Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance  

SciTech Connect

The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He/sup 3/ reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored.

Powell, J.R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cross section generation strategy for high conversion light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High conversion water reactors (HCWR), such as the Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR), are being designed with axial heterogeneity of alternating fissile and blanket zones to achieve a conversion ratio of ...

Herman, Bryan R. (Bryan Robert)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Biometric Web Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biometric Web Services. The biometric web services project combines biometrics and web services to. ... What are Web services? ...

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

The LEU conversion status of U.S. Research Reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the conversion status of US research and test reactors and estimates uranium densities needed to convert reactors with power levels 21 MW from HEU ({ge} 20% U-235) to LEU (<20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each reactor need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.

Matos, J. E.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect

Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

8

Direct Energy Conversion for Fast Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermoelectric generators (TEG) are a well-established technology for compact low power output long-life applications. Solid state TEGs are the technology of choice for many space missions and have also been used in remote earth-based applications. Since TEGs have no moving parts and can be hermetically sealed, there is the potential for nuclear reactor power systems using TEGs to be safe, reliable and resistant to proliferation. Such power units would be constructed in a manner that would provide decades of maintenance-free operation, thereby minimizing the possibility of compromising the system during routine maintenance operations. It should be possible to construct an efficient direct energy conversion cascade from an appropriate combination of solid-state thermoelectric generators, with each stage in the cascade optimized for a particular range of temperature. Performance of cascaded thermoelectric devices could be further enhanced by exploitation of compositionally graded p-n couples, as well as radial elements to maximize utilization of the heat flux. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena has recently reported segmented unicouples that operate between 300 and 975 K and have conversion efficiencies of 15 percent [Caillat, 2000]. TEGs are used in nuclear-fueled power sources for space exploration, in power sources for the military, and in electrical generators on diesel engines. Second, there is a wide variety of TE materials applicable to a broad range of temperatures. New materials may lead to new TEG designs with improved thermoelectric properties (i.e. ZT approaching 3) and significantly higher efficiencies than in designs using currently available materials. Computational materials science (CMS) has made sufficient progress and there is promise for using these techniques to reduce the time and cost requirements to develop such new TE material combinations. Recent advances in CMS, coupled with increased computational power afforded by the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), should improve the speed and decrease the cost of developing new TEGs. The system concept to be evaluated is shown in Figure 1. Liquid metal is used to transport heat away from the nuclear heat source and to the TEG. Air or liquid (water or a liquid metal) is used to transport heat away from the cold side of the TEG. Typical reactor coolants include sodium or eutectic mixtures of lead-bismuth. These are coolants that have been used to cool fast neutron reactors. Heat from the liquid metal coolant is rejected through the thermal electric materials, thereby producing electrical power directly. The temperature gradient could extend from as high as 1300 K to 300 K, although fast reactor structural materials (including those used to clad the fuel) currently used limit the high temperature to about 825K.

Brown, N.; Cooper, J.; Vogt, D.; Chapline, G.; Turchi, P.; Barbee Jr., T.; Farmer, J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

LEU conversion status of US research reactors, September 1996  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States from the use of fuels containing highly- enriched uranium (HEU, greater than or equal to 20%) to the use of fuels containing low-enriched uranium (LEU, < 20%). Estimates of the uranium densities required for conversion are made for reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW that are not currently involved in the LEU conversion process.

Matos, J.E.

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

Biometric Web Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Biometric Web Services. ... This page last updated Thursday, November 14, 2013. Join the Biometric Web Services Mailing List. ...

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion June 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 This release is cross-posted from NNSA.energy.gov. MOSCOW - The U.S. and Russian Federation jointly announced today that the first stage of work defined in the Implementing Agreement between the Russian State Corporation for Atomic Energy (Rosatom) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Regarding Cooperation in Concluding Feasibility Studies of the Conversion of Russian Research Reactors of Dec. 7, 2010, has been completed. The announcement comes at the close of the most recent session of the Working Group on Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security under the U.S.-Russia bilateral Presidential Commission, co-chaired by Daniel

12

US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion June 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 This release is cross-posted from NNSA.energy.gov. MOSCOW - The U.S. and Russian Federation jointly announced today that the first stage of work defined in the Implementing Agreement between the Russian State Corporation for Atomic Energy (Rosatom) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Regarding Cooperation in Concluding Feasibility Studies of the Conversion of Russian Research Reactors of Dec. 7, 2010, has been completed. The announcement comes at the close of the most recent session of the Working Group on Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security under the U.S.-Russia bilateral Presidential Commission, co-chaired by Daniel

13

Novel reactor configuration for synthesis gas conversion to alcohols  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on the conversion of synthesis gas to alcohols and reactor configuration. Objectives for this quarter: the project stated on October 1, 1989 and according to the Task Schedule provided in the original work breakdown schedule, Task I was to be completed in the first quarter and Task II to be started. Task I consisted of construction of the slurry reactor set-up to be used in Task IV for determination of the reactor kinetics and procurement of the parts for automation equipment, separators, computer activated parts etc. for automation of the trickle bed rector and GC equipment. Task II consisted of standardization and automation of GC analysis protocols. 1 fig.

Akgerman, A.; Anthony, R.G. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

MHD power conversion system for NERVA reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimized linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems to produce 200 MWe for 1000 seconds are defined. For the specific mission envisioned, a mass flow of 45.36 Kg/sec (100 lbs/sec) of hydrogen is available to the system. Westinghouse NERVA reactor technology can heat this mass flow of hydrogen to 2550 K at a pressure of 12 atm. This hydrogen flow is assumed to be seeded with cesium to obtain the required MHD generator conductivity. For each MHD system concept considered, the MHD generator design was optimized in terms of operating Mach number, load parameter, and cesium seed fraction. The simplest concept, an open-cycle MHD system, is optimized by minimizing the total magnet plus cesium seed mass. The resulting magnet and magnet plus seed mass are 44092 and 54143 Kg respectively. The second concept considered was an open-cycle MHD system with seed recovery and reuse. It is optimized by minimizing the magnet mass. The resulting magnet mass is 40110 Kg. A third concept, a closed-cycle MHD system, was also considered. If only equilibrium conductivity is considered, cesium seeded hydrogen is shown to be the more attractive than cesium seeded helium, and the optimum generator would be identical to that for the open-cycle MHD system with seed recovery.

Seikel, G.R.; Condit, W.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JUNE 1, 2001 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JUNE 1, 2001 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2001

L.C. BROWN

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor for the period December 1, 1999 through February 29, 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B135 Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor for the period December 1, 1999 through February 29, 2000

Brown, L.C.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Novel, Integrated Reactor / Power Conversion System (LMR-AMTEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main features of this project were the development of a long life (up to 10 years) Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) and a static conversion subsystem comprising an Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric (AMTEC) topping cycle and a ThermoElectric (TE) Bottom cycle. Various coupling options of the LMR with the energy conversion subsystem were explored and, base in the performances found in this analysis, an Indirect Coupling (IC) between the LMR and the AMTEC/TE converters with Alkali Metal Boilers (AMB) was chosen as the reference design. The performance model of the fully integrated sodium-and potassium-AMTEC/TE converters shows that a combined conversion efficiency in excess of 30% could be achieved by the plant. (B204)

Pablo Rubiolo, Principal Investigator

2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Forensic Database Biometrics Table  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... operates and enhances associated search and retrieval services and ... Contains several million records of biometric information including fingerprint ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Reactor core design and modeling of the MIT research reactor for conversion to LEU  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility design studies for conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) to LEU are described. Because the reactor fuel has a rhombic cross section, a special input processor was created in order to model the reactor in great detail with the REBUS-PC diffusion theory code, in 3D (triangular-z) geometry. Comparisons are made of fuel assembly power distributions and control blade worth vs. axial position, between REBUS-PC results and Monte Carlo predictions from the MCNP code. Results for the original HEU core at zero burnup are also compared with measurement. These two analysis methods showed remarkable agreement. Ongoing fuel cycle studies are summarized. A status report will be given as to results thus far that affect key design decisions. Future work plans and schedules to achieve completion of the conversion are presented. (author)

Newton, Thomas H. Jr. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Olson, Arne P.; Stillman, John A. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Friction pressure drop measurements and flow distribution analysis for LEU conversion study of MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Nuclear Research Reactor (MITR) is the only research reactor in the United States that utilizes plate-type fuel elements with longitudinal fins to augment heat transfer. Recent studies on the conversion to low-enriched ...

Wong, Susanna Yuen-Ting

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Design of passive decay heat removal system for the lead cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lead-cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor shows many benefits over other fast-reactor designs; however, the higher power rating and denser primary coolant present difficulties for the design of a passive decay ...

Whitman, Joshua (Joshua J.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Usability for Biometric Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to improve the usability of biometric systems, it is ... users will have with a system, including the hardware, software and instructional design of a ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

24

Biometric Quality Reading Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IEEE Transaction on Pattern Analysis and Machine ... ISO/IEC 19795-2 Biometric Performance Testing and Reporting: Scenario Testing., JTC1 ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Preliminary Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density, high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. The ATR has large irradiation test volumes located in high flux areas. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. As a result, the ATR is a representative candidate for assessing the necessary modifications and evaluating the subsequent operating effects associated with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed for the fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU 235U enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the LEU uranium density and 235U enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent Keff between the HEU core and a LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the 235U loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in Keff between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 150 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN-2 (MCWO) method was used to calculate Keff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the LEU core conversion designer should be able to optimize the 235U content of each fuel plate, so that the Keff and relative radial fission heat flux profile are similar to the reference ATR HEU case. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) safety requirements, a further study will be required in order to investigate the detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profile variations versus EFPDs.

G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information concerning: analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU; changes to technical specifications mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; changes in the Safety Analysis Report mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; and copies of all changed pages of the SAR and the technical specifications.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Biometrics Identity Management Agency Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biometrics Identity Management Agency Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200933-0. Address and Contact Information: 1000 ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Commercial application of thermionic conversion using a fusion reactor energy source. A preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of using thermionic conversion as a topping cycle for fusion reactors is presented. Because of the absence of restrictive temperature limitations for fusion-reactor blankets, fusion reactors may offer significant advantages, compared to fission reactors and fossil-fuel energy sources, for utilizing thermionic topping cycles. A system with a thermionic topping cycle and a conventional steam-turbine generator that utilizes the heat rejected by the thermionic converters is presented for illustration. This system consists of conceptual laser-fusion reactors with high-temperature radiating reactor blankets serving as heat sources for the thermionic topping cycle. The design concept appears to be equally adaptable to magnetically confined fusion reactors. For the example analyzed, net conversion efficiencies of combined thermionic and steam-turbine cycles are high, exceeding 50 percent for some values of the operating parameters, and the cost of producing low-voltage direct current for electrochemical processing is low.

Frank, T.G.; Kern, E.A.; Booth, L.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) helps convert research

30

Thermal hydraulic design and analysis of a large lead-cooled reactor with flexible conversion ratio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation Project, a part of the Nuclear Cycle Technology and Policy Program funded by the Department of Energy through the Nuclear Energy ...

Nikiforova, Anna S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Design, analysis and optimization of the power conversion system for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor system (MPBR) requires a gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) as the power conversion system for it to achieve economic competitiveness as a GenIV nuclear system. The availability of controllable ...

Wang, Chunyun, 1968-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A Review of Previous Research in Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From the earliest days of power reactor development, direct energy conversion was an obvious choice to produce high efficiency electric power generation. Directly capturing the energy of the fission fragments produced during nuclear fission avoids the intermediate conversion to thermal energy and the efficiency limitations of classical thermodynamics. Efficiencies of more than 80% are possible, independent of operational temperature. Direct energy conversion fission reactors would possess a number of unique characteristics that would make them very attractive for commercial power generation. These reactors would be modular in design with integral power conversion and operate at low pressures and temperatures. They would operate at high efficiency and produce power well suited for long distance transmission. They would feature large safety margins and passively safe design. Ideally suited to production by advanced manufacturing techniques, direct energy conversion fission reactors could be produced more economically than conventional reactor designs. The history of direct energy conversion can be considered as dating back to 1913 when Moseleyl demonstrated that charged particle emission could be used to buildup a voltage. Soon after the successful operation of a nuclear reactor, E.P. Wigner suggested the use of fission fragments for direct energy conversion. Over a decade after Wigner's suggestion, the first theoretical treatment of the conversion of fission fragment kinetic energy into electrical potential appeared in the literature. Over the ten years that followed, a number of researchers investigated various aspects of fission fragment direct energy conversion. Experiments were performed that validated the basic physics of the concept, but a variety of technical challenges limited the efficiencies that were achieved. Most research in direct energy conversion ceased in the US by the late 1960s. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this day, but there have been no recent significant programs to develop the technology.

DUONG,HENRY; POLANSKY,GARY F.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; SIEGEL,MALCOLM D.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

Liquid Metal MHD Energy Conversion in Fusion Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Innovative Concepts for Power Conversion / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

L. Blumenau; H. Branover; A. El-Boher; E Spero; S. Sukoriansky; G. Talmage; E. Greenspan

34

Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Power Conversion System for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology and complies with all current codes and standards. Using the initial reference design, limiting. A dynamic model, MPBRSim, has been developed. The model integrates the reactor core and the power conversion reactor design requirements...........................................39 2.5 Overall development path

35

Conversion and standardization of US university reactor fuels using LEU, status 1989  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the US Department of Energy initiated a program to change the fuel used in most of the US university research reactors using HEU (93%) to LEU({lt}20{percent}) in order to minimize the risk of theft or diversion of this weapons-useable material. An important consideration in the LEU conversion planning process has been the desire to standardize the fuels that are used and to enhance the performance and utilization of the reactors. This paper describes the current status of this conversion process and the plans and schedules to complete an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. To date, three university reactors have been converted to LEU fuel, completed safety documentation for three reactors is being evaluated by the USNRC, and work on the safety documentation for six reactors is in progress. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Leu conversion status of U.S. research reactors: September 1996  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Department of Energy, the RERTR Program has summarized the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States and has made estimates of the uranium densities that would be needed to convert the reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) (greater than or equal to 20% U-235) to Lightly Enriched Uranium (LEU) (less than 20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each of the reactors need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.

Matos, J.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

GLOBAL THREAT REDUCTION INITIATIVE REACTOR CONVERSION PROGRAM: STATUS AND CURRENT PLANS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Reactor Conversion Program supports the minimization, and to the extent possible, elimination of the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors and radioisotope production processes to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU). The Reactor Conversion Program is a technical pillar of the NNSA Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is a key organization for implementing U.S. HEU minimization policy and works to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material domestically and abroad.

Staples, Parrish A.; Leach, Wayne; Lacey, Jennifer M.

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for the University of Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at the University of Florida. This project was successfully completed through an integrated and collaborative effort involving the INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (Headquarters and Field Office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Universities, and contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and SNF shipping and disposition. With the work completed with these two universities, and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Thermal hydraulic limits analysis for the MIT Research Reactor low enrichment uranium core conversion using statistical propagation of parametric uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is evaluating the conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. In addition to the fuel element re-design from 15 to 18 plates per element, a reactor ...

Chiang, Keng-Yen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1,2000 THROUGH FEBRUARY 28,2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1,2000 THROUGH FEBRUARY 28,2001

L.C. BROWN

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002

L.C. BROWN

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1,1999 THRIUGH FEBRUARY 29,2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1,1999 THRIUGH FEBRUARY 29,2000

LC BROWN

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001

L.C. BROWN

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1,2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31,2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1,2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31,2001

L.C. BROWN

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD APRIL 1, 2002 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct energy conversion is the only potential means for producing electrical energy from a fission reactor without the Carnot efficiency limitations. This project was undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratories, The University of Florida, Texas A&M University and General Atomics to explore the possibilities of direct energy conversion. Other means of producing electrical energy from a fission reactor, without any moving parts, are also within the statement of proposed work. This report documents the efforts of General Atomics. Sandia National Laboratories, the lead laboratory, provides overall project reporting and documentation.

L.C. BROWN

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 2002 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct energy conversion is the only potential means for producing electrical energy from a fission reactor without the Carnot efficiency limitations. This project was undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratories, The University of Florida, Texas A&M University and General Atomics to explore the possibilities of direct energy conversion. Other means of producing electrical energy from a fission reactor, without any moving parts, are also within the statement of proposed work. This report documents the efforts of General Atomics. Sandia National Laboratories, the lead laboratory, provides overall project reporting and documentation.

L.C. BROWN

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Neutronic safety parameters and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor.  

SciTech Connect

An initial safety study for potential LEU conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor was completed. The study compares safety parameters and example transients for reactor cores with HEU and LEU fuels. Reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters and control rod worths were calculated for cores with HEU(36%) UAl alloy fuel and UO{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel, and with LEU (19.75%)UO{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel that has a uranium density of about 2.5 g/cm{sup 3}. A preliminary fuel conversion plan was developed for transition cores that would convert the BRR from HEU to LEU fuel after the process is begun.

Pond, R. B.; Hanan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.; Maraczy, C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab.

Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor September through November 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK - B135 The initial kickoff meeting/brainstorming session was held as Albuquerque with the other participants in this study. The prompt critical pulse reactor was proposed at the brainstorming session. The other participants in this study, Sandia National Laboratories (lead), Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Florida and Texas A and M University are separately funded and their work is separately reported. The combined reporting is done by Sandia.

Brown, Lloyd C.

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Disk magnetohydrodynamic power conversion system for NERVA reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator of the disk type with a NERVA reactor yields an advanced power system particularly suited to space applications with the capability of producing up to gigawatt pulses and multi-megawatt continuous operation. Several unique features result from the combination of this type of reactor and a disk MHD generator in which hydrogen serves as the plasma working fluid. Cesium seedings is utilized under conditions which enable the generator to operate stably in the non-equilibrium electrical conduction mode. In common with all practical MHD generators, the disk output is DC and voltages in the range 20--100 kV are attainable. This leads to a simplification of the power conditioning system and a major reduction in specific mass. Taken together with the high performance capabilities of the NERVA reactor, the result is an attractively low overall system specific mass. Further, the use of non-equilibrium ionization enables system specific enthalpy extractions in excess of 40% to be attained. This paper reports the results of a study to establish the basis for the design of a cesium seeded hydrogen MHD disk generator. Generator performance results are presented in terms of a stability factor which is related to cesium seeded hydrogen plasma behavior. It is shown that application of the results already obtained with cesium seeded noble gases (argon and helium) to the case of hydrogen as the working fluid in a disk MHD generator enables a high performance power system to be defined.

Jackson, W.D. (HMJ Corporation. 10400 Connecticut Ave., Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)); Bernard, F.E. (Westinghouse Corp., P.O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230 (United States)); Holman, R.R. (HMJ Corporation, 10400 Connecticut Ave., Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)); Maxwell, C.D. (STD Research Corp., P.O. Box C, Arcadia, California 91006 (United States)); Seikel, G.R. (SeiTec, Inc., P.O. Box 81264, Cleveland, Ohio 44181 (United States))

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. Results of design and safety analyses performed by the RERTR Program at the Argonne National Laboratory for LEU conversion of the GTRR are summarized. Only those parameters which could change as a result of replacing the fuel are addressed. The performance of the reactor and all safety margins with LEU fuel are expected to be about the same as those with the current HEU fuel.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. Results of design and safety analyses performed by the RERTR Program at the Argonne National Laboratory for LEU conversion of the GTRR are summarized. Only those parameters which could change as a result of replacing the fuel are addressed. The performance of the reactor and all safety margins with LEU fuel are expected to be about the same as those with the current HEU fuel.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Design of a 2400MW liquid-salt cooled flexible conversion ratio reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 2400MWth liquid-salt cooled flexible conversion ratio reactor was designed, utilizing the ternary chloride salt NaCl-KCl-MgCI2 (30%-20%-50%) as coolant. The reference design uses a wire-wrapped, hex lattice core, and is ...

Petroski, Robert C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

UsabilityBiometrics workshop08  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of ... of Special Projects International Biometrics Group ... Ph.D. Ministry of Home Affairs, Singapore. ...

55

Testing of an advanced thermochemical conversion reactor system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of work conducted by MTCI to verify and confirm experimentally the ability of the MTCI gasification process to effectively generate a high-quality, medium-Btu gas from a wider variety of feedstock and waste than that attainable in air-blown, direct gasification systems. The system's overall simplicity, due to the compact nature of the pulse combustor, and the high heat transfer rates attainable within the pulsating flow resonance tubes, provide a decided and near-term potential economic advantage for the MTCI indirect gasification system. The primary objective of this project was the design, construction, and testing of a Process Design Verification System for an indirectly heated, thermochemical fluid-bed reactor and a pulse combustor an an integrated system that can process alternative renewable sources of energy such as biomass, black liquor, municipal solid waste and waste hydrocarbons, including heavy oils into a useful product gas. The test objectives for the biomass portion of this program were to establish definitive performance data on biomass feedstocks covering a wide range of feedstock qualities and characteristics. The test objectives for the black liquor portion of this program were to verify the operation of the indirect gasifier on commercial black liquor containing 65 percent solids at several temperature levels and to characterize the bed carbon content, bed solids particle size and sulfur distribution as a function of gasification conditions. 6 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 1, 2002 THROUGH MARCH 31, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct energy conversion is the only potential means for producing electrical energy from a fission reactor without the Carnot efficiency limitations. This project was undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratories, The University of Florida, Texas A&M University and General Atomics to explore the possibilities of direct energy conversion. Other means of producing electrical energy from a fission reactor, without any moving parts, are also within the statement of proposed work. This report documents the efforts of General Atomics. Sandia National Laboratories, the lead laboratory, provides overall project reporting and documentation. The highlights of this reporting period are: (1) Cooling of the vapor core reactor and the MHD generator was incorporated into the Vapor Core Reactor model using standard heat transfer calculation methods. (2) Fission product removal, previously modeled as independent systems for each class of fission product, was incorporated into the overall fuel recycle loop of the Vapor Core Reactor. The model showed that the circulating activity levels are quite low. (3) Material distribution calculations were made for the ''pom-pom'' style cathode for the Fission Electric Cell. Use of a pom-pom cathode will eliminate the problem of hoop stress in the thin spherical cathode caused by the electric field.

L.C. BROWN

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Progress report on the conversion of the Purdue University reactor, PUR-1, from HEU to LEU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effort for the conversion of the Purdue University Research Reactor, PUR-1, began in August, 2005, and will be completed in late 2007. Initial low-enriched uranium (LEU) assemblies will be inserted into the core in September, and the final core load is expected to be completed by October 2007. This paper summarizes the work performed to date, and the expectations for the work remaining to complete the project. The PUR-1 conversion has been a collaborative effort with Purdue, Idaho National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory participating under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy-Global Threat Reduction. Construction of PUR-1 began in 1961, and it was initially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in August of 1962 for operation at 1kW. The primary missions of the reactor are training, education and research. Each graduate of the School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University will have operated the reactor in two or more separate experiments as part of their curriculum. Students were used extensively throughout all phases of this conversion project, providing additional learning opportunities to complete their education experience. (author)

Jenkins, J.H.; Merritt, E.C.; Revis, B. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Preliminary neutronics calculations for conversion of the Tehran research reactor core from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 5-MW highly enriched uranium (HEU)-fueled Tehran Research Reactor is considered for conversion to high-density, low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. A preliminary neutronics calculation is performed as part of the conversion goal. In this study, two cores are considered: the HEU reference core and a proposed LEU core similar to the reference core, and a proposed LEU core similar to the reference core, using standardized U[sub 3]Si[sub 2] plates with the option of different [sup 235]U loadings. Various possibilities are investigated for the conversion of HEU to LEU fuel elements with 20% enriched [sup 235]U loadings of 207 to 297 g [sup 235]U/element. For the same equilibrium cycle length, the fuels are compared for flux, power distribution, burnup, and reactivity.

Nejat, S.M.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics.)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reliability analysis of a passive cooling system using a response surface with an application to the Flexible Conversion Ratio Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive risk-informed methodology for passive safety system design and performance assessment is presented and demonstrated on the Flexible Conversion Ratio Reactor (FCRR). First, the methodology provides a framework ...

Fong, Christopher J. (Christopher Joseph)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

BiomDI - Software tools supporting Standard Biometric Data ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BiomDI - Software Tools supporting Standard Biometric Data Interchange Formats. Utilities for processing of biometric data ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

Low-temperature conversion of high-moisture biomass: Continuous reactor system results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a low-temperature, catalytic process for converting high-moisture biomass feedstocks and other wet organic substances to useful gaseous fuels. This system, in which thermocatalytic conversion takes place in an aqueous environment, was designed to overcome the problems usually encountered with high-water-content feedstocks. The process uses a reduced nickel catalyst at temperatures as low as 350{degree}C and pressures ranging from 2000 to 4000 psig -- conditions favoring the formation of gas consisting mostly of methane. The results of numerous batch tests showed that the system could convert feedstocks not readily converted by conventional methods. Fifteen tests were conducted in a continuous reactor system to further evaluate the effectiveness of the process for high-moisture biomass gasification and to obtain conversion rate data needed for process scaleup. During the tests, the complex gasification reactions were evaluated by several analytical methods. The results of these tests show that the heating value of the gas ranged from 400 to 500 Btu/scf, and if the carbon dioxide is removed, the product gas is pipeline quality. Conversion of the feedstocks was high. Engineering analysis indicates that, based on these results, a tubular reactor can be designed that should convert greater than 99% of the carbon fed as high-moisture biomass to a gaseous product in a reaction time of less than 11 min.

Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Butner, R.S.; Baker, E.G.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION (DEC) FISSION REACTORS - A U.S. NERI PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The direct conversion of the electrical energy of charged fission fragments was examined early in the nuclear reactor era, and the first theoretical treatment appeared in the literature in 1957. Most of the experiments conducted during the next ten years to investigate fission fragment direct energy conversion (DEC) were for understanding the nature and control of the charged particles. These experiments verified fundamental physics and identified a number of specific problem areas, but also demonstrated a number of technical challenges that limited DEC performance. Because DEC was insufficient for practical applications, by the late 1960s most R&D ceased in the US. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this day, but there have been no recent programs to develop the technology. This has changed with the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative that was funded by the U.S. Congress in 1999. Most of the previous concepts were based on a fission electric cell known as a triode, where a central cathode is coated with a thin layer of nuclear fuel. A fission fragment that leaves the cathode with high kinetic energy and a large positive charge is decelerated as it approaches the anode by a charge differential of several million volts, it then deposits its charge in the anode after its kinetic energy is exhausted. Large numbers of low energy electrons leave the cathode with each fission fragment; they are suppressed by negatively biased on grid wires or by magnetic fields. Other concepts include magnetic collimators and quasi-direct magnetohydrodynamic generation (steady flow or pulsed). We present the basic principles of DEC fission reactors, review the previous research, discuss problem areas in detail and identify technological developments of the last 30 years relevant to overcoming these obstacles. A prognosis for future development of direct energy conversion fission reactors will be presented.

D. BELLER; G. POLANSKY; ET AL

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Recovery of Carbon Dioxide in Advanced Fossil Energy Conversion Processes Using a Membrane Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide in Advanced Fossil Energy Conversion Processes Carbon Dioxide in Advanced Fossil Energy Conversion Processes Using a Membrane Reactor Ashok S. Damle * Research Triangle Institute P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 Phone: (919) 541-6146 Fax: (919) 541-6965 E-mail: adamle@rti.org Thomas P. Dorchak National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, Mail Stop C04 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Phone: (304) 285-4305 E-mail: tdorch@netl.doe.gov Abstract Increased awareness of the global warming trend has led to worldwide concerns regarding "greenhouse gas" emissions, with CO 2 being the single greatest contributor to global warming. Fossil fuels (i.e., coal, oil, and natural gas) currently supply over 85% of the world's energy needs, and their utilization is the major source of the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions of

65

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

66

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Budapest research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor (BRR) from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute in Hungary. Comparisons were made of the reactor performance with the current HEU (36%) fuel and with a proposed LEU (19.75%) fuel. Cycle lengths, thermal neutron fluxes, and rod worths were calculated in equilibrium-type cores for each type of fuel. Relative to the HEU fuel, the LEU fuel has up to a 50% longer fuel cycle length, but a 7-10% smaller thermal neutron flux in the experiment locations. The rod worths are smaller with the LEU fuel, but are still large enough to easily satisfy the BRR shutdown margin criteria. Irradiation testing of four VVR-M2 LEU fuel assemblies that are nearly the same as the proposed BRR LEU fuel assemblies is currently in progress at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute.

Pond, R. B.

1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Investigation of the low enrichment conversion of the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The use of highly enriched uranium as a fuel research reactors is of concern due to the possibility of diversion for nuclear weapons applications. The Texas A M TRIGA reactor currently uses 70% enriched uranium in a FLIP (Fuel Life Improvement Program) fuel element manufactured by General Atomics. Thus fuel also contains 1.5 weight percent of erbium as a burnable poison to prolong useful core life. US university reactors that use highly enriched uranium will be required to covert to 20% or less enrichment to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for the next core loading if the fuel is available. This investigation examined the feasibility of a material alternate to uranium-zirconium hydride for LEU conversion of a TRIGA reactor. This material is a beryllium oxide uranium dioxide based fuel. The theoretical aspects of core physics analyses were examined to assess the potential advantages of the alternative fuel. A basic model was developed for the existing core configuration since it is desired to use the present fuel element grid for the replacement core. The computing approach was calibrated to the present core and then applied to a core of BeO-UO{sub 2} fuel elements. Further calculations were performed for the General Atomics TRIGA low-enriched uranium zirconium hydride fuel.

Reuscher, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Imputing human descriptions in semantic biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human identification at a distance has received significant interest due to the ever increasing surveillance infrastructure. Biometrics such as face and gait offer a suitable physical attribute to uniquely identify people from a distance. When linking ... Keywords: SVD, biometrics, imputation, latent semantic analysis, semantic biometrics, surveillance

Daniel A. Reid; Mark S. Nixon

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Biometric Fusion Using Enhanced SVM Classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Support Vector Machines or SVM is one of the most successful and powerful statistical learning classification techniques. It has been also implemented in the biometric field. In this paper we propose the use of SVM as a fusion tool. We propose a system ... Keywords: SVM, Biometric Fusion, Multimodal Biometrics, Fingerprint, Iris

Menrit S. Fahmy; Amir F. Atyia; Raafat S. Elfouly

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Limitations of power conversion systems under transient loads and impact on the pulsed tokamak power reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of cyclic loading of the power conversion system of a helium-cooled, pulsed tokamak power plant is assessed. Design limits of key components of heat transport systems employing Rankie and Brayton thermodynamic cycles are quantified based on experience in gas-cooled fission reactor design and operation. Cyclic loads due to pulsed tokamak operation are estimated. Expected performance of the steam generator is shown to be incompatible with pulsed tokamak operation without load leveling thermal energy storage. The close cycle gas turbine is evaluated qualitatively based on performance of existing industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines. Advances in key technologies which significantly improve prospects for operation with tokamak fusion plants are reviewed.

Sager, G.T.; Wong, C.P.C.; Kapich, D.D.; McDonald, C.F.; Schleicher, R.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the WWR-SM research reactor in Uzbekistan.  

SciTech Connect

The WWR-SM research reactor in Uzbekistan has operated at 10 MW since 1979, using Russian-supplied IRT-3M fuel assemblies containing 90% enriched uranium. Burnup tests of three full-sized IRT-3M FA with 36% enrichment were successfully completed to a burn up of about {approximately}50% in 1987-1989. In August 1998, four IRT-3M FA with 36% enriched uranium were loaded into the core to initiate conversion of the entire core to 36% enriched fuel. This paper presents the results of equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons of the reactor using HEU (90%) and HEU (36%) IRT-3M fuel and compares results with the performance of IRT-4M FA containing LEU (19.75%). The results show that an LEU (19.75%) density of 3.8 g/cm{sup 3} is required to match the cycle length of the HEU (90%) core and an LEU density 3.9 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU (36%) core.

Rakhmanov, A.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

73

Direct energy conversion in fission reactors: A U.S. NERI project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In principle, the energy released by a fission can be converted directly into electricity by using the charged fission fragments. The first theoretical treatment of direct energy conversion (DEC) appeared in the literature in 1957. Experiments were conducted over the next ten years, which identified a number of problem areas. Research declined by the late 1960's due to technical challenges that limited performance. Under the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative the authors are determining if these technical challenges can be overcome with todays technology. The authors present the basic principles of DEC reactors, review previous research, discuss problem areas in detail, and identify technological developments of the last 30 years that can overcome these obstacles. As an example, the fission electric cell must be insulated to avoid electrons crossing the cell. This insulation could be provided by a magnetic field as attempted in the early experiments. However, from work on magnetically insulated ion diodes they know how to significantly improve the field geometry. Finally, a prognosis for future development of DEC reactors will be presented .

SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.; POLANSKY,GARY F.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; BESENBRUCH,G.; BROWN,L.C.; PARISH,T.A.; ANGHAIE,S.; BELLER,D.E.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Thermal-hydraulic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core  

SciTech Connect

The thermal-hydraulic analysis performed for the needs of the conversion of the open pool 5MW Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) to a pure Low Enrichment (LEU) configuration is presented. The methodology was based on a complete set of neutronic calculations performed for the new core configuration, in compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. The hottest channel analysis approach was adopted, and peaking factors were used to account for fabrication or measuring uncertainties. Calculations were carried out using the numerical codes NATCON, PLTEMP and PARET provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Two main different classes of conditions were considered, namely i) steady state normal operating conditions and ii) transient cases related to accidental events including reactivity feedback effects. For steady state operating conditions the behaviour of the new configuration was examined both for forced and natural convection cooling modes. Transient calculations considered several initiating events including reactivity insertion accidents (slow or fast reactivity insertion) and total or partial loss-of-flow accidents, i.e. in accordance to guidelines provided by the IAEA for research Reactors. (author)

Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus); Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Conversion of methanol to light olefins on SAPO-34: kinetic modeling and reactor design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the reaction scheme of the MTO process was written in terms of elementary steps and generated by means of a computer algorithm characterizing the various species by vectors and Boolean relation matrices. The number of rate parameters is very large. To reduce this number the rate parameters related to the steps on the acid sites of the catalyst were modeled in terms of transition state theory and statistical thermodynamics. Use was made of the single event concept to account for the effect of structure of reactant and activated complex on the frequency factor of the rate coefficient of an elementary step. The Evans-Polanyi relation was also utilized to account for the effect of the structure on the change in enthalpy. The structure was determined by means of quantum chemical software. The number of rate parameters of the complete reaction scheme to be determined from experimental data is thus reduced from 726 to 30. Their values were obtained from the experimental data of Abraha by means of a genetic algorithm involving the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and combined with sequential quadratic programming. The retained model yields an excellent fit of the experimental data. All the parameters satisfy the statistical tests as well as the rules of carbenium ion chemistry. The kinetic model also reproduces the experimental data of Marchi and Froment, also obtained on SAPO-34. Another set of their data was used to introduce the deactivation of the catalyst into the kinetic equations. This detailed kinetic model was used to investigate the influence of the operating conditions on the product distribution in a multi-bed adiabatic reactor with plug flow. It was further inserted into riser and fluidized bed reactor models to study the conceptual design of an MTO reactor, accounting for the strong exothermicity of the process. Multi-bed adiabatic and fluidized bed technologies show good potential for the industrial process for the conversion of methanol into olefins.

Al Wahabi, Saeed M. H.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study -- 2006 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the U.S. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. Because of these operating parameters, and the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U-235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U 235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent Keff between the HEU core and a LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U 235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in Keff and heat profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 125 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The Monte-Carlo coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) depletion methodology was used to calculate Keff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the Keff versus EFPDs plot is similar in shape to the reference ATR HEU case. The LEU core conversion feasibility study can also be used to optimize the U-235 content of each fuel plate, so that the relative radial fission heat flux profile is bounded by the reference ATR HEU case. The detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profiles of the HEU and optimized LEU cases have been investigated. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the UFSAR safety requirements, additional studies will be necessary to evaluate and compare safety parameters such as void reactivity and Doppler coefficients, control components worth (OSCC, safety rods and regulating rod), and shutdown margins between the HEU and LEU cores.

G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study (2006 Annual Report)  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. Because of these operating parameters, and the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff between the HEU core and the LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U-235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 125 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The depletion methodology, Monte-Carlo coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO), was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar in shape to the reference ATR HEU case. The LEU core conversion feasibility study can also be used to optimize the U-235 content of each fuel plate, so that the relative radial fission heat flux profile is bounded by the reference ATR HEU case. The detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profiles of the HEU and optimized LEU cases have been investigated. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the UFSAR safety requirements, additional studies will be necessary to evaluate and compare safety parameters such as void reactivity and Doppler coefficients, control components worth (outer shim control cylinders (OSCCs), safety rods and regulating rod), and shutdown margins between the HEU and LEU cores.

Gray S. Chang; Richard G. Ambrosek; Misti A. Lillo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Biometric Standards Program and Resource Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... based on this Patron Format conform or not to the standard. ... of Biometric Information Records specified in both national and international standards. ...

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Multifeature biometric system based on EEG signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the person authentication problem based on EEG signals. Many features extracted from EEG recordings have proved to be unique enough among subjects for biometric application. However, different features show different discriminative ... Keywords: authentication, biometric, electroencephalogram (EEG), motor imagery, multifeature

Hu Jian-feng

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

On selecting Gabor features for biometric authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a Gabor feature selection technique that allows us to develop a fast and robust Gabor-feature based biometric system. Existing Gabor based methods use a huge number of Gabor features to represent the patterns. Our experiments on different ... Keywords: Gabor features, automated identification, biometrics, ear authentication, equal error rate, feature selection, finger authentication

Loris Nanni; Alessandra Lumini

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A contactless biometric system using multiple hand features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of modern computing technology, there is increased reliance on biometrics to provide stronger personal authentication. Among the variety of biometric solutions in the market, hand-based system is the oldest, and perhaps the most successful ... Keywords: Contactless biometrics, Hand geometry recognition, Hand vein recognition, Image processing, Image quality assessment scheme, Knuckle print recognition, Multimodal biometrics, Palm print recognition

Goh Kah Ong Michael; Tee Connie; Andrew Beng Jin Teoh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Towards the reanalysis of void coefficients measurements at proteus for high conversion light water reactor lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Conversion Light Water Reactors (HCLWR) allows a better usage of fuel resources thanks to a higher breeding ratio than standard LWR. Their uses together with the current fleet of LWR constitute a fuel cycle thoroughly studied in Japan and the US today. However, one of the issues related to HCLWR is their void reactivity coefficient (VRC), which can be positive. Accurate predictions of void reactivity coefficient in HCLWR conditions and their comparisons with representative experiments are therefore required. In this paper an inter comparison of modern codes and cross-section libraries is performed for a former Benchmark on Void Reactivity Effect in PWRs conducted by the OECD/NEA. It shows an overview of the k-inf values and their associated VRC obtained for infinite lattice calculations with UO{sub 2} and highly enriched MOX fuel cells. The codes MCNPX2.5, TRIPOLI4.4 and CASMO-5 in conjunction with the libraries ENDF/B-VI.8, -VII.0, JEF-2.2 and JEFF-3.1 are used. A non-negligible spread of results for voided conditions is found for the high content MOX fuel. The spread of eigenvalues for the moderated and voided UO{sub 2} fuel are about 200 pcm and 700 pcm, respectively. The standard deviation for the VRCs for the UO{sub 2} fuel is about 0.7% while the one for the MOX fuel is about 13%. This work shows that an appropriate treatment of the unresolved resonance energy range is an important issue for the accurate determination of the void reactivity effect for HCLWR. A comparison to experimental results is needed to resolve the presented discrepancies. (authors)

Hursin, M.; Koeberl, O.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect

Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor, Gaseous Core Reactor with Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Generator; Final Report - Part I and Part II  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on the power conversion cycle and efficiency. The technical issues involving the ionization mechanisms, the power management and distribution and radiation shielding and safety will be discussed in future reports.

Samim Anghaie; Blair Smith; Travis Knight

2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

Introduction of Thorium-Based Fuels in High Conversion Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regular Technical Paper / Special Issue on the Symposium on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Oxide and Novel LWR Fuels / Fission Reactors

V. Vallet; B. Gastaldi; J. Politello; A. Santamarina; L. Van Den Durpel

88

Expanding and optimizing fuel management and data analysis capabilities of MCODE-FM in support of MIT research reactor (MITR-II) LEU conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies are underway in support of the MIT research reactor (MITR-II) conversion from high enriched Uranium (HEU) to low enriched Uranium (LEU), as required by recent non-proliferation policy. With the same core configuration ...

Horelik, Nicholas E. (Nicholas Edward)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part of a global effort to minimize the availability of ...

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

Yoder, G.L.

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

EPRI NMAC Maintainability Review of the International Gas-Turbine Modular Helium Reactor Power Conversion Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information of interest to the designers of modular helium-reactor-driven gas turbines and persons considering the purchase of this type of plant.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Turbostar: An ICF Reactor using Both Direct and Thermal Power Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Reactor Design—I / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

John H. Pitts

93

Conversion of the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to convert the UMR Reactor fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and to ship the HEU fuel back to the Department of Energy Savannah River Site. The actual core conversion was completed in the summer of 1992. The HEU fuel was offloaded to an onsite storage pit where it remained until July, 1996. In July, 1996, the HEU fuel was shipped to the DOE Savannah River Site. The objectives of the project have been achieved. DOE provided the following funding for the project. Several papers were published regarding the conversion project and are listed in the Attachment. In retrospect, the conversion project required much more time and effort than originally thought. Several difficulties were encountered including the unavailability of a shipping cask for several years. The authors are grateful for the generous funding provided by DOE for this project but wish to point out that much of their efforts on the conversion project went unfunded.

Bolon, A.E.; Straka, M.; Freeman, D.W.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.

Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluation of ethane as a power conversion system working fluid for fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A supercritical ethane working fluid Brayton power conversion system is evaluated as an alternative to carbon dioxide. The HSC® chemical kinetics code was used to study thermal dissociation and chemical interactions for ...

Perez, Jeffrey A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Reactor fuel conversion assistance request. Technical progress report, August 15, 1992--May 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the progress that has been made on the preparations required to convert the WSU TRIGA reactor from High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel.

Tripard, G.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reactor fuel conversion assistance request: Technical progress report, August 15, 1992-December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the progress that has been made on the preparations required to convert the WSU TRIGA reactor from High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel.

Tripard, G.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

A neutronics feasibility study for the LEU conversion of Poland's Maria research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

The MARIA reactor is a high-flux multipurpose research reactor which is water-cooled and moderated with both beryllium and water. Standard HEU (80% {sup 235}U)fuel assemblies consist of six concentric fuel tubes of a U-Al alloy clad in aluminum. Although the inventory of HEU (80%) fuel is nearly exhausted, a supply of highly-loaded 36%-enriched fuel assemblies is available at the reactor site. Neutronic equilibrium studies have been made to determine the relative performance of fuels with enrichments of 80%, 36% and 19.7%. These studies indicate that LEU (19.7%) densities of about 2.5 gU/cm{sup 3} and 3.8 gU/cm{sup 3} are required to match the performance of the MARIA reactor with 80%-enriched and with 36%-enriched fuels, respectively.

Bretscher, M. M.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

99

The conversion of the 2 MW reactor at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2 MW Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission reactor is required to convert from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using a standard LEU fuel plate which is thinner and contains more U-235 than the current HEU plate. These differences, coupled with a desire to upgrade the characteristics and capability of the reactor, have resulted in core design studies and thermal hydraulic studies not only at the current 2 MW but also at the maximum power level of the reactor, 5 MW. In addition, during 23 years of operation, it has become clear that the main uses of the reactor have been neutron scattering and neutron activation analysis. The requirement to convert to LEU presents and opportunity to optimize the core for the utilization and to restudy the thermal hydraulics using modern techniques. This paper presents the current conclusions of both aspects. 2 refs., 9 figs.

DiMeglio, A.F.; Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.; Spring, E.F. (Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center; Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux beam reactor (HFBR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm{sup 3} in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept.

Pond, R. B.

1998-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Feasibility analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the LAUE Langivin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF).  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Reactor (RHF) of the Laue Langevin Institute (ILL) based in Grenoble, France is a research reactor designed primarily for neutron beam experiments for fundamental science. It delivers one of the most intense neutron fluxes worldwide, with an unperturbed thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s in its reflector. The reactor has been conceived to operate at a nuclear power of 57 MW but currently operates at 52 MW. The reactor currently uses a Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most worldwide research and test reactors have already started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the RHF. This report presents the results of reactor design, performance and steady state safety analyses for conversion of the RHF from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to show that is feasible, under a set of manufacturing assumptions, to design a new RHF fuel element that could safely replace the HEU element currently used. The new proposed design has been developed to maximize performance, minimize changes and preserve strong safety margins. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the RHF have been developed and qualified by benchmark against experiments and/or against other codes and models. The models developed were then used to evaluate the RHF performance if LEU UMo were to replace the current HEU fuel 'meat' without any geometric change to the fuel plates. Results of these direct replacement analyses have shown a significant degradation of the RHF performance, in terms of both neutron flux and cycle length. Consequently, ANL and ILL have collaborated to investigate alternative designs. A promising candidate design has been selected and studied, increasing the total amount of fuel without changing the external plate dimensions by relocating the burnable poison. In this way, changes required in the fuel element are reasonably small. With this new design, neutronics analyses have shown that performance could be maintained at a high level: 2 day decrease of cycle length (to 47.5 days at 58.3 MW) and 1-2% decrease of brightness in the cold and hot sources in comparison to the current typical operation. In addition, studies have shown that the thermal-hydraulic and shutdown margins for the proposed LEU design would satisfy technical specifications.

Stevens, J.; Tentner. A.; Bergeron, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

102

Brainwaves as a Biometric Parameter for Unique Identification and Authentication  

A number of biometric parameters exist for positive identification of individuals including, fingerprints, facial recognition, ear pattern, eye iris ...

103

PREPARING THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR FOR CONVERSION TO LOW ENRICHED URANIUM FUEL ? EXTENDING CYCLE BURNUP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor performance studies have been completed for conceptual plate designs and show that maintaining reactor performance while converting HFIR from high enriched to low enriched uranium (20 wt % 235U) fuel requires extending the end-of-life burnup value for HFIR fuel from the current nominal value of 2200 MWD to 2600 MWD. The current fuel fabrication procedure is discussed and changes that would be required to this procedure are identified. Design and safety related analyses that are required for the certification of a new fuel are identified. Qualification tests and comments regarding the regulatory approval process are provided along with a conceptual schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

On guided model-based analysis for ear biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ears are a new biometric with a major advantage in that they appear to maintain their structure with increasing age. Current approaches have exploited 2D and 3D images of the ear in human identification. Contending that the ear is mainly a planar shape ... Keywords: Biometrics, Ear biometrics, Ear embryology, Model-based analysis, Occlusion analysis

Banafshe Arbab-Zavar; Mark S. Nixon

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Qualification of JEFF3.1.1 library for high conversion reactor calculations using the ERASME/R experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With its low CO{sub 2} production, Nuclear Energy appears to be an efficient solution to the global warming due to green-house effect. However, current LWR reactors are poor uranium users and, pending the development of Fast Neutron Reactors, alternative concepts of PWR with higher conversion ratio (HCPWR) are being studied again at CEA, first studies dating from the middle 80's. In these French designs, low moderation ratio has been performed by tightening the lattice pitch, achieving a conversion ratio of 0.8-0.9 with a MOX fuel coming from PWR UOX recycling. Theses HCPWRs are characterized by a harder neutron spectrum and the calculation uncertainties on the fundamental neutronics parameters are increased by a factor 3 regarding a standard PWR lattice, due to the major contribution of the Plutonium isotopes and of the epithermal energy range to the reaction rates. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a 3-year experimental validation program called ERASME has been performed by CEA from 1984 to 1986 in the EOLE reactor. Monte Carlo analysis of the ERASME/R experiments with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI4 allowed the qualification of the recommended JEFF.3.1.1 library for major neutronics parameters. K{sub eff} of the MOX under-moderated lattice is over-predicted by 440 {+-} 830 pcm (2{sigma}); the conversion ratio, indicator of the good use of uranium, is also slightly over-predicted: 2 % {+-} 4 % (2{sigma}) and the same for B4C absorber rods worth and soluble boron worth, over-predicted by 2 %, both in the 2 standard deviations range. The radial fission maps of heterogeneities (water-holes, B4C and fertile rods) are well reproduced: maximal (C-E)/E dispersion is 1.3 %, maximal power peak error is 2.7 %. The void reactivity worth is the only parameter poorly calculated with an overprediction of +12.4% {+-} 1.5%. ERASME/R analysis of MOX reactivity, void effect and spectral indexes will contribute to the reevaluation of {sup 241}Am and Plutonium isotopes nuclear data for the next library JEFF3.2. (authors)

Vidal, J. F.; Noguere, G.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC/LEPh, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were solved by finite difference method. The solution of the model equations is complicated by the coupled reactions. At the inlet, if there is no hydrogen, rate expressions become singular. To overcome this problem, the first element of the reactor was treated as a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Several alternative numerical schemes were implemented in the solution algorithm to get a converged, stable solution. The model was also capable of handling steam-methane reforming reactions under non-membrane condition and equilibrium reaction conversions. Some of the numerical results were presented in the previous report. To test the membrane reactor model, we fabricated Pd-stainless steel membranes in tubular configuration using electroless plating method coupled with osmotic pressure. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the fabricated Pd-film composite membranes. Gas-permeation tests were performed to measure the permeability of hydrogen, nitrogen and helium using pure gas. The membranes showed excellent perm-selectivity for hydrogen. This makes the Pd-composite membrane attractive for selective separation and recovery of H{sub 2} from mixed gases at elevated temperature.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were solved by finite difference method. The solution of the model equations is complicated by the coupled reactions. At the inlet, if there is no hydrogen, rate expressions become singular. To overcome this problem, the first element of the reactor was treated as a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Several alternative numerical schemes were implemented in the solution algorithm to get a converged, stable solution. The model was also capable of handling steam-methane reforming reactions under non-membrane condition and equilibrium reaction conversions. Some of the numerical results were presented in the previous report. To test the membrane reactor model, we fabricated Pd-stainless steel membranes in tubular configuration using electroless plating method coupled with osmotic pressure. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Xray (EDX) were used to characterize the fabricated Pd-film composite membranes. Gas-permeation tests were performed to measure the permeability of hydrogen, nitrogen and helium using pure gas. Some of these results are discussed in this progress report.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

Advanced-fueled fusion reactors suitable for direct energy conversion. Fourth quarterly progress report: October 1976--December 1976 and first quarterly progress report: January 1977--March 1977  

SciTech Connect

The direct energy conversion efficiencies calculated for Cat-D and D-/sup 3/He fueled Tokamak reactors are summarized over a range of reactor designs, collector configurations, assumed T/sub e//T/sub i/ ratios, and power densities. The performance of a system of superconducting coils that produce those fields required to guide escaping plasma along the path between the bundle divertor coils and the direct converter is also discussed.

Blum, A.S. (ed.)

1977-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Technology of direct conversion for mirror reactor end-loss plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design concepts are presented for plasma direct convertors (PDC) intended primarily for use on the end-loss plasma from tandem-mirror reactors. Recent experimental results confirm most of these design concepts. Both a one-stage and a two-stage PDC were tested in reactor-like conditions using a 100-kV, 6-kW ion beam. In a separate test on the end of the TMX machine, a single stage PDC recovered 79 W for a net efficiency of 50%. Tandem mirror devices are well suited to PDC. The high minimum energy of the end-loss ions, the magnetic expansion outside the mirrors, and the vacuum conditions in the end tanks required by the confined plasma, all preexist. The inclusion of a PDC is therefore a rather small addition. These facts and the scale parameters for a PDC are discussed.

Barr, W.L.; Moir, R.W.

1980-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gas-phase chemistry during the conversion of cyclohexane to carbon: Flow reactor studies at low and intermediate pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas-phase branching during the conversion of cyclohexane to solid carbon has been measured in a high-temperature-flow reactor. The experiments show that cyclohexane decomposes into a broad distribution of hydrocarbons that further decompose into the more kinetically stable products hydrogen, methane, acetylene, ethylene, benzene, and PAH. At 1363 K, the evolution to these species occurs quickly. We also observe the buildup of significant amounts of aromatic molecules at later stages in the decomposition, with as much as 15% of the total carbon in PAH and 25% in benzene. At later stages, the gas-phase molecules react slowly, even though the system is not at equilibrium, because of their kinetic stability and the smaller radical pool. The decomposition does not appear to depend sensitively on pressure in the regime of 25 to 250 torr. Thus, to a first approximation, these results can be extrapolated to atmospheric pressure.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Larson, R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Lunar Nuclear Power Plant With Solid Core Reactor, Heatpipes and Thermoelectric Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a lunar nuclear power plant with the advantages of minimum mass, with no moving parts, no pumped liquid coolant, a solid metal rugged core, with no single point of failure. The electrical output is 100 kilowatts with a 500 kilowatt thermal reactor. The thermoelectric converters surround the potassium heatpipes from the core and water heatpipes surround the converter and connect to the radiator. The solid core reactor is made from HT9 alloy. The fuel is uranium oxide with 90% enrichment. The thermoelectric converter is bonded to the outside of the 1.10 inch ID heat pipe and is 30 inches long. The thermoelectric couple is Si/SiGe-Si/SiC Quantum Well with over 20% efficiency with an 890 K hot side and a 490 K cold side and produces 625 Watts. 176 converters produce 110 kWe. With less than 10% loss in controls this yields 100 kWe for use. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is designed and fabricated by HIPing to keep brittle materials in compression and to ensure conductivity. The solid core is fabricated by machining the heatpipe tubes with 6 grooves that are diffusion bonded together by HIPing to form the fuel tubes. The maximum temperature of the heat pipes is 940 K and the return flow temperature is 890 K. The reactor core is hexagonal shaped, 61 cm. wide and 76.2 cm high with 12 rotating control drums surrounding it. There is shielding to protect components and human habitation. The radiator is daisy shaped at 45 degrees with each petal 5.5 meters long. The design life is ten years.

Sayre, Edwin D. [Engineering Consultant, 218 Brooke Acres Drive, Los Gatos, CA 95032 (United States); Ring, Peter J. [Advanced Methods and Materials, 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Rd. Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Brown, Neil [Engineering Consultant, 5134 Cordoy Lane, San Jose, CA 95124 (United States); Elsner, Norbert B.; Bass, John C. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., 7606 Miramar Rd. Suite 7400, San Diego, CA 92126 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons for the IR-8 research reactor were made for HEU(90%), HEU(36%), and LEU (19.75%) fuel assembly (FA) designs using three dimensional multi-group diffusion theory models benchmarked to detailed Monte Carlo models of the reactor. Comparisons were made of changes in reactivity, cycle length, average {sup 235}U discharge burnup, thermal neutron flux, and control rod worths for the 90% and 36% enriched IRT-3M fuel assembly and the 19.75% enriched IRT-4M fuel assembly with the same fuel management strategy. The results of these comparisons showed that a uranium density of 3.5 g/cm{sup 3} in the fuel meat would be required in the LEU IRT-4M fuel assembly to match the cycle length of the HEU(90%) IRT-3M FA and an LEU density of 3.7 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU(36%) IRT-3M FA.

Deen, J. R.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm{sup 3} or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study.

Hanan, N. A.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

Neutronic safety and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Kinetic parameters, isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients and three transients for the IR-8 research reactor cores loaded with either HEU(90%), HEU(36%), or LEU (19.75%) fuel assemblies (FA) were calculated using three dimensional diffusion theory flux solutions, RELAP5/MOD3.2 and PARET. The prompt neutron generation time and effective delayed neutron fractions were calculated for fresh and beginning-of-equilibrium-cycle cores. Isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated for changes in coolant density, coolant temperature and fuel temperature in fresh and equilibrium cores. These kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients were used in transient analysis models to predict power histories, and peak fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. The transients modeled were a rapid and slow loss-of-flow, a slow reactivity insertion, and a fast reactivity insertion.

Deen, J. R.; Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.; Egorenkov, P. M.; Nasonov, V. A.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

115

Dual bed reactor for the study of catalytic biomass tars conversion  

SciTech Connect

A dual fixed bed laboratory scale set up has been used to compare the activity of a novel Rh/LaCoO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst to that of dolomite, olivine and Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, typical catalysts used in fluidized bed biomass gasification, to convert tars produced during biomass devolatilization stage. The experimental apparatus allows the catalyst to be operated under controlled conditions of temperature and with a real gas mixture obtained by the pyrolysis of the biomass carried out in a separate fixed bed reactor operated under a selected and controlled heating up rate. The proposed catalyst exhibits much better performances than conventional catalysts tested. It is able to completely convert tars and also to strongly decrease coke formation due to its good redox properties. (author)

Ammendola, P.; Piriou, B.; Lisi, L.; Ruoppolo, G.; Chirone, R.; Russo, G. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace several obsolete components of the current analytical tool set used for ATR neutronics support. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). It will also greatly facilitate the LEU conversion effort, since the upgraded computational capabilities are now at a stage where they can be, and in fact have been, used for the required physics analysis from the beginning. In this context, extensive scoping neutronics analyses were completed for six preconceptual candidate LEU fuel element designs for the ATR (and for its companion critical facility, ATRC). Of these, four exhibited neutronics performance in what is believed to be an acceptable range. However, there are currently some concerns with regard to fabricability and mechanical performance that have emerged for one of the four latter concepts. Thus three concepts have been selected for more comprehensive conceptual design analysis during the upcoming fiscal year.

David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Millimeter-Wave Remote Biometric Identification and Tracking...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Multimedia Bookmark and Share Millimeter-Wave Remote Biometric Identification and Tracking (RBIT) System for Security Applications Argonne National Laboratory and Northwestern...

118

Brainwaves as a Biometric Parameter for Unique Identification ...  

of a person’s identity including federal/state/local government and financial institutions. ... E-mail: simsdl@ornl.gov Brainwaves as a Biometric Parameter for

119

Feature level fusion of face and palmprint biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a feature level fusion of face and palmprint biometrics. It uses the improved K-medoids clustering algorithm and isomorphic graph. The performance of the system has been verified by two distance metrics namely, K-NN and normalized ... Keywords: Ffeature level fusion, K-medoids artitioning algorithm, biometrics, face, isomorphic graph, palmprint

Dakshina Ranjan Kisku; Phalguni Gupta; Jamuna Kanta Sing

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biometric verification/identification based on hands natural layout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a hand biometric system for verification and recognition purposes is presented. The method is based on three keys. Firstly, the system is based on using a Natural Reference System (NRS) defined on the hand's natural layout. Consequently, ... Keywords: Biometric systems, Hand geometry, Invariant features, Security, Similarity

Miguel Adán; Antonio Adán; Andrés S. Vázquez; Roberto Torres

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Minutiae feature analysis for infrared hand vein pattern biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel technique to analyze the infrared vein patterns in the back of the hand for biometric purposes. The technique utilizes the minutiae features extracted from the vein patterns for recognition, which include bifurcation points ... Keywords: Biometrics, Infrared, Minutiae, Vein pattern

Lingyu Wang; Graham Leedham; David Siu-Yeung Cho

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

An integration of biometrics and mobile computing for personal identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new approach to efficient and effective personal identification for the security of network access by combining techniques in biometrics and mobile computing. To overcome the limitations of the existing password-based authentication ... Keywords: biometrics computing, feature extraction and indexing, guided search, identity authentication and verification, mobile computing

J. You; K. H. Cheung; Q. Li; P. Bhattacharya

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Cross section generation and physics modeling in a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study has been initiated at ORNL to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The current study is limited to steady-state, nominal operation and are focused on the determination of the fuel requirements, primarily density, that are required to maintain the performance of the reactor. Reactor physics analyses are reported for a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. An LEU core design has been obtained and requires an increase in {sup 235}U loading of a factor of 1.9 over the current HEU fuel. These initial results indicate that the conversion from HEU to LEU results in a reduction of the thermal fluxes in the central flux trap region of approximately 9 % and in the outer beryllium reflector region of approximately 15%. Ongoing work is being performed to improve upon this initial design to further minimize the impact of conversion to LEU fuel. (authors)

Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density… (more)

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application this new development. We designed and built a membrane reactor to study the reforming reaction. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was developed to study the performance of the membrane reactor parametrically. The important results are presented in this report.

Shamsuddin Illias

2002-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

China National BodyChina National Body ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 37 BiometricsISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 37 Biometrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 China National BodyChina National Body ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 37 BiometricsISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 37 Biometrics London. July 10, 2006London. July 10, 2006 Biometrics in ChinaBiometrics in China ­­ A National Activity ReportA National Activity Report ChinaChina''s Participation in SC37s Participation in SC37 Joined

Li, Stan Z.

127

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application this new development. To have better understanding of the membrane reactor, during this reporting period, we developed a two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model for steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in a tubular membrane reactor. In numerical solution of the reactor model equations, numerical difficulties were encountered and we seeking alternative solution techniques to overcome the problem.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

128

Plant Design and Cost Estimation of a Natural Circulation Lead-Bismuth Reactor with Helium Power Conversion Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of an indirect helium power conversion system with lead-bismuth natural circulation primary system has been performed. The work of this report is focused on 1) identifying the allowable design region for the ...

Kim, D.

129

Plant Design and Cost Estimation of a Natural Circulation Lead-Bismuth Reactor with Steam Power Conversion Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of an indirect steam power conversion system with lead-bismuth natural circulation primary system has been performed. The work of this report is focused on 1) identifying the allowable design region for the ...

Kim, D.

130

Biometric cryptosystem based on discretized fingerprint texture descriptors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on a biometric cryptosystem implementation and evaluation based on a number of fingerprint texture descriptors. The texture descriptors, namely, the Gabor filter-based FingerCode, a local binary pattern (LBP), and a local direction ... Keywords: BCH, BPA, Biometric discretization, DROBA, ECC, EER, Error-correcting code, FAR, FCS, FRR, Fingerprint texture descriptors, Fuzzy commitment scheme, GAR, LBP, LCM, LDP, LDPC, LDerivP, Local binary pattern, MPA, PEG, ROI, SPA

Yadigar Imamverdiyev; Andrew Beng Jin Teoh; Jaihie Kim

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density monolithic UMo fuel. The design of an optimum LEU core for the ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. Prior studies have shown that the MITR will be able to ...

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

Roman, W.G.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

134

Enhanced homeland security and disaster emergency operations based on biometrics and RFID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods that enhance homeland security and disaster emergency operations through biometrics and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) were studied. Biometrics can be used in visas and e-passports for border security, identity verification at airports, ...

Lidong Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Conceptual design analysis of an MHD power conversion system for droplet-vapor core reactors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A nuclear driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator system is proposed for the space nuclear applications of few hundreds of megawatts. The MHD generator is coupled to a vapor-droplet core reactor that delivers partially ionized fissioning plasma at temperatures in range of 3,000 to 4,000 K. A detailed MHD model is developed to analyze the basic electrodynamics phenomena and to perform the design analysis of the nuclear driven MHD generator. An incompressible quasi one dimensional model is also developed to perform parametric analyses.

Anghaie, S.; Saraph, G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

EVALUATION OF CORE PHYSICS ANALYSIS METHODS FOR CONVERSION OF THE INL ADVANCED TEST REACTOR TO LOW-ENRICHMENT FUEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR.

Mark DeHart; Gray S. Chang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evaluation of core physics analysis methods for conversion of the INL advanced test reactor to low-enrichment fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR. (authors)

DeHart, M. D.; Chang, G. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Street, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ON CONSISTENT FUSION OF MULTIMODAL BIOMETRICS Dept. of Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON CONSISTENT FUSION OF MULTIMODAL BIOMETRICS S. Y. Kung Dept. of Electrical Engineering Princeton feasible. Therefore, multi-modality adaptive fusion, combining audio and visual information, offers architecture. In addition, a consistent fusion strategy is in- troduced as a baseline fusion scheme, which

Mak, Man-Wai

139

Validation of the MULCH-II code for thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the MIT research reactor conversion to LEU  

SciTech Connect

An in-house thermal hydraulics code was developed for the steady-state and loss of primary flow analysis of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR). This code is designated as MULti-CHannel-II or MULCH-II. The MULCH-II code is being used for the MITR LEU conversion design study. Features of the MULCH-II code include a multi-channel analysis, the capability to model the transition from forced to natural convection during a loss of primary flow transient, and the ability to calculate safety limits and limiting safety system settings for licensing applications. This paper describes the validation of the code against PLTEMP/ANL 3.0 for steady-state analysis, and against RELAP5-3D for loss of primary coolant transient analysis. Coolant temperature measurements obtained from loss of primary flow transients as part of the MITR-II startup testing were also used for validating this code. The agreement between MULCH-II and the other computer codes is satisfactory. (author)

Ko, Y.-C. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hu, L.-W. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)], E-mail: lwhu@mit.edu; Olson, Arne P.; Dunn, Floyd E. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Validation of the MULCH-II code for thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the MIT research reactor conversion to LEU.  

SciTech Connect

An in-house thermal hydraulics code was developed for the steady-state and loss of primary flow analysis of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR). This code is designated as MULti-CHannel-II or MULCH-II. The MULCH-II code is being used for the MITR LEU conversion design study. Features of the MULCH-II code include a multi-channel analysis, the capability to model the transition from forced to natural convection during a loss of primary flow transient, and the ability to calculate safety limits and limiting safety system settings for licensing applications. This paper describes the validation of the code against PLTEMP/ANL 3.0 for steady-state analysis, and against RELAP5-3D for loss of primary coolant transient analysis. Coolant temperature measurements obtained from loss of primary flow transients as part of the MITR-II startup testing were also used for validating this code. The agreement between MULCH-II and the other computer codes is satisfactory.

Ko, Y. C.; Hu, L. W.; Olson, A. P.; Dunn, F. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; MIT

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Influence of CO Conversion on Selectivities H2/CO Usage Ratios and Catalyst Stability for a 0.27 percent Ru 25 percent Co/Al2O3 using a Slurry Phase Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The effect of CO conversion on hydrocarbon selectivities (i.e., CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, olefin and paraffin), H{sub 2}/CO usage ratios, CO{sub 2} selectivity, and catalyst stability over a wide range of CO conversion (12-94%) on 0.27%Ru-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied under the conditions of 220 C, 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 2.1 and gas space velocities of 0.3-15 NL/g-cat/h in a 1-L continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Catalyst samples were withdrawn from the CSTR at different CO conversion levels, and Co phases (Co, CoO) in the slurry samples were characterized by XANES, and in the case of the fresh catalysts, EXAFS as well. Ru was responsible for increasing the extent of Co reduction, thus boosting the active site density. At 1%Ru loading, EXAFS indicates that coordination of Ru at the atomic level was virtually solely with Co. It was found that the selectivities to CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, and CO{sub 2} on the Co catalyst are functions of CO conversion. At high CO conversions, i.e. above 80%, CH{sub 4} selectivity experienced a change in the trend, and began to increase, and CO{sub 2} selectivity experienced a rapid increase. H{sub 2}/CO usage ratio and olefin content were found to decrease with increasing CO conversion in the range of 12-94%. The observed results are consistent with water reoxidation of Co during FTS at high conversion. XANES spectroscopy of used catalyst samples displayed spectra consistent with the presence of more CoO at higher CO conversion levels.

W Ma; G Jacobs; Y Ji; T Bhatelia; D Bukur; S Khalid; B Davis

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

A user-specific and selective multimodal biometric fusion strategy by ranking subjects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recognition performance of a biometric system varies significantly from one enrolled user to another. As a result, there is a need to tailor the system to each user. This study investigates a relatively new fusion strategy that is both user-specific ... Keywords: Biometrics, Client specific fusion, Doddington's Zoo, Fusion, Multibiometrics, User-specific fusion

Norman Poh, Arun Ross, Weifeng Lee, Josef Kittler

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Biological conversion of synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A continuous stirred tank reactor with and without sulfur recovery has been operated using Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum for the conversion of H[sub 2]S to elemental sulfur. In operating the reactor system with sulfur recovery, a gas retention time of 40 min was required to obtain a 100 percent conversion of H[sub 2]S to elemental sulfur. Essentially no SO[sub 4][sup 2[minus

Clausen, E.C.

1993-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Unit Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unit Conversion. ... Unit Conversion Example. "If you have an amount of unit of A, how much is that in unit B?"; Dimensional Analysis; ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

145

Low power data acquisition for microImplant biometric monitoring of tremors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide doctors a means to continuously monitor biometrics over long time scales ...

Khanna, Tania

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Conversion Factor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed... 1,110 1,106 1,105 1,106 1,109 Extraction Loss ......

148

Development of the Process for the Recovery and Conversion of {sup 233}UF{sub 6} Chemisorbed in NaF Traps from the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is being cleaned up and remediated. The removal of {approx}37 kg of fissile {sup 233}U is the main activity. Of that inventory, {approx}23 kg has already been removed as UF{sub 6} from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is in temporary storage while it awaits conversion to a stable oxide. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}), which is suitable for long-term storage.The conversion of the MSRE material into an oxide presents unique problems, such as criticality concerns, a large radiation field caused by the daughters of {sup 232}U (an impurity isotope in the {sup 233}U), and the possible spread of the high-radiation field from the release of {sup 220}Rn gas. To overcome these problems, a novel process was conceived and developed. This process was specially tailored for providing remote operations inside a hot cell while maintaining full containment at all times to avoid the spread of contamination. This process satisfies criticality concerns, maximizes the recovery of uranium, minimizes any radiation exposure to operators, and keeps waste disposal to a minimum.

Cul, Guillermo D. del; Icenhour, Alan S.; Simmons, Darrell W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assumptions and criteria for performing a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the operating power for the High Flux Isotope Reactor when fuelled with low enriched uranium (LEU). Uncertainties in the fuel fabrication and inspection processes are reviewed for the current fuel cycle [highly enriched uranium (HEU)] and the impact of these uncertainties on the proposed LEU fuel cycle operating power is discussed. These studies indicate that for the power distribution presented in a companion paper in these proceedings, the operating power for an LEU cycle would be close to the current operating power. (authors)

Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6399 (United States); Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Moses, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6050 (United States); Binder, J. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6162 (United States); Xoubi, N. [Univ. of Cincinnati, Rhodes Hall, ML 72, PO Box 210072, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Gaze Estimation for Off-Angle Iris Recognition Based on the Biometric Eye Model  

SciTech Connect

Iris recognition is among the highest accuracy biometrics. However, its accuracy relies on controlled high quality capture data and is negatively affected by several factors such as angle, occlusion, and dilation. Non-ideal iris recognition is a new research focus in biometrics. In this paper, we present a gaze estimation method designed for use in an off-angle iris recognition framework based on the ANONYMIZED biometric eye model. Gaze estimation is an important prerequisite step to correct an off-angle iris images. To achieve the accurate frontal reconstruction of an off-angle iris image, we first need to estimate the eye gaze direction from elliptical features of an iris image. Typically additional information such as well-controlled light sources, head mounted equipment, and multiple cameras are not available. Our approach utilizes only the iris and pupil boundary segmentation allowing it to be applicable to all iris capture hardware. We compare the boundaries with a look-up-table generated by using our biologically inspired biometric eye model and find the closest feature point in the look-up-table to estimate the gaze. Based on the results from real images, the proposed method shows effectiveness in gaze estimation accuracy for our biometric eye model with an average error of approximately 3.5 degrees over a 50 degree range.

Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Barstow, Del R [ORNL; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Thompson, Joseph W [ORNL; Bolme, David S [ORNL; Boehnen, Chris Bensing [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8})], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

Del Cul, G.D.

2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

Apparatus and method for improving electrostatic precipitator performance by plasma reactor conversion of SO.sub.2 to SO.sub.3  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and process that utilize a low temperature nonequilibrium plasma reactor, for improving the particulate removal efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are disclosed. A portion of the flue gas, that contains a low level of SO.sub.2 O.sub.2 H.sub.2 O, and particulate matter, is passed through a low temperature plasma reactor, which defines a plasma volume, thereby oxidizing a portion of the SO.sub.2 present in the flue gas into SO.sub.3. An SO.sub.2 rich flue gas is thereby generated. The SO.sub.3 rich flue gas is then returned to the primary flow of the flue gas in the exhaust treatment system prior to the ESP. This allows the SO.sub.3 to react with water to form H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 that is in turn is absorbed by fly ash in the gas stream in order to improve the removal efficiency of the EPS.

Huang, Hann-Sheng (Darien, IL); Gorski, Anthony J. (Woodridge, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Biometrics Technology and the New Economy: A Review of the Field and the Case of the United Arab Emirates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, biometrics technology has evolved from a technology used primarily in forensics and a narrow scientific and technological field to an indispensable technology in public and private sectors expanding into areas calling for advanced ... Keywords: Biometrics, Digital Economy, Digital Society, Identity Management, United Arab Emirates

Ali M. Al-Khouri

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A TWO-LEVEL FUSION APPROACH TO MULTIMODAL BIOMETRIC VERIFICATION Ming-Cheung Cheung, Man-Wai Mak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A TWO-LEVEL FUSION APPROACH TO MULTIMODAL BIOMETRIC VERIFICATION Ming-Cheung Cheung, Man-Wai Mak This paper proposes a two-level fusion strategy for audio-visual biometric authentication. Specifically, fusion is performed at two levels: intramodal and intermodal. In intramodal fusion, the scores

Mak, Man-Wai

156

Content-based image retrieval approach for biometric security using colour, texture and shape features controlled by fuzzy heuristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss a new content-based image retrieval approach for biometric security, which is based on colour, texture and shape features and controlled by fuzzy heuristics. The proposed approach is based on the three well-known algorithms: ... Keywords: Biometric security, Colour histogram, Image retrieval, Moment invariant

Kashif Iqbal; Michael O. Odetayo; Anne James

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Conversion Tables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Contents taken from Glossary: Carbon Dioxide and Climate, 1990. ORNL/CDIAC-39, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Third Edition. Edited by: Fred O'Hara Jr. 1 - International System of Units (SI) Prefixes 2 - Useful Quantities in CO2 3 - Common Conversion Factors 4 - Common Energy Unit Conversion Factors 5 - Geologic Time Scales 6 - Factors and Units for Calculating Annual CO2 Emissions Using Global Fuel Production Data Table 1. International System of Units (SI) Prefixes Prefix SI Symbol Multiplication Factor exa E 1018 peta P 1015 tera T 1012 giga G 109 mega M 106 kilo k 103 hecto h 102 deka da 10 deci d 10-1 centi c 10-2

158

Precious Metals Conversion Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precious Metals Conversion Information. The Office of Weights and Measures (OWM) has prepared a Conversion Factors ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

159

Improving verification accuracy by synthesis of locally enhanced biometric images and deformable model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a 2-stage preprocessing framework which consists of image enhancement and deformation techniques to increase the verification performance of image-based biometric systems. In the preprocessing framework, first the quality of ... Keywords: Deformation, Face recognition, Iris recognition, Phase congruency, Quality enhancement, Support vector machine

Richa Singh; Mayank Vatsa; Afzel Noore

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Context: Destruction/Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Context: Destruction/Conversion. ... Process for Conversion of Halon 1211.. Tran, R.; Kennedy, EM; Dlugogorski, BZ; 2000. ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fast computation of the performance evaluation of biometric systems: application to multibiometric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance evaluation of biometric systems is a crucial step when designing and evaluating such systems. The evaluation process uses the Equal Error Rate (EER) metric proposed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO/IEC). The EER metric is a powerful metric which allows easily comparing and evaluating biometric systems. However, the computation time of the EER is, most of the time, very intensive. In this paper, we propose a fast method which computes an approximated value of the EER. We illustrate the benefit of the proposed method on two applications: the computing of non parametric confidence intervals and the use of genetic algorithms to compute the parameters of fusion functions. Experimental results show the superiority of the proposed EER approximation method in term of computing time, and the interest of its use to reduce the learning of parameters with genetic algorithms. The proposed method opens new perspectives for the development of secure multibiometrics systems by speedi...

Giot, Romain; Rosenberger, Christophe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Research Reactor Conversion | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

163

EER of fixed and trainable fusion classifiers: A theoretical study with application to biometric authentication tasks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biometric authentication is a process of verifying an identity claim using a person’s behavioural and physiological characteristics. Due to the vulnerability of the system to environmental noise and variation caused by the user, fusion of several biometric-enabled systems is identified as a promising solution. In the literature, various fixed rules (e.g. min, max, median, mean) and trainable classifiers (e.g. linear combination of scores or weighted sum) are used to combine the scores of several base-systems. How exactly do correlation and imbalance nature of base-system performance affect the fixed rules and trainable classifiers? We study these joint aspects using the commonly used error measurement in biometric authentication, namely Equal Error Rate (EER). Similar to several previous studies in the literature, the central assumption used here is that the class-dependent scores of a biometric system are approximately normally distributed. However, different from them, the novelty of this study is to make a direct link between the EER measure and the fusion schemes mentioned. Both synthetic and real experiments (with as many as 256 fusion experiments carried out on the XM2VTS benchmark score-level fusion data sets) verify our proposed theoretical modeling of EER of the two families of combination scheme. In particular, it is found that weighted sum can provide the best generalisation performance when its weights are estimated correctly. It also has the additional advantage that score normalisation prior to fusion is not needed, contrary to the rest of fixed fusion rules.

Norman Poh; Samy Bengio

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Methods for using a biometric parameter in the identification of persons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Brain waves are used as a biometric parameter to provide for authentication and identification of personnel. The brain waves are sampled using EEG equipment and are processed using phase-space distribution functions to compare digital signature data from enrollment of authorized individuals to data taken from a test subject to determine if the data from the test subject matches the signature data to a degree to support positive identification.

Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mobile biometric device (MBD) technology : summary of selected first responder experiences in pilot projects.  

SciTech Connect

Mobile biometric devices (MBDs) capable of both enrolling individuals in databases and performing identification checks of subjects in the field are seen as an important capability for military, law enforcement, and homeland security operations. The technology is advancing rapidly. The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate through an Interagency Agreement with Sandia sponsored a series of pilot projects to obtain information for the first responder law enforcement community on further identification of requirements for mobile biometric device technology. Working with 62 different jurisdictions, including components of the Department of Homeland Security, Sandia delivered a series of reports on user operation of state-of-the-art mobile biometric devices. These reports included feedback information on MBD usage in both operational and exercise scenarios. The findings and conclusions of the project address both the limitations and possibilities of MBD technology to improve operations. Evidence of these possibilities can be found in the adoption of this technology by many agencies today and the cooperation of several law enforcement agencies in both participating in the pilot efforts and sharing of information about their own experiences in efforts undertaken separately.

Aldridge, Chris D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

Control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide power conversion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-C02) recompression cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples well to numerous advanced nuclear reactor designs. This thesis investigates the dynamic simulation ...

Carstens, Nathan, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W _7405-eng- 4B QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvint r UCRL-9 533 QUANrUM CONVERSION IN PHWOSYNTHESIS * Melvinitself. The primary quantum conversion act is an ionization

Calvin, Melvin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fuel Reformation: Microchannel Reactor Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel processing is used to extract hydrogen from conventional vehicle fuel and allow fuel cell powered vehicles to use the existing petroleum fuel infrastructure. Kilowatt scale micro-channel steam reforming, water-gas shift and preferential oxida-tion reactors have been developed capable of achieving DOE required system performance metrics. Use of a microchannel design effectively supplies heat to the highly endothermic steam reforming reactor to maintain high conversions, controls the temperature profile for the exothermic water gas shift reactor, which optimizes the overall reaction conversion, and removes heat to prevent the unwanted hydrogen oxidation in the prefer-ential oxidation reactor. The reactors combined with micro-channel heat exchangers, when scaled to a full sized 50 kWe automotive system, will be less than 21 L in volume and 52 kg in weight.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Davis, James M.; Fischer, Christopher M.; King, David L.; Pederson, Larry R.; Rawlings, Gregg C.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Produced Conversion Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical conversion coatings are commonly applied to Mg alloys as paint bases and in some cases as stand-alone protection. Traditional conversion coatings ...

171

Library Conversion Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Library Conversion Tool. ... The LIB2NIST mass spectral data conversion program consists of the following files (which are contained in a ZIP archive): ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

172

Conversion of Legacy Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion of Legacy Data. Conversion of legacy data can be one of the most difficult and challenging components in an SGML environment. ...

173

Biofuel Conversion Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The conversion of biomass solids into liquid or gaseous biofuels is a complex process. Today, the most common conversion processes are biochemical- and thermochemical-based. However, researchers...

174

Thermochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art thermochemical conversion pilot plant includes several configurable, complementary unit operations for testing and developing various reactors, filters, catalysts, and other unit operations. NREL engineers and scientists as well as clients can test new processes and feedstocks in a timely, cost-effective, and safe manner to obtain extensive performance data on processes or equipment.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Conversion Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conversion Plan Conversion Plan This template is used to document the conversion plan that clearly defines the system or project's conversion procedures; outlines the installation...

176

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

177

Membrane reactor advantages for methanol reforming and similar reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membrane reactors achieve efficiencies by combining in one unit a reactor that generates a product with a semipermeable membrane that extracts it. One well-known benefit of this is greater conversion, as removal of a product drives reactions toward completion, but there are several potentially larger advantages that have been largely ignored. Because a membrane reactor tends to limit the partial pressure of the extracted product, it fundamentally changes the way that total pressure in the reactor affects equilibrium conversion. Thus, many gas-phase reactions that are preferentially performed at low pressures in a conventional reactor are found to have maximum conversion at high pressures in a membrane reactor. These higher pressures and reaction conversions allow greatly enhanced product extraction as well. Further, membrane reactors provide unique opportunities for temperature management which have not been discussed previously. These benefits are illustrated for methanol reforming to hydrogen for use with PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane) fuel cells.

Buxbaum, R.E. [REB Research and Consulting Co., Ferndale, MI (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

179

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT, FEBRUARY 1961  

SciTech Connect

Design, development, and testing efforts were continued on BORAX-V, EBR- I, EBR-II, EBWR, JUGGERNAUT ZPRIII, ZPR-VI, and ZPR-W. An evaluation program is outlined for Pebble Bed Reactor designs. Fast and thermal reactor safety studies were conducted. Experimental and theoretical studies in applied nuclear and reactor physics are dsscribed. Developments made in reactor components, fuels, and materials are discussed. Heat engineering studies were conducted on steam separation, and velocity and void distributions in two-phase systems. Fluidization and fluoride volatility separation, and chemical-metallurgical separation processes were studied. Advanced reactor concepts that were discusssd includsed. Basic Radiation Effects Beactor, Biogeonuclear Reactor, Fast Reactor Test Facility, compact high-power density fast reactors, AHFR hydraulic test loop, Packed Bed Reactor, and direct conversion. (For preceding period see ANL- 6328.) (B.O.G.)

1961-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Physics problems of thermonuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

From topical conference on energy; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (Nov 1973). A problem common to all controlled fusion reactors is that of the burning deuterium --tritium fuel under conditions of plasma confinement which approach the ideal limit as nearly as possible. After ignitlon, the balance between alpha- particle energy deposition and plasma losses (radiation plus thermal and particle diffusion) determines the stability or instability of the burn in toroidal systems. Tokamak systems are described both with unstable, injection-regulated burn cycles and stabilized steady-state burn conditions. In the theta-pinch reactor an unstable burn occurs, some, what regulated by high-beta plasma expansion, which is quenched by a programmed plasma decompression. The plasma expansion during the constant-pressure burn provides direct'' conversion of plasma thermonuclear heat to electrical output, in addition to the electrical power derived from the neutron energy through conventional thermal conversion equipment. The open-ended mirror reactor is characterized by a direct conversion system for recovering end-loss plasma energy and converting it to electrical energy for reinjection into the plasma. This allows a favorable reactor energy balance and an amplification factor Q (= thermonuclear energy output/injected plasma energy) which is compatible with classical collisional losses. For the three reactor types considered the ramifications of burn and confinement conditions for reactor configuration, energy balance, economy, fuel handling, materials problems, and environmentalradiological factors are considered. (auth)

Ribe, F.L.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Conversion Between Implicit - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion Between Implicit and Parametric Representation of Differential Varieties. Xiao-Shan Gao, Institute of Systems Science, Chinese Academy of ...

182

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

183

Fusion reactor design studies. [ARIES Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources. (LSP)

Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

DNA Biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... presentation at Advances in Forensic DNA Analysis workshop held at the American Academy of Forensic Sciences meeting (Seattle, WA), February ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Biometric Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Component fault replacement – Decommissioning • Issues for large scale, long-lived systems – Technology refresh – hardware and software ...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

Biometrics Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... And we want to thank all the federal agencies that have worked with us on this project, especially DARPA and the US Navy, which allowed us to ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Biometric Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Questions to be addressed include: has face recognition technology performance improved by an order of magnitude since the last formal ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy Basics: Biofuel Conversion Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Biofuel Conversion Processes Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biofuel Conversion Processes The conversion of...

189

Beneficial Conversion Features or Contingently Adjustable Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. An entity may issue convertible debt with an embedded conversion option that is required to be bifurcated under Statement 133 if all of the conditions in paragraph 12 of that Statement are met. An embedded conversion option that initially requires separate Copyright © 2008, Financial Accounting Standards Board Not for redistribution Page 1accounting as a derivative under Statement 133 may subsequently no longer meet the conditions that would require separate accounting as a derivative. A reassessment of whether an embedded conversion option must be bifurcated under Statement 133 is required each reporting period. When an entity is no longer required to bifurcate a conversion option pursuant to Statement 133, there are differing views on how an entity should recognize that change.

Bifurcation Criteria; Fasb Statement No; Stock Purchase Warrants

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Iterated multidimensional wave conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

Brizard, A. J. [Dept. Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D. [Dept. Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Kaufman, A. N. [LBNL and Physics Dept., UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, A. S. [T-5, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zobin, N. [Dept. Mathematics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Planning Document for an NBSR Conversion Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR). The NBSR is a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a planning document for the conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to, and approved by, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before the reactor could be converted.This report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis herein is on the SAR chapters that require significant changes as a result of conversion, primarily Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis. The document provides information on the proposed design for the LEU fuel elements and identifies what information is still missing. This document is intended to assist ongoing fuel development efforts, and to provide a platform for the development of the final conversion SAR. This report contributes directly to the reactor conversion pillar of the GTRI program, but also acts as a boundary condition for the fuel development and fuel fabrication pillars.

Diamond D. J.; Baek J.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on a mechanism for oxygen transport through mixed- oxide conductors as used in dense ceramic membrane reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to syngas (CO and H{sub 2}). The in-situ separation of O{sub 2} from air by the membrane reactor saves the costly cryogenic separation step that is required in conventional syngas production. The mixed oxide of choice is SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x}, which exhibits high oxygen permeability and has been shown in previous studies to possess high stability in both oxidizing and reducing conditions; in addition, it can be readily formed into reactor configurations such as tubes. An understanding of the electrical properties and the defect dynamics in this material is essential and will help us to find the optimal operating conditions for the conversion reactor. In this paper, we discuss the conductivities of the SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} system that are dependent on temperature and partial pressure of oxygen. Based on the experimental results, a defect model is proposed to explain the electrical properties of this system. The oxygen permeability of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} is estimated by using conductivity data and is compared with that obtained from methane conversion reaction.

Balachandran, U.; Mieville, R.L.; Ma, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Udovich, C.A. [Amoco Oil Co., Naperville, IL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Polymeric and Conversion Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Ongoing research reveals that the search for appropriate conversion ... of the coated alloy was ~ 250 mV more noble compared to bare alloy.

194

QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Januaryas it occurs in modern photosynthesis can only take place inof the problem or photosynthesis, or any specific aspect of

Calvin, Melvin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Catalytic conversion of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Catalytic processes for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels have gained an increasing attention in sustainable energy production. The biomass can be converted to… (more)

Calleja Aguado, Raquel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

Daniels, F.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Numerical simulations of ion transport membrane oxy-fuel reactors for CO? capture applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the key features of oxygen permeation and hydrocarbon conversion in ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors. ITM reactors have been suggested as a novel technology to enable ...

Hong, Jongsup

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Mode conversion studies in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

Mode converted Ion Bernstein Waves (IBW) have important potential applications in tokamak reactors. These applications include on or off axis electron heating and current drive and the channeling of alpha particle power for both current drive and increased reactivity. Efficient mode conversion electron heating with a low field side antenna, with both on and off axis power deposition, has been demonstrated for the first time in TFTR in D{sup 3}He-{sup 4}He plasmas. Up to 80% of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) power is coupled to electrons at the mode conversion surface. Experiments during deuterium and tritium neutral beam injection (NBI) indicate that good mode conversion efficiency can be maintained during NBI if sufficient {sup 3}He is present. No evidence of strong alpha particle heating by the IBW is seen. Recent modeling indicates that if the mode converted IBW is preferentially excited off the horizontal midplane then the resultant high poloidal mode number wave may channel alpha particle power to either electrons or ions. In TFTR both the propagation of the IBW and its effect on the alpha particle population is being investigated. Experiments with 2 MW of ICRF power launched with {+-} 90{degree} antenna phasing for current drive show that electron heating and sawtooth activity depend strongly on the direction of the launched wave. The noninductively driven current could not be experimentally determined in these relatively high plasma current, short pulse discharges. Experiments at higher RF power and lower plasma current are planned to determine on and off axis current drive efficiency.

Majeski, R.; Fisch, N.J.; Adler, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States) Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CONVECTION REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

1960-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

NUCLEAR CONVERSION APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear conversion apparatus is described which comprises a body of neutron moderator, tubes extending therethrough, uranium in the tubes, a fluid- circulating system associated with the tubes, a thorium-containing fluid coolant in the system and tubes, and means for withdrawing the fluid from the system and replacing it in the system whereby thorium conversion products may be recovered.

Seaborg, G.T.

1960-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

Chemical Conversion Coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 16   Applications of aluminum using chemical conversion coatings...doors 6063 Acrylic paint (b) Cans 3004 Sanitary lacquer Fencing 6061 None applied Chromate conversion coatings Aircraft fuselage skins 7075 clad with 7072 Zinc chromate primer Electronic chassis 6061-T4 None applied Cast missile bulkhead 356-T6 None applied Screen 5056 clad with 6253 Clear varnish...

204

ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Direct energy conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

The potential importance of direct energy conversion to the long-term development of fusion power is discussed with stress on the possibility of alleviating waste heat problems. This is envisioned to be crucial for any central power station in the 21st century. Two approaches to direct conversion, i.e., direct collection and magnetic expansion, are reviewed. While other techniques may be possible, none have received sufficient study to allow evaluation. It is stressed that, due to the intimate connection between the type of fusion fuel, the confinement scheme, direct conversion, and the coupling technique, all four element must be optimized simultaneously for high overall efficiency.

Miley, G.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thermal catalytic conversion of the used isobutyl isoprene rubber into valuable hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuous ?ow reactor for thermal degradation of polymers.Qian J. Studies of the thermal degradation of waste rubber.10.1007/s10973-009-0577-3 Thermal catalytic conversion of

Rasul Jan, M.; Jabeen, Farah; Shah, Jasmin; Mabood, Fazal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

211

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RISÃ? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RISÃ?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

212

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background: The photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen has drawn properties In order to develop better materials for solar energy applications, in-depth photoelectrochemical simulated solar irradiance. Hydrogen production experiments are conducted in a sealed aluminum cell

Raftery, Dan

213

Photovoltaic Cell Conversion Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The conversion efficiency of a photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, is the percentage of the solar energy shining on a PV device that is converted into electrical energy, or electricity....

214

Structured luminescence conversion layer  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

215

System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

Aigner, R.D.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Methane conversion to methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor for the partial oxidation of methane. The specific goals are to demonstrate that we can improve product yield, demonstrate the optimal conditions for membrane reactor operation, determine the transport properties of the membrane, and provide demonstration of the process at the pilot plant scale. The last goal will be performed by Unocal, Inc., our industrial partner, upon successful completion of this study.

Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

Wigner, E.P.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

218

Solid State Reactor Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research were undertaken: (1) establishing the design and safety-related basis via neutronic and reactor control assessments with the graphite foam as heat transfer medium; (2) evaluating the thermal performance of the graphite foam for heat removal, reactor stability, reactor operations, and overall core thermal characteristics; (3) characterizing the physical properties of the graphite foam under normal and irradiated conditions to determine any effects on structure, dimensional stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion; and (4) developing a power conversion system design to match the reactor operating parameters.

Mays, G.T.

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

Advances in Tandem Mirror fusion power reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tandem Mirror exhibits several distinctive features which make the reactor embodiment of the principle very attractive: Simple low-technology linear central cell; steady-state operation; high-..beta.. operation; no driven current or disruptions; divertorless operation; direction conversion of end-loss power; low-surface heat loads; and advanced fusion fuel capability. In this paper, we examine these features in connection with two tandem mirror reactor designs, MARS and MINIMARS, and several advanced reactor concepts including the wall-stabilized reactor and the field-reversed mirror. With a novel compact end plug scheme employing octopole stabilization, MINIMARS is expressly designed for short construction times, factory-built modules, and a small (600 MWe) but economic reactor size. We have also configured the design for low radioactive afterheat and inherent/passive safety under LOCA/LOFA conditions, thereby obviating the need for expensive engineered safety systems. In contrast to the complex and expensive double-quadrupole end-cell of the MARS reactor, the compact octopole end-cell of MINIMARS enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths and considerably improves the economy of scale for small (approx.250 to 600 MWe) tandem mirror reactors. Finally, we examine the prospects for realizing the ultimate potential of the tandem mirror with regard to both innovative configurations and novel neutron energy conversion schemes, and stress that advanced fuel applications could exploit its unique reactor features.

Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.

1986-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

Kotter, Dale K. (North Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Overview of coal conversion  

SciTech Connect

The structure of coal and the processes of coal gasification and coal liquefaction are reviewed. While coal conversion technology is not likely to provide a significant amount of synthetic fuel within the next several years, there is a clear interest both in government and private sectors in the development of this technology to hedge against ever-diminishing petroleum supplies, especially from foreign sources. It is evident from this rather cursory survey that there is some old technology that is highly reliable; new technology is being developed but is not ready for commercialization at the present state of development. The area of coal conversion is ripe for exploration both on the applied and basic research levels. A great deal more must be understood about the reactions of coal, the reactions of coal products, and the physics and chemistry involved in the various stages of coal conversion processes in order to make this technology economically viable.

Clark, B.R.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Direct conversion technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Power conversion technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Power Conservation Technologies thrust area supports initiatives that enhance the core competencies of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Engineering Directorate in the area of solid-state power electronics. Through partnerships with LLNL programs, projects focus on the development of enabling technologies for existing and emerging programs that have unique power conversion requirements. This year, a multi-disciplinary effort was supported which demonstrated solid-state, high voltage generation by using a dense, monolithic photovoltaic array. This effort builds upon Engineering's strengths in the core technology areas of power conversion, photonics, and microtechnologies.

Haigh, R E

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Direct Conversion Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. Initially, two systems were selected for exploratory research and advanced development. These are Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and Two-Phase Liquid Metal MD Generator (LMMHD). This report describes progress that has been made during the first six months of 1992 on research activities associated with these two systems. (GHH)

Back, L.H.; Fabris, G.; Ryan, M.A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE...

228

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

229

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

Wigner, E.P.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

REACTOR SHIELD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. (showing ...

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Programs ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

233

Links to on-line unit conversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basic physical quantities. General unit, currency, and temperature conversion. ... Many conversions, including unusual and ancient units. ...

234

Model Energy Conversion Efficiency of Biological Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MML Researchers Model Energy Conversion Efficiency of Biological Systems. Novel, highly efficient energy conversion ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented.

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Heat pipe reactors for space power applications  

SciTech Connect

A family of heat pipe reactors design concepts has been developed to provide heat to a variety of electrical conversion systems. Three power plants are described that span the power range 1-500 kW(e) and operate in the temperature range 1200 to 1700/sup 0/K. The reactors are fast, compact, heat-pipe cooled, high-temperature nuclear reactors fueled with fully enriched refractory fuels, UC-ZrC or UO/sub 2/. Each fuel element is cooled by an axially located molybdenum heat pipe containing either sodium or lithium vapor.

Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.; Salmi, E.W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Photovoltaic Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photovoltaic Energy Conversion Frank Zimmermann #12;Solar Electricity Generation Consumes no fuel Buy Solar Energy Stocks? Make Photovoltaics your Profession! #12;Challenges Make solar cells more and fossil fuel depletion problems! #12;Photovoltaics: Explosive Growth #12;Take Advantage of Solar Megatrend

Glashausser, Charles

239

ENERGY CONVERSION Spring 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this course: Week 1: Review Week 2: Entropy and exergy Week 3: Power cycles, Otto and Diesel Week 4 resources including: wind, wave energy conversion devices, and fuel cell technologies Week12: Introduction will work in groups as assigned. Experiment: Diesel Engine Assessment: Projects 20% Lab Reports

Bahrami, Majid

240

Solar energy conversion.  

SciTech Connect

If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels, we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity, fuel, and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology, materials, and especially nanoscience. The Sun has the enormous untapped potential to supply our growing energy needs. The barrier to greater use of the solar resource is its high cost relative to the cost of fossil fuels, although the disparity will decrease with the rising prices of fossil fuels and the rising costs of mitigating their impact on the environment and climate. The cost of solar energy is directly related to the low conversion efficiency, the modest energy density of solar radiation, and the costly materials currently required. The development of materials and methods to improve solar energy conversion is primarily a scientific challenge: Breakthroughs in fundamental understanding ought to enable marked progress. There is plenty of room for improvement, since photovoltaic conversion efficiencies for inexpensive organic and dye-sensitized solar cells are currently about 10% or less, the conversion efficiency of photosynthesis is less than 1%, and the best solar thermal efficiency is 30%. The theoretical limits suggest that we can do much better. Solar conversion is a young science. Its major growth began in the 1970s, spurred by the oil crisis that highlighted the pervasive importance of energy to our personal, social, economic, and political lives. In contrast, fossil-fuel science has developed over more than 250 years, stimulated by the Industrial Revolution and the promise of abundant fossil fuels. The science of thermodynamics, for example, is intimately intertwined with the development of the steam engine. The Carnot cycle, the mechanical equivalent of heat, and entropy all played starring roles in the development of thermodynamics and the technology of heat engines. Solar-energy science faces an equally rich future, with nanoscience enabling the discovery of the guiding principles of photonic energy conversion and their use in the development of cost-competitive new technologies.

Crabtree, G. W.; Lewis, N. S. (Materials Science Division); (California Inst. of Tech.)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Feedstock handling and processing effects on biochemical conversion to biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abating the dependence of the United States on foreign oil by reducing oil consumption and increasing biofuels usage will have far-reaching global effects. These include reduced greenhouse gas emissions and an increased demand for biofuel feedstocks. To support this increased demand, cellulosic feedstock production and conversion to biofuels (e.g. ethanol, butanol) is being aggressively researched. Thus far, research has primarily focused on optimizing feedstock production and ethanol conversion, with less attention given to the feedstock supply chain required to meet cost, quality, and quantity goals. This supply chain comprises a series of unit operations from feedstock harvest to feeding the conversion process. Our objectives in this review are (i) to summarize the peer-reviewed literature on harvest-to-reactor throat variables affecting feedstock composition and conversion to ethanol; (ii) to identify knowledge gaps; and (iii) to recommend future steps.

Daniel Inman; Nick Nagle; Jacob Jacobson; Erin Searcy; Allison Ray

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Question detection in spoken conversations using textual conversations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the use of textual Internet conversations for detecting questions in spoken conversations. We compare the text-trained model with models trained on manually-labeled, domain-matched spoken utterances with and without prosodic features. ...

Anna Margolis; Mari Ostendorf

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Research Reactor BMRR The last of the Lab's reactors, the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), was shut down in December 2000. The BMRR was a three megawatt...

246

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Coupled Reactor Kinetics and Heat Transfer Model for Heat Pipe Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). The paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities.

WRIGHT,STEVEN A.; HOUTS,MICHAEL

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Wind energy conversion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Session: Energy Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology'' by David Robertson and Raymond J. LaSala; ''Materials for Geothermal Production'' by Lawrence E. Kukacka; ''Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants'' by Carl J. Bliem; ''Geothermal Waster Treatment Biotechnology: Progress and Advantages to the Utilities'' by Eugen T. Premuzic; and ''Geothermal Brine Chemistry Modeling Program'' by John H. Weare.

Robertson, David; LaSala, Raymond J.; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Bliem, Carl J.; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Weare, John H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

Zinn, W.H.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

1962-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Natural gas conversion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sign Me Up Search: OK Button DUF6 Guide DU Uses DUF6 Management and Uses DUF6 Conversion EIS Documents News FAQs Internet Resources Glossary Home Conversion Facility EISs...

258

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents, For your convenience, you may convert energies online below. Or display factors as: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells. Sponsorship, MS&T Organization.

262

Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Decommissioning Click here to view Click here to view Reactor Decommissioning Click on an image to enlarge A crane removes the reactor vessel from the Power Burst Facility...

263

Conversion of Questionnaire Data  

SciTech Connect

During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann, 'Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications,' NUREG/CR-1278). This conversion produces the basic event risk of failure values required for the fault tree calculations. The fault tree is a deductive logic structure that corresponds to the operational nuclear MC&A system at a nuclear facility. The conventional Delphi process is a time-honored approach commonly used in the risk assessment field to extract numerical values for the failure rates of actions or activities when statistically significant data is absent.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

notably energy conversion. As research continues in thisnanowires for energy conversion. Chemical Reviews, 2010.for solar energy conversion. Physical Review Letters, 2004.

Fardy, Melissa Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

: Package gov.nist.nlpir.irf.conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

gov.nist.nlpir.irf.conversion Classes Ascii2HtmlConverter ConversionRule ConversionRules IrfConverter Sgml2AppDocConverter.

267

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor is described comprising a plurality of horizontal trays containing a solution of a fissionable material, the trays being sleeved on a vertical tube which contains a vertically-reciprocable control rod, a gas-tight chamber enclosing the trays, and means for conducting vaporized moderator from the chamber and for replacing vaporized moderator in the trays. (AEC)

Wigner, E.P.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

268

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

Wende, Charles W. J. (West Chester, PA)

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

269

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

Anderson, H.L.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Energy conversion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weathproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction and operational with a minimal power draw.

Murphy, L.M.

1985-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Energy conversion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weatherproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction, and operational with a minimal power draw.

Murphy, Lawrence M. (Lakewood, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

REACTOR UNLOADING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

Leverett, M.C.

1958-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

278

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

Treshow, M.

1958-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels.

Lewis, Warren R. (Richland, WA)

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents Conversion factors for energy equivalents are derived from the following relations: ...

282

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents Return to online conversions. Next page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty ...

283

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons ...  

Conventional biomass to hydrocarbon conversion is generally not commercially feasible, due to costs of the conversion process.

284

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

Ruano, W.J.

1957-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

286

Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power  

SciTech Connect

A heat-pipe cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MW(t) to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat pipe temperature of 1675/sup 0/K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum, lithium vapor, heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO/sub 2/ pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber and a BeO reflector containing boron loaded control drums.

Koenig, D.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Proceedings of the 25th intersociety energy conversion engineering conference  

SciTech Connect

This book contains the proceedings of the 25th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference. Volume 5 is organized under the following headings: Photovoltaics I, Photovoltaics II, Geothermal power, Thermochemical conversion of biomass, Energy from waste and biomass, Solar thermal systems for environmental applications, Solar thermal low temperature systems and components, Solar thermal high temperature systems and components, Wind systems, Space power sterling technology Stirling cooler developments, Stirling solar terrestrial I, Stirling solar terrestrial II, Stirling engine generator sets, Stirling models and simulations, Stirling engine analysis, Stirling models and simulations, Stirling engine analysis, Stirling engine loss understanding, Novel engine concepts, Coal conversion and utilization, Power cycles, MHD water propulsion I, Underwater vehicle powerplants - performance, MHD underwater propulsion II, Nuclear power, Update of advanced nuclear power reactor concepts.

Nelson, P.A.; Schertz, W.W.; Till, R.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

High temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Power conversion technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

Newton, M. A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Quantum optical waveform conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently proposed architectures for long-distance quantum communication rely on networks of quantum processors connected by optical communications channels [1,2]. The key resource for such networks is the entanglement of matter-based quantum systems with quantum optical fields for information transmission. The optical interaction bandwidth of these material systems is a tiny fraction of that available for optical communication, and the temporal shape of the quantum optical output pulse is often poorly suited for long-distance transmission. Here we demonstrate that nonlinear mixing of a quantum light pulse with a spectrally tailored classical field can compress the quantum pulse by more than a factor of 100 and flexibly reshape its temporal waveform, while preserving all quantum properties, including entanglement. Waveform conversion can be used with heralded arrays of quantum light emitters to enable quantum communication at the full data rate of optical telecommunications.

Kielpinski, D; Wiseman, HM

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Neutron Radiography Reactor Reactivity -- Focused Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was converted from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. After the conversion, NRAD resumed operations and is meeting operational requirements. Radiography image quality and the number of images that can be produced in a given time frame match pre-conversion capabilities. However, following the conversion, NRAD’s excess reactivity with the LEU fuel was less than it had been with the HEU fuel. Although some differences between model predictions and actual performance are to be expected, the lack of flexibility in NRAD’s safety documentation prevented adjusting the reactivity by adding more fuel, until the safety documentation could be modified. To aid future reactor conversions, a reactivity-focused Lessons Learned meeting was held. This report summarizes the findings of the lessons learned meeting and addresses specific questions posed by DOE regarding NRAD’s conversion and reactivity.

Eric Woolstenhulme; Randal Damiana; Kenneth Schreck; Ann Marie Phillips; Dana Hewit

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOENETL-20051217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy...

293

Wideband Wavelength Conversion Using Cavity ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The researchers use the interaction of two ... bands that are frequently used in telecommunications. ... conversion should be possible using the same ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy Basics: Biofuel Conversion Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

from the EERE Bioenergy Technologies Office. Thermochemical Conversion Processes Heat energy and chemical catalysts can be used to break down biomass into intermediate compounds...

295

Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national annual quantity-weighted average conversion factors for conventional, reformulated, and oxygenated motor gasolines (see Table A3). The factor ...

296

PRIMARY QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactions in,Bacterial Photosynthesis. I, Nature of lightReactions in Bacterial Photosynthesis. 111. Reactions ofQUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin and G. M.

Calvin, Melvin; Androes, G.M.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

GT-MHR power conversion system: Design status and technical issues  

SciTech Connect

The Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) builds on 30 years of international gas-cooled reactor experience utilizing the unique properties of helium gas coolant, graphite moderator and coated particle fuel. To efficiently utilize the high temperature potential of the MHR, an innovative power conversion system has been developed featuring an intercooled and recuperated gas turbine. The gas turbine replaces a conventional steam turbine and its many auxiliary components. The Power Conversion System converts the thermal energy of the helium directly into electrical energy utilizing a closed Brayton cycle. The Power Conversion System draws on even more years of experience than the MHR: the world`s first closed-cycle plant, fossil fired and utilizing air as working fluid, started operation in Switzerland in 1939. Shortly thereafter, in 1945, the coupling of a closed-cycle plant to a nuclear heat generation system was conceived. Directly coupling the closed-cycle gas turbine concept to a modern, passively safe nuclear reactor opens a new chapter in power generation technology and brings with it various design challenges. Some of these challenges are associated with the direct coupling of the Power Conversion System to a nuclear reactor. Since the primary coolant is also the working fluid, the Power Conversion System has to be designed for reactor radionuclide plateout. As a result, issues like component maintainability and replaceability, and fission product effects on materials must be addressed. Other issues concern the integration of the Power Conversion System components into a single vessel. These issues include the selection of key technologies for the power conversion components such as submerged generator, magnetic bearings, seals, compact heat exchangers, and the overall system layout.

Etzel, K.; Baccaglini, G.; Schwartz, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hillman, S.; Mathis, D. [AlliedSignal Aerospace, Tempe, AZ (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Conversion Regulations Conversion Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on AddThis.com... Conversion Regulations All vehicle and engine conversions must meet standards instituted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and state agencies like the California Air Resources Board (CARB).

299

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious quantities of low-energy neutrons for absorption in a lattice of fertile material and moderator. The fertile material of the lattice is converted by neutron absorption reactions to an artificially produced material, e.g., plutonium, where depleted uranium is utilized as the fertile material.

Lawrence, E.O.; McMillan, E.M.; Alvarez, L.W.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photocatalytic reactor for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane.

Bischoff, Brian L. (Knoxville, TN); Fain, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stockdale, John A. D. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Project status report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A continuous stirred tank reactor with and without sulfur recovery has been operated using Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum for the conversion of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. In operating the reactor system with sulfur recovery, a gas retention time of 40 min was required to obtain a 100 percent conversion of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. Essentially no SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, an undesirable product, was produced under these conditions. Significant reductions in the gas retention time are expected by employing cell recycle after sulfur recovery, and by using increased pressure.

Clausen, E.C.

1993-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)]|[Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Final report, September 1, 1990--January 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated because the supply of isobutylene had been identified as a limitation on the production of methyl-t-butyl ether, a gasoline additive. Prior research on isobutylene synthesis had been at low conversion (less than 5%) or extremely high pressures (greater than 300 bars). The purpose of this research was to optimize the synthesis of a zirconia based catalyst, determine process conditions for producing isobutylene at pressures less than 100 bars, develop kinetic and reactor models, and simulate the performance of fixed bed, trickle bed and slurry flow reactors. A catalyst, reactor models and optimum operating conditions have been developed for producing isobutylene from coal derived synthesis gas. The operating conditions are much less severe than the reaction conditions developed by the Germans during and prior to WWII. The low conversion, i.e. CO conversion less than 15%, have been perceived to be undesirable for a commercial process. However, the exothermic nature of the reaction and the ability to remove heat from the reactor could limit the extent of conversion for a fixed bed reactor. Long residence times for trickle or slurry (bubble column) reactors could result in high CO conversion at the expense of reduced selectivities to iso C{sub 4} compounds. Economic studies based on a preliminary design, and a specific location will be required to determine the commercial feasibility of the process.

Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.; Philip, C.V.; Erkey, C.; Feng, Z.; Postula, W.S.; Wang, J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

MEDICAL IMAGE CONVERSION Peter Stanchev  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEDICAL IMAGE CONVERSION Peter Stanchev Institute of Mathematics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with the problem of converting medical images from one format to another. In solving it the structure of the most commonly used medical image formats are studied and analysed. A mechanism for medical image file conversion

Stanchev, Peter

306

Visualization components for persistent conversations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An appropriately designed interface to persistent, threaded conversations could reinforce socially beneficial behavior by prominently featuring how frequently and to what degree each user exhibits such behaviors. Based on the data generated by the Netscan ... Keywords: Usenet, asynchronous threaded discussions, newsgroup, persistent conversation, social cyberspaces, visualization

Marc A. Smith; Andrew T. Fiore

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Alcohol fuel conversion apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an alcohol fuel conversion apparatus for internal combustion engines comprising: fuel storage means for containing an alcohol fuel; primary heat exchange means in fluid communication with the fuel storage means for transferring heat to pressurized alcohol contained within the heat exchange means; a heat source for heating the primary heat exchange means; pressure relief valve means in closed fluid communication with the primary heat exchange means for releasing heated pressurized alcohol into an expansion chamber; converter means including the expansion chamber in fluid communication with the pressure relief valve means for receiving the heated pressurized alcohol and for the vaporization of the alcohol; fuel injection means in fluid communication with the converter means for injecting vaporized alcohol into the cylinders of an internal combustion engine for mixing with air within the cylinders for proper combustion; and pump means for pressurized pumping of alcohol from the 23 fuel storage means to the primary heat exchanger means, converter means, fuel injector means, and to the engine.

Carroll, B.I.

1987-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

Feasibility of breeding in hard spectrum boiling water reactors with oxide and nitride fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study assesses the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and fuel performance aspects of using nitride fuel in place of oxides in Pu-based high conversion light water reactor designs. Using the higher density nitride fuel ...

Feng, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

$?- e$ Conversion With Four Generations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study $\\mu - e$ conversion with sequential four generations. A large mass for the fourth generation neutrino can enhance the conversion rate by orders of magnitude. We compare constraints obtained from $\\mu - e$ conversion using experimental bounds on various nuclei with those from $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to e\\bar e e$. We find that the current bound from $\\mu - e$ conversion with Au puts the most stringent constraint in this model. The relevant flavor changing parameter $\\lambda_{\\mu e} = V^*_{\\mu 4}V_{e4}^{}$ is constrained to be less than $1.6\\times 10^{-5}$ for the fourth generation neutrino mass larger than 100 GeV. Implications for future $\\mu -e$ conversion, $\\mu \\to e\\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to e\\bar e e$ experiments are discussed.

N. G. Deshpande; T. Enkhbat; T. Fukuyama; X. -G. He; L. -H. Tsai; K. Tsumura

2011-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

310

CONTROL MEANS FOR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a tank just below the reactor, tubes extending from the tank into the reactor, and a thermally expansible liquid neutron absorbent material in the tank. The liquid in the tank is exposed to a beam of neutrons from the reactor which heats the liquid causing it to expand into the reactor when the neutron flux in the reactor rises above a predetermincd danger point. Boron triamine may be used for this purpose.

Manley, J.H.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear Reactor Accidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Accidents The accidents at the Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl nuclear reactors have triggered particularly intense concern about radiation hazards. The TMI accident,...

312

Principles of Reactor Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Physics M A Smith Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Engineering Division Phone: 630-252-9747, Email: masmith@anl.gov Abstract: Nuclear reactor physics deals with...

313

Biological conversion of biomass to methane. Quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in comparative studies of complete-mix and multi-stage reactors for use in the anaerobic fermentation of organic solids for methane production is reported. Results indicate that if a balanced population of organisms can be maintained in the initial stage, multi-stage fermentation is more efficient than a complete-mix system. However, if the system is stressed, failure of the multi-staged system is more rapid. When the first stage is not inhibited due to a short retention time, the waste stabilization in the additional stages is minimal. Further studies on the effect of retention time on reaction rates indicate that the type of reactor design desired will depend upon the objective of the system. If it is desired to maximize the conversion of solids to methane, a staged system will produce more methane per unit volume of reactor for a given quantity of substrate. If the objective is to maximize methane production per unit volume of reactor, a single-stage reactor operating at near the minimum retention is required. Results of studies on the fermentation of manures and corn stover are discussed briefly. (JGB)

Pfeffer, J T

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Hydrothermal Program is to develop concepts which allow better utilization of geothermal energy to reduce the life-cycle cost of producing electricity from liquid-dominated, hydrothermal resources. Research in the program is currently ongoing in three areas: (1) Heat Cycle Research, which is looking at methods to increase binary plant efficiencies; (2) Materials Development, which is developing materials for use in geothermal associated environments; and (3) Advanced Brine Chemistry, with work taking place in both the brine chemistry modeling area and waste disposal area. The presentations during this session reviewed the accomplishments and activities taking place in the hydrothermal energy conversion program. Lawrence Kukacka, Brookhaven National Laboratory, discussed advancements being made to develop materials for use in geothermal applications. This research has identified a large number of potential materials for use in applications from pipe liners that inhibit scale buildup and reduce corrosion to elastomers for downhole use. Carl J. Bliem, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, discussed preparations currently underway to conduct field investigations of the condensation behavior of supersaturated turbine expansions. The research will evaluate whether the projected 8% to 10% improvement in brine utilization can be realized by allowing these expansions. Eugene T. Premuzic, Brookhaven National Laboratory, discussed advancements being made using biotechnology for treatment of geothermal residual waste; the various process options were discussed in terms of biotreatment variables. A treatment scenario and potential disposal costs were presented. John H. Weare, University of California, San Diego, discussed the present capabilities of the brine chemistry model he has developed for geothermal applications and the information it can provide a user. This model is available to industry. The accomplishments from the research projects presented in this session have been many. It is hoped that these accomplishments can be integrated into industrial geothermal power plant sites to assist in realizing the goal of reducing the cost of energy produced from the geothermal resource.

Robertson, David W.; LaSala, Raymond J.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

NUCLEAR REACTOR AND THERMIONIC FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent relates to the direct conversion of fission heat to electricity by use of thermionic plasma diodes having fissionable material cathodes, said diodes arranged to form a critical mass in a nuclear reactor. The patent describes a fuel element comprising a plurality of diodes each having a fissionable material cathode, an anode around said cathode, and an ionizable gas therebetween. Provision is made for flowing the gas and current serially through the diodes. (AEC)

Rasor, N.S.; Hirsch, R.L.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power plant is described comprising a turbine and employing round cylindrical fuel rods formed of BeO and UO/sub 2/ and stacks of hexagonal moderator blocks of BeO provided with passages that loosely receive the fuel rods so that coolant may flow through the passages over the fuels to remove heat. The coolant may be helium or steam and fiows through at least one more heat exchanger for producing vapor from a body of fluid separate from the coolant, which fluid is to drive the turbine for generating electricity. By this arrangement the turbine and directly associated parts are free of particles and radiations emanating from the reactor. (AEC)

Daniels, F.

1962-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

317

Management and Uses Conversion Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion Depleted UF6 Conversion DOE is planning to build two depleted UF6 conversion facilities, and site-specific environmental impact statements (EISs) to evaluate project alternatives. The Final Plan for Conversion and the Programmatic EIS The eventual disposition of depleted UF6 remains the subject of considerable interest within the U.S. Congress, and among concerned citizens and other stakeholders. Congress stated its intentions in Public Law (P. L.) 105-204, signed by the President in July 1998. P. L. 105-204 required DOE to develop a plan to build two depleted UF6 conversion facilities, one each at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. DOE submitted the required plan, Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, to Congress in July 1999. This document provided a discussion of DOE's technical approach and schedule to implement this project. Although much of the information provided in this report is still valid, a few aspects of this plan have changed since its publication.

318

Barn ConversionBarn Conversion DiscussionDiscussion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B.G.S.A.C Stats ·· 2500 square foot insulated pole barn2500 square foot insulated pole barn ·· concrete neededhouse the system needed ·· Is the conversion cost worthIs the conversion cost worth while when compared installedNo vapor barrier installed ·· Rains in barnRains in barn ·· Up to 75 gallons per dayUp to 75

319

Reactor and method of operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

Wheeler, John A. (Princeton, NJ)

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing World Technologies' Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant DOE/EA 1506 Weld County, Colorado December 2004 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration - Weld County, CO TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration Project Weld County, Colorado SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

EPA Redesigns EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies At a recent meeting held in Washington, DC, officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) opened dialogue about proposed changes to its emission certification policies that affect alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). "We are trying to accommo- date the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) and Executive Order requirements while trying to change enforce- ment policies and guidance with respect to conversions," said Rich Ackerman of EPA's Enforcement Office. The meeting, attended by representatives of more than 60 organizations, was held to discuss actions addressing AFV emission certification. Specifically, topics included * Conversion emissions perfor- mance data * Status of environmental laws pertaining to alternative fuel

322

Existing reactor expansion study basis  

SciTech Connect

The latest HAPO Five Year Program review, HW-59633, forecasts substantial increases in Pu production from the eight existing Hanford reactors over the next several years. These production increases would be attained by a combination of several methods which include increased reactor power levels resulting from higher process water flow rates and coolant bulk outlet temperatures, improved time operated efficiency, higher conversion ratios, and reduced transient reactivity losses. In order to provide a realistic basis for budgeting to meet these or other increased production goals, it is necessary that a study program be undertaken to determine in general terms the plant changes required to support these forecasted levels, to evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of achieving the process conditions, and to present an integrated program for achieving these objectives. This study program will necessarily consider the interrelated effects of a number of various facets of reactor and water plant process conditions, operational requirements, and proposed development programs. The purpose of this document is to present a plan for the execution of the proposed study. Included in this outline are a review of the basic study considerations, problem assignments and schedules, and manpower and cost estimates for the performance of the study.

Heacock, H.W.

1959-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

323

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop a new catalyst, the kinetics for this catalyst, reactor models for trickle bed, slurry and fixed bed reactors, and simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for conversion of a hydrogen lean synthesis gas to isobutylene. The goals for the quarter include: (1) Conduct experiments using a trickle bed reactor to determine the effect of reactor type on the product distribution. (2) Use spherical pellets of silica as a support for zirconia for the purpose of increasing surface, area and performance of the catalysts. (3) Conduct exploratory experiments to determine the effect of super critical drying of the catalyst on the catalyst surface area and performance. (4) Prepare a ceria/zirconia catalyst by the precipitation method.

Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Conversions Conversions Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on AddThis.com... Vehicle Conversions Photo of converted to run on propane. What kinds of conversions are available? Natural Gas Propane Electric Hybrid Ethanol An aftermarket conversion is a vehicle or engine modified to operate using

325

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Conversions to someone by E-mail Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Propane Vehicle Conversions Related Information Conversion Basics Regulations Vehicle conversions provide alternative fuel options beyond what is

326

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE-EPA Working Group on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion,Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversion

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in...

328

Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations are presented of the rate of energy conversion of the barotropic tide into internal gravity waves above topography on the ocean floor. The ocean is treated as infinitely deep, and the topography consists of ...

Balmforth, Neil J.

329

Conversion to the Metric System  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix C Conversion to the Metric System Public Law 100–418, the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988, states: “It is the declared policy of the United ...

330

Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations are presented of the rate of energy conversion of the barotropic tide into internal gravity waves above topography on the ocean floor. The ocean is treated as infinitely deep, and the topography consists of periodic obstructions; a ...

Neil J. Balmforth; Thomas Peacock

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Conversion coefficients for superheavy elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report on internal conversion coefficients for Z = 111 to Z = 126 superheavy elements obtained from relativistic Dirac-Fock (DF) calculations. The effect of the atomic vacancy created during the conversion process has been taken into account using the so called "Frozen Orbital" approximation. The selection of this atomic model is supported by our recent comparison of experimental and theoretical conversion coefficients across a wide range of nuclei. The atomic masses, valence shell electron configurations, and theoretical atomic binding energies required for the calculations were adopted from a critical evaluation of the published data. The new conversion coefficient data tables presented here cover all atomic shells, transition energies from 1 keV up to 6000 keV, and multipole orders of 1 to 5. A similar approach was used in our previous calculations [1] for Z = 5 - 110.

T. Kibédi; M. B. Trzhaskovskaya; M. Gupta; A. E. Stuchbery

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

Cosmopolitanism - Conversation with Stuart Hall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversation between Stuart Hall and Pnina Werbner on the theme of Cosmopolitanism (to be shown at the Association of Social Anthropologists Silver Jubilee conference in 2006), in March 2006...

Hall, Stuart

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

Unsupervised modeling of Twitter conversations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose the first unsupervised approach to the problem of modeling dialogue acts in an open domain. Trained on a corpus of noisy Twitter conversations, our method discovers dialogue acts by clustering raw utterances. Because it accounts for the sequential ...

Alan Ritter; Colin Cherry; Bill Dolan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Reactor safety method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

NEUTRONIC REACTOR MANIPULATING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cable connecting a control rod in a reactor with a motor outside the reactor for moving the rod, and a helical conduit in the reactor wall, through which the cable passes are described. The helical shape of the conduit prevents the escape of certain harmful radiations from the reactor. (AEC)

Ohlinger, L.A.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Effect of coal rank and process conditions on temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor  

SciTech Connect

The temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor in the integrated TSL process is studied. The effects of gas and slurry superficial velocities, process solvent characteristics, reactor length, and catalyst sulfiding agent on the exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are studied. A substantial temperature difference is observed with subbituminous coal as compared with bituminous coal, at comparable reactor conditions. Some of the factors that are believed to have contributed to the large exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are slow kinetics and high reaction heat for subbituminous coal conversion and pyrrhotite catalysis.

Nalitham, R.V.; Moniz, M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fast Conversion Algorithms for Orthogonal Polynomials - Computer ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 13, 2008 ... a known conversion algorithm from an arbitrary orthogonal basis to the ... Fast algorithms, transposed algorithms, basis conversion, orthogonal.

338

Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The photocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to methanol was investigated. The procedure for the carbon dioxide conversion was carried out using a small scale… (more)

Okpo, Emmanuel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Vehicle Technologies Office: Solid State Energy Conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Conversion to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Solid State Energy Conversion on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Solid State Energy...

340

Vehicle Technologies Office: Solid State Energy Conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid State Energy Conversion The Solid State Energy Conversion R&D activity is focused on developing advanced thermoelectric technologies for utilizing engine waste heat by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Documents: Disposal of DUF6 Conversion Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUF6 Conversion Products Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Disposal of DUF6 Conversion Products PDF Icon Engineering Analysis for Disposal of...

342

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when...

343

Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013  

SciTech Connect

This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

An Engineering Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A relatively inexpensive reactor for the specific purpose of testing a sub-critical portion of another reactor under conditions that would exist during actual operation is discussed. It is concluded that an engineering tool for reactor development work that bridges the present gap between exponential and criticality experiments and the actual full scale operating reactor is feasible. An example of such a test reactor which would not entail development effort to ut into operation is depicted.

Fahrner, T.; Stoker, R.L.; Thomson, A.S.

1951-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Neutronic Analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) reactor (MITR-II), based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a research reactor designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the MITR-II. This report presents the results of steady state neutronic safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of U-Mo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to demonstrate that the safety analyses meet current requirements for an LEU core replacement of MITR-II.

Wilson, E. H.; Newton, T. H.; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. G (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( NS)

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure...

347

Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications.

Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Memorandum on Chemical Reactors and Reactor Hazards  

SciTech Connect

Two important problems in the investigation of reactor hazards are the chemical reactivity of various materials employed in reactor construction and the chracteristics of heat transfer under transient conditions, specifically heat transfer when driven by an exponentially increasing heat source (exp t/T). Although these problems are independent of each other, when studied in relation to reactor hazards they may occur in a closely coupled sequence. For example the onset of a dangerous chemical reactor may be due to structural failure of various reactor components under an exponentially rising heat source originating with a runaway nuclear reactor. For this reason, these two problems should eventually be studied together after an exploratory experimental survey has been made in which they are considered separately.

Mills, M.M.; Pearlman, H.; Ruebsamen, W.; Steele, G., Chrisney, J.

1951-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most significant cost associated with partial oxidation of methane to syngas is that of the oxygen plant. In this paper, the authors offer a technology, based on dense ceramic membranes, that uses air as the oxidant for methane conversion reactions, thus eliminating the need for the oxygen plant. Certain ceramic materials exhibit both electronic and ionic conductivities (of particular interest is oxygen-ion conductivity). These materials transport not only oxygen ions (functioning as selective oxygen separators) but also electrons back from the reactor side to the oxygen/reduction interface. No external electrodes are required, and, if the driving potential of transport is adequate, the partial oxidation reactions should be spontaneous. Such a system will operate without an externally applied potential. Oxygen is transported across the ceramic material in the form of oxygen ions, not oxygen molecules. Recent reports in the literature suggest that dense ceramic membranes made of these mixed conductors can successfully separate oxygen from air at flux rates that could be considered commercially feasible. Thus, these membranes have the potential to improve the economics of methane conversion processes. In principle, the dense ceramic materials can be shaped into hollow-tube reactors, in which air passes over the outside of the membrane and methane flows through the inside. The surfaces can also be reversed. The membrane is permeable to oxygen at high temperatures, but not to nitrogen or other gases. Thus, only oxygen from air can be transported through the membrane to the inside of the reactor surface, where it reacts with methane. Other geometric forms, such as honeycombs or corrugations, of the reactor are possible and can provide substantially greater surface areas for reaction.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Maiya, P.S.; Ma, B.; Mieville, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A.; Fleisch, T.H. [Amoco Exploration/Production, Naperville, IL (United States); Bose, A.C. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI).

Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

GAS COOLED PEBBLE BED REACTOR FOR A LARGE CENTRAL STATION. Reactor Design and Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

An optimum econonic design for a high temperature, helium cooled, central station reactor power plant of about 400 Mw of electric power was determined. The core consists of a randomly packed bed of unclad graphite spheres, approximately one in. in diameter, impregnated with U/sup 233/ and thorium such that a conversion ratio of near unity is achieved. The high temperature helium permits steam conditions, at the turbine throttle, of 1000 deg F and 1450 psia. (auth)

Schock, A.; Bruley, D.F.; Culver, H.N.; Ianni, P.W.; Kaufman, W.F.; Schmidt, R.A.; Supp, R.E.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy Conversion – Photovoltaic, Concentrating Solar Power, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Energy Conversion – Photovoltaic, Concentrating Solar Power, and  ...

354

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Frequency Conversion of Entangled State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum characteristics of sum-frequency process in an optical cavity with an input signal optical beam, which is a half of entangled optical beams, are analyzed. The calculated results show that the quantum properties of the signal beam can be maintained after its frequency is conversed during the intracavity nonlinear optical interaction. The frequency-conversed output signal beam is still in an entangled state with the retained other half of initial entangled beams. The resultant quantum correlation spectra and the parametric dependences of the correlations on the initial squeezing factor, the optical losses and the pump power of the sum-frequency cavity are calculated. The proposed system for the frequency conversion of entangled state can be used in quantum communication network and the calculated results can provide direct references for the design of experimental systems.

Aihong Tan; Xiaojun Jia; Changde Xie

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Basic and Applied Science Research Reactors - Reactors designed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th...

357

RERTR 2009 (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction in cooperation with the China Atomic Energy Authority and International Atomic Energy Agency hosted the 'RERTR 2009 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors.' The meeting was organized by Argonne National Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy and Idaho National Laboratory and was held in Beijing, China from November 1-5, 2009. This was the 31st annual meeting in a series on the same general subject regarding the conversion of reactors within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program develops technology necessary to enable the conversion of civilian facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets.

Totev, T.; Stevens, J.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Matos, J.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Dionne, B.; Olson, A.; Feldman, E.; Dunn, F.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Atomic Research Center; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; LLNL; INL; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Comisi?n Nacional de Energ?a At?mica; Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Inst. of Atomic Energy-Poland; AECL-Canada; Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Nuclear Power Inst. of China; Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Estimate of radiation release from MIT reactor with low enriched uranium (LEU) core during maximum hypothetical accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In accordance with a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. A component of the conversion analysis ...

Plumer, Kevin E. (Kevin Edward)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxvile, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Guidebook to nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reactor Sharing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress achieved at the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Sharing Program is reported for the period of 1991--1992.

Vernetson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

Metcalf, H.E.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

Conversion of the Barotropic Tide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using linear wave theory, the rate at which energy is converted into internal gravity waves by the interaction of the barotropic tide with topography in an ocean is calculated. Bell's formula for the conversion rate is extended to the case of an ...

Stefan G. Llewellyn Smith; W. R. Young

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy Conversion and Storage Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

Cairns, E.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Conversion of ethane and of propane to higher olefin hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purely thermal reactions for the conversion of ethane were carried out in an empty and in a quartz chip filled reactor over a temperature range of 300--800{degrees}C in the absence and presence of oxygen and oxygen plus water. Ethane alone shows no conversion below 600{degrees}C and some conversion to CH{sub 4} and very little C{sub 2}H{sub 4} at 700{degrees} and 800{degrees}C. Ethane and oxygen produce CO{sub 2} as the major product above 400{degrees}C. The additional presence of water does not appreciably change this picture. Converting ethane with oxygen and water over a Ca{sub 3}Ni{sub 1}K{sub 0.1} catalyst at very low space velocity gave increasing conversion with temperature, primarily CO{sub 2} production and a small amount of C{sub 3+} hydrocarbons. The CO{sub 2} production was decreased and slightly more C{sub 3} hydrocarbons were produced when the potassium concentration of the catalyst was increased. Activation energies have been calculated for the various ethane conversion reactions. It appears that the CaNiK oxide catalyst is not suited for oxidative ethane coupling at the conditions thus far investigated. The indications are that much shorter contact times are required to prevent oxidation of intermediates. Blank runs with propane and oxygen in the absence of a catalyst have shown significant reaction at temperatures as low as 400{degrees}C. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

High solids fermentation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Littleton, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Richard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

FAST NEUTRON REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor comprising fissionable material in concentration sufficiently high so that the average neutron enengy within the reactor is at least 25,000 ev is described. A natural uranium blanket surrounds the reactor, and a moderating reflector surrounds the blanket. The blanket is thick enough to substantially eliminate flow of neutrons from the reflector.

Soodak, H.; Wigner, E.P.

1961-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Conversion Vehicle Conversion Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversion Basics on AddThis.com... Vehicle Conversion Basics Photo of a Ford Transit Connect converted to run on compressed natural gas. A Ford Transit Connect converted to run on compressed natural gas. A converted vehicle or engine is one modified to use a different fuel or

372

The Argonaut Reactor - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Training Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

373

Nuclear reactor overflow line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

Severson, Wayne J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Spinning fluids reactor  

SciTech Connect

A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fission reactors and materials  

SciTech Connect

The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions.

Frost, B.R.T.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Sixth quarterly report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron- and Manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is a catalyst for the conversion of propane, but the rate of conversion of propane is much less than the rate of conversion of butane. Whereas this catalyst appears to be a good candidate for practical, industrial conversion of butane, it appears to lack sufficient activity for practical conversion of propane. Perhaps more active catalysts will be useful for propane conversion. The propane conversion data reported here provide excellent insights into the chemistry of the catalytic conversions; they are consistent with the inference that the catalyst is a superacid and that the chemistry is analogous to. that determined in superacid solutions by G.A. Olah, who was awarded the most recent Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work. The catalyst was tested for conversion of propane at 1 bar, 200--300{degrees}C and propane partial pressures in the range of 0.01--0.05 bar. At 250{degrees}C, catalysis was demonstrated, as the number of propane molecules converted was at least 1 per sulfate group after 16 days of operation in a continues flow reactor. Propane was converted in high yield to butanes, but the conversions were low, for example being only a fraction of a percent at a space velocity of 9.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mol(g of catalysis {center_dot} s) and 250{degrees}C. Coke formation was rapid. The observation of butanes, pentanes, and methane as products is consistent with Olah superacid chemistry, whereby propane is first protonated by a very strong acid to form a carbonium ion. The carbonium ion then decomposes into methane and an ethyl cation which undergoes oligocondensation reactions with propane to form higher molecular weight alkanes. The results are consistent with the identification of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia as a superacid.

Gates, B.C. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Final Report of the five-year project Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes (DE-FC36-04GO14276, July 1, 2004- June 30, 2009), in which we present our major accomplishments with detailed descriptions of our experimental and theoretical efforts. Upon the successful conduction of this project, we have followed our proposed breakdown work structure completing most of the technical tasks. Finally, we have developed and demonstrated several optimized homogenously catalytic methane conversion systems involving applications of novel ionic liquids, which present much more superior performance than the Catalytica system (the best-to-date system) in terms of three times higher reaction rates and longer catalysts lifetime and much stronger resistance to water deactivation. We have developed in-depth mechanistic understandings on the complicated chemistry involved in homogenously catalytic methane oxidation as well as developed the unique yet effective experimental protocols (reactors, analytical tools and screening methodologies) for achieving a highly efficient yet economically feasible and environmentally friendly catalytic methane conversion system. The most important findings have been published, patented as well as reported to DOE in this Final Report and our 20 Quarterly Reports.

Tang, Yongchun; Periana, Roy; Chen, Weiqun; van Duin, Adri; Nielsen, Robert; Shuler, Patrick; Ma, Qisheng; Blanco, Mario; Li, Zaiwei; Oxgaard, Jonas; Cheng, Jihong; Cheung, Sam; Pudar, Sanja

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evaluation and Optimization of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Conversion Cycle for Nuclear Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550°C and 750°C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550°C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton Cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550°C versus 850°C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of the supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression Cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The UniSim model assumed a 600 MWt reactor power source, which provides heat to the power cycle at a maximum temperature of between 550°C and 750°C. The UniSim model used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete power conversion system. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating range for the cycle was adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing conditions near the critical point. The UniSim model was then optimized to maximize the power cycle thermal efficiency at the different maximum power cycle operating temperatures. The results of the analyses showed that power cycle thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved.

Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Biofuel Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuel Conversion Basics Biofuel Conversion Basics Biofuel Conversion Basics August 14, 2013 - 12:31pm Addthis The conversion of biomass solids into liquid or gaseous biofuels is a complex process. Today, the most common conversion processes are biochemical- and thermochemical-based. However, researchers are also exploring photobiological conversion processes. Biochemical Conversion Processes In biochemical conversion processes, enzymes and microorganisms are used as biocatalysts to convert biomass or biomass-derived compounds into desirable products. Cellulase and hemicellulase enzymes break down the carbohydrate fractions of biomass to five- and six-carbon sugars in a process known as hydrolysis. Yeast and bacteria then ferment the sugars into products such as ethanol. Biotechnology advances are expected to lead to dramatic

384

DUF6 Conversion Facility EIS Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs Schedule The final EISs for the DUF6 Conversion Facilities have been completed, and are available through this web site. The RODs are...

385

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various option will be performed as experimental data become available. The project is of two year's duration and contains three major tasks: Project Management Plan, Pilot Plant Modification, and Comparison of Preliminary Data With Los Alamos Model: We will determine if the kinetic model developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory can be used to guide our experimental effort. Other subtasks under Task 3 include: Pressure/Temperature/Reaction Time Effects; Study of Different Injection Systems: Different schemes for introducing and mixing reactants before or within the reactor will be evaluated theoretically and/or experimentally; Study of Different Quench Systems; Effect of Reactor Geometry; Effect of Reactor Recycle; and Enhanced-Yield Catalyst Study. 5 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

HYLIFE-II power conversion system design and cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power conversion system for the HYLIFE-2 fusion power plant has been defined to include the IHX's (intermediate heat exchangers) and everything that support the exchange of energy from the reactor. It is referred to simply as the BOP (balance of plant) in the rest of this report. The above is a convenient division between the reactor equipment and the rest of the fusion power plant since the BOP design and cost then depend only on the specification of the thermal power to the IHX's and the temperature of the primary Flibe coolant into and out of the IHX's, and is almost independent of the details of the reactor design. The main efforts during the first year have been on the definition and thermal-hydraulics of the IHX's, the steam generators and the steam power plant, leading to the definition of a reference BOP with the molten salt, Flibe, as the primary coolant. A summary of the key results in each of these areas is given in this report.

Hoffman, M.A. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Materials Engineering)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Design studies of mirror machine reactors  

SciTech Connect

An overview is presented of a mirror fusion reactor design study. The general methodology used in the study is discussed, the reactor is described, and some design alternatives to the present approach are enumerated. The system chosen for this design study is a mirror machine with direct conversion using D- T fuel. The nominal power output is 200 MW. The coil geometry is the Yin Yang, minimum B with a vacuum mirror ratio of 3. The coil is of particular utility because of its simple conductor shapes and because the two separate conductors, by proper B-field biasing, allow the charged particles to escape preferentially through one mirror only and through a relatively small window'' of that mirror. This is necessary for direct converter economy. (auth)

Werner, R.W.; Carlson, G.A.; Hovingh, J.; Lee, J.D.; Peterson, M.A.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Medium Power Lead Alloy Reactors: Missions for this Reactor Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [~100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant. These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO2 power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a long operating cycle length by enhancing in-core breeding. For the actinide-burning mission three design variants were produced: (1) a fertile-free actinide burner, i.e., a single-tier strategy, (2) a minor actinide burner with plutonium burned in the LWR fleet, i.e., a two-tier strategy, and (3) an actinide burner with characteristics balanced to also favor economic electricity production.

Neil E. Todreas; Philip E. MacDonald; Pavel Hejzlar; Jacopo Buongiorno; Eric Loewen

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

2012-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

390

EFFECT OF DENTAL POLYMER DEGREE OF CONVERSION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of Dental Polymer Degree of Conversion on Oral Biofilms. Alison Kraigsley, Sheng Lin-Gibson, Nancy J. Lin. National ...

391

Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 193 Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables

392

Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran. Battelle ...

393

Energy Storage, Transport, and Conversion in CNST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage, Transport, and Conversion in CNST. Nanotribology ... Theory and Modeling of Materials for Renewable Energy. Nanostructures ...

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Contact PNNL About This Technology ...

395

Structured catalyst bed and method for conversion of feed materials to chemical products and liquid fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is a structured monolith reactor and method that provides for controlled Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The invention controls mass transport limitations leading to higher CO conversion and lower methane selectivity. Over 95 wt % of the total product liquid hydrocarbons obtained from the monolithic catalyst are in the carbon range of C.sub.5-C.sub.18. The reactor controls readsorption of olefins leading to desired products with a preselected chain length distribution and enhanced overall reaction rate. And, liquid product analysis shows readsorption of olefins is reduced, achieving a narrower FT product distribution.

Wang, Yong (Richland, WA), Liu; Wei (Richland, WA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

MBE Multiple Biometric Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... recognition field. Revised MBE-STILL Test Plan and API. 2010-01 ... prior versions. Final MBE-STILL Test Plan and API. 2009-12 ...

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Biometric Quality Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3. Interstate Photo System (IPS) Enhancements • (Mugshots with Scars, Marks, & Tatoos) 4. Disposition Reporting Improvements (DRI) ...

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

Biometrics Test Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Environment: electrical supply, uninterruptible power backup, and air conditioning. This project provides continual technology ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

NVLAP Biometrics Testing LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reserves the right to update, modify or rename the set of test methods associated with any scope of accreditation. Proficiency Testing Requirements. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

400

DNA and Biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... January 17, 2008 Press Release From Mayor Bloomberg's STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS Efforts towards Portable/Mobile DNA Devices ...

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Conversion of municipal solid waste to hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen via the steps of hydrothermal pretreatment, gasification and purification. LLNL`s focus has been on hydrothermal pretreatment of MSW in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. The project has evolved along 3 parallel paths: laboratory scale experiments, pilot scale processing, and process modeling. Initial laboratory-scale MSW treatment results (e.g., viscosity, slurry solids content) over a range of temperatures and times with newspaper and plastics will be presented. Viscosity measurements have been correlated with results obtained at MRL. A hydrothermal treatment pilot facility has been rented from Texaco and is being reconfigured at LLNL; the status of that facility and plans for initial runs will be described. Several different operational scenarios have been modeled. Steady state processes have been modeled with ASPEN PLUS; consideration of steam injection in a batch mode was handled using continuous process modules. A transient model derived from a general purpose packed bed model is being developed which can examine the aspects of steam heating inside the hydrothermal reactor vessel. These models have been applied to pilot and commercial scale scenarios as a function of MSW input parameters and have been used to outline initial overall economic trends. Part of the modeling, an overview of the MSW gasification process and the modeling of the MSW as a process material, was completed by a DOE SERS (Science and Engineering Research Semester) student. The ultimate programmatic goal is the technical demonstration of the gasification of MSW to hydrogen at the laboratory and pilot scale and the economic analysis of the commercial feasibility of such a process.

Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

Treshow, M.

1958-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

404

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Friedman, S. ,"Conversion of Anthraxylon - Kinetics ofiv- LBL 116807 CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COALand Mechanisms of Coal Conversion to Clean Fuel,iI pre-

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

STRIPPING OF PROCESS CONDENSATES FROM SOLID FUEL CONVERSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aqueous from Fossil Fuel Conversion Processes", ~l:;_£J. _and Pollution Control in Coal Conversion Processes", U. s.By-Product Waters from Coal Conversion Processes", American

Hill, Joel David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft Programmatic Environ-Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistant Secre-

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,thermal energy conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean Systems

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoporous Thermal-to-Electrical Energy Conversion System (hand, the indirect energy conversion systems tend to beIn a direct energy conversion system, heat can be converted

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Name NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion AgencyCompany Organization...

410

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

High resolution A/D conversion based on piecewise conversion at lower resolution  

SciTech Connect

Piecewise conversion of an analog input signal is performed utilizing a plurality of relatively lower bit resolution A/D conversions. The results of this piecewise conversion are interpreted to achieve a relatively higher bit resolution A/D conversion without sampling frequency penalty.

Terwilliger, Steve (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

NUCLEAR REACTORS AND EARTHQUAKES  

SciTech Connect

A book is presented which supplies pertinent seismological information to engineers in the nuclear reactor field. Data are presented on the occurrence, intensity, and wave shapes. Techniques are described for evaluating the response of structures to such events. Certain reactor types and their modes of operation are described briefly. Various protection systems are considered. Earthquake experience in industrial and reactor plants is described. (D.L.C.)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

Spinrad, B.I.

1960-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

414

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Capabilities Biochemical Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are working to improve the efficiency and economics of the biochemical conversion process by focusing on the most challenging steps in the process. Biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels involves three basic steps: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock through: Pretreatment Conditioning and enzymatic hydrolysis Enzyme development. Fermenting these biomass-derived feedstocks using: Microorganisms for fermentation. Processing the fermentation product to produce fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels, chemicals, heat, and electricity by: Integrating the bioprocess. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the biochemical conversion

416

Biomass thermochemical conversion program: 1987 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate a base of scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels. To accomplish this objective, in fiscal year 1987 the Thermochemical Conversion Program sponsored research activities in the following four areas: Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology; Gasification Technology; Direct Combustion Technology; Program Support Activities. In this report an overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program is presented. Specific research projects are then described. Major accomplishments for 1987 are summarized.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

Isaksson, J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

422

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

King, L.D.P.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Materials measurement and accounting in an operating plutonium conversion and purification process. Phase I. Process modeling and simulation. [PUCSF code  

SciTech Connect

A model of an operating conversion and purification process for the production of reactor-grade plutonium dioxide was developed as the first component in the design and evaluation of a nuclear materials measurement and accountability system. The model accurately simulates process operation and can be used to identify process problems and to predict the effect of process modifications.

Thomas, C.C. Jr.; Ostenak, C.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Impact of Feed Injection Strategies on Fluidization Dynamics for Biomass Thermochemical Conversion  

SciTech Connect

To better understand some of the key parameters that control biomass conversion processes in dense granular beds, an efficient computational framework for large-scale simulations of dense, reactive particulate flows using a Lagrange-Euler approach has been developed. This framework is applied here to the investigation of feed injection in a hot fluidized bed reactor, and how it may impact the biomass conversion dynamics. A simple, pseudo-two dimensional configuration is adopted to facilitate the parametric study. Chemical processes are modeled using global kinetics that accurately reproduce particle mass loss and gas release. A posteriori analysis of particle heating rate, mixing and segregation, along with products distribution and residence time inside the reactor is performed for different injection strategies, and compared to non-reactive cases. Results highlight some non-trivial coupling between chemistry and flow dynamics.

Malhotra, K. N.; Pepiot, P.; Capecelatro, J. S.; Desjardins, O.; Grout, R.; Nimlos, M. R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Formation of alcohol conversion catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of the present invention involves a composition containing an intimate mixture of (a) metal oxide support particles and (b) a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, its method of manufacture, and its method of use for converting alcohols to aldehydes. During the conversion process, catalytically active metal oxide from the discrete catalytic metal oxide particles migrates to the oxide support particles and forms a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on the oxide support particle to form a catalyst composition having a higher specific activity than the admixed particle composition.

Wachs, Israel E. (Bridgewater, NJ); Cai, Yeping (Louisville, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program: 1986 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. Thermochemical conversion processes can generate a variety of products such as gasoline hydrocarbon fuels, natural gas substitutes, or heat energy for electric power generation. The US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on biomass conversion technologies through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been designated the Technical Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program with overall responsibility for the Program. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1986. 88 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

THE SNAP-II POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS. TOPICAL REPORT NO. 3  

SciTech Connect

SNAP II is the designation for a nuclear auxiliary power unit, designed primarily for utilization in the WS117L satellite vehicle. The SNAP II system consists of a reactor heat source, a mercury Rankin engin, and an alternator. Dynamic analysis of the power conversion system was conducted utilizing a comprehensive analog computer simulation. Feasibility of a parasitic load control for numerous system disturbances was demonstrated. (auth)

Deibel, D.L.; Mrava, G.L.; Seldner, K.

1960-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Biological conversion of synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H[sub 2]0 [yields] CO[sub 2] + H[sub 2]. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H[sub 2]S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25[degree] and 30[degree]C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30[degree], 32[degree] or 34[degree]C. The rate of conversion of COs and H[sub 2]O to CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2]S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30[degree]C was found to be 0.243 h[sup [minus]1]. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: [mu] = [sub 351] + I[sub o]/[sup 0.152]I[sub o]. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Foreign Research Reactor/Domestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research ReactorDomestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

431

Enhancement of methane conversion using electric fields. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of novel, economical, processes for the conversion of natural gas to more valuable projects such as methanol, ethylene and other organic oxygenates or higher hydrocarbons. The methodologies of the project are to investigate and develop low temperature electric discharges and electric field-enhanced catalysis for carrying out these conversions. In the case of low temperature discharges, the conversion is carried out at ambient temperature which in effect trades high temperature thermal energy for electric energy as the driving force for conversion. The low operating temperatures relax the thermodynamic constraints on the product distribution found at high temperature and also removes the requirements of large thermal masses required for current technologies. With the electric field-enhanced conversion, the operating temperatures are expected to be below those currently required for such processes as oxidative coupling, thereby allowing for a higher degree of catalytic selectivity while maintaining high activity. During this quarter the authors worked on some kinetics experiments and also did some catalyst screening, particularly looking for correlations with surface OH and oxygen groups to help determine the manner in which these surfaces alter the selectivities. On the dielectric systems they looked at power versus frequency and conversions relationships, worked on oxygen utilization and started building a short residence time reactor for studying intermediate formation and destruction.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

ADMINISTRATION OF ORNL RESEARCH REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Organization of the ORNL Operations division for administration of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Low Intensity Testing Reactor, and the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor is described. (J.R.D.)

Casto, W.R.

1962-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

433

Production reactor characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Reactors for the production of special nuclear materials share many similarities with commercial nuclear power plants. Each relies on nuclear fission, uses uranium fuel, and produces large quantities of thermal power. However, there are some important differences in production reactor characteristics that may best be discussed in terms of mission, role, and technology.

Thiessen, C.W.; Hootman, H.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Advanced converter reactors  

SciTech Connect

Advanced converter reactors (ACRs) of primary US interest are those which can be commercialized within about 20 years, and are: Advanced Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Control Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors (CANDU type), and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. These reactors can operate on uranium, thorium, or uranium-thorium fuel cycles, but have the greatest fuel utilization on thorium type cycles. The water reactors tend to operate more economically on uranium cycles, while the HTGR is more economical on thorium cycles. Thus, the HTGR had the greatest practical potential for improving fuel utilization. If the US has 3.4 to 4 million tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at reasonable costs, ACRs can make important contributions to maintaining a high nuclear power level for many decades; further, they work well with fast breeder reactors in the long term under symbiotic fueling conditions. Primary nuclear data needs of ACRs are integral measurements of reactivity coefficients and resonance absorption integrals.

Kasten, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor system incorporating a reactor of the heterogeneous boiling water type is described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a core submerged adwater in the lower half of a pressure vessel and two distribution rings connected to a source of water are disposed within the pressure vessel above the reactor core, the lower distribution ring being submerged adjacent to the uppcr end of the reactor core and the other distribution ring being located adjacent to the top of the pressure vessel. A feed-water control valve, responsive to the steam demand of the load, is provided in the feedwater line to the distribution rings and regulates the amount of feed water flowing to each distribution ring, the proportion of water flowing to the submerged distribution ring being proportional to the steam demand of the load. This invention provides an automatic means exterior to the reactor to control the reactivity of the reactor over relatively long periods of time without relying upon movement of control rods or of other moving parts within the reactor structure.

Treshow, M.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

NEUTRONIC REACTOR BURIAL ASSEMBLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burial assembly is shown whereby an entire reactor core may be encased with lead shielding, withdrawn from the reactor site and buried. This is made possible by a five-piece interlocking arrangement that may be easily put together by remote control with no aligning of bolt holes or other such close adjustments being necessary.

Treshow, M.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Integral Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Lineberry, M.J. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Final report, September 1, 1990--January 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous work on isosynthesis (conversion of synthesis gas to isobutane and isobutylene) was performed at very low conversions or extreme process conditions. The objectives of this research were (1) determine the optimum process conditions for isosynthesis; (2) determine the optimum catalyst preparation method and catalyst composition/properties for isosynthesis; (3) determine the kinetics for the best catalyst; (4) develop reactor models for trickle bed, slurry, and fixed bed reactors; and (5) simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for isosynthesis. More improvement in catalyst activity and selectivity is needed before isosynthesis can become a commercially feasible (stand-alone) process. Catalysts prepared by the precipitation method show the most promise for future development as compared with those prepared hydrothermally, by calcining zirconyl nitrate, or by a modified sol-gel method. For current catalysts the high temperatures (>673 K) required for activity also cause the production of methane (because of thermodynamics). A catalyst with higher activity at lower temperatures would magnify the unique selectivity of zirconia for isobutylene. Perhaps with a more active catalyst and acidification, oxygenate production could be limited at lower temperatures. Pressures above 50 atm cause an undesirable shift in product distribution toward heavier hydrocarbons. A model was developed that can predict carbon monoxide conversion an product distribution. The rate equation for carbon monoxide conversion contains only a rate constant and an adsorption equilibrium constant. The product distribution was predicted using a simple ratio of the rate of CO conversion. This report is divided into Introduction, Experimental, and Results and Discussion sections.

Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

Explorations of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems By Andrewof Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems by Andrew

Duffin, Andrew Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Progress on reactor programs and in general engineering research and development programs is summarized. Research and development are reported on water-cooled reactors including EBWR and Borax-V, sodium-cooled reactors including ZPR-III, IV, and IX, Juggernaut, and EBR-I and II. Other work included a review of fast reactor technology, and studies on nuclear superheat, thermal and fast reactor safety, and reactor physics. Effort was also devoted to reactor materials and fuels development, heat engineering, separation processes and advanced reactor concepts. (J.R.D.)

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing a technology review to assess the market for commercially available power electronic converters that can be used to connect microturbines to either the electric grid or local loads. The intent of the review is to facilitate an assessment of the present status of marketed power conversion technology to determine how versatile the designs are for potentially providing different services to the grid based on changes in market direction, new industry standards, and the critical needs of the local service provider. The project includes data gathering efforts and documentation of the state-of-the-art design approaches that are being used by microturbine manufacturers in their power conversion electronics development and refinement. This project task entails a review of power converters used in microturbines sized between 20 kW and 1 MW. The power converters permit microturbine generators, with their non-synchronous, high frequency output, to interface with the grid or local loads. The power converters produce 50- to 60-Hz power that can be used for local loads or, using interface electronics, synchronized for connection to the local feeder and/or microgrid. The power electronics enable operation in a stand-alone mode as a voltage source or in grid-connect mode as a current source. Some microturbines are designed to automatically switch between the two modes. The information obtained in this data gathering effort will provide a basis for determining how close the microturbine industry is to providing services such as voltage regulation, combined control of both voltage and current, fast/seamless mode transfers, enhanced reliability, reduced cost converters, reactive power supply, power quality, and other ancillary services. Some power quality improvements will require the addition of storage devices; therefore, the task should also determine what must be done to enable the power conversion circuits to accept a varying dc voltage source. The study will also look at technical issues pertaining to the interconnection and coordinated/compatible operation of multiple microturbines. It is important to know today if modifications to provide improved operation and additional services will entail complete redesign, selected component changes, software modifications, or the addition of power storage devices. This project is designed to provide a strong technical foundation for determining present technical needs and identifying recommendations for future work.

Staunton, R.H.

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

Integrating Safeguards into the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility  

SciTech Connect

In September 2000, the United States and the Russian Federation entered into an agreement which stipulates each country will irreversibly transform 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium into material which could not be used for weapon purposes. Supporting the Department of Energy's (DOE) program to dispose of excess nuclear materials, the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) is being designed and constructed to disassemble the weapon ''pits'' and convert the nuclear material to an oxide form for fabrication into reactor fuel at the separate Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility. The PDCF design incorporates automation to the maximum extent possible to facilitate material safeguards, reduce worker dose, and improve processing efficiency. This includes provisions for automated guided vehicle movements for shipping containers, material transport via automated conveyor between processes, remote process control monitoring, and automated Nondestructive Assay product systems.

Clark, T.G.

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

443

Non-oxidative conversion of methane with continuous hydorgen removal  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to overcome the restrictions of non-oxidative methane pyrolysis and oxidative coupling of methane by transferring hydrogen across a selective inorganic membrane between methane and air streams, without simultaneous transport of hydrocarbon reactants or products. This will make the overall reaction system exothermic, remove the thermodynamic barrier to high conversion, and eliminate the formation of carbon oxides. Our approach is to couple C-H bond activation and hydrogen removal by passage of hydrogen atoms through a dense ceramic membrane. In our membrane reactor, catalytic methane pyrolysis produces C2+ hydrogen carbons and aromatics on the one side of the membrane and hydrogen is removed through an oxide film and combusted with air on the opposite side. This process leads to a net reaction with the stoichiometry and thermodynamic properties of oxidative coupling, but without contact between the carbon atoms and oxygen species.

Borry, R.W. III [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Iglesia, E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Energy Calculator- Common Units and Conversions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Calculators for Energy Used in the United States: Coal Electricity Natural Gas Crude Oil Gasoline Diesel & Heating Oil Coal Conversion Calculator Short Tons Btu Megajoules Metric Tons Clear Calculate 1 Short Ton = 20,169,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007) Electricity Conversion Calculator KilowattHours Btu Megajoules million Calories Clear Calculate 1 KilowattHour = 3,412 Btu Natural Gas Conversion Calculator Cubic Feet Btu Megajoules Cubic Meters Clear Calculate 1 Cubic Foot = 1,028 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007); 1 therm = 100,000 Btu; 1 terajoule = 1,000,000 megajoules Crude Oil Conversion Calculator Barrels Btu Megajoules Metric Tons* Clear Calculate 1 Barrel = 42 U.S. gallons = 5,800,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption,

445

Documents: DUF6 Conversion EIS Supporting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUF6 Conversion EIS DUF6 Conversion EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents NEPA Compliance: DUF6 Conversion EIS Supporting Documents PDF Icon Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project 38 KB details PDF Icon Press Release: DOE Seeks Public Input for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Environmental Impact Statement 90 KB details PDF Icon Advance Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 52 KB details PDF Icon Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 60 KB details PDF Icon Overview: Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Management Program

446

DUF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternatives Alternatives Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives Alternatives included in the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs. Proposed Action The proposed action evaluated in each EIS is to construct and operate a conversion facility at each site for conversion of the DOE DUF6 inventory. The time period considered is a construction period of approximately 2 years, an operational period of 25 years at Paducah and 18 years at Portsmouth, and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facility of about 3 years. The EISs assess the potential environmental impacts from the following proposed activities: Construction, operation, maintenance, and D&D of the proposed DUF6 conversion facility at each site; Transportation of uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility;

447

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2005/1217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2005 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

448

Power conversion apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power conversion apparatus includes an interfacing circuit that enables a current source inverter to operate from a voltage energy storage device (voltage source), such as a battery, ultracapacitor or fuel cell. The interfacing circuit, also referred to as a voltage-to-current converter, transforms the voltage source into a current source that feeds a DC current to a current source inverter. The voltage-to-current converter also provides means for controlling and maintaining a constant DC bus current that supplies the current source inverter. The voltage-to-current converter also enables the current source inverter to charge the voltage energy storage device, such as during dynamic braking of a hybrid electric vehicle, without the need of reversing the direction of the DC bus current.

Su, Gui-Jia (Knoxville, TN)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cleanup of hydrocarbon conversion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a substantially contaminant-free second hydrocarbon feed using a second reforming catalyst, in a catalytic-reforming system having equipment contaminated through contact with a contaminant-containing prior feed. It comprises: contacting the first hydrocarbon feed in the catalytic-reforming system at first reforming conditions with a first reforming catalyst until contaminant removal from the conversion system is substantially completed and the system is contaminant-free; thereafter replacing the first reforming catalyst in the contaminant-free catalytic-reforming system with a second reforming catalyst; and thereafter contacting the second hydrocarbon feed in the contaminant-free catalytic-reforming system with the second reforming catalyst at second reforming conditions.

Peer, R.L.; Russ, M.B.

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas: Interim Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process is being developed that produces a fuel gas with a heating value of 500 Btu/SCF from diverse forms of biomass, including shredded bark, wood chips, and sawdust. The system uses a high throughput, non-oxygen gasifier that employs sand circulation to supply process heat. Results obtained with a 10-inch I.D. gasifier are presented and compared with those in a 6-inch I.D. reactor. Feed rates up to 12 tons/day (dry) have been achieved corresponding to a specific wood throughput of 2000 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr. Gas compositions in the two reactors are in excellent agreement and performance in the larger reactor, as measured by carbon conversion, is significantly improved. Cost projections comparing this process with direct combustion are presented that indicate gasification technology should have very significant cost advantages for both generation of plant steam and cogeneration of electricity. 5 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Feldmann, H.G.; Paisley, M.A.; Appelbaum, H.R.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Indirect coal liquefaction, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive review of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, including fixed, fluidized, and bubble column reactors, was undertaken in order to develop an information base before initiating the design of the Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction PDU as a part of the Generic Coal Conversion Facilities to be built at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The pilot plant will include a fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactor for the F-T mode of operation. The review encompasses current status of both these technologies, their key variables, catalyst development, future directions, and potential improvement areas. However, more emphasis has been placed on the slurry bubble column reactor since this route is likely to be the preferred technology for commercialization, offering process advantages and, therefore, better economics than fixed and fluidized bed approaches.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Isotope separation by selective charge conversion and field deflection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A deuterium-tritium separation system wherein a source beam comprised of positively ionized deuterium (D.sup.+) and tritium (T.sup.+) is converted at different charge-exchange cell sections of the system to negatively ionized deuterium (D.sup.-) and tritium (T.sup.-). First, energy is added to the beam to accelerate the D.sup.+ ions to the velocity that is optimum for conversion of the D.sup.+ ions to D.sup.- ions in a charge-exchange cell. The T.sup.+ ions are accelerated at the same time, but not to the optimum velocity since they are heavier than the D.sup.+ ions. The T.sup.+ ions are, therefore, not converted to T.sup.- ions when the D.sup.+ ions are converted to D.sup.- ions. This enables effective separation of the beam by deflection of the isotopes with an electrostatic field, the D.sup.- ions being deflected in one direction and the T.sup.+ ions being deflected in the opposite direction. Next, more energy is added to the deflected beam of T.sup.+ ions to bring the T.sup.+ ions to the optimum velocity for their conversion to T.sup.- ions. In a particular use of the invention, the beams of D.sup.- and T.sup.- ions are separately further accelerated and then converted to energetic neutral particles for injection as fuel into a thermonuclear reactor. The reactor exhaust of D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ and the D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ that was not converted in the respective sections is combined with the source beam and recycled through the system to increase the efficiency of the system.

Hickman, Robert G. (Livermore, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Introduction to Solar Photon Conversion  

SciTech Connect

The efficient and cost-effective direct conversion of solar photons into solar electricity and solar fuels is one of the most important scientific and technological challenges of this century. It is estimated that at least 20 terawatts of carbon-free energy (1 and 1/2 times the total amount of all forms of energy consumed today globally), in the form of electricity and liquid and gaseous fuels, will be required by 2050 in order to avoid the most serious consequences of global climate change and to ensure adequate global energy supply that will avoid economic chaos. But in order for solar energy to contribute a major fraction of future carbon-free energy supplies, it must be priced competitively with, or perhaps even be less costly than, energy from fossil fuels and nuclear power as well as other renewable energy resources. The challenge of delivering very low-cost solar fuels and electricity will require groundbreaking advances in both fundamental and applied science. This Thematic Issue on Solar Photon Conversion will provide a review by leading researchers on the present status and prognosis of the science and technology of direct solar photoconversion to electricity and fuels. The topics covered include advanced and novel concepts for low-cost photovoltaic (PV) energy based on chemistry (dye-sensitized photoelectrodes, organic and molecular PV, multiple exciton generation in quantum dots, singlet fission), solar water splitting, redox catalysis for water oxidation and reduction, the role of nanoscience and nanocrystals in solar photoconversion, photoelectrochemical energy conversion, and photoinduced electron transfer. The direct conversion of solar photons to electricity via photovoltaic (PV) cells is a vital present-day commercial industry, with PV module production growing at about 75%/year over the past 3 years. However, the total installed yearly averaged energy capacity at the end of 2009 was about 7 GW-year (0.2% of global electricity usage). Thus, there is potential for the PV industry to grow enormously in the future (by factors of 100-300) in order for it to provide a significant fraction of total global electricity needs (currently about 3.5 TW). Such growth will be greatly facilitated by, and probably even require, major advances in the conversion efficiency and cost reduction for PV cells and modules; such advances will depend upon advances in PV science and technology, and these approaches are discussed in this Thematic Issue. Industrial and domestic electricity utilization accounts for only about 30% of the total energy consumed globally. Most ({approx}70%) of our energy consumption is in the form of liquid and gaseous fuels. Presently, solar-derived fuels are produced from biomass (labeled as biofuels) and are generated through biological photosynthesis. The global production of liquid biofuels in 2009 was about 1.6 million barrels/day, equivalent to a yearly output of about 2.5 EJ (about 1.3% of global liquid fuel utilization). The direct conversion of solar photons to fuels produces high-energy chemical products that are labeled as solar fuels; these can be produced through nonbiological approaches, generally called artificial photosynthesis. The feedstocks for artificial photosynthesis are H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, either reacting as coupled oxidation-reduction reactions, as in biological photosynthesis, or by first splitting H{sub 2}O into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and then reacting the solar H{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} (or CO produced from CO2) in a second step to produce fuels through various well-known chemical routes involving syngas, water gas shift, and alcohol synthesis; in some applications, the generated solar H{sub 2} itself can be used as an excellent gaseous fuel, for example, in fuel cells. But at the present time, there is no solar fuels industry. Much research and development are required to create a solar fuels industry, and this Thematic Issue presents several reviews on the relevant solar fuels science and technology. The first three manuscripts relate to the daunting problem of producing

Nozik, A.; Miller, J.

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

454

Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Frequency Conversion Interfaces for Photonic Quantum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by nearly two orders of magnitude while maintaining equal conversion efficiency. ... focused on developing approaches to tune the energy levels of ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

457

Novel Nitride-Modified Multielectron Conversion Electrode ...  

Novel Nitride-Modified Multielectron Conversion Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

458

Share of Conversion Capacity - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the early to mid 1980’s, Atlantic Basin refiners rapidly expanded their conversion capacity as a consequence of the belief that world crude production would get ...

459

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically converting an alcohol ...

460

Direct Conversion of Biomass into Transportation Fuels  

Direct Conversion of Biomass into Transportation Fuels . Return to Marketing Summary. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Conversion of Ultra High Performance Carbon Fiber  

Conversion of Ultra High Performance Carbon Fiber Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

462

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

463

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically ...

464

Converse, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Converse, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

465

Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

465– Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

Margulis, Harry L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Processing and Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

sugar-rich stream (hydrolyzate) is fed to organisms that ferment the sugars to fuel precursor molecules. The biochemical conversion platform also has a large stake in some...

467

"Approaches to Ultrahigh Efficiency Solar Energy Conversion"...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

"Approaches to Ultrahigh Efficiency Solar Energy Conversion" Webinar Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News...

468

"Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop hosted by LMI-EFRC Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events...

469

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Previous page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty notation eg, 123(45) | Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents. Top. ...

470

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Slurry reactor design studies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a nuclear fission reactor which has a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200 to 1800/sup 0/C range, and even higher to 2500/sup 0/C.

Minkov, V.

1984-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor  

SciTech Connect

This invention teaches a nuclear fission reactor having a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200.degree.-1800.degree. C. range, and even higher to 2500.degree. C., limited only by the thermal effectiveness of the structural materials, increasing the efficiency of power generation from the normal 30-35% with 300.degree.-500.degree. C. upper limit temperature to 50-65%. Irradiation of the circulating liquid fuel, as contrasted to only localized irradiation of a solid fuel, provides improved fuel utilization.

Minkov, Vladimir (Skokie, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

476

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

1959-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Fast Breeder Reactor studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Microfluidic electrochemical reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Mitrovski, Svetlana M. (Urbana, IL)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactor conversion biometrics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Thermocatalytic conversion of food processing wastes: Topical report, FY 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The efficient utilization of waste produced during food processing operations is a topic of growing importance to the industry. While incineration is an attractive option for wastes with relatively low ash and moisture contents (i.e., under about 50 wt % moisture), it is not suitable for wastes with high moisture contents. Cheese whey, brewer's spent grain, and fruit pomace are examples of food processing wastes that are generally too wet to burn efficiently and cleanly. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a thermocatalytic conversion process that can convert high-moisture wastes (up to 98 wt % moisture) to a medium-Btu fuel gas consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. At the same time, the COD of these waste streams is reduced by 90% to 99%, Organic wastes are converted by thermocatalytic treatment at 350/degree/C to 400/degree/C and 3000 to 4000 psig. The process offers a relatively simple solution to waste treatment while providing net energy production from wastes containing as little as 2 wt % organic solids (this is equivalent to a COD of approximately 25,000 mg/L). This report describes continuous reactor system (CRS) experiments that have been conducted with food processing wastes. The purpose of the CRS experiments was to provide kinetic and catalyst lifetime data, which could not be obtained with the batch reactor tests. These data are needed for commercial scaleup of the process.

Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Topical report: Economic evaluations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the proposed research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H{sub 2} from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating c