of the Internals, the RV will be segmented using a 'First in the US' thermal cutting process through a co-operative effort with Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH using their experience at the Stade NPP and Karlsruhe in Germany. SNS mobilized in the fall of 2011 to commence execution of the project in order to complete the RVI segmentation, removal and packaging activities for the first unit (Unit 2) by end of the 2012/beginning 2013 and then mobilize to the second unit, Unit 1. Parallel to the completion of the segmentation of the reactor vessel internals at Unit 1, SNS will segment the Unit 2 pressure vessel and at completion move to Unit 1. (authors)

Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)] [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Machining and Technical Services Service Request Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machining and Technical Services Service Request Form Clemson University - College of Engineering $35 $60 $55 $90 $52.50 $82.50 Total Labor EDM Hours Outside Hours Outside EDM Hours Priority -

Duchowski, Andrew T.

344

Machining and Technical Services Service Request Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machining and Technical Services Service Request Form 2010-2011 Clemson University - College: Hours Price per hour Amount $35 $60 $55 $90 $52.50 $82.50 Total Labor EDM Hours Outside Hours Outside EDM Hours Priority -

Duchowski, Andrew T.

345

DOE Drops Plan to Restart Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...longer in flux. Hanford research reactor...decision to scrap the Hanford reactor, which...research. At public meetings, however...decision to scrap the Hanford reactor, which...research. At public meetings, however, FFTF...

Robert F. Service

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics NASSAR H. S. HAIDAR...analytically for a multiregional nuclear reactor whose subregions are of arbitrary...Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics NASSAU H. S. HAIDAR......

NASSAR H. S. HAIDAR

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

DIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a centralized resource of regional health care services for persons with developmental disabilitiesDIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES FOR BRONX RESIDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 2012 Compiled Albert Einstein College of Medicine in collaboration with Health Services Committee, Bronx Developmental

Yates, Andrew

348

Fusion materials irradiations at MaRIE's fission fusion facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory's proposed signature facility, MaRIE, will provide scientists and engineers with new capabilities for modeling, synthesizing, examining, and testing materials of the future that will enhance the USA's energy security and national security. In the area of fusion power, the development of new structural alloys with better tolerance to the harsh radiation environments expected in fusion reactors will lead to improved safety and lower operating costs. The Fission and Fusion Materials Facility (F{sup 3}), one of three pillars of the proposed MaRIE facility, will offer researchers unprecedented access to a neutron radiation environment so that the effects of radiation damage on materials can be measured in-situ, during irradiation. The calculated radiation damage conditions within the F{sup 3} match, in many respects, that of a fusion reactor first wall, making it well suited for testing fusion materials. Here we report in particular on two important characteristics of the radiation environment with relevancy to radiation damage: the primary knock-on atom spectrum and the impact of the pulse structure of the proton beam on temporal characteristics of the atomic displacement rate. With respect to both of these, analyses show the F{sup 3} has conditions that are consistent with those of a steady-state fusion reactor first wall.

Pitcher, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Improving Thermal Model Prediction Through Statistical Analysis of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Data from AGR Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Research and Development program for Next Generation High Temperature Reactors (HTR), a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. The data representing the crucial test fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) while impossible to obtain from direct measurements are calculated by physics and thermal models. The irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) experimental data are used in model calibration effort to reduce the inherent uncertainty of simulation results. This paper is focused on fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for improving qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. The present work exercises the idea that the abnormal trends of measured data observed from statistical analysis may be caused by either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 revealed by the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps justify the reduction in TC readings instead of TC drift. This in turn prompts modification of thermal model to better fit with experimental data, thus help increase confidence, and in other word reduce model uncertainties in thermal simulation results of the AGR-1 test.

Dr. Binh T. Pham; Grant L. Hawkes; Jeffrey J. Einerson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Solvent refined coal reactor quench system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream. 1 fig.

Thorogood, R.M.

1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Post-irradiation Examination of the AGR-1 Experiment: Plans and Preliminary Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract – The AGR-1 irradiation experiment contains seventy-two individual cylindrical fuel compacts (25 mm long x 12.5 mm diameter) each containing approximately 4100 TRISO-coated uranium oxycarbide fuel particles. The experiment accumulated 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory with peak burnups exceeding 19% FIMA. An extensive post-irradiation examination campaign will be performed on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature accident testing. PIE experiments will include dimensional measurements of fuel and irradiated graphite, burnup measurements, assessment of fission metals release during irradiation, evaluation of coating integrity using the leach-burn-leach technique, microscopic examination of kernel and coating microstructures, and accident testing of the fuel in helium at temperatures up to 1800°C. Activities completed to date include opening of the irradiated capsules, measurement of fuel dimensions, and gamma spectrometry of selected fuel compacts.

Paul Demkowicz

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Temperature effects on chemical reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we had to study some characteristics of the chemical reactors from which we can understand the reactor operation in different circumstances; from these and the most important factor that has a great effect on the reactor operation is the temperature it is a mathematical processing of a chemical problem that was already studied but it may be developed by introducing new strategies of control; in our case we deal with the analysis of a liquid?gas reactor which can make the flotation of the benzene to produce the ethylene; this type of reactors can be used in vast domains of the chemical industry especially in refinery plants where we find the oil separation and its extractions whether they are gases or liquids which become necessary for industrial technology especially in our century.

M. Azzouzi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Services | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Services Services The Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management has numerous and diverse responsibilities. Our ultimate mission is to remove environmental contamination to...

354

Services | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Services Services Expert Evaluations of Management Performance in DOE Health, Safety and Security The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA)...

355

ORISE: Health physics services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

356

Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear reactors in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors in the United States ... A chart listing the operating and planned nuclear reactors in the United States. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Hubert N. Alyea

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

359

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM: INTRODUCTION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM: INTRODUCTION The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1...

360

MOOSE simulating nuclear reactor CRUD buildup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This simulation uses multiple physical models to show how the buildup of boron deposits on reactor fuel can affect performance and the reactor's power profile.

None

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Advanced Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Reactor Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies The Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) sponsors research, development and deployment (RD&D) activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will pursue these advancements through RD&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and U.S. universities, as well as through collaboration with industry and international partners. These activities will focus on advancing scientific

362

Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pebble bed reactor,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol.the AVR reactor,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol. 121,Operating Experience,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol.

Laufer, Michael Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

F Reactor Inspection | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inspection F Reactor Inspection Addthis Description Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor last week before...

364

Physics of nuclear reactor safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Provides a concise review of the physical aspects of safety of nuclear fission reactors. It covers the developments of roughly the last decade. The introductory chapter contains an analysis of the changes in safety philosophy that are characteristic of the last decade and that have given rise to an increased importance of physical aspects because of the emphasis on passive or natural safety. The second chapter focuses on the basics of reactor safety, identifying the main risk sources and the main principles for a safe design. The third chapter concerns a systematic treatment of the physical processes that are fundamental for the properties of fission chain reacting processes and the control of those processes. Because of the rather specialized nature of the field of reactor physics, each paragraph contains a very concise description of the theory of the phenomenon under consideration, before presenting a review of the developments. Chapter 4 contains a short review of the thermal aspects of reactor safety, restricted to those aspects that are characteristic of the nuclear reactor field, because thermal hydraulics of fission reactors is not principally different from that of other physical systems. In chapter 5 the consequences of the physics treated in the preceding chapters for the dynamics and safety of actual reactors are reviewed. The systematics of the treatment is mainly based on a division of reactors into three categories according to the type of coolant, which to a large extent determines the safety properties of the reactors. The last chapter contains a physical analysis of the Chernobyl accident that occurred in 1986. The reason for an attempt to give a review of this accident, as complete as possible within the space limits set by the editors, is twofold: the Chernobyl accident is the most severe accident in history and physical properties of the reactor played a decisive role, thereby serving as an illustration of the material of the preceding chapters.

H van Dam

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

13 - Generation IV reactor designs, operation and fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter looks at Generation IV nuclear reactors, such as the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR), the supercritical water reactor (SCWR), the molten salt reactor (MSR), the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), the lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) and the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR). Reactor designs and fuel cycles are also described.

N. Cerullo; G. Lomonaco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Three-dimensional imaging and precision metrology for liquid-salt-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid-salt-cooled very high temperature reactor, also called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR), is a new large high-temperature reactor concept that combines in a novel way four established technologies: (1) coated-particle graphite-matrix nuclear fuels, (2) Brayton power cycles, (3) passive safety systems and plant designs previously developed for liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors, and (4) low-pressure liquid-salt coolants. The AHTR will require refueling, in-service inspection, and maintenance (RIM) with supporting instrumentation systems. The fluoride salts that are being evaluated as potential reactor coolants have melting points between 350 and 500 deg. C, values that imply minimum RIM temperatures between 400 and 550 deg. C. These salts are transparent over a wider range of the light spectrum than is water. The high temperatures, the optical characteristics of the coolant, and advances in metrology may enable the use of lasers to create three-dimensional images of the reactor interior to assist refueling, monitor vibrations in components, map fluid flow, and enable inspections of internal reactor components. A description of the reactor and an initial evaluation of the use of optical techniques for AHTR instrumentation are provided. (authors)

Forsberg, C. W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States); Varma, V. K.; Burgess, T. W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6304 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A simple setup for neutron tomography at the Portuguese Nuclear Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple setup for neutron radiography and tomography was recently installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor. The objective of this work was to determine the operational characteristics of the installed setup, namely the irradiation time to obtain the best dynamic range for individual images and the spatial resolution. The performance of the equipment was demonstrated by imaging a fragment of a 17th century decorative tile.

M. A. Stanojev Pereira; J. G. Marques; R. Pugliesi

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Assessment of torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R[sub 0] = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B[sup 0] = 4.8-7.5 T, B[sub max] (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

Lyon, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Painter, S.L. (Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)) [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Assessment of torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R{sub 0} = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B{sup 0} = 4.8-7.5 T, B{sub max} (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

Lyon, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Painter, S.L. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition: Opportunities, Options, and Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has created a legacy of surplus fissile materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium) in the United States (U.S.) and the former Soviet Union. These materials pose a danger to national and international security. During the past few years, the U.S. and Russia have engaged in an ongoing dialog concerning the safe storage and disposition of surplus fissile material stockpiles. In January 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced the U. S. would pursue a dual track approach to rendering approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons. One track involves immobilizing the plutonium by combining it with high-level radioactive waste in glass or ceramic ''logs''. The other method, referred to as reactor-based disposition, converts plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors. The U.S. and Russia are moving ahead rapidly to develop and demonstrate the technology required to implement the MOX option in their respective countries. U.S. MOX fuel research and development activities were started in the 1950s, with irradiation of MOX fuel rods in commercial light water reactors (LWR) from the 1960s--1980s. In all, a few thousand MOX fuel rods were successfully irradiated. Though much of this work was performed with weapons-grade or ''near'' weapons-grade plutonium--and favorable fuel performance was observed--the applicability of this data for licensing and use of weapons-grade MOX fuel manufactured with modern fuel fabrication processes is somewhat limited. The U.S. and Russia are currently engaged in an intensive research, development, and demonstration program to support implementation of the MOX option in our two countries. This paper focuses on work performed in the U.S. and provides a brief summary of joint U.S./Russian work currently underway.

Greene, S.R.

1999-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Personal Services Agreements Waivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not have the staff or resources necessary to perform this specialized service. 5. Trash and RecyclingPersonal Services Agreements Waivers: Appendix A2 Responsible Administrative Units: Human Resources Services: Services include trash removal from campus and recycling for the campus community. The School

374

Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Altman, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels have been investigated. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-sulfur-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor water, and in air. Analytical studies focused on the behavior of carbon steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. Crack-growth rates of composite fracture-mechanics specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B steel were determined under small-amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with {approx}300 pbb dissolved oxygen. Radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence also have been investigated. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289{degrees}C.

Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Conversion and upgrade of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, an agency of the state of Rhode Island, has operated a 2-MW swimming pool research reactor at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) since 1964. The reactor, which utilizes plate-type materials test reactor fuel elements, is used primarily by facility and research scientists from the University of Rhode Island for neutron scattering, using the beam tubes and activation analysis programs that use irradiation facilities both inside and adjacent to the core. Along with most other university research reactors, the RINSC reactor is now required, pursuant to 10CFR50.64, to convert from the use of high-enrichment uranium fuel elements to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel elements. It is apparent that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission mandate to convert the RINSC reactor to the use of LEU will result in a new core, designed to use the standard fuel plate and at the same time enhance the available neutron flux and spectrum for research using neutron scattering and activation analysis.

DiMeglio, A.F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Tritium diagnostics in a fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods for controlling tritium in a fusion reactor are reviewed. The characteristic features of the...

A. I. Markin; N. I. Syromyatnikov; A. M. Belov

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Academic Testing Services STRATEGIC PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academic Testing Services STRATEGIC PLAN 2009 MISSION STATEMENT Academic Testing Services provides proctored testing services administered in a secure and appropriate standardized testing environment. VISION STATEMENT Academic Testing Services will provide quality services that are integral to recruitment

Rock, Chris

382

Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Combustion synthesis continuous flow reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a reactor for combustion synthesis of inorganic powders. The reactor includes a reaction vessel having a length and a first end and a second end. The reaction vessel further has a solution inlet and a carrier gas inlet. The reactor further has a heater for heating both the solution and the carrier gas. In a preferred embodiment, the reaction vessel is heated and the solution is in contact with the heated reaction vessel. It is further preferred that the reaction vessel be cylindrical and that the carrier gas is introduced tangentially into the reaction vessel so that the solution flows helically along the interior wall of the reaction vessel. As the solution evaporates and combustion produces inorganic material powder, the carrier gas entrains the powder and carries it out of the reactor.

Maupin, Gary D. (Richland, WA); Chick, Lawrence A. (West Richland, WA); Kurosky, Randal P. (Maple Valley, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Interfacial effects in fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of increased resonance capture rates near zone interfaces in fast reactor media has been examined both theoretically and experimentally. An interface traversing assembly was designed, constructed and employed ...

Saidi, Mohammad Said

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Reactor physics project final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the final report in an experimental and theoretical program to develop and apply single- and few-element methods for the determination of reactor lattice parameters. The period covered by the report is January 1, ...

Driscoll, Michael J.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

New Reactor Concepts and New Nuclear Data Needed to Develop Them  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments of new reactor designs for the utilization of thorium such as the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor especially demand creation of new nuclear data for all the isotopes of the thorium fuel cycle. Improved nuclear data are essential to support new initiatives such as the international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO) which aims to support the safe sustainable economic and proliferation?resistant use of nuclear technology to meet the global energy needs of the 21st century. The detailed pursuit of development of Generation IV nuclear energy systems that offer advantages in the areas of economics safety reliability and sustainability require significantly improved nuclear data. The development of Accelerator Driven Sub?critical Systems proposed by Carlo Rubbia and others require a significant amount of new nuclear data in extended energy regions and improvement of the presently available nuclear data. The quality assurance in design and safety studies in nuclear energy in the next few decades and centuries require new and improved nuclear data with high accuracy and energy resolution. The paper presents from the perspective of the author an overview of some of the improvements in nuclear data required for a sound scientific basis of advanced nuclear systems. Also from the perspective of benchmarking and integral validation of nuclear data presented briefly is the status of thorium irradiations performed in a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) in India and new results of post?irradiation analyses available thus far.

S. Ganesan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 °C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Alternate-fuel reactor studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Low energy electron irradiation of an apple  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The viability of pathogenic organisms on the surface of fresh fruits and vegetables can be significantly reduced by low energy electron beam irradiation. The most difficult technical challenge for surface irradiation of fruits and vegetable...

Brescia, Giovanni Batista

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Solar solids reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

Yudow, Bernard D. (Chicago, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Solar solids reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

Yudow, B.D.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

Stuart Nemser, PhD

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of Torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors. This scoping study, which uses an integrated cost-minimization code that incorporates costing and reactor component models self-consistently with a 1-D energy transport calculation, shows that a torsatron reactor could also be economically competitive with a tokamak reactor. The projected cost of electricity (COE) estimated using the Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Studies (ARIES) costing algorithms is 65.6 mill/kW(e)h in constant 1992 dollars for a reference 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor case. The COE is relatively insensitive (<10% variation) over a wide range of assumptions, including variations in the maximum field allowed on the coils, the coil elongation, the shape of the density profile, the beta limit, the confinement multiplier, and the presence of a large loss region for alpha particles. The largest variations in the COE occur for variations in the electrical power output demanded and the plasma-coil separation ratio.

Lyon, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gulec, K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

When Do Commercial Reactors Permanently Shut Down?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For those wishing to obtain current data, the following resources are available: U.S. reactors, go to the Energy Information Administration's nuclear reactor shutdown list. (Note: As of April 30, 2010, the last U.S. reactor to permanently shut down was Big Rock Point in 1997.) Foreign Reactors, go to the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) on the International Atomic Energy Agency's website.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

397

3, 895959, 2006 Irradiance and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and corals. However, the contribution of benthic communities to the primary production of the global coastal energy source fueling marine primary prBGD 3, 895­959, 2006 Irradiance and primary production in the coastal ocean J.-P. Gattuso et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes 1 1.1 Introduction

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

399

Fracture behavior and microstructural characteristics of irradiated Zircaloy cladding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zircaloy cladding tube specimens from commercial power reactor fuel assemblies (burnup >22 MWd/kgU) have been deformed to fracture at 325/sup 0/C by either the internal gas-pressurization or the expanding-mandrel technique in a helium or argon environment containing no fission product species (e.g., I, Cs, or Cd). The fracture surfaces of 11 irradiated specimens fractured by internal gas pressurization were examined by scanning electron microscopy, and 7 specimens were found to contain various degrees of the pseudocleavage feature that is characteristic of pellet-cladding interaction failures. Out of 10 test specimens fractured by expanding-mandrel loading, 5 were found to contain regions of pseudocleavage on the fracture surfaces. The specimens exhibited ''X-marks'' on the outer surface and brittle incipient cracks distributed on the inner surface, which are also characteristic of pellet-cladding interaction failures.

Chung, H.M.; Yaggee, F.L.; Kassner, T.F.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Transition from Irradiation-Induced Amorphization to Crystallization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Irradiation-Induced Amorphization to Crystallization in Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide. Transition from Irradiation-Induced Amorphization to Crystallization in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500°C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of n-irradiated Fe-Cr Model Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High chromium ( 9-12 wt %) ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors and other advanced systems such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). Their use for these applications requires a careful assessment of their mechanical stability under high energy neutron irradiation and in aggressive environments. In particular, the Cr concentration has been shown to be a key parameter to be optimized in order to guarantee the best corrosion and swelling resistance, together with the least embrittlement. In this work, the characterization of the neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys with different Cr % with respect to microstructure and mechanical tests will be presented. The behavior of Fe-Cr alloys have been studied using tensile tests at different temperature range ( from -160 deg. C to 300 deg. C). Irradiation-induced microstructure changes have been studied by TEM for two different irradiation doses at 300 deg. C. The density and the size distribution of the defects induced have been determined. The tensile test results indicate that Cr content affects the hardening behavior of Fe-Cr binary alloys. Hardening mechanisms are discussed in terms of Orowan type of approach by correlating TEM data to the measured irradiation hardening. (authors)

Matijasevic, Milena; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim [Reactor materials research, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Signature Service Oil Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNM Staff EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Jiffy Lube Signature Service Oil Change Fast - No Appointment We change your oil with up to 5 quarts of major brand motor oil We install a new oil fi We visually inspect. ASE training programs · Jiffy Lube uses top quality products that meet or exceed vehicle warranty

New Mexico, University of

404

Center for Health & Counseling Services Health Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College How is West Nile diagnosed? If a health care provider suspects WNV, samples of the patient's bloodCenter for Health & Counseling Services Health Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430 Nile Virus outbreak is the biggest since the virus was first identified in the United States, health

Rainforth, Emma C.

405

Student Business Services Student Services Bldg.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Business Services 203 Hahn Student Services Bldg. sbs.ucsc.edu Sheryl Hoffman #12;Information Student Billing Refunds: Financial Aid, Loans and scholarships Direct Deposit Checks Deferred As an outgrowth of the University's commitment to the student's privacy and protection against identity theft

California at Santa Cruz, University of

406

Radiobiologic Significance of Response of Intratumor Quiescent Cells In Vivo to Accelerated Carbon Ion Beams Compared With {gamma}-Rays and Reactor Neutron Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To clarify the radiosensitivity of intratumor quiescent cells in vivo to accelerated carbon ion beams and reactor neutron beams. Methods and Materials: Squamous cell carcinoma VII tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine to label all intratumor proliferating cells. Next, they received accelerated carbon ion or {gamma}-ray high-dose-rate (HDR) or reduced-dose-rate (RDR) irradiation. Other tumor-bearing mice received reactor thermal or epithermal neutrons with RDR irradiation. Immediately after HDR and RDR irradiation or 12 h after HDR irradiation, the response of quiescent cells was assessed in terms of the micronucleus frequency using immunofluorescence staining for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The response of the total (proliferating plus quiescent) tumor cells was determined from the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine nontreated tumors. Results: The difference in radiosensitivity between the total and quiescent cell populations after {gamma}-ray irradiation was markedly reduced with reactor neutron beams or accelerated carbon ion beams, especially with a greater linear energy transfer (LET) value. Clearer repair in quiescent cells than in total cells through delayed assay or a decrease in the dose rate with {gamma}-ray irradiation was efficiently inhibited with carbon ion beams, especially with a greater LET. With RDR irradiation, the radiosensitivity to accelerated carbon ion beams with a greater LET was almost similar to that to reactor thermal and epithermal neutron beams. Conclusion: In terms of tumor cell-killing effect as a whole, including quiescent cells, accelerated carbon ion beams, especially with greater LET values, are very useful for suppressing the dependency on the heterogeneity within solid tumors, as well as depositing the radiation dose precisely.

Masunaga, Shin-ichiro [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ando, Koichi; Uzawa, Akiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Koike, Sachiko [Heavy-Ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Sakurai, Yoshinori [Department of Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kashino, Genro [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Kinashi, Yuko [Department of Radiation Safety and Control, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroki; Maruhashi, Akira [Department of Radiation Medical Physics, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Koji [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

(Liquid metal reactor/fast breeder reactor research and development)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second meeting of the UJCC was held in Japan on June 6--8, 1990. The first day was devoted to presentations of the status of the US and Japanese Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) programs and the status of specific areas of cooperative work. Briefly, the Japanese are following the FBR development program which has been in place since the 1970s. This program includes an FBR test reactor (JOYO), a pilot-scale reactor (MONJU), a demonstration-scale plant, and commercial-scale plants by about 2020. The US program has been redirected toward an actinide recycle mission using metal fuel and pyroprocessing of spent fuel to recovery both Pu and the higher actinides for return to the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR). The second day was spent traveling from Tokyo to Tsuruga for a tour of the MONJU reactor. The tour was especially interesting. The third day was spent writing the minutes of the meeting and the return trip to Tokyo.

Homan, F.J.

1990-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Key Differences in the Fabrication, Irradiation, and Safety Testing of U.S. and German TRISO-coated Particle Fuel and Their Implications on Fuel Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature gas reactor technology is achieving a renaissance around the world. This technology relies on high quality production and performance of coated particle fuel. Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the United States. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than U.S. fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the U.S. and Germany and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the U.S. fuel has not faired as well, and what process/ production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer U.S. irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, and degree of acceleration) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance.

Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hobbins, Richard Redfield

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Advanced Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Nuclear Advanced Nuclear Reactors Advanced Nuclear Reactors Turbulent Flow of Coolant in an Advanced Nuclear Reactor Visualizing Coolant Flow in Sodium Reactor Subassemblies Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) Coolant Flow At the heart of a nuclear power plant is the reactor. The fuel assembly is placed inside a reactor vessel where all the nuclear reactions occur to produce the heat and steam used for power generation. Nonetheless, an entire power plant consists of many other support components and key structures like coolant pipes; pumps and tanks including their surrounding steel framing; and concrete containment and support structures. The Reactors Product Line within NEAMS is concerned with modeling the reactor vessel as well as those components of a complete power plant that

410

Advanced Reactor Technology Documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Technology Documents Advanced Reactor Technology Documents January 30, 2013 Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report This report documents the establishment of a technical review process and the findings of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) Technical Review Panel (TRP).1 The intent of the process is to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. A goal of the process is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. The process involved establishing evaluation criteria, conducting a pilot review, soliciting concept inputs from industry entities, reviewing the concepts by TRP members and compiling the

411

Microsoft Word - power_reactors_briggs.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Water Reactors About 80% of the world's nuclear reactors used for generating electricity are either boiling water reactors or pressurized water reactors. Of these, about 30% are boiling water reactors and 70% are pressurized water reactors. All power reactors currently in use in the United States are of these two types. Both types of reactors have been very successfully used for reliable, on-demand, emissions-free electricity generation for decades. How does a boiling water reactor work? Water flows from the bottom of the fuel to the top of the fuel, and as it moves past the fuel, it carries away the heat produced by the

412

The technique and preliminary results of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel testing in the MIR reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2007 in-pile testing of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel elements was started in the MIR reactor. Four prototype fuel elements for Uzbekistan WWR SM reactor are being tested simultaneously - two of tube type design and two of pin type design. The dismountable irradiation devices were constructed for intermediate reloading and inspection of fuel elements during reactor testing. The objective of the test is to obtain the experimental results for determination of more reliable design and licensing fuel elements for conversion of the WWR SM reactor. The heat power of fuel elements is measured on-line by thermal balance method. The distribution of fission density and burn-up of uranium in the volume of elements are calculated by using the MIR reactor MCU code (Monte-Carlo) model. In this paper the design of fuel elements, the technique, main parameters and preliminary results are described. (author)

Izhutov, A.L.; Starkov, V.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Fedoseev, V.Ye. [Research Reactor Complex, RIAR, 433510, Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk Region (Russian Federation); Dobrikova, I.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Suprun, V.B. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, P. O. Box 369, 123060, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kartashov, Ye.F.; Lukichev, V.A. [Research and Development Institute of Nuclear Energy and Industry, P. O. Box 788, 107014, Moscow (Russian Federation); Troyanov, V.M.; Enin, A.A.; Tkachev, A.A. [OAO 'TVEL' 119017, ul. B. Ordinka 24/26, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

DOE Grids Service Transition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Grids Service Transition DOE Grids Service Transition Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net DOE Grids Service Transition Background ESnet has decided to transition support and management for the certificate services provided by the DOE Grids public key infrastructure (PKI) to the Open Sciences Grid (OSG). OSG and ESnet provide service to many of the same user communities, and have long been collaborators in the areas of identity

414

Semantic Web Services Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The research area of Semantic Web Services investigates the annotation of services, typically in a SOA, with a precise mathematical meaning in a formal ontology. These annotations allow a higher degree of auto...

Stijn Heymans; Jörg Hoffmann; Annapaola Marconi…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Cybersecurity and Financial Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cybersecurity and Financial Services Anna Nagurney Isenberg School of Management, University, Boston, Massachusetts March 30 - April 1, 2014 Anna Nagurney Cybersecurity and Financial Services #12;Funding for our project, Cybersecurity Risk Analysis and Investment Optimization, provided by: with Co

Nagurney, Anna

416

Safety & Environmental Protection Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety & Environmental Protection Services Guidance Note --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW Safety & Environmental Protection Services 1 Telephone: 0141-330-5532 Email: safety of others who live near you. It is about fire and the tragic consequences of getting some simple things

Guo, Zaoyang

417

Safety & Environmental Protection Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety & Environmental Protection Services Guidance Note --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW Safety & Environmental Protection Services 1 Telephone: 0141-330-5532 Email: safety FOR THE CURRENT REVISION. Emergency Fire Action Plan Revision 03/10 Listed below are the procedures and other

Guo, Zaoyang

418

Web services @ MIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are several useful web services developed at MIT by students, faculty and researchers. However, they are scattered all over MIT. Most people at MIT are unaware of the availability of these web services and hence they ...

Tyagi, Sapna DevendraSingh, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

420

Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model; 3-D; Monolith; Reactor; Optimization Introduction TheAngeles Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and KineticGlobal Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic

ALHUSSEINI, ZAYNA ISHAQ

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Statistical Methods Handbook for Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel materials such as kernels, coated particles, and compacts are being manufactured for experiments simulating service in the next generation of high temperature gas reactors. These must meet predefined acceptance specifications. Many tests are performed for quality assurance, and many of these correspond to criteria that must be met with specified confidence, based on random samples. This report describes the statistical methods to be used. The properties of the tests are discussed, including the risk of false acceptance, the risk of false rejection, and the assumption of normality. Methods for calculating sample sizes are also described.

J. J. Einerson

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D-{sup 3}He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Rapid starting methanol reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

basic exchange telecommunications radio service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A service that extends telecommunications service to rural, outlying, and remote...Common abbreviation BETRS. Note: In the basic exchange telecommunications radio service (BETRS), the (a)....

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

DOE plutonium disposition study: Analysis of existing ABB-CE Light Water Reactors for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core reactivity and basic fuel management calculations were conducted on the selected reactors (with emphasis on the System 80 units as being the most desirable choice). Methods used were identical to those reported in the Evolutionary Reactor Report. From these calculations, the basic mission capability was assessed. The selected reactors were studied for modification, such as the addition of control rod nozzles to increase rod worth, and internals and control system modifications that might also be needed. Other system modifications studied included the use of enriched boric acid as soluble poison, and examination of the fuel pool capacities. The basic geometry and mechanical characteristics, materials and fabrication techniques of the fuel assemblies for the selected existing reactors are the same as for System 80+. There will be some differences in plutonium loading, according to the ability of the reactors to load MOX fuel. These differences are not expected to affect licensability or EPA requirements. Therefore, the fuel technology and fuel qualification sections provided in the Evolutionary Reactor Report apply to the existing reactors. An additional factor, in that the existing reactor availability presupposes the use of that reactor for the irradiation of Lead Test Assemblies, is discussed. The reactor operating and facility licenses for the operating plants were reviewed. Licensing strategies for each selected reactor were identified. The spent fuel pool for the selected reactors (Palo Verde) was reviewed for capacity and upgrade requirements. Reactor waste streams were identified and assessed in comparison to uranium fuel operations. Cost assessments and schedules for converting to plutonium disposition were estimated for some of the major modification items. Economic factors (incremental costs associated with using weapons plutonium) were listed and where possible under the scope of work, estimates were made.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Being Interactive Services and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for engineering software and more than sufficient justification for all the inter- est in services. AlthoughBeing Interactive Services and Situations 4 SEPTEMBER · OCTOBER 2001 http the Editor in Chief ... F orget objects. The killer buzzword of our era is now services. And who isn

427

Student Services at Dalhousie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Services at Dalhousie #12;Student Feedback Processes Data-driven decision-making Student contact data--service demand monitoring Student surveys--NSSE, CUSC, DAL Profile/Connections Fall survey: recreation activity; food security; service priorities) - participation rates and data validity Student

Dellaire, Graham

428

Mail Services User's Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides information on using Department of Energy (DOE) mail services in accordance with U.S. Postal Service, General Services Administration (GSA), and DOE regulations. Cancels DOE M 573.1-1. Canceled by DOE N 251.89.

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

429

Implications for health services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...L. Tyler Implications for health services John Grimley Evans...Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK Health services for older people in...Grimley Evans Implications for health services Phil.Trans. R...coronary heart disease this was dangerous nonsense. Moreover, it was...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Horizon Health EAP Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/09) HorizonCareLinkSM ­ All the help you need online Horizon Health EAP also provides services through counselors- Child care or elder care services- Pet care and veterinarians- Adoption resources- Health clubsHorizon Health EAP Services Employee Assistance Program with Telephone and 3 Face

Yates, Andrew

431

Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited...

Bellanger, Philippe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Generation of Web Service Descriptions and Web Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of Web Service Descriptions and Web Service Module Implementation for Concept University of Science and Technology Software Systems Institute (STS) #12;Abstract Nowadays web services in order to initiate the communication. A web services endpoint communication interface utilizes

433

N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete June 14, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 Mark McKenna mmckenna@wch-rcc.com 509-372-9032 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has completed placing N Reactor in interim safe storage, a process also known as "cocooning." N Reactor was the last of nine plutonium production reactors to be shut down at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state. It was Hanford's longest-running reactor, operating from 1963 to 1987. "In the 1960's, N Reactor represented the future of energy in America.

434

An improved characterization method for international accountancy measurements of fresh and irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel: helping achieve continual monitoring and safeguards through the fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel accountancy measurements are conducted at several points through the nuclear fuel cycle to ensure continuity of knowledge (CofK) of special nuclear material (SNM). Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements are performed on fresh fuel (prior to irradiation in a reactor) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) post-irradiation. We have developed a fuel assembly characterization system, based on the novel concept of 'neutron fingerprinting' with multiplicity signatures to ensure detailed CofK of nuclear fuel through the entire fuel cycle. The neutron fingerprint in this case is determined by the measurement of the various correlated neutron signatures, specific to fuel isotopic composition, and therefore offers greater sensitivity to variations in fissile content among fuel assemblies than other techniques such as gross neutron counting. This neutron fingerprint could be measured at the point of fuel dispatch (e.g. from a fuel fabrication plant prior to irradiation, or from a reactor site post-irradiation), monitored during transportation of the fuel assembly, and measured at a subsequent receiving site (e.g. at the reactor site prior to irradiation, or reprocessing facility post-irradiation); this would confirm that no unexpected changes to the fuel composition or amount have taken place during transportation and/ or reactor operations. Changes may indicate an attempt to divert material for example. Here, we present the current state of the practice of fuel measurements for both fresh mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and SNF (both MOX and uranium dioxide). This is presented in the framework of international safeguards perspectives from the US and UK. We also postulate as to how the neutron fingerprinting concept could lead to improved fuel characterization (both fresh MOX and SNF) resulting in: (a) assured CofK of fuel across the nuclear fuel cycle, (b) improved detection of SNM diversion, and (c) greater confidence in safeguards of SNF transportation.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worrall, Andrew [U.K. NNL

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

An improved characterization method for international accountancy measurements of fresh and irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel: helping achieve continual monitoring and safeguards through the fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel accountancy measurements are conducted at several points through the nuclear fuel cycle to ensure continuity of knowledge (CofK) of special nuclear material (SNM). Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements are performed on fresh fuel (prior to irradiation in a reactor) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) post-irradiation. We have developed a fuel assembly characterization system, based on the novel concept of 'neutron fingerprinting' with multiplicity signatures to ensure detailed CofK of nuclear fuel through the entire fuel cycle. The neutron fingerprint in this case is determined by the measurement of the various correlated neutron signatures, specific to fuel isotopic composition, and therefore offers greater sensitivity to variations in fissile content among fuel assemblies than other techniques such as gross neutron counting. This neutron fingerprint could be measured at the point of fuel dispatch (e.g. from a fuel fabrication plant prior to irradiation, or from a reactor site post-irradiation), monitored during transportation of the fuel assembly, and measured at a subsequent receiving site (e.g. at the reactor site prior to irradiation, or reprocessing facility post-irradiation); this would confirm that no unexpected changes to the fuel composition or amount have taken place during transportation and/or reactor operations. Changes may indicate an attempt to divert material for example. Here, we present the current state of the practice of fuel measurements for both fresh mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and SNF (both MOX and uranium dioxide). This is presented in the framework of international safeguards perspectives from the US and UK. We also postulate as to how the neutron fingerprinting concept could lead to improved fuel characterization (both fresh MOX and SNF) resulting in: (a) assured CofK of fuel across the nuclear fuel cycle, (b) improved detection of SNM diversion, and (c) greater confidence in safeguards of SNF transportation.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, B. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worrall, Andrew [U.K., NNL

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

436

Graphite Reactor | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphite Reactor Graphite Reactor 'In the early, desperate days of World War II, the United States launched the top-secret, top-priority Manhattan Project...' In the early, desperate days of U.S. involvement in World War II, American scientists began to fear that the German discovery of uranium fission in 1939 might enable the Nazis to develop a super bomb. Afraid of losing this crucial race, the United States launched the top-secret, top-priority Manhattan Project. The plan was to create two atomic weapons-one fueled by plutonium, the other by enriched uranium. Hanford, Washington, was selected as the site for plutonium production, but before large reactors could be built there, a pilot plant was necessary to prove the feasibility of scaling up from laboratory experiments. A secluded, rural area near Clinton, Tennessee, was

437

Business Opportunities for Small Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the market potential and identifies a number of potential paths for developing the small nuclear reactor business. There are several potential opportunities identified and evaluated. Selecting a specific approach for the business development requires additional information related to a specific market and sources of capital to support the investment. If and how a market for small nuclear plants may develop is difficult to predict because of the complexity of the economic and institutional factors that will influence such development. Key factors are; economics, safety, proliferation resistance and investment risk. The economic and political interest of any of the identified markets is also dependent on successful demonstration of the safety and reliability of small nuclear reactor. Obtaining a US-NRC Standard Design approval would be an important development step toward establishing a market for small reactors. (authors)

Minato, Akio; Nishimura, Satoshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry - CRIEPI, 2-11-1 Iwado-Kita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Brown, Neil W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - LLNL, PO Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Graphite Materials Testing in the ATR for Lifetime Management of Magnox Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on the ir graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment.

Grover, S.B. (INEEL); Metcalfe, M.P. (BNFL, United Kingdom)

2002-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Graphite Materials Testing in the ATR for Lifetime Management of Magnox Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on their graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment.

Grover, Stanley Blaine; Metcalfe, M. P.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Internal Audit Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Contacts Organizational Chart IAS Search Staff Only Lab Search Phone Book A-Z Index Privacy and Security Notice "Internal Auditing is an independent, objective assurance and consulting activity designed to add value and improve an organization's operations. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes." The Institute of Internal Auditors Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing About IAS | Audit Committee | Audit Planning | Ethics & Investigations | External Audit Coordination Advisory Services | Other Relevant Audit Links | Contacts | Organizational

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor irradiation services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.