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1

Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to conduct laboratory and field experiments to determine the sensitivity of low frequency electrical measurements (resistivity and induced polarization) to the processes of corrosion and precipitation that are believed to limit permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance. The research was divided into four sets of experiments that were each written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal: [1] A laboratory experiment to define the controls of aqueous chemistry (electrolyte activity; pH; valence) and total zero valent iron (Fe0) available surface area on the electrical properties of Fe0 columns. [2] A laboratory experiment to determine the impact of corrosion and precipitation on the electrical response of synthetic Fe0 columns as a result of geochemical reactions with NaSO4 and NaCO3 electrolytes. [3] Laboratory experiments on a sequence of cores retrieved from the Kansas City PRB to determine the magnitude of electrical and geochemical changes within a field active PRB after eight years of operation [4] Field-scale cross borehole resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of the Kansas City PRB to evaluate the potential of electrical imaging as a technology for non-invasive, long-term monitoring of indicators of reduced PRB performance This report first summarizes the findings of the four major experiments conducted under this research. The reader is referred to the four papers in Appendices 1-4 for a full description of each experiment, including motivation and significance, technical details, findings and implications. The deliverables of the project, including the publications, conference papers and new collaborative arrangements that have resulted are then described. Appendices 5-6 contain two technical reports written by co-PI Korte describing (1) supporting geochemical measurements, and (2) the coring procedure, conducted at the Kansas City PRB as part of this project.

Slater, Lee D.; Korte, N.; Baker, J.

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

2

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barrier Field Projects Durango, Colorado DOE installed a PRB in October 1995 to treat ground water from a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Durango, Colorado Read more Cañon City, Colorado ESL personnel conduct tests and help evaluate performance at other PRB sites, such as Cotter Corporation's Cañon City site in Colorado. Read more Monticello, Utah Installation of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello, Utah, millsite was completed June 30, 1999, as an Interim Remedial Action. Read more A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a zone of reactive material placed underground to intercept and react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils with reactive

3

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

4

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

5

Microsoft Word - S01394_PRB_ZVI.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GJ719-2004 GJ719-2004 ESL-RPT-2004-06 Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site September 2004 Prepared by Environmental Sciences Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally blank Signature Page Document Number S0139400 PRB Using Granular ZVI-2004 Annual Report U.S. Department of Energy Page iv September 2004 End of current text Document Number S0139400 Contents U.S. Department of Energy PRB Using Granular ZVI-2004 Annual Report September 2004 Page v Contents Signature Page ...............................................................................................................................

6

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

7

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support January 2004 Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

8

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

9

Microsoft Word - S0212500_HydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update January 2006 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier-November 2005 Update January 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello PRB-November 2005 Update January 2006 Doc. No. S0212500 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................

10

Microsoft Word - S0212500_HydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update January 2006 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier-November 2005 Update January 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello PRB-November 2005 Update January 2006 Doc. No. S0212500 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................

11

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah

12

PRB mines mature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and

14

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah Alternatives for Mending a Permeable Reactive Barrier at a Former Uranium Milling Site: Monticello, Utah More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive

15

Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing

16

Final Report- Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

17

FIELD TEST INSTRUCTION 100-NR-2 OPERABLE UNIT DESIGN OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR SEQUESTRATION OF SR-90 SATURATED ZONE APATITE PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER EXTENSION  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this field test instruction is to provide technical guidance for aqueous injection emplacement of an extension apatite permeable reactive barrier (PRE) for the sequestration of strontium-90 (Sr-90) using a high concentration amendment formulation. These field activities will be conducted according to the guidelines established in DOE/RL-2010-29, 100-NR-2 Design Optimization Study, hereafter referred to as the DOS. The DOS supports the Federal Facility Agreement Consent Order (EPA et al., 1989), Milestone M-16-06-01, and 'Complete Construction of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at 100-N.' Injections of apatite precursor chemicals will occur at an equal distance intervals on each end of the existing PRE to extend the PRB from the existing 91 m (300 ft) to at least 274 m (900 ft). Field testing at the 100-N Area Apatite Treatability Test Site, as depicted on Figure 1, shows that the barrier is categorized by two general hydrologic conceptual models based on overall well capacity and contrast between the Hanford and Ringold hydraulic conductivities. The upstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by relatively low overall well specific capacity. This is estimated from well development data and a lower contrast in hydraulic conductivity between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formations. Comparison of test results from these two locations indicate that permeability contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation is significantly less over the upstream one-third of the barrier. The estimated hydraulic conductivity for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the upstream portion of the barrier based on observations during emplacement of the existing 91 m (300 ft) PRB is approximately 12 and 10 m/day (39 and 32 ft/day), respectively (PNNL-17429). However, these estimates should be used as a rough guideline only, as significant variability in hydraulic conductivity is likely to be observed in the barrier extension wells, particularly those in the Ringold formation. The downstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by generally higher well specific capacity and a larger hydraulic conductivity contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation. Hydraulic conductivity rates for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the downstream portion of the barrier were estimated at 29 and 9 m/day (95 and 29 ft/day), respectively (with the Hanford formation hydraulic conductivity being greater in the downstream portion than the upstream portion). Once again, it should be noted that the actual conductivities may vary significantly, and the values state above should only be used as a rough initial estimates. Optimum apatite emplacement has been shown to occur when injections targeting the Hanford formation and the Ringold Formation are performed separately. The remainder of this test instruction provides details for conducting these formation-targeted injections.

BOWLES NA

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

In Situ Formation Of Reactive Barriers For Pollution Control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating soil contamination by forming one or more zones of oxidized material in the path of percolating groundwater is disclosed. The zone or barrier region is formed by delivering an oxidizing agent into the ground for reaction with an existing soil component. The oxidizing agent modifies the existing soil component creating the oxidized zone. Subsequently when soil contaminates migrate into the zone, the oxidized material is available to react with the contaminates and degrade them into benign products. The existing soil component can be an oxidizable mineral such as manganese, and the oxidizing agent can be ozone gas or hydrogen peroxide. Soil contaminates can be volatile organic compounds. Oxidized barriers can be used single or in combination with other barriers.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Riley, Robert G. (West Richland, WA)

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

19

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporations Caon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporations Canon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill (April 2005)

20

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron, hydroxyapatite, magnesium oxide, and others. As the contaminant moves through the reactive material, the contaminant is either sorbed by the reactive material or chemically reacts with the material to form a less harmful substance. Because of the high risk associated with failure of a geological repository for nuclear waste, most nations favor a near-field multibarrier engineered system using backfill materials to prevent release of radionuclides into the surrounding groundwater.

Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Microsoft Word - S0162200_VariationHydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GJ803-2005 GJ803-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-01 Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Doc. No. S0162200 Page v Contents Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................

24

Microsoft Word - S0162200_VariationHydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJ803-2005 GJ803-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-01 Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Doc. No. S0162200 Page v Contents Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................

25

PRB Coal Users' Group enjoys growing interest in its concerns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is given of some of the topics discussed at the PRB Coal Users' Group annual meeting, including combustion dusts and a new session on conveyor belts. 7 figs.

Rahm, R. [CoalTech Consultants Inc. (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

pRb's role in cell fate, lineage commitment, and tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The product of the retinoblastoma gene, pRB, was the first known and cloned tumor suppressor gene and it is functionally inactivated in most human cancers. pRB is thought to suppresses tumorigenesis by restraining cellular ...

Calo-Velzquez, Eliezer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Impacts of PRB Coals on SCR Catalyst Life and Performance: Field Data from Ameren's Sioux Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States utility industry is making greater use of Powder River Basin (PRB) coals while at the same time moving towards selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for compliance with nitrogen oxide (NOx) regulations. Some catalyst test coupons in PRB fired boilers have reportedly experienced accelerated deactivation. This project studied the effects of PRB flue gas on catalytic samples at Ameren's Sioux Station.

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modelling the remediation of contaminated groundwater using zero-valent iron barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results of modelling studies on remediation of groundwater contaminated with uranium using a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at the U.S. Oak Ridge Y-12 site that are used to establish modelling techniques that are of value to other sites such as in the UK. A systematic modelling methodology has been developed to study the problem by using a suite of modelling tools. Firstly a conceptual basis of the main chemical processes representing the remediation of uranium by the ZVI PRB is developed. Two main effects involving reduction and corrosion have been identified as being relevant for the remediation processes. These are then formulated and implemented using the reactive chemical model PHREEQC to provide underpinning chemical input parameters for subsequent reactive solute transport modelling using the TRAFFIC and PHAST codes. Initial results shows that modelling can be a very cost-effective means to study the hydrogeological and geochemical processes involved and to aid understanding of the remediation concept. The modelling approaches presented and lessons learnt are thought to be relevant to other cases of contaminated land study and are likely to be of value to site management concepts which consider on-site disposal of contaminated soils and materials. (authors)

Kwong, S.; Small, J.; Tahar, B. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Hinton House, Risley, Warrington, WA (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

File:EIA-PRB-N-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PRB-N-LIQ.pdf PRB-N-LIQ.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Powder River Basin, Northern Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 13.85 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Powder River Basin, Northern Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana, Wyoming File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:34, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:34, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (13.85 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

30

File:EIA-PRB-N-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PRB-N-BOE.pdf PRB-N-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Powder River Basin, Northern Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 13.86 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Powder River Basin, Northern Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana, Wyoming File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:33, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:33, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (13.86 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

31

File:EIA-PRB-S-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PRB-S-GAS.pdf PRB-S-GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Powder River Basin, Southern Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 13.01 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Powder River Basin, Southern Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana, Wyoming File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:35, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:35, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (13.01 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

32

Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir, one is neutral and the other is acidic (pH=3). It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. We carried out reactive geothermal transport simulations using TOUGHREACT (Xu and Pruess, 1998 and 2001) to test such a conceptual model. Mn-rich smectite precipitated near the mixing front and is likely to form an impermeable barrier between regions with acidic and neutral fluids.

Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitosi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2003-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

Impacts of PRB Coals on SCR Catalyst Life and Performance: Field Data from Texas Genco's W.A. Parish Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States utility industry is seeing a trend of greater use of Powder River Basin (PRB) coals while at the same time moving towards selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for compliance with nitrogen oxides (NOx) regulations. Previous catalyst coupon tests have raised concerns within the industry that PRB coal ash could result in accelerated catalyst deactivation. The study reported here exposed catalyst coupons to PRB flue gas for 10,000 hours under realistic SCR reactor conditions in order to moni...

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical

35

Nano Materials Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Scientists at Idaho National Laboratory have developed improved nano-composite materials composed of an organic polymer constituent, an inorganic ...

36

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

37

Impacts of PRB Coals on SCR Catalyst Life and Performance: Field Data from In Situ Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the greater use of both Powder River basin (PRB) coals and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) in the utility industry, there is a concern about the effects of the high calcium coals on SCR catalyst life and performance. Using the "in situ" reactor approach, two catalysts are invloved in an ongoing long-term activity evaluation program at two test sites. The "in situ" reactor is a 2" by 2" (50mm x 50mm) cross-section probe installed in the economizer exit of utility boilers. It subjects catalyst sam...

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies.

Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Environmental Science and Engineering Div.; Lowe, K.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Life Sciences Div.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Murdoch, L.D. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Slack, W.W. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Houk, T.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States)] [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Vehicle barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

Hirsh, Robert A. (Bethel Park, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cells. PRBs can be installed using several methods including trenching or through injection wells. Treatability studies are typically conducted to evaluate the performance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nitrate Removal in NITREXTM Permeable Reactive Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was originally the injection site for our tracer solution, but instead it became our lone up-gradient well) and ~48 hours (low tide) after injection. At every time point, samples were collected from all wells and nitrate concentrations were estimated from samples taken from the injection well right before the solution

Vallino, Joseph J.

42

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero-valent iron is helping to clean up groundwater at a former uranium and vanadium ore processing mill at Monticello, Utah. LM...

43

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

44

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

1980-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA); Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Liquid metal hydrogen barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

Grover, George M. (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Thurman G. (Los Alamos, NM); Keddy, Edward S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

Field Demonstration Of Permeable Reactive Barriers To Remove  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracturing ("hydrofracking" or "fracking") now allow the extraction of vast shale gas reserves previously and contamination from fracking-fluid chemicals. Extraction of gas from shale formations may also pro- duce a mixture of fracking fluids and natural geologic formation water flowing back out of the well

49

Laboratory Screening Tests and Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barrier Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary constituents of concern in coal combustion product (CCP) leachate are inorganic elements, which have generally received less attention in the remediation literature than organic compounds. EPRI is evaluating remediation options that are applicable to the unique matrix of inorganic constituents typically found at CCP disposal sites. This report presents screening level treatability data for three CCP leachate types using several media that may be considered for in situ groundwater remediation.

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

Permeable Reactive Barriers for Inorganic and Radionuclide Contamination NOTICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document was prepared by a National Network of Environmental Management Studies grantee under a fellowship from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report was not subject to EPA peer review or technical review. EPA makes no warranties, expressed or implied, including without limitation, warranties for completeness, accuracy, usefulness of the information, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose. Moreover, the listing of any technology, corporation, company, person, or facility in this report does not constitute endorsement, approval, or recommendation by EPA. The report contains information gathered from a range of currently available sources, including project documents, reports, periodicals, Internet searches, and personal communication with involved parties. No attempts were made to independently confirm the resources used. It has been reproduced to help provide federal agencies, states, consulting engineering firms, private industries, and technology developers with information on the current status of this project.

Kate Bronstein

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Laboratory Screening Tests for Permeable Reactive Barrier Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary constituents of concern in coal combustion product (CCP) leachate are inorganic elements, which have generally received less attention in the remediation literature than organic compounds. EPRI is evaluating remediation options that are applicable to the unique matrix of inorganic constituents typically found at CCP disposal sites. This report presents screening level treatability data for three CCP leachate types using several media that may be considered for in situ groundwater remediation.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wowczuk, Andrew (Wheeling, WV); Vellenoweth, Thomas E. (Wheeling, WV)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Retractable barrier strip  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McQueen, Miles A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

55

Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

Shurter, R.P.

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

System for reactivating catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

PRB rail loadings shatter record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rail transport of coal in the Powder River Basin has expanded, with a record 2,197 trains loaded in a month. Arch Coal's Thunder basin mining complex has expanded by literally bridging the joint line railway. The dry fork mine has also celebrated its safety achievements. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fuel blending with PRB coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many methods exist to accomplish coal blending at a new or existing power plant. These range from a basic use of the secondary (emergency) stockout/reclaim system to totally automated coal handling facilities with segregated areas for two or more coals. Suitable choices for different sized coal plant are discussed, along with the major components of the coal handling facility affected by Powder River Basin coal. 2 figs.

McCartney, R.H.; Williams, R.L. Jr. [Roberts and Schaefer, Chicago, IL (United States)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Method of installing subsurface barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

60

MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER  

SciTech Connect

In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations, indicating some loss of reductive capacity within the aquifer. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) was requested to perform the following activities: (1) evaluate the most probable condition(s) that has led to the presence of Cr(VI) in 12 different barrier wells (i.e. premature loss of reductive capacity), (2) recommend methods for determining the cause of the problem, (3) recommend methods for evaluating the magnitude of the problem, (4) recommend practicable method(s) for mending the barrier that involves a long-term solution, and (5) recommend methods for extending the barrier to the northeast (e.g., changing injection procedure, changing or augmenting the injected material). Since the March 2004 workshop, a decision has been made to place a hold on the barrier extension until more is known about the cause of the problem. However, the report complies with the original request for information on all of the above activities, but focuses on determining the cause of the problem and mending of the existing barrier.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Barriers to energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

This study provides policy guidance to the FEA in its efforts to break down barriers to the efficient usage of finite energy sources. Such efforts may involve mechanisms to promote the more-efficient usage of current energy sources or to break down the barriers that presently inhibit the introduction of alternative energy sources. The major concern is with the energy used by finished products and not with the energy used in the production process itself. A wide range of such products, including many forms of construction, are dealt with. The primary exceptions are the various kinds of motor vehicles, which have been thoroughly covered both in Congressional hearings and in other studies. A large number of different types of barriers and potential incentives were examined during the study. They range from those that are essentially purely energy-related, such as the absence of adequate technology, to constraints that only unintentionally inhibit efficient energy usage (e.g., the antitrust laws).

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Thermal barrier coating  

SciTech Connect

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys  

SciTech Connect

In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

64

Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers  

SciTech Connect

An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

Borns, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Radiant Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barriers Barriers Radiant Barriers May 30, 2012 - 2:07pm Addthis What does this mean for me? Properly installed radiant barriers can reduce your cooling costs. Radiant barriers are easiest to install in new construction, but can be installed in your existing house, especially if it has an open attic. How does it work? Radiant barriers work by reflecting radiant heat away from living spaces. Radiant barriers are installed in homes -- usually in attics -- primarily to reduce summer heat gain and reduce cooling costs. The barriers consist of a highly reflective material that reflects radiant heat rather than absorbing it. They don't, however, reduce heat conduction like thermal insulation materials. How They Work Heat travels from a warm area to a cool area by a combination of

66

Radiant Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiant Barriers Radiant Barriers Radiant Barriers May 30, 2012 - 2:07pm Addthis What does this mean for me? Properly installed radiant barriers can reduce your cooling costs. Radiant barriers are easiest to install in new construction, but can be installed in your existing house, especially if it has an open attic. How does it work? Radiant barriers work by reflecting radiant heat away from living spaces. Radiant barriers are installed in homes -- usually in attics -- primarily to reduce summer heat gain and reduce cooling costs. The barriers consist of a highly reflective material that reflects radiant heat rather than absorbing it. They don't, however, reduce heat conduction like thermal insulation materials. How They Work Heat travels from a warm area to a cool area by a combination of

67

Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yearns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

Shurter, R.P.

1990-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Catalysis and Reactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

understanding of basic principles of surface reactivity and its control by surface modification, on identification of active sites and full characterization of their electronic...

70

Breaking Down the Barriers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breaking Down the Barriers Breaking Down the Barriers Engaging Agency Legal Resources to be Part of the Solution Daniel Gore US Coast Guard Energy Manager X ESPC ISC Kodiak ESPC/UESC Unit Contract Type Coast Guard Alternatively Financed Project Status Estimated Contract Value (Millions) Under Consideration Initial Proposal Delayed by lack of Contracting Officer or Champion Detailed Design Study Recently Awarded TRACEN Cape May ESPC X TRACEN Petaluma PPA X X ISC San Pedro UESC X X CG Academy ESPC X TRACEN Cape May UESC X Air Station Borenquin ESPC X X Sector New York (3 sites) ESPC X X CG Yard (BAMF) ESPC X E-City ESPC X West Coast - 9 Sites ESPC X Five Essentials for Alt. Financed Project * Site approval * Technical Champion * Contracting Officer * Financial Analyst * Legal Support

71

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, Charles A. (Tracy, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, C.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Where radiant barriers really shine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufactures of radiant barrier materials claim their products significantly cut cooling costs by reducing summertime radiant heat gain through attics and ceilings. A new study confirms that radiant barriers can indeed conserve cooling energy. However, the study`s authors found that radiant barriers are much more effective at reducing energy losses from attic air conditioner duct runs than at directly lowering heat transfer through the attic floor into conditioned living space. Furthermore the study demonstrated that radiant barrier savings can be significant even in a new well-weatherized house and that these saving may justify specifying smaller capacity cooling systems. This article discusses the findings of the study.

Engel, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reactive Power Compensator.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reactive power compensator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Techniques A. M. English, T. Fox, G. Tsaprailis, C. W. Fenwick, J. F. Wishart, J. T. Hazzard, and G. Tollin Adv. Chem. Ser. 254, Ch. 6, pp. 81-98 Abstract: Flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate reductants in situ to study the electron-transfer (ET) reactivity of the FeIV=O heme centers in myoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase. Reduction of a5RuIII groups covalently bound to surface histidines allowed intramolecular RuII --> FeIV=O ET rates to be measured. Protonation of the oxene ligand was found to be largely rate determining in myoglobin, consistent with the lack of proton donors in its heme pocket. The large distance (21-23 Å) between surface histidines and the heme in wild-type

79

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

80

Reactive Power Compensating System.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reactive power compensating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes ... successfully tested as a replacement for barrier bricks in several reduction cell technology types...

83

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Phoenix Overcomes Barriers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phoenix Overcomes Barriers and Energizes Homeowners to Make Upgrades to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Phoenix Overcomes Barriers and Energizes...

84

ORNL Radiant Barrier - ETSD Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Zone 2), radiant barriers could reduce your utility bills by as much as 150 per year using average residential electricity prices. If you're able to participate in one of...

85

Method and apparatus for constructing an underground barrier wall structure  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for constructing a underground barrier wall structure using a jet grout injector subassembly comprising a pair of primary nozzles and a plurality of secondary nozzles, the secondary nozzles having a smaller diameter than the primary nozzles, for injecting grout in directions other than the primary direction, which creates a barrier wall panel having a substantially uniform wall thickess. This invention addresses the problem of the weak "bow-tie" shape that is formed during conventional jet injection when using only a pair of primary nozzles. The improvement is accomplished by using at least four secondary nozzles, of smaller diameter, located on both sides of the primary nozzles. These additional secondary nozzles spray grout or permeable reactive materials in other directions optimized to fill in the thin regions of the bow-tie shape. The result is a panel with increased strength and substantially uniform wall thickness.

Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Willis E. (W. Richland, WA); Dwyer, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Grid Shunt Reactive Power Compensation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides essential information on transmission grid shunt reactive power compensation, with particular focus on controllable reactive power sources such as the static var controller (SVC). Applying the information presented in this report can help electric utilities planning grid shunt reactive power compensation strategies or operating shunt reactive power compensation equipment to increase grid reliability, improve grid performance and prevent costly cascading outages. The report is intende...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

87

Reactive Air Aluminization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lowering Barriers to someone by Lowering Barriers to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Lowering Barriers DOE is working to improve solar market conditions in order to create green jobs and increase the availability of clean, renewable energy for Americans. Efforts to promote favorable policies and encourage easier

89

Reactive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities. Advantages Reactive maintenance advantages are a double-edged sword. Federal agencies following a purely reactive maintenance strategy can expect little expenditures for manpower or system upkeep until something breaks. However, systems do break. With new equipment, Federal agencies can expect minimal incidents of failure. However, older equipment often experiences higher failure incidents and costlier repairs. Other advantages of reactive maintenance are:

90

Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA); Jackaway, Adam D. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

Waldrop, James R. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Cohen, Marshall J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Simulated Attic Radiant Barrier Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent EPRI evaluation determined that attic radiant barriers installed under roof decks are increasingly effective in reducing cooling energy use as insolation increases and ceiling insulation thickness decreases. A savings worksheet included in this report allows rapid estimation of these energy cost impacts.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

One-dimensional solute transport in a permeable reactive barrieraquifer system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[Gupta and Fox, 1999; Hemsi and Shackelford, 2006], or design considerations, such as the spatial [Gupta and Fox, 1999; Hemsi and Shackelford, 2006]. Since the early stage of PRB optimi- zation studies

Zhan, Hongbin

95

Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barrier Resources Act Barrier Resources Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Barrier Resources Act Year 1982 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Wikipedia[1] FWS Coastal Barrier Resources Act Webpage[2] The Coastal Barrier Resources Act of the United States was enacted October 18, 1982. The United States Congress passed this Act in order to address the many problems associated with coastal barrier development. CBRA designated various undeveloped coastal barriers, which were illustrated by a set of maps adopted by law, to be included in the John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS). These designated areas were made ineligible for both direct and indirect Federal expenditures and financial assistance, which are believed to encourage development of fragile,

96

Electrical Calcium Test for Measuring Barrier Permeability ...  

Energy Analysis; Energy Storage ... Technology Marketing Summary Moisture or water vapor barriers are important in ... Software techniques for data an ...

97

Reactive rules on the web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive rules are used for programming rule-based, reactive systems, which have the ability to detect events and respond to them automatically in a timely manner. Such systems are needed on the Web for bridging the gap between the existing, passive ...

Bruno Berstel; Philippe Bonnard; Franois Bry; Michael Eckert; Paula-Lavinia P?trnjan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive Reactive Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types

99

NERSC's Hopper Breaks Petaflops Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC's Hopper Breaks NERSC's Hopper Breaks Petaflops Barrier NERSC's Hopper Breaks Petaflops Barrier Ranks 5th in the World November 14, 2010 Media Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 hopper1.jpg NERSC's Cray XE6-Hopper BERKELEY, Calif.-The Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), already one of the world's leading centers for scientific productivity, is now home to the fifth most powerful supercomputer in the world and the second most powerful in the United States, according to the latest edition of the TOP500 list, the definitive ranking of the world's top computers NERSC's newest supercomputer, a 153,408 processor-core Cray XE6 system, posted a performance of 1.05 petaflops (quadrillions of calculations per second) running the Linpack benchmark. In keeping with NERSC's tradition of

100

A Tariff for Reactive Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system operation in the future.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

102

State Barriers to CHP Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every year, ACEEE collects data on regulatory policies in each state that theoretically serve to promote and discourage combined heat and power (CHP) development. In our annual State Energy Efficiency Scorecard (5), we assess the regulatory environment for CHP in each state and score states based on the favorability of their policies for CHP. As part of an effort to make this Scorecard more robust, ACEEE is conducting research to determine the practical realities of CHP development in each state from the perspective of CHP developers and technical assistance agencies. Preliminary research has shown that while certain regulations-and lack of regulations-can greatly influence the attractiveness or success of a project, there are market barriers outside the realm of policy that deserve a great deal of exploration and attention. Traditional regulatory barriers to CHP, such as interconnection procedures, air emissions regulations, and utility standby rates, do pose challenges for development in many states. However, discussions with CHP developers have revealed that many of these issues are overshadowed by economic and financial barriers, as well as other hidden market hurdles. Among these hurdles are the availability of natural gas at reasonable prices, the spark spread in a given region, the effectiveness of CHP developers, the presence of a devoted CHP champion at a host site, and the availability of financing mechanisms to mitigate the upfront capital burden on new projects. This paper will examine each region of the country and each state to determine specific barriers and outline a state-by-state market overview for CHP.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Double barrier system for an in situ conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier system for a subsurface treatment area is described. The barrier system includes a first barrier formed around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. The first barrier is configured to inhibit fluid from exiting or entering the subsurface treatment area. A second barrier is formed around at least a portion of the first barrier. A separation space exists between the first barrier and the second barrier.

McKinzie, Billy John [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Cowan, Kenneth Michael [Sugar land, TX; Deeg, Wolfgang Friedrich Johann [Houston, TX; Wong, Sau-Wai [Rijswijk, NL

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Reactivity of heat treated chars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reactivities of a number of chars produced from American coals varying in rank from lignite to anthracite have been measured in air, CO/sub 2/, steam and H/sub 2/. The variables chosen for the study were: rank of the parent coal, inorganic matter content, particle size, reaction temperature and pressure as well as heat treatment conditions used during char preparation. In all gasification atmospheres studied, reactivity plots for different chars are essentially of the same general shape and have three distinct regions. The reaction rate first increases slowly with time. The plot then goes through a maximum in slope, followed by a lengthy region of decreasing slope as burn-off approaches 100 percent. The shape of the burn-off curves can be explained on the basis of what is known about the development of porosity and surface area in microporous chars as they undergo gasification. Using an adjustable time parameter, equations have been developed which successfully correlate the reactivity data. Char reactivity decreases, in general, with increase in rank of the parent coal. Reactivities of chars in air, CO/sub 2/ and steam increase over 150-fold in going from a low volatile bituminous to a lignite parent coal; the spread in char reactivities in H/sub 2/ is only 30-fold. Removal of inorganic matter from coal precursors prior to their charring or from chars produced from the raw coals has a marked effect on char reactivity and surface area. Removal of inorganic matter (by acid washing) decreases, in general, reactivity of chars produced from lower rank coals, whereas reactivities of chars derived from higher rank coals increase.

Mahajan, O. P.; Walker, Jr., P. L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and dusting potential. (6) Evaluate drift conditions and configurations to determine the suitability of Richards Barrier installation methodology. (7) Perform cost assessment of barrier material placement. (8) Evaluate the feature with criteria that will be supplied by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) Team. (9) Comment on the use of depleted uranium as a Richards Barrier material.

N.E. Kramer

1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

106

Radiant Barrier Performance during the Heating Season  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of winter experiments conducted in Central Texas are presented. The experiments were side-by-side tests using two identical 144 ft2 houses which responded similarly to weather variations prior to any retrofits. Two radiant barrier orientations were tested, horizontal barrier and barrier against the rafters, in vented and non-vented attics. The results compiled in this paper are for attics with R-19 fiberglass insulation. The data showed that radiant barriers were still effective during the winter season. During a typical day radiant barriers prevented approximately 9-17 percent of the indoor heat from escaping into the attic. No significant difference in moisture accumulation was detected in the attic with the radiant barrier.

Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barriers to Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings. Preparedbuilding standards were proposed (which have since been implemented). Neighborhood planning and solar heating

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Testing for the technology barrier: Applets - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 24, 1998 ... Testing for the technology barrier: Applets. The first stage was to support the creation of a set of focussed resources by a model teacher.

109

SunShot Initiative: Lowering Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lowering Barriers DOE is working to improve solar market conditions in order to create green jobs and increase the availability of clean, renewable energy for Americans. Efforts to...

110

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tax incentives to promote solar energy; state and localstate government can promote energy conservation and surmount institutional barriers through utilities regulation, land use control, tax incentives,

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Field Projects: Monticello, Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance » Permeable Reactive Barriers » Field Projects: Monticello, Utah Field Projects: Monticello, Utah A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero-valent iron is helping to clean up groundwater at a former uranium and vanadium ore processing mill at Monticello, Utah. LM managed remediation of tailings and tailings-contaminated material at this site. Cleanup of the mill site is regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, selenium, uranium, and vanadium are contaminants of concern in groundwater at the site. An Interim Record of Decision designated emplacement of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the mill site to remove these contaminants. Results of both laboratory and

112

CX-003592: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

592: Categorical Exclusion Determination 592: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003592: Categorical Exclusion Determination Remove a Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) Treatment System at the Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Durango, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management The United States Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management proposes to remove all residual radioactive materials and structures associated with a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) treatment system at the Durango disposal site. The materials would be disposed of at the Grand Junction, Colorado, disposal site. The entire project is expected to take approximately 8 weeks; work would begin August 30 and be completed in early November. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

113

Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of geological porous media with multiphase flow: Theory andmultiphase flow, solute transport andreactive chemistry in porousMultiphase Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Deformation in Fractured Porous

Steefel, Carl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Permanganate Treatment of DNAPLs in Reactive Barriers and Source Zone Flooding Schemes - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a detailed process-level understanding of the oxidative destruction of the organic contaminant emphasizing on reaction pathways and kinetics. A remarkable rise in the MnO{sup {minus}} consumption rate with TCA and PCE mixtures proves that the phase transfer catalysts have the ability to increase oxidation rate of DNAPLs either in pure phase or mixtures and that there is significant potential for testing the catalyzed scheme under field conditions. Secondly, as an attempt to enhance the oxidation of DNAPL, we are trying to exploit cosolvency effects, utilizing various alcohol-water mixtures to increase DNAPL solubilization. Preliminary results of cosolvency experiments indicate the enhancement in the transfer of nonaqueous phase TCE to TBA-water solution and the rate of TCE degradation in aqueous phase.

Schwartz, F.W.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installation and initial water intake of the buffer over asaturated with water. Water intake is a slow process because

Steefel, Carl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 deposition hole. Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste ManagementReport, 2008. Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Managementoperated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management

Steefel, Carl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption of Long-Lived Radionuclides Cesium-134, Strontium-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved inas heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (

Steefel, Carl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

Dessauer, G.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Electrical imagining of engineered hydraulic barriers  

SciTech Connect

Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to image the full-scale test emplacement of a thin-wall grout barrier installed by high-pressure jetting and a thick-wall polymer barrier installed by low-pressure permeation injection. Both case studies compared images of electrical resistivity before and after barrier installation. Barrier materials were imaged as anomalies which were more electrically conducting than the native sandy soils at the test sites. Although the spatial resolution of the ERT was insufficient to resolve flaws smaller than a reconstruction voxel (50 cm on a side), the images did show the spatial extent of the barrier materials and therefore the general shape of the structures. To verify barrier performance, ERT was also used to monitor a flood test of a thin-wall grout barrier. Electrical resistivity changes were imaged as a saltwater tracer moved through the barrier at locations which were later found to be defects in a wall or the joining of two walls.

Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP FY2013 END-YEAR REPORT  

SciTech Connect

In FY2013, the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) demonstrated continued tangible progress toward fulfilling the objective of developing a set of software tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long?term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. In November 2012, the CBP released Version 1.0 of the CBP Software Toolbox, a suite of software for simulating reactive transport in cementitious materials and important degradation phenomena. In addition, the CBP completed development of new software for the Version 2.0 Toolbox to be released in early FY2014 and demonstrated use of the Version 1.0 Toolbox on DOE applications. The current primary software components in both Versions 1.0 and 2.0 are LeachXS/ORCHESTRA, STADIUM, and a GoldSim interface for probabilistic analysis of selected degradation scenarios. The CBP Software Toolbox Version 1.0 supports analysis of external sulfate attack (including damage mechanics), carbonation, and primary constituent leaching. Version 2.0 includes the additional analysis of chloride attack and dual regime flow and contaminant migration in fractured and non?fractured cementitious material. The LeachXS component embodies an extensive material property measurements database along with chemical speciation and reactive mass transport simulation cases with emphasis on leaching of major, trace and radionuclide constituents from cementitious materials used in DOE facilities, such as Saltstone (Savannah River) and Cast Stone (Hanford), tank closure grouts, and barrier concretes. STADIUM focuses on the physical and structural service life of materials and components based on chemical speciation and reactive mass transport of major cement constituents and aggressive species (e.g., chloride, sulfate, etc.). THAMES is a planned future CBP Toolbox component focused on simulation of the microstructure of cementitious materials and calculation of resultant hydraulic and constituent mass transfer parameters needed in modeling. Two CBP software demonstrations were conducted in FY2013, one to support the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at SRS and the other on a representative Hanford high?level waste tank. The CBP Toolbox demonstration on the SDF provided analysis on the most probable degradation mechanisms to the cementitious vault enclosure caused by sulfate and carbonation ingress. This analysis was documented and resulted in the issuance of a SDF Performance Assessment Special Analysis by Liquid Waste Operations this fiscal year. The two new software tools supporting chloride attack and dual?regime flow will provide additional degradation tools to better evaluate performance of DOE and commercial cementitious barriers. The CBP SRNL experimental program produced two patent applications and field data that will be used in the development and calibration of CBP software tools being developed in FY2014. The CBP software and simulation tools varies from other efforts in that all the tools are based upon specific and relevant experimental research of cementitious materials utilized in DOE applications. The CBP FY2013 program involved continuing research to improve and enhance the simulation tools as well as developing new tools that model other key degradation phenomena not addressed in Version 1.0. Also efforts to continue to verify the various simulation tools through laboratory experiments and analysis of field specimens are ongoing and will continue into FY2014 to quantify and reduce the uncertainty associated with performance assessments. This end?year report summarizes FY2013 software development efforts and the various experimental programs that are providing data for calibration and validation of the CBP developed software.

Flach, G.; Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Smith, F.; Kosson, D.; Brown, K.; Samson, E.; Meeussen, J.; van der Sloot, H.; Garboczi, E.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Preliminary Analysis of the Economics of Using Distributed Energy as a Source of Reactive Power Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major blackout affecting 50 million people in the Northeast United States, where insufficient reactive power supply was an issue, and an increased number of filings made to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by generators for reactive power has led to a closer look at reactive power supply and compensation. The Northeastern Massachusetts region is one such area where there is an insufficiency in reactive power compensation. Distributed energy due to its close proximity to loads seems to be a viable option for solving any present or future reactive power shortage problems. Industry experts believe that supplying reactive power from synchronized distributed energy sources can be 2 to 3 times more effective than providing reactive support in bulk from longer distances at the transmission or generation level. Several technology options are available to supply reactive power from distributed energy sources such as small generators, synchronous condensers, fuel cells or microturbines. In addition, simple payback analysis indicates that investments in DG to provide reactive power can be recouped in less than 5 years when capacity payments for providing reactive power are larger than $5,000/kVAR and the DG capital and installation costs are lower than $30/kVAR. However, the current institutional arrangements for reactive power compensation present a significant barrier to wider adoption of distributed energy as a source of reactive power. Furthermore, there is a significant difference between how generators and transmission owners/providers are compensated for reactive power supplied. The situation for distributed energy sources is even more difficult, as there are no arrangements to compensate independent DE owners interested in supplying reactive power to the grid other than those for very large IPPs. There are comparable functionality barriers as well, as these smaller devices do not have the control and communications requirements necessary for automatic operation in response to local or system operators. There are no known distributed energy asset owners currently receiving compensation for reactive power supply or capability. However, there are some cases where small generators on the generation and transmission side of electricity supply have been tested and have installed the capability to be dispatched for reactive power support. Several concerns need to be met for distributed energy to become widely integrated as a reactive power resource. The overall costs of retrofitting distributed energy devices to absorb or produce reactive power need to be reduced. There needs to be a mechanism in place for ISOs/RTOs to procure reactive power from the customer side of the meter where distributed energy resides. Novel compensation methods should be introduced to encourage the dispatch of dynamic resources close to areas with critical voltage issues. The next phase of this research will investigate in detail how different options of reactive power producing DE can compare both economically and functionally with shunt capacitor banks. Shunt capacitor banks, which are typically used for compensating reactive power consumption of loads on distribution systems, are very commonly used because they are very cost effective in terms of capital costs. However, capacitor banks can require extensive maintenance especially due to their exposure to lightning at the top of utility poles. Also, it can be problematic to find failed capacitor banks and their maintenance can be expensive, requiring crews and bucket trucks which often requires total replacement. Another shortcoming of capacitor banks is the fact that they usually have one size at a location (typically sized as 300, 600, 900 or 1200kVAr) and thus don't have variable range as do reactive power producing DE, and cannot respond to dynamic reactive power needs. Additional future work is to find a detailed methodology to identify the hidden benefit of DE for providing reactive power and the best way to allocate the benefit among customers, utilities, transmission companies or RTOs.

Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; King, Thomas F [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

123

Multi-layer waste containment barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for constructing an underground containment barrier for containing an in-situ portion of earth. The apparatus includes an excavating device for simultaneously (i) excavating earthen material from beside the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming an open side trench defined by opposing earthen sidewalls, and (ii) excavating earthen material from beneath the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming a generally horizontal underground trench beneath the in-situ portion defined by opposing earthen sidewalls. The apparatus further includes a barrier-forming device attached to the excavating device for simultaneously forming a side barrier within the open trench and a generally horizontal, multi-layer barrier within the generally horizontal trench. The multi-layer barrier includes at least a first layer and a second layer.

Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nickelson, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

Staller, George E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wemple, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Treating water-reactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Treating water-reactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds in Acyclic Tertiary Diamines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Search of a Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in Proton Bridgedand J.A. Gerlt, The Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in EnzymaticShow That Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds do not Offer a

Khodagholian, Sevana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

EVALUATION OF AMENDMENTS FOR MENDING THE INSITU REDOX MANIPULATION (ISRM) BARRIER  

SciTech Connect

In May of 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from DOE Headquarters EM-23 to provide a team of technical experts to evaluate likely chemical/biological amendments for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. This request was a follow-on to an earlier request for assistance regarding the cause of chromium (Cr) breakthrough and recommendations for mending the barrier (March 2004 workshop). This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the ISRM technology, was installed at a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to estimate barrier longevity, calculated to be in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in approximately 17 wells has been found to contain elevated Cr concentrations. The March 2004 technical assistance team (TAT) identified potential causes of Cr breakthrough as likely related to physical and chemical heterogeneity within the aquifer (including loss of reductive capacity within preferential flow paths) and the presence of other oxidants (DO and nitrate) significantly affecting the reductive capacity of the treated aquifer. These aquifer characteristics may limit the ability of alternative amendments to extend the reducing capacity of the barrier. A 2001 Bechtel Hanford report and evaluation of the ISRM performance data and barrier longevity assessment corroborate the observations and findings of the March 2004 TAT. The March 2004 TAT recommended the collection of new aquifer characterization data in combination with the interpretation of existing data to develop a conceptual model of aquifer heterogeneity to enable design of the most appropriate barrier mending system. The current TAT was convened to examine the most promising amendment that could be applied to mend the ISRM barrier. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) performed the following activities: (1) Evaluate the most appropriate single or combination of chemical/biological amendments suitable for increasing the reductive capacity of the ISRM barrier; (2) Evaluate the most practicable means of introducing chemical/biological amendments in the target zones along the current BRM barrier; (3) Provide recommendations for laboratory treatability-testing protocol development to evaluate the type and delivery mechanisms of amendments in the current ISRM barrier location. Sections of this report present analyses and recommendations of potential amendments and delivery options to improve performance of the ISRM barrier. The report covers the spectrum of passive barrier mending to chemical and biological amendments that have been shown to perform more efficiently in more active remedial design approaches. Because DOE/RL is considering significant aquifer characterization studies as additional time and cost investment to mending the barrier, the TAT strongly recommends that DOE/RL conduct cost-benefit analyses of alternative designs to mend the barrier. In this way, the value and extent of characterization studies, compared to passive amendment delivery, compared to engineering redesign, can be quantitatively estimated for decision-making purposes.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

Market barriers to energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such market barriers'' suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

Howarth, R.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Andersson, B. (Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Market barriers to energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such ``market barriers`` suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

Howarth, R.B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Andersson, B. [Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TVA has conducted a study to determine the effects of radiant barriers (RBI (i.e., material with a low emissivity surface facing an air space), when used with fiberglass, on attic heat transfer during summer and winter. This study employed five small test cells exposed to ambient conditions and having attics with gable and soffit vents. Three different RB configurations were tested and compared to the non-RR configuration. Heat flux transducers determined the heat transfer between the attic and conditioned space. The results showed that all RB con figurations significantly reduced heat gain through the ceiling during the summer. Reductions in heat gain during daylight and peak electric load hours were especially attractive. Roof temperatures for the RB configurations were only slightly higher than for the non-RB case. Heat transfer reductions for the RB configurations in the winter were smaller than those for the summer but were still significant in many, but not all, situations. Savings during night and peak electric load hours were especially attractive.

Hall, J. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Radiant barrier applications: Symposium and workshop proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities and their customers are continually looking for ways to improve the thermal integrity of buildings. Radiant barrier systems can reduce summer air conditioning loads by reducing radiant heat transfer in attics. EPRI conducted two programs to help utilities with radiant barriers. A Symposium and Workshop were conducted in April 1988. The Symposium reviewed the state of the art in radiant barriers. The Workshop brought industry experts together to identify research needs for radiant barriers. The Workshop found that research is needed in six major areas. Listed in order of importance these are: (1) Field and laboratory testing, (2) Materials research, (3) Modeling, (4) Materials standards, (5) Economic issues, and (6) Installation methods. The leading research topics within these six major areas in order of importance include:(1) Modeling to fill voids in existing field data and aid in the development of performance standards, (2) Calculation of energy savings for various configurations, (3) Analysis of existing data to better understand radiant barrier performance, (4) Assessment of the effect of dust accumulation on performance, (5) Development of standard testing procedures, (6) Development of systems standards, (7) Measurement of changes in the emissivity of radiant barrier materials with time, (8) Determination of the possibility of moisture accumulation under horizontal radiant barriers during heating season operation, (9) Ventilation effects, (10) Configuration testing, (11) Costs of new and retrofit applications, and (12) Characterization of side effects. 34 refs., 5 figs.

Isaksen, L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Permanent isolation surface barrier development plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exhumation and treatment of wastes may not always be the preferred alternative in the remediation of a waste site. In-place disposal alternatives, under certain circumstances, may be the most desirable alternatives to use in the protection of human health and the environment. The implementation of an in-place disposal alternative will likely require some type of protective covering that will provide long-term isolation of the wastes from the accessible environment. Even if the wastes are exhumed and treated, a long-term barrier may still be needed to adequately dispose of the treated wastes or any remaining waste residuals. Currently, no {open_quotes}proven{close_quotes} long-term barrier is available. The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site. The permanent isolation barrier technology also could be used at other sites. Permanent isolation barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with redundant protective features. Drawings of conceptual permanent isolation surface barriers are shown. The natural construction materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity. The objective of current designs is to use natural materials to develop a maintenance-free permanent isolation surface barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1,000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling the exhalation of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion-related problems.

Wing, N.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Transport Properties for Triangular Barriers in Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically study the electronic transport properties of Dirac fermions through one and double triangular barriers in graphene. Using the transfer matrix method, we determine the transmission, conductance and Fano factor. They are obtained to be various parameters dependent such as well width, barrier height and barrier width. Therefore, different discussions are given and comparison with the previous significant works is done. In particular, it is shown that at Dirac point the Dirac fermions always own a minimum conductance associated with a maximum Fano factor and change their behaviors in an oscillatory way (irregularly periodical tunneling peaks) when the potential of applied voltage is increased.

Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

137

Disposal barriers that release contaminants only by molecular diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered barriers can slow the movement of pollutants out of land disposal facilities in several ways. If the advective velocity is low, release will be primarily by molecular diffusion. Attenuation processes also work to slow the transport of many contaminants. Barriers that cause pollutants to be released almost entirely by molecular diffusion represent the best barriers achievable. Use of thick barrier materials will maximize the breakthrough time of contaminants that diffuse through the barrier. Thin barriers with exceedingly low permeabilities will not necessarily outperform thicker, more permeable liners. In fact, if diffusion is the dominant mechanism of release, the thicker, more permeable barrier may actually outperform the thinner barrier with lower permeability.

Daniel, D.E.; Shackelford, C.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Definition: Reactive Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reactive Power Reactive Power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reactive Power The portion of electricity that establishes and sustains the electric and magnetic fields of alternating-current equipment. Reactive power must be supplied to most types of magnetic equipment, such as motors and transformers. It also must supply the reactive losses on transmission facilities. Reactive power is provided by generators, synchronous condensers, or electrostatic equipment such as capacitors and directly influences electric system voltage. It is usually expressed in kilovars (kvar) or megavars (Mvar).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electric power transmission and distribution, volt-ampere reactive (var) is a unit used to measure reactive power in an AC electric

139

Particle Swarm Optimization Based Reactive Power Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive power plays an important role in supporting the real power transfer by maintaining voltage stability and system reliability. It is a critical element for a transmission operator to ensure the reliability of an electric system while minimizing the cost associated with it. The traditional objectives of reactive power dispatch are focused on the technical side of reactive support such as minimization of transmission losses. Reactive power cost compensation to a generator is based on the incurred cost of its reactive power contribution less the cost of its obligation to support the active power delivery. In this paper an efficient Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based reactive power optimization approach is presented. The optimal reactive power dispatch problem is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. The objective of the proposed PSO is to minimize the total support cost from generators and reactive compensators. It is achieved by maintaining the whole system power loss as minimum...

Sujin, P R; Linda, M Mary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reactive and Catalytic Air Purification Materials - Energy ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; ... Target selectivity can be controlled through selection of reactive components.

142

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission  

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission Technology Summary ... The invention can transmit electrical power through the surface of the ...

143

Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive ...  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCT Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive NanoTechnologies Inc.: Temperature-controlled Precision Bonding

144

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neighborhood planning and solar heating and cooling in DavisLegal Barriers to Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings.the interaction of solar energy heating/cooling/hot water

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Surprising attractive potential barriers and repulsive wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental fact is revealed that in the old good quantum mechanics there is possible such unexpected inversion: potential barriers can drag in wave-particles and wells can push them off.

B. N. Zakhariev

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic ...

Sheikh, J. A.

148

Photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic devices with quantum barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic or thermophotovoltaic device includes a diode formed by p-type material and n-type material joined at a p-n junction and including a depletion region adjacent to said p-n junction, and a quantum barrier disposed near or in the depletion region of the p-n junction so as to decrease device reverse saturation current density while maintaining device short circuit current density. In one embodiment, the quantum barrier is disposed on the n-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to electrons while in another, the barrier is disposed on the p-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to holes. In another embodiment, both types of quantum barriers are used.

Wernsman, Bernard R. (Jefferson Hills, PA)

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Liquid junction schottky barrier solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixture of ceric ions (Ce.sup.+4) and cerous ions (Ce.sup.+3) in an aqueous electrolyte solution forms a Schottky barrier at the interface between an active region of silicon and the electrolyte solution. The barrier height obtained for hydrogenated amorphous silicon using the Ce.sup.+4 /Ce.sup.+3 redox couple is about 1.7 eV.

Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

A dielectric-barrier discharge enhanced plasma brush array at atmospheric pressure  

SciTech Connect

This study developed a large volume cold atmospheric plasma brush array, which was enhanced by a dielectric barrier discharge by integrating a pair of DC glow discharge in parallel. A platinum sheet electrode was placed in the middle of the discharge chamber, which effectively reduced the breakdown voltage and working voltage. Emission spectroscopy diagnosis indicated that many excited argon atoms were distributed almost symmetrically in the lateral direction of the plasma. The concentration variations of reactive species relative to the gas flow rate and discharge current were also examined.

Li Xuemei; Zhan Xuefang; Yuan Xin; Zhao Zhongjun; Yan Yanyue; Duan Yixiang [Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Analytical Testing Center, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Tang Jie [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi'an (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

ELECTROSTATICALLY ENHANCED BARRIER FILTER COLLECTION  

SciTech Connect

This work was performed through the University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department with assistance from UND's Energy & Environmental Research Center. This research was undertaken in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Technology Center Program Solicitation No. DE-PS26-99FT40479, Support of Advanced Coal Research at U.S. Universities and Colleges. Specifically, this research was in support of the UCR Core Program and addressees Topic 1, Improved Hot-Gas Contaminant and Particulate Removal Techniques, introducing an advanced design for particulate removal. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offers the potential for very high efficiency and clean electric generation. In IGCC, the product gas from the gasifier needs to be cleaned of particulate matter to avoid erosion and high-temperature corrosion difficulties arising with the turbine blades. Current methods involve cooling the gases to {approx}100 C to condense alkalis and remove sulfur and particulates using conventional scrubber technology. This ''cool'' gas is then directed to a turbine for electric generation. While IGCC has the potential to reach efficiencies of over 50%, the current need to cool the product gas for cleaning prior to firing it in a turbine is keeping IGCC from reaching its full potential. The objective of the current project was to develop a highly reliable particulate collector system that can meet the most stringent turbine requirements and emission standards, can operate at temperatures above 1500 F, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, is compatible with various sorbent injection schemes for sulfur and alkali control, can be integrated into a variety of configurations for both pressurized gasification and combustion, increases allowable face velocity to reduce filter system capital cost, and is cost-competitive with existing technologies. The collector being developed is a new concept in particulate control called electrostatically enhanced barrier filter collection (EBFC). This concept combines electrostatic precipitation (ESP) with candle filters in a single unit. Similar technology has been recently proven on a commercial scale for atmospheric applications, but needed to be tested at high temperatures and pressures. The synergy obtained by combining the two control technologies into a single system should actually reduce filter system capital and operating costs and make the system more reliable. More specifically, the ESP is expected to significantly reduce candle filter load and also to limit ash reintrainment, allowing for full recovery of baseline pressure drop during backpulsing of the filters.

John Erjavec; Michael D. Mann; Ryan Z. Knutson; Michael L. Swanson; Michael E. Collings

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Evaluation Criteria. Organizational Barriers to MSW Ener.gy Organizational Barriers to Wind Energy

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R&D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo- transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Beller, John Michael; Geesey, Gill Gregroy; Glenn, David Frankie; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Martian, Pete; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Porro, Indrek; Southworth, Finis Hio; Steffler, Eric Darwin; Stormberg, Angelica Isabel; Stormberg, Gregory John; Versteeg, Roelof Jan; White, Gregory J

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The relationship between isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. For nuclei around $^{278}$112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy as compared to the nuclei around $^{292}$114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and saddle-point temperatures. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied.

J. C. Pei; W. Nazarewicz; J. A. Sheikh; A. K. Kerman

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

Carver, D.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

159

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

160

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed. 7 figures.

Carver, D.W.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder's making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

Carver, Don W. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical methods, described in this report, are used to systematically determine experimental fuel sub-batch reactivities as a function of burnup. Fuel sub-batch reactivities are inferred using more than 600 in-core pressurized water reactor (PWR) flux maps taken during 44 cycles of operation at the Catawba and McGuire nuclear power plants. The analytical methods systematically search for fuel sub-batch reactivities that minimize differences between measured and computed reaction rates, using Studsvik ...

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

164

ENGINE COMBUSTION CONTROL VIA FUEL REACTIVITY ...  

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a ...

165

Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry...

166

Reactive Air Aluminizing - Energy Innovation Portal  

Reactive Air Aluminizing is a process for applying a protective coating on steel components in solid oxide fuel ... Building Energy Efficiency; ...

167

Reactive Air Aluminizing - Energy Innovation Portal  

Reactive Air Aluminizing is a process for applying a protective coating on steel components in solid oxide fuel cells and other high temperature electrochemical devices.

168

Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

P. Dixon

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

Modeling of Residential Attics with Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a summary of the efforts at ORNL in modeling residential attics with radiant barriers. Analytical models based on a system of macroscopic heat balances have been developed. Separate models have been developed for horizontal radiant barriers laid on top of the insulation, and for radiant barriers attached to the bottom of the top chords of the attic trusses. The models include features such as a radiation interchange analysis within the attic space, convective coupling with the ventilation air, and sorption/desorption of moisture at surfaces facing the attic enclosure. The paper gives details of the models and the engineering assumptions that were made in their development. The paper also reports on the status of efforts that are underway to verify the models by comparing their predictions with the results of laboratory and field tests on residential attics and test cells, both with and without radiant barriers. Comparisons are given for a number of selected sets of experimental data. Suggestions are given for needed model refinements and additional experimental data. Plans for utilization of the models for extrapolation to seasonal and annual performance in a variety of climatic conditions are also described.

Wilkes, K. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA); Wronski, Christopher R. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Proceedings: Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the layup and reactivation of fossil-fired power plants has become more important as increasing numbers of utilities develop a need for retaining capacity not currently needed. A 1992 EPRI conference highlighted key technical issues, focusing on proven layup procedures, descriptions of layup equipment and preservation methods, layup and reactivation case studies, and summaries of regulatory issues.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Transmission of Rossby Waves through Basin Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of a basin with a topographic barrier to spatially localized and time periodic forcing is considered. The barrier, which almost completely divides the full basin into two adjacent subbasins, is offered as a model of either a ...

Joseph Pedlosky

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Sensitivity of Global Mixing and Fluxes to Isolated Transport Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of isolated transport barriers on the global mixing and fluxes of a tracer are investigated, where a barrier is defined as a local minimum in effective diffusivity. An idealized 1D model with a prescribed diffusivity profile, with or ...

Noboru Nakamura

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Climatology of Wintertime Barrier Winds off Southeast Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatology of barrier winds along the southeastern coast of Greenland is presented based on 20 yr of winter months (19892008) from the ECMWF Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim). Barrier wind events occur predominantly at two locations: Denmark ...

B. E. Harden; I. A. Renfrew; G. N. Petersen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.

Brent Bailey; Evan Hansen

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

178

Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings ...  

... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings - Energy Innovation Portal on Delicious ...

179

Simulations of highly reactive fluids  

SciTech Connect

We report density functional molecular dynamics simulations to determine the early chemical events of hot (T = 3000 K) and dense (1.97 g/cm{sup 3}, V/V{sub 0} = 0.68) nitromethane (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}). The first step in the decomposition process is an intermolecular proton abstraction mechanism that leads to the formation of CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}H and the aci ion H{sub 2}CNO{sub 2}{sup -}, in support of evidence from static high-pressure and shock experiments. An intramolecular hydrogen transfer that transforms nitromethane into the aci acid form, CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}H, accompanies this event. This is the first confirmation of chemical reactivity with bond selectivity for an energetic material near the condition of fully reacted specimen. We also report the decomposition mechanism followed up to the formation of H{sub 2}O as the first stable product.

Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Reed, E J

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

Biological barrier composition and method of use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a composition for use as barrier to the growth of biological organisms such as roots, insects and small burrowing animals. It comprises a mixture of an effective amount of a chemical substance that thwarts the movement of the biological organisms, the substance diffused in a sufficient quality of a medium so that the physical and chemical characteristics of the medium rather than adjacent soil determine the rate of diffusion of the chemical substance. In one embodiment, trifluralin, a root growth inhibitor, is mixed with bentonite clay to provide a water-impermeable, root growth inhibiting barrier for a disposal site. The amount of clay and trifluralin is determined independent of the physical characteristics of the soil of the site thus avoiding the need for engineering the trifluralin for each set of soil characteristics.

Corey, J.C.; Murphy, C.E.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESD/10-4 ESD/10-4 Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities Energy Systems Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov.

184

Pratt and Whitney thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. They are used in aircraft engines and have accumulated millions upon millions of reliable hours. Differences in the duty cycles of the aircraft and industrial gas turbines are recognized as is the marked differences in environmental operational envelope. At the completion of this program the TBCs best suited to meet the needs of the ATS program will have been identified, tested, and confirmed.

Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, East Hartford, CT (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Plastic Schottky-barrier solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a metallic area electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates a magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film. With the proper selection and location of elements a photovoltaic cell structure and solar cell are obtained.

Waldrop, J.R.; Cohen, M.J.

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fission barriers and half-lives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We briefly review the development of theoretical models for the calculation of fission barriers and half-lives. We focus on how results of actual calculations in a unified macroscopic-microscopic approach provide an interpretation of the mechanisms behind some of the large number of phenomena observed in fission. As instructive examples we choose studies of the rapidly varying fission properties of elements at the end of the periodic system. 31 refs., 10 figs.

Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Plasma measurements with surface barrier detectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A surface barrier detector system for measuring the loss rate of protons from a hydrogen plasma and their energy spectrum is described. A full width at half maximum (FWHM) resolution of 1.4 keV for 15-keV hydrogen atoms was obtained using a selected detector having a sensitive area of 3 mm/sup 2/ and a depletion depth of 700 microns.

Futch, A.H. Jr.; Bradley, A.E.

1969-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Advanced Thermal Barrier Coating System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the program are to provide an improved Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase I: Program Planning - Complete; Phase II: Development; and Phase III: Selected Specimen - Bench Test Work is being performed in Phase II and III of the program.

NONE

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Reactive Power Measurement Using the Wavelet Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractThis paper provides the theoretical basis for the measurement of reactive and distortion powers from the wavelet transforms. The measurement of reactive power relies on the use of broad-band phase-shift networks to create concurrent in-phase currents and quadrature voltages. The wavelet real power computation resulting from these 90 phase-shift networks yields the reactive power associated with each wavelet frequency level or subband. The distortion power at each wavelet subband is then derived from the real, reactive and apparent powers of the subband, where the apparent power is the product of the v; i element pair's subband rms voltage and current. The advantage of viewing the real and reactive powers in the wavelet domain is that the domain preserves both the frequency and time relationship of these powers. In addition, the reactive power associated with each wavelet subband is a signed quantity and thus has a direction associated with it. This permits tracking the reactive power flow in each subband through the power system. Index TermsDigital signal processing, phase shift networks, measurement, power, RMS, subband, wavelets. I.

Weon-ki Yoon; Michael J. Devaney

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Comparison of biomass and coal char reactivities  

SciTech Connect

Char combustion is typically the rate limiting step during the combustion of solid fuels. The magnitude and variation of char reactivity during combustion are, therefore, of primary concern when comparing solid fuels such as coal and biomass. In an effort to evaluate biomass` potential as a sustainable and renewable energy source, the reactivities of both biomass and coal chars were compared using Sandia`s Captive Particle Imaging (CPI) apparatus. This paper summarizes the experimental approach used to determine biomass and coal reactivities and presents results from CPT experiments. The reactivity of six types of char particles, two high-rank coal chars, two low-rank coal chars, and two biomass chars, were investigated using the CPT apparatus. Results indicate that both of the high-rank coal chars have relatively low reactivities when compared with the higher reactivities measured for the low-rank coal and the biomass chars. In addition, extinction behavior of the chars support related investigations that suggest carbonaceous structural ordering is an important consideration in understanding particle reactivity as a function of extent of burnout. High-rank coal chars were found to have highly ordered carbon structures, where as, both low-rank coal and biomass chars were found to have highly disordered carbon structures.

Huey, S.P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K.A. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hurt, R.H. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Title Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-2294e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., Girish Ghatikar, Jessica Granderson, Paul Haugen, Carlos Romero, and David S. Watson Keywords technologies Abstract Various wireless technologies were field-tested in a six-story laboratory building to identify wireless technologies that can scale for future DR applications through very low node density power consumption, and unit cost. Data analysis included analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), packet loss, and link quality at varying power levels and node densities. The narrowband technologies performed well, penetrating the floors of the building with little loss and exhibiting better range than the wideband technology. 900 MHz provided full coverage at 1 watt and substantially complete coverage at 500 mW at the test site. 900 MHz was able to provide full coverage at 100 mW with only one additional relay transmitter, and was the highest-performing technology in the study. 2.4 GHz could not provide full coverage with only a single transmitter at the highest power level tested (63 mW). However, substantially complete coverage was provided at 2.4 GHz at 63 mW with the addition of one repeater node.

192

Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dielectric thin-film barrier and adhesion-promoting layers consisting of silicon oxynitride materials (SiOxNy, with various stoichiometry) were investigated. For process development, films were applied to glass (TCO, conductive SnO2:F; or soda-lime), polymer (PET, polyethylene terephthalate), aluminized soda-lime glass, or PV cell (a-Si, CIGS) substrates. Design strategy employed de-minimus hazard criteria to facilitate industrial adoption and reduce implementation costs for PV manufacturers or suppliers. A restricted process window was explored using dilute compressed gases (3% silane, 14% nitrous oxide, 23% oxygen) in nitrogen (or former mixtures, and 11.45% oxygen mix in helium and/or 99.999% helium dilution) with a worst-case flammable and non-corrosive hazard classification. Method employed low radio frequency (RF) power, less than or equal to 3 milliwatts per cm2, and low substrate temperatures, less than or equal to 100 deg C, over deposition areas less than or equal to 1000 cm2. Select material properties for barrier film thickness (profilometer), composition (XPS/FTIR), optical (refractive index, %T and %R), mechanical peel strength and WVTR barrier performance are presented.

Glick, S. H.; delCueto, J. A.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

G.H. Nieder-Westermann

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, reactive chemicals may proceed into uncontrolled chemical reaction pathways with rapid and significant increases in temperature, pressure, and/or gas evolution. Reactive chemicals have been involved in many industrial incidents, and have harmed people, property, and the environment. Evaluation of reactive chemical hazards is critical to design and operate safer chemical plant processes. Much effort is needed for experimental techniques, mainly calorimetric analysis, to measure thermal reactivity of chemical systems. Studying all the various reaction pathways experimentally however is very expensive and time consuming. Therefore, it is essential to employ simplified screening tools and other methods to reduce the number of experiments and to identify the most energetic pathways. A systematic approach is presented for the evaluation of reactive chemical hazards. This approach is based on a combination of computational methods, correlations, and experimental thermal analysis techniques. The presented approach will help to focus the experimental work to the most hazardous reaction scenarios with a better understanding of the reactive system chemistry. Computational methods are used to predict reaction stoichiometries, thermodynamics, and kinetics, which then are used to exclude thermodynamically infeasible and non-hazardous reaction pathways. Computational methods included: (1) molecular group contribution methods, (2) computational quantum chemistry methods, and (3) correlations based on thermodynamic-energy relationships. The experimental techniques are used to evaluate the most energetic systems for more accurate thermodynamic and kinetics parameters, or to replace inadequate numerical methods. The Reactive System Screening Tool (RSST) and the Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC) were employed to evaluate the reactive systems experimentally. The RSST detected exothermic behavior and measured the overall liberated energy. The APTAC simulated near-adiabatic runaway scenarios for more accurate thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. The validity of this approach was investigated through the evaluation of potentially hazardous reactive systems, including decomposition of di-tert-butyl peroxide, copolymerization of styrene-acrylonitrile, and polymerization of 1,3-butadiene.

Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive chemicals are presented widely in the chemical and petrochemical process industry. Their chemical reactivity hazards have posed a significant challenge to the industries of manufacturing, storage and transportation. The accidents due to reactive chemicals have caused tremendous loss of properties and lives, and damages to the environment. In this research, three classes of reactive chemicals (unsaturated hydrocarbons, self-reacting chemicals, energetic materials) were evaluated through theoretical and experimental methods. Methylcyclopentadiene (MCP) and Hydroxylamine (HA) are selected as representatives of unsaturated hydrocarbons and self-reacting chemicals, respectively. Chemical reactivity of MCP, including isomerization, dimerization, and oxidation, is investigated by computational chemistry methods and empirical thermodynamicenergy correlation. Density functional and ab initio methods are used to search the initial thermal decomposition steps of HA, including unimolecular and bimolecular pathways. In addition, solvent effects are also examined using water cluster methods and Polarizable Continuum Models (PCM) for aqueous solution of HA. The thermal stability of a basic energetic material, Nitroethane, is investigated through both theoretical and experimental methods. Density functional methods are employed to explore the initial decomposition pathways, followed by developing detailed reaction networks. Experiments with a batch reactor and in situ GC are designed to analyze the distribution of reaction products and verify reaction mechanisms. Overall kinetic model is also built from calorimetric experiments using an Automated Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC). Finally, a general evaluation approach is developed for a wide range of reactive chemicals. An index of thermal risk is proposed as a preliminary risk assessment to screen reactive chemicals. Correlations are also developed between reactivity parameters, such as onset temperature, activation energy, and adiabatic time to maximum rate based on a limited number, 37 sets, of Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) data. The research shows broad applications in developing reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. The methodology of reaction modeling in combination with molecular modeling can also be used to study other reactive chemical systems.

Wang, Qingsheng

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Determining the Energy Barrier for Decay out of Superdeformed Bands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An asymptotically exact quantum mechanical calculation of the matrix elements for tunneling through an asymmetric barrier is combined with the two-state statistical model for decay out of superdeformed bands to determine the energy barrier (as a function of spin) separating the superdeformed and normal-deformed wells for several nuclei in the 190 and 150 mass regions. The spin-dependence of the barrier leading to sudden decay out is shown to be consistent with the decrease of a centrifugal barrier with decreasing angular momentum. Values of the barrier frequency in the two mass regions are predicted.

B. R. Barrett; J. Brki; D. M. Cardamone; C. A. Stafford; D. L. Stein

2008-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

197

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M. [Ebasco Environmental, Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Phillips, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption - Insights from an Integrated Program of Engineering and Economics Research Title Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power...

200

Olefin production via reactive distillation based Olefin metathesis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reactive distillation is a combination of a traditional multi-stage distillation column with a chemical reaction. The primary benefits of a reactive distillation process are reduced (more)

Morrison, Ryan Frederick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Parametric Reactive Distillation Study: Economic Feasibility and Design Heuristics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The integration of reaction and distillation into a single column is called reactive distillation or catalytic distillation. Reactive distillation provides many benefits such as reduced (more)

Hoyme, Craig Alan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Observations on the Coke Air Reactivity Test - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coke air reactivities are strongly dependent on coke calcination levels and it is possible to drive air reactivities lower by increasing calcining temperatures.

203

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

Miller, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fossil plant layup and reactivation conference: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 14--15, 1992. The Conference was sponsored by EPRI and hosted by Entergy Services, Inc. to bring together representatives from utilities, consulting firms, manufacturers and architectural engineers. Eighteen papers were presented in three sessions. These sessions were devoted to layup procedures and practices, and reactivation case studies. A panel discussion was held on the second day to interactively discuss layup and reactivation issues. More than 80 people attended the Conference. This report contains technical papers and a summary of the panel discussion. Of the eighteen papers, three are related to general, one is related to regulatory issues, three are related to specific equipment, four are related to layup procedures and practices, and seven are layup and reactivation case studies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Oxidation Resistance of Reactive Atoms in Graphene  

SciTech Connect

We have found that reactive elements that are normally oxidized at room temperature are present as individual atoms or clusters on and in graphene. Oxygen is present in these samples but it is only detected in the thicker amorphous carbon layers present in the graphene specimens we have examined. However, we have seen no evidence that oxygen reacts with the impurity atoms and small clusters of these normally reactive elements when they are incorporated in the graphene layers. First principles calculations suggest that the oxidation resistance is due to kinetic effects such as preferential bonding of oxygen to nonincorporated atoms and H passivation. The observed oxidation resistance of reactive atoms in graphene may allow the use of these incorporated metals in catalytic applications. It also opens the possibility of designing and producing electronic, opto-electronic, and magnetic devices based on these normally reactive atoms.

Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Duscher, Gerd [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Windl, Wolfgang [Ohio State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiative Forcing Due to Reactive Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive gas emissions (CO, NOx, VOC) have indirect radiative forcing effects through their influences on tropospheric ozone and on the lifetimes of methane and hydrogenated halocarbons. These effects are quantified here for the full set of ...

T. M. L. Wigley; S. J. Smith; M. J. Prather

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Quantum reactive scattering in three dimensions using hyperspherical (APH) coordinates. 5. Comparison between two accurate potential energy surfaces for H + H sub 2 and D + H sub 2  

SciTech Connect

Accurate 3D quantum calculations for zero total angular momentum are presented for the H + H{sub 2} and D + H{sub 2} reactions utilizing both the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) potential energy surface (PES) and the double many-body expansion (DMBE) PES. The APH formulation of reactive scattering is employed, and the adiabatic basis (surface) functions are calculated by using the discrete variable representation (DVR) method. The DMBE PES was found to be more reactive than the LSTH PES for both reactions, in accord with its lower classical barrier height.

Kress, J.D.; Bacic, Z.; Parker, G.A.; Pack, R.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

Enhanced Oxidative Reactivity for Anthracite Coal via a Reactive Ball Milling Pretreatment Step  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive ball milling in a cyclohexene solvent significantly increases the oxidative reactivity of an anthracite coal, due to the combined effects of particle size reduction, metal introduction, introduction of volatile matter, and changes in carbon structure. Metals introduced during milling can be easily removed via a subsequent demineralization process, and the increased reactivity is retained. Solvent addition alters the morphological changes that occur during pyrolysis and leads to a char with significantly increased reactivity. When the solvent is omitted, similar effects are seen for the milled product, but a significant fraction of the char is resistant to oxidation. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Angela D. Lueking; Apurba Sakti; Dania Alvarez-Fonseca; Nichole Wonderling [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States). Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

94E 94E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J. Granderson, D. Watson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory P. Haugen, C. Romero Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory February 2009 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

213

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Wind energy: legal issues and institutional barriers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before the potential of wind energy can be realized, large-scale commercialization will have to occur. Standing in the way of commercial development are various institutional and legal barriers. These include (1) possible conflicts with existing zoning and other land-use planning schemes, (2) the question of guaranteeing access to the wind, (3) possible tort and environmental law issues raised by WECS operation, and (4) the critical problem of creating financial incentives. The implications of each of these issues and solutions where practicable are presented.

Coit, L.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Pricing and hedging a barrier option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barrier options are options where the payoff depends on whether the underlying asset's price reaches a certain level during a certain period of time. This path-dependency makes these options difficult to manage in practice. In this work, general methods of pricing and hedging are proposed. General properties of the Black - Scholes model are studied. Three methods of pricing are discussed and compared. Hedging issues are analyzed. Finally an improvement of the Black - Scholes model for the stock's price is proposed to take into account the stochastic aspect of the stock price volatility.

Bogossian, Alan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cooling Energy Measurements of Houses with Attics Containing Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft paper faced nominal R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicated that the most effective way of installing the foil was to lay it on top of the fiberglass batt insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to house by approximately 30-35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W. P.; Karnitz, M. A.; Knight, D. K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

review of extraction, processing, properties & applications of reactive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REVIEW OF EXTRACTION,. PROCESSING, PROPERTIES. & APPLICATIONS OF. REACTIVE METALS. Edited by. Brajendra Mishra...

218

Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

Dovichi, Norman J. (Edmonton, CA); Zhang, Jian Z. (Edmonton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

DOE Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers DOE Discussion on Small Business Contract Barriers March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management Jack Surash speaks during the session on barriers small businesses face competing for prime contracts. EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management Jack Surash speaks during the session on barriers small businesses face competing for prime contracts. Pictured at the session on barriers in small business contracting, left to right, are Jim Fiore of Fiore Consulting; John Coffman of DeNuke Contracting Services, Inc.; John Hale III of the DOE Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization; Jack Surash of EM; and Matt Moeller of Dade Moeller.

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment.

Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Hanson, Richard W. (Spokane, WA); Hodges, Richard T. (Deer Park, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cooling energy measurements of houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.; Knight, D.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Disposal systems evaluations and tool development : Engineered Barrier System (EBS) evaluation.  

SciTech Connect

Key components of the nuclear fuel cycle are short-term storage and long-term disposal of nuclear waste. The latter encompasses the immobilization of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and radioactive waste streams generated by various phases of the nuclear fuel cycle, and the safe and permanent disposition of these waste forms in geological repository environments. The engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a very important role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. EBS concepts and their interactions with the natural barrier are inherently important to the long-term performance assessment of the safety case where nuclear waste disposition needs to be evaluated for time periods of up to one million years. Making the safety case needed in the decision-making process for the recommendation and the eventual embracement of a disposal system concept requires a multi-faceted integration of knowledge and evidence-gathering to demonstrate the required confidence level in a deep geological disposal site and to evaluate long-term repository performance. The focus of this report is the following: (1) Evaluation of EBS in long-term disposal systems in deep geologic environments with emphasis on the multi-barrier concept; (2) Evaluation of key parameters in the characterization of EBS performance; (3) Identification of key knowledge gaps and uncertainties; and (4) Evaluation of tools and modeling approaches for EBS processes and performance. The above topics will be evaluated through the analysis of the following: (1) Overview of EBS concepts for various NW disposal systems; (2) Natural and man-made analogs, room chemistry, hydrochemistry of deep subsurface environments, and EBS material stability in near-field environments; (3) Reactive Transport and Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes in EBS; and (4) Thermal analysis toolkit, metallic barrier degradation mode survey, and development of a Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF). This report will focus on the multi-barrier concept of EBS and variants of this type which in essence is the most adopted concept by various repository programs. Empasis is given mainly to the evaluation of EBS materials and processes through the analysis of published studies in the scientific literature of past and existing repository research programs. Tool evaluations are also emphasized, particularly on THCM processes and chemical equilibria. Although being an increasingly important aspect of NW disposition, short-term or interim storage of NW will be briefly discussed but not to the extent of the EBS issues relevant to disposal systems in deep geologic environments. Interim storage will be discussed in the report Evaluation of Storage Concepts FY10 Final Report (Weiner et al. 2010).

Rutqvist, Jonny (LBNL); Liu, Hui-Hai (LBNL); Steefel, Carl I. (LBNL); Serrano de Caro, M. A. (LLNL); Caporuscio, Florie Andre (LANL); Birkholzer, Jens T. (LBNL); Blink, James A. (LLNL); Sutton, Mark A. (LLNL); Xu, Hongwu (LANL); Buscheck, Thomas A. (LLNL); Levy, Schon S. (LANL); Tsang, Chin-Fu (LBNL); Sonnenthal, Eric (LBNL); Halsey, William G. (LLNL); Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wolery, Thomas J. (LLNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Transport Modeling of Reactive and Non-Reactive Constituents from Summitville,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey (USGS) began water- quality investigations at Summitville, Terrace #12;Figure 2. Aerial photographTransport Modeling of Reactive and Non- Reactive Constituents from Summitville, Colorado in the Wightman Fork/Alamosa River system downstream of the Summitville Mine, south-central Colorado, were

225

K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Quantum calculation of Coulomb reorientation and near-barrier fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the role of deformation on the fusion probability around the barrier using the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock theory with a full Skyrme force. We obtain a distribution of fusion probabilities around the nominal barrier due to the different contributions of the various orientations of the deformed nucleus at the touching point. It is also shown that the long range Coulomb reorientation reduces the fusion probability around the barrier.

Cdric Simenel; Michael Bender; Philippe Chomaz; Thomas Duguet; Gilles De France

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations...

228

Research utilisation in nursing practice : Barriers and facilitators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research utilisation in nursing practice - barriers and facilitators To improve and develop nursing practice it is important that research findings are utilised by the (more)

Nilsson Kajermo, Kerstin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

TEST DEVICE FOR MEASURING PERMEABILITY OF A BARRIER ...  

A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed ...

230

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation-The Ohio State University Background When coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) is used in place of natural...

231

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash Ingested...

232

Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.orgwebinar-drivers-and-barriers-current-csp-marke...

233

Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in Lycopersicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study employs Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii as model systems to study the interspecific reproductive barriers unilateral incongruity (UI), hybrid breakdown and interspecific aberrant ratio syndrome (IARS).

Mutschler, M.A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); McCormick, S. (Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA (United States). Plant Gene Expression Center)

1993-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Some effects of metallic substrate composition on degradation of thermal barrier coatings  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons have been made in laboratory isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests of the degradation of oxide scales grown on single crystal superalloy substrates and bond coating alloys intended for use in thermal barrier coatings systems. The influence of desulfurization of the superalloy and bond coating, of reactive element addition to the bond coating alloy, and of oxidation temperature on the spallation behavior of the alumina scales formed was assessed from oxidation kinetics and from SEM observations of the microstructure and composition of the oxide scales. Desulfurization of nickel-base superalloy (in the absence of a Y addition) resulted in an increase in the lifetime of a state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating applied to it compared to a Y-free, non-desulfurized version of the alloy. The lifetime of the same ceramic coating applied without a bond coating to a non-desulfurized model alloy that formed an ideal alumina scale was also found to be at least four times longer than on the Y-doped superalloy plus state-of-the-art bond coating combination. Some explanations are offered of the factors controlling the degradation of such coatings.

Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Alexander, K.B.; Pruessner, K.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early with biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the boiler, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value, which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior.

Jay R. Gunderson; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

In-situ method to remove iron and other metals from Solution in Groundwater down Gradient from Permeable Reactive Barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a process for treating the flow of anaerobic groundwater through an aquifer with a primary treatment media, preferably iron, and then passing the treated groundwater through a second porous media though which an oxygenated gas is passed in order to oxygenate the dissolved primary treatment material and convert it into an insoluble material thereby removing the dissolved primary treatment material from the groundwater.

Carpenter, Clay E.; Morrison, Stanley J.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

In-situ method to remove iron and other metals from solution in groundwater down gradient from permeable reactive barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a process for treating the flow of anaerobic groundwater through an aquifer with a primary treatment media, preferably iron, and then passing the treated groundwater through a second porous media though which an oxygenated gas is passed in order to oxygenate the dissolved primary treatment material and convert it into an insoluble material thereby removing the dissolved primary treatment material from the groundwater.

Carpenter, Clay E. (Grand Junction, CO); Morrison, Stanley J. (Grand Junction, CO)

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nuclear engine flow reactivity shim control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear engine control system is provided which automatically compensates for reactor reactivity uncertainties at the start of life and reactivity losses due to core corrosion during the reactor life in gas-cooled reactors. The coolant gas flow is varied automatically by means of specially provided control apparatus so that the reactor control drums maintain a predetermined steady state position throughout the reactor life. This permits the reactor to be designed for a constant drum position and results in a desirable, relatively flat temperature profile across the core. (Official Gazette)

Walsh, J.M.

1973-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

Modeling experimental results of diffusion of alkaline solutions through a compacted bentonite barrier  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between concrete/cement and swelling clay (bentonite) has been modeled in the context of engineered barrier systems for deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The geochemical transformations observed in laboratory diffusion experiments at 60 and 90 {sup o}C between bentonite and different high-pH solutions (K-Na-OH and Ca(OH){sub 2}-saturated) were reconciled with the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. For K-Na-OH solutions (pH = 13.5 at 25 {sup o}C) partial dissolution of montmorillonite and precipitation of Mg-silicates (talc-like), hydrotalcite and brucite at the interface are predicted at 60 {sup o}C, while at 90 {sup o}C the alteration is wider. Alkaline cations diffused beyond the mineralogical alteration zone by means of exchange with Mg{sup 2+} in the interlayer region of montmorillonite. Very slow reactivity and minor alteration of the clay are predicted in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-bentonite system. The model is a reasonable description of the experiments but also demonstrates the difficulties in modeling processes operating at a small scale under a diffusive regime.

Fernandez, Raul, E-mail: raul.fernandez@ietcc.csic.e [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion (CSIC), C/Serrano Galvache, 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Cuevas, Jaime [Dpto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Maeder, Urs K. [Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/2011 9/2011 1 BASF Fuel Cell, Inc. Manufacturing Barriers to high temperature PEM commercialization 39 Veronica Ave Somerset , NJ 08873 Tel : (732) 545-5100 9/9/2011 2 Background on BASF Fuel Cell  BASF Fuel Cell was established in 2007, formerly PEMEAS Fuel Cells (including E-TEK)  Product line is high temperature MEAs (Celtec ® P made from PBI-phosphoric acid)  Dedicated a new advanced pilot manufacturing facility in Somerset NJ May 2009. Ribbon-cutting hosted by Dr. Kreimeyer (BASF BoD, right) and attended by various US pubic officials including former NJ Governor Jon Corzine (left) 9/9/2011 3 Multi-layer product of membrane (polybenzimidazole and phosphoric acid), gas diffusion material and catalysts Unique characteristics:  High operating temperature

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-voltage electrical insulator for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall of a heat exchanger filled with liquid lithium while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl[sub 2]O[sub 3], sapphire) with a niobium foil layer bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal facing the heat exchanger wall, and a molybdenum layer bonded to the niobium layer to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface. 3 figures.

Van Der Beck, R.R.; Bond, J.A.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-voltage electrical insulator (21) for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module (17) in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall (11) of a heat exchanger (13) filled with liquid lithium (16) while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator (21) has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl.sub.2 O.sub.3, sapphire) with a niobium foil layer (32) bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal (26) facing the heat exchanger wall (11), and a molybdenum layer (31) bonded to the niobium layer (32) to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface.

Van Der Beck, Roland R. (Lansdale, PA); Bond, James A. (Exton, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Removing Barriers to Utility Interconnected Photovoltaic Inverters  

SciTech Connect

The Million Solar Roofs Initiative has motivated a renewed interest in the development of utility interconnected photovoltaic (UIPV) inverters. Government-sponsored programs (PVMaT, PVBONUS) and competition among utility interconnected inverter manufacturers have stimulated innovations and improved the performance of existing technologies. With this resurgence, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed a program to assist industry initiatives to overcome barriers to UIPV inverters. In accordance with newly adopted IEEE 929-2000, the utility interconnected PV inverters are required to cease energizing the utility grid when either a significant disturbance occurs or the utility experiences an interruption in service. Compliance with IEEE 929-2000 is being widely adopted by utilities as a minimum requirement for utility interconnection. This report summarizes work done at the SNL balance-of-systems laboratory to support the development of IEEE 929-2000 and to assist manufacturers in meeting its requirements.

Gonzalez, S.; Bonn, R.H.; Ginn, J.W.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

244

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Exploring the multi-humped fission barrier of 238U via sub-barrier photofission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photofission cross-section of 238U was measured at sub-barrier energies as a function of the gamma-ray energy using, for the first time, a monochromatic, high-brilliance, Compton-backscattered gamma-ray beam. The experiment was performed at the High Intensity gamma-ray Source (HIgS) facility at beam energies between E=4.7 MeV and 6.0 MeV and with ~3% energy resolution. Indications of transmission resonances have been observed at gamma-ray beam energies of E=5.1 MeV and 5.6 MeV with moderate amplitudes. The triple-humped fission barrier parameters of 238U have been determined by fitting EMPIRE-3.1 nuclear reaction code calculations to the experimental photofission cross section.

L. Csige; D. M. Filipescu; T. Glodariu; J. Gulys; M. M. Gnther; D. Habs; H. J. Karwowski; A. Krasznahorkay; G. C. Rich; M. Sin; L. Stroe; O. Tesileanu; P. G. Thirolf

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reaction Barrier Transparency for Cold Fusion with Deuterium and Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An improved parametric representation of Coulomb barrier penetration is presented. These detailed calculations are improvements upon the conventionally used Gamow tunneling coefficient. This analysis yields a reaction barrier transparency (RBT) which may have singular ramifications for cold fusion, as well as significant consequences in a wide variety of fusion settings. 1.

Yeong E. Kim; Jin-hee Yoon; Alexander L. Zubarev; Mario Rabinowitz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Stability and Schottky barrier of silicides: First-principles study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using first-principles calculations, we explain why some metal atoms such as Ni produce bulk silicides and the others like Au never produce silicides, why silicides with some stoichiometry are difficult to grow on Si substrate, and why Schottky barrier ... Keywords: First-principles calculation, Schottky barrier, Silicide, Silicide/Si interfaces, Stability

T. Nakayama; S. Sotome; S. Shinji

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

Neutron Radiography Reactor Reactivity -- Focused Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was converted from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. After the conversion, NRAD resumed operations and is meeting operational requirements. Radiography image quality and the number of images that can be produced in a given time frame match pre-conversion capabilities. However, following the conversion, NRADs excess reactivity with the LEU fuel was less than it had been with the HEU fuel. Although some differences between model predictions and actual performance are to be expected, the lack of flexibility in NRADs safety documentation prevented adjusting the reactivity by adding more fuel, until the safety documentation could be modified. To aid future reactor conversions, a reactivity-focused Lessons Learned meeting was held. This report summarizes the findings of the lessons learned meeting and addresses specific questions posed by DOE regarding NRADs conversion and reactivity.

Eric Woolstenhulme; Randal Damiana; Kenneth Schreck; Ann Marie Phillips; Dana Hewit

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

LES algorithm for turbulent reactive flows simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the development and implementation of a Large Eddy Simulation numerical algorithm for simulating turbulent reactive flows. The numerical algorithm is based on a 5 step modified Runge - Kutta numerical scheme with a dual time stepping ... Keywords: Runge - Kutta numerical scheme, large eddy simulation, linear eddy model

Ionut Porumbel; Cristian Crl?nescu; Florin Gabriel Florean; Constantin Eusebiu Hritcu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 19370 of 29,416 results. 61 - 19370 of 29,416 results. Article Early Detection Saves Lives Former Department of Energy (DOE) workers tell how medical screening helped them lead healthier and longer lives. http://energy.gov/hss/articles/early-detection-saves-lives Page Permeable Reactive Barriers A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a zone of reactive material placed underground to intercept and react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils... http://energy.gov/lm/services/long-term-surveillance-and-maintenance-ltsm-operations-and-maintenance/permeable Download Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,

252

File:EIA-PRB-S-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

S-LIQ.pdf S-LIQ.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Powder River Basin, Southern Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 12.89 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Powder River Basin, Southern Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana, Wyoming File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:35, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:35, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (12.89 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

253

File:EIA-PRB-N-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin, Northern Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Basin, Northern Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 13.87 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Powder River Basin, Northern Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana, Wyoming File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:33, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:33, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (13.87 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

254

File:EIA-PRB-S-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powder River Basin, Southern Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Powder River Basin, Southern Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 12.92 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Powder River Basin, Southern Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana, Wyoming File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:34, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:34, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (12.92 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

255

Removing Barriers to Innovations: Related Codes and Standards CSI Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removing Barriers to Innovation Removing Barriers to Innovation Related Codes and Standards CSI Team PAM COLE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Meeting, April 29-30, 2013, Denver, CO PNNL-SA-95120 Background/History Transformation of U.S. housing markets to favor high- performance homes faces significant challenges, from education to technology to infrastructure and cost barriers. Some of the most difficult challenges involve industry codes and standards that may prevent or slow the innovation process. Building America Research has a history of: Successful market innovations and transformation and overcoming codes and standards barriers. Top 3 Existing Innovations C/S Challenges Thermal Bypass Air Barrier Requirements: Building America research teams effectively

256

Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual, Training materials Website: uneprisoe.org/ Cost: Free Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies Screenshot References: UNEP-Risoe[1] Logo: Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies This guidebook deals with the transfer of proven technologies both between countries and within them. "The purpose of the TNA project is to assist participant developing country

257

Barriers to energy conservation. Conservation paper Number 55  

SciTech Connect

This study's aim is to provide policy guidance to the FEA in its efforts to break down barriers to the efficient usage of finite energy sources. Such efforts may involve mechanisms to promote the more-efficient usage of current energy sources or to break down the barriers which presently inhibit the introduction of alternative energy sources. Only the energy used by finished products is considered and not energy used in the production process itself. The majority of barriers that can be easily and/or directly affected involve the marketplace. This is true even where the barriers are technolgical; for, in many cases, the problem is not the absence of adequate technology, but its cost. For this reason, considerable time was spent developing an understanding of the various ways in which economic barriers affect efficient energy usage.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Diffusion Barrier Characteristic and Breakdown Mechanism of Ni3P ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Transformations, and Reactive Phase Formation in Electronic Materials XII ... electrical signal delay and power loss in high-frequency electronic devices.

260

CONTAINMENT EVALUATION OF PU-METAL TRANSPORT USING MULTIPLE BARRIERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology was developed previously by SRNL to show that Al-SNF with cladding breaches can be directly transported in standard casks and maintained within the allowable release rates. This novel approach may be extended to other nuclear material systems. Utilizing an adaptation to the methodology, a containment analysis has been performed for the scenario of non-routine transfer of a damaged 9975 package containing plutonium metal from K-area monitored storage to F-area on the Savannah River Site. A multiple barrier system with each barrier having a defined leakage rate of less than 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at Standard Temperature and Pressure was analyzed to determine the number of barriers needed to transport the package under normal transportation conditions to meet transportation requirements for containment. The barrier system was analyzed parametrically to achieve a composite system that met the federal requirements for the maximum permissible release rate. The multiple barrier system acts to retard the release of radioactivity. That is, a build-up in the radioactivity release rate occurs with time. For example, a system with three barriers (e.g., sealed plastic barrier) with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for a total time of up to approximately 10 days with a release rate within the permissible rate. Additional number of barriers, or volume of the barriers, or both, would extend to this period of time. For example, a system with seven barriers with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for up to 100 days. Plastic bags are one type of barrier used in movement of radioactive materials and capable of achieving a leak rate of 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at STP. Low-density polyethylene bags can withstand high temperature (up to 180 C); a barrier thickness of 10 mils should be suitable for the barrier system.

Vinson, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Exploiting atomic operations for barrier on cray XE/XK systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Barrier is a collective operation used by many scientific applications and parallel libraries for synchronization. Typically, a Barrier operation is implemented by exchanging a short data message that requires demultiplexing, thereby adding ... Keywords: MPI, atomic operations, barrier, collectives, cray, gemini

Manjunath Gorentla Venkata; Richard L. Graham; Joshua S. Ladd; Pavel Shamis; Nathan T. Hjelm; Samuel K. Gutierrez

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development and feasibility of a waste package coupled reactive transport model (AREST-CT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most models that analyze the waste package and engineered barrier system (near-field) of an underground geologic repository assume constant boundary conditions at the waste form surface and constant chemical properties of the groundwater. These models are useful for preliminary modeling, iterative modeling to estimate uncertainties, and as a source for a total systems analysis. However, the chemical behavior of the system is a very important factor in the containment and release of radionuclides, and one needs to understand the underlying processes involved. Therefore, the authors are developing a model to couple the calculation of the chemical properties with the reactive transport which can be used to assess the near-field. This report describes the models being implemented and presents some simple analyses demonstrating the feasibility of the chemical and coupled transport models.

Engel, D.W.; McGrail, B.P.; Fort, J.A.; Roberts, J.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.

Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

Skotheim, Terje A. (Berkeley, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural gas vehicles : Status, barriers, and opportunities.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, recent shale gas discoveries have generated renewed interest in using natural gas as a vehicular fuel, primarily in fleet applications, while outside the United States, natural gas vehicle use has expanded significantly in the past decade. In this report for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program - a public-private partnership that advances the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions that reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector - we have examined the state of natural gas vehicle technology, current market status, energy and environmental benefits, implications regarding advancements in European natural gas vehicle technologies, research and development efforts, and current market barriers and opportunities for greater market penetration. The authors contend that commercial intracity trucks are a prime area for advancement of this fuel. Therefore, we examined an aggressive future market penetration of natural gas heavy-duty vehicles that could be seen as a long-term goal. Under this scenario using Energy Information Administration projections and GREET life-cycle modeling of U.S. on-road heavy-duty use, natural gas vehicles would reduce petroleum consumption by approximately 1.2 million barrels of oil per day, while another 400,000 barrels of oil per day reduction could be achieved with significant use of natural gas off-road vehicles. This scenario would reduce daily oil consumption in the United States by about 8%.

Rood Werpy, M.; Santini, D.; Burnham, A.; Mintz, M.; Energy Systems

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

266

Behavior of Laminate Reactive Materials under Dynamic Loading ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Behavior of Laminate Reactive Materials under Dynamic Loading ... Atomistically-Informed Dislocation Dynamics Simulations of High Rate ...

267

SIC Manufature via Reactive Infiltration - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, SIC Manufature via Reactive...

268

Multiple Steady States in Azeotropic and Reactive Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction . Motivation Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions . The Starting Point . Consolidation . Industrial Applications . Incorporating Reactions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation . Prediction Method . MTBE Process Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Distillation Overview . Ideal binary / multicomponent distillation . Homogeneous azeotropic distillation -- Heavy entrainer (extractive distillation) -- Intermediate entrainer -- "Boundary scheme" (ligh

Thomas E. Gttinger

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early for biomass fuels compared to the design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides, in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project is to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project are: Modification of an existing EERC pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system; Verification testing of the simulator; Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system; and Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data will be collected, analyzed, and reported to elucidate ash-related problems during biomass-coal cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has completed a project to examine fundamental issues that could limit the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC attempted to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience problematic fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive coal-biomass blends. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause increased clinkering or slagging at the grate due to higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start much earlier for biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates, various chlorides, and phosphates. These species in combination with different flue gas temperatures, because of changes in fuel heating value, can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project was to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project were: (1) Modification of an existing pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system. (2) Verification testing of the simulator. (3) Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system. (4) Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data were used to elucidate ash-related problems during coal-biomass cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Jay R. Gunderson; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of .sup.3 He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the .sup.3 He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the .sup.3 He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neturons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the .sup.3 He for spin-polarizing the .sup.3 He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the .sup.3 He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with .sup.3 He to spin-polarize the .sup.3 He atoms.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Treatment of Radioactive Reactive Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PacificEcoSolutions, Inc. (PEcoS) has installed a plasma gasification system that was recently modified and used to destroy a trimethyl-aluminum mixed waste stream from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL.) The unique challenge in handling reactive wastes like trimethyl-aluminum is their propensity to flame instantly on contact with air and to react violently with water. To safely address this issue, PacificEcoSolutions has developed a new feed system to ensure the safe containment of these radioactive reactive wastes during transfer to the gasification unit. The plasma gasification system safely processed the radioactively contaminated trimethyl-metal compounds into metal oxides. The waste stream came from LANL research operations, and had been in storage for seven years, pending treatment options. (authors)

Colby, S.; Turner, Z.; Utley, D. [Pacific EcoSolutions, Inc., 2025 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Duy, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory - LA-UR-05-8410, Post Office Box 1663 MS J595, Los Alamos, New Mexico 97545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nuclear reactivity control using laser induced polarization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control element for reactivity control of a fission source provides an atomic density of {sup 3}He in a control volume which is effective to control criticality as the {sup 3}He is spin-polarized. Spin-polarization of the {sup 3}He affects the cross section of the control volume for fission neutrons and hence, the reactivity. An irradiation source is directed within the {sup 3}He for spin-polarizing the {sup 3}He. An alkali-metal vapor may be included with the {sup 3}He where a laser spin-polarizes the alkali-metal atoms which in turn, spin-couple with {sup 3}He to spin-polarize the {sup 3}He atoms. 5 figs.

Bowman, C.D.

1989-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Microsoft Word - IG-0741 Y-12 Barrier Final 101006.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Concerns With Security Barriers at the Y-12 National Security Complex DOE/IG-0741 October 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries CONCERNS WITH SECURITY BARRIERS AT THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objective 1 Observations and Conclusions 1 DETAILS OF FINDINGS Weapon Ports 2 Observations 2 RECOMMENDATIONS 5 MANAGEMENT COMMENTS 5 INSPECTOR COMMENTS 5 APPENDICES A. Scope and Methodology 8 B. Management Comments 9 Overview Page 1 Concerns with Security Barriers at the Y-12 National Security Complex INTRODUCTION The DOE Office of Inspector General received an allegation that

277

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross median crashes have become a serious problem in recent years. Most of the median cross sections used for divided highways have terrains with steep slopes. Traffic barriers, frequently used on slopes, are generally designed based on the findings obtained from crash tests performed on flat terrain. For barriers placed on roadside and median slopes, vehicle impact height varies depending on the trajectory of the vehicle along the ditch section and lateral offset of the barrier. Thus depending on the placement location on a relatively steep slope, a barrier can be impacted by an errant vehicle at height and orientation more critical compared to those considered during its design. Hence, detailed study of performance of barriers on roadside and median slopes is needed to achieve acceptable safety performance. In this study, performances of modified G4(1S) W-beam, Midwest Guardrail System (MGS), modified Thrie-beam, modified weak post W-beam, and box-beam guardrail systems on sloped terrains are investigated using numerical simulations. A procedure is developed that provide guidance for their placement on roadside and median slopes. The research approach consists of nonlinear finite element analyses and multi-rigid-body dynamic analyses approach. Detailed finite element representation for each of the barriers is developed using LS-DYNA. Model fidelity is assessed through comparison of simulated and measured responses reported in full scale crash test studies conducted on flat terrain. LS-DYNA simulations of vehicle impacts on barriers placed on flat terrain at different impact heights are performed to identify performance limits of the barriers in terms of acceptable vehicle impact heights. The performances of the barriers are evaluated following the guidelines provided in NCHRP Report 350. Multi-rigid-body dynamic analysis code, CARSIM, is used to identify trajectories of the vehicles traversing various roadside and median cross-slopes. After analyzing vehicle trajectories and barrier performance limits, a guideline has been prepared with recommendations for the placement of barriers along roadside and median slopes. This guideline is then verified and refined using the responses obtained from full-scale LS-DYNA simulations. These simulations capture the full encroachment event from departure of the vehicle off the traveled way through impact with the barrier.

Ferdous, Md Rubiat

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Transmission of electron through monolayer graphene laser barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present theoretical model deals with the transmission property of the Dirac fermions in the Floquet sidebands for the laser radiated graphene nanostructure. The laser assisted structure behaves as a tunneling barrier that leads to asymmetric transmission around the normal to the interface and is capable to confine the massless Dirac particles in a monolayer graphene strip. The absence of the Klein tunneling and the presence of a large number of controlling parameters would make the time dependent vector potential barrier superior over the electrostatic and magnetic barriers towards the opto-electronic device fabrication.

Sinha, C. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Biswas, R. [Department of Physics, P. K. College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal 721401 (India)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Effects of weakly coupled channels on quasielastic barrier distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy-ion collisions often produce fusion barrier distributions with structures displaying a fingerprint of couplings to highly collective excitations. Similar distributions can be obtained from large-angle quasielastic scattering, although in this case, the role of the many weak direct-reaction channels is unclear. For {sup 20}Ne+{sup 90}Zr, we have observed the barrier structures expected for the highly deformed neon projectile; however, for {sup 20}Ne+{sup 92}Zr, we find significant extra absorption into a large number of noncollective inelastic channels. This leads to smearing of the barrier distribution and a consequent reduction in the ''resolving power'' of the quasielastic method.

Piasecki, E.; Kisielinski, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Swiderski, L.; Keeley, N.; Rusek, K.; Strojek, I. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Gawlikowicz, W.; JastrzePbski, J.; Kordyasz, A.; Trzcinska, A. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Kliczewski, S. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Kowalczyk, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Khlebnikov, S. [Khloplin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Koshchiy, E. [Kharkiv University, Kharkiv (Ukraine); Kozulin, E.; Loktev, T.; Smirnov, S. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Krogulski, T. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Bialystok (Poland); Mutterer, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Piasecki, K. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland)] (and others)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Influence of Dust on the Absorptivity of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to model and quantify the increase of the absorptivity of radiant barriers caused by the accumulation of dust on the surface of radiant barriers. This research was the continuation of a previous work by the author at Texas A&M University in which a radiation energy balance inside the attic enclosure was developed. The particles were considered as flat, circular planes, all having the same radii. That early model showed that there was a linear relationship between the fraction of area of the foil covered by dust and the mean absorptivity of the dusty radiant barrier. In the present work, it was found that the assumption of treating the dust particles as plane circles, underestimated the effective area of the particles by about 20%. Experimental measurements indicated that dust particles achieved the same temperature as the radiant barrier. The new model used the linear relationship just described, and simulated the dust particles as flat circular planes having random radii and laying in random locations within the radiant barrier surface. The new model calculated the fraction of radiant barrier area covered by particles using a digital array in which the clean barrier was represented as zeroes and the dust particles were represented as a set of ones appropriately dimensioned inside the array. The experimentation used natural dust and Arizona Road Test Dust. Using an infrared emissometer, the emissivities (absorptivities) of the clean and dusty barriers were measured and using an electronic scale, the dust loading was measured. An electron microscope was used to experimentally find the fraction of radiant barrier covered by the dust particles to correlate the experimentally found absorptivity with the experimentally found fraction of dust coverage. The limited experimental data available were also used to correlate the absorptivity of the dusty radiant barrier with the time of dust accumulation and the location of the barrier inside the attic. A linear relationship between the absorptivity and the time of dust accumulation was found that can be applied to predict future barrier effectiveness based upon the rate of dust accumulation for a given location.

Noboa, Homero L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of $^{16}$O with $^{154,}$$^{144}$Sm,$^{186}$W and $^{208}$Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two $^{64}$Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

F. Muhammad Zamrun; K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Real time reactive programming in lucid enriched with contexts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a synchronous approach to real-time reactive programming in Lucid enriched with contexts as first class objects. The declarative intensional approach allows real-time reactive programs to manipulate both events and state-based representations ... Keywords: contexts, formal verification, intensional programming, real-time reactive programming

Kaiyu Wan; Vasu Alagar; Joey Paquet

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

BARRIER SYSTEM FULL SCALE FIRE TESTING ADDRESSEES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All holders of operating licenses for nuclear power reactors, except those who have permanently ceased operations and have certified that fuel has been permanently removed from the reactor vessel, and fuel facilities licensees. PURPOSE The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing this information notice (IN) to inform addressees of the results of Hemyc electrical raceway fire barrier system (ERFBS) full-scale fire tests. The Hemyc ERFBS did not perform for one hour as designed because shrinkage of the Hemyc ERFBS occurred during the testing. It is expected that recipients will review the information for applicability to their facilities and consider actions as appropriate to avoid similar problems. However, suggestions contained in this information notice are not NRC requirements; therefore, no specific action or written response is required. BACKGROUND The Hemyc ERFBS, manufactured by Promatec, Inc., has been installed at nuclear power plants (NPPs) to protect circuits in accordance with regulatory requirements (Reference 1) and plant-specific commitments. As a result of fire protection inspections, unresolved items (URIs) were opened at some nuclear power stations due to questions raised regarding the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 2). The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) performed a review of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 3) and requested the NRCs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to perform confirmatory testing of this ERFBS. RES performed the testing at the Omega Point Laboratories in Elmendorf, Texas. DISCUSSION This information notice describes the results of the investigation of the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Attachment 1). The NRC performed two ASTM E 119 furnace tests on a number of cable raceway types that are protected by the Hemyc ERFBS (with and without air gaps) in accordance with the Hemyc ERFBS test plan (see ADAMS Accession No. ML043210141 for a preliminary version of the test plan). The test plan provides ML050890089 IN 2005-07

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Commercial Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code requires openings in the building envelope to be sealed to prevent air leakage into and out of the space, including an air barrier at insulation installations. Publication Date: Wednesday, June 22, 2011 cn_commercial_air_barrier_requirements_for_insulated_ceilings.pdf Document Details Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 2009 IECC Document type: Code Notes Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 17:25

286

Obstacles and Opportunity: Overcoming Barriers in Today's CHP Marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP), which can offer tremendous efficiency benefits to industrial facilities around the country, continues to be viewed as a long-term efficiency opportunity. However, the high up-front cost of CHP equipment and fuel-dependent operating costs have made CHP a difficult sell internally in some corporations. The recent recession and slow recovery have further discouraged facility managers and owners from making large capital investments such as CHP. This paper addresses the biggest barriers to new CHP project development from the perspective of those intimately involved in moving new CHP projects forward: CHP developers and CHP advocates. It identifies economic and financial barriers as the largest common barriers found throughout the U.S. It also suggests ways that CHP developers and advocates can address these barriers, and attempts to overcome them in the current economic context.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Determine Employee Commuting Incentives and Barriers for Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determine Employee Commuting Incentives and Barriers for Greenhouse Determine Employee Commuting Incentives and Barriers for Greenhouse Gas Profile Determine Employee Commuting Incentives and Barriers for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 2:23pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Finally, when evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, it is important to consider what specific incentives would most influence an employee's decision to adopt an alternative to single-occupancy vehicle commuting and what employees perceive as major barriers to using certain alternatives. Agencies must determine whether they can influence commute behavior changes with the strategies described in the following section. To illustrate, survey data from Worksite B2 in Figure 1 below summarize the reasons why employees drive alone and factors that would motivate them to

288

Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Wideband Radio-Wave Communications and ..... Speaker(s): Farid Dowla Date: June 1, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette (Complete seminar title is: Through-Barrier Electromagnetic Communication and Sensing: Advances in Wideband Radio-Wave Communications and Radar Imaging, Radio-Frequency (RF) Tags and Tera-Hertz (THz) Standoff Detection Spectroscopy) In many remote sensing problems there is a critical need to detect and image objects through barriers, such as buildings, with high reliability and resolution and at long ranges. A related problem is the wireless communication and geolocation of transceivers in harsh RF environments, such as in urban areas and underground caves, where

289

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Title Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6155E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Cappers, Peter, Jason MacDonald, and Charles A. Goldman Date Published 03/2013 Keywords advanced metering infrastructure, aggregators of retail customers, ancillary services, demand response, electric utility regulation, electricity market rules, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, institutional barriers, market and value, operating reserves, retail electricity providers, retail electricity tariffs, smart grid Attachment Size

290

Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers.

Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Household Preferences for Supporting Renewable Energy, and Barriers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Household Preferences for Supporting Renewable Energy, and Barriers to Green Power Demand Speaker(s): Ryan Wiser Date: May 9, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Nearly 40% of the...

292

Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas-Turbine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

070103 (36 Months Duration) 546,000 Total Contract Value (546,000 DOE) Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas-Turbine Engines Using a Novel Solution-Precursor...

293

Economic evaluation of closure cap barrier materials study  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of the Economic Evaluation of the Closure Cap Barrier Materials, Revision I contains detailed cost estimates for closure cap barrier materials. The cost estimates incorporate the life cycle costs for a generic hazardous waste seepage basin closure cap under the RCRA Post Closure Period of thirty years. The economic evaluation assessed six barrier material categories. Each of these categories consists of several composite cover system configurations, which were used to develop individual cost estimates. The information contained in this report is not intended to be used as a cost estimating manual. This information provides the decision makers with the ability to screen barrier materials, cover system configurations, and identify cost-effective materials for further consideration.

Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

HOLM MJ

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Nontechnical Barriers to Solar Energy Use: Review of Recent Literature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the nontechnical barriers to solar energy use, drawing on recent literature to help identify key barriers that must be addressed as part of the Technology Acceptance efforts under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America Initiative. A broad literature search yielded more than 400 references, which were narrowed to 19 recent documents on nontechnical barriers to the use of solar energy and other energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) technologies. Some of the most frequently identified barriers included lack of government policy supporting EE/RE, lack of information dissemination and consumer awareness about energy and EE/RE, high cost of solar and other EE/RE technologies compared with conventional energy, and inadequate financing options for EE/RE projects.

Margolis, R.; Zuboy, J.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Moisture Measurements in Residential Attics Containing Radiant Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal radiant barriers, rigorously tested during a typical Tennessee winter, allowed moisture to dissipate on a diurnal cycle and caused no structural, wet insulation, or stained-ceiling problems.

1989-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fusion dynamics of symmetric systems near barrier energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections was explained as the lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model. The numbers of nucleon transfer in the neck region are appreciably dependent on the incident energies, but strongly on the reaction systems. A comparison of the neck dynamics is performed for the symmetric reactions $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. An increase of the ratios of neutron to proton in the neck region at initial collision stage is observed and obvious for neutron-rich systems, which can reduce the interaction potential of two colliding nuclei. The distribution of the dynamical fusion barriers and the fusion excitation functions are calculated and compared them with the available experimental data.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology development  

SciTech Connect

An important component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier is the use of a two-layer composite asphalt system, which provides backup water diversion capabilities if the primary capillary barrier fails to meet infiltration goals. Because of asphalt`s potential to perform to specification over the 1000-year design life criterion, a composite asphalt barrier (HMAC/fluid-applied polymer-modified asphalt) is being considered as an alternative to the bentonite clay/high density poly(ethylene) barriers for the low-permeability component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier. The feasibility of using asphalt as a long-term barrier is currently being studied. Information that must be known is the ability of asphalt to retain desirable physical properties over a period of 1000 years. This paper presents the approach for performing accelerated aging tests and evaluating the performance of samples under accelerated conditions. The results of these tests will be compared with asphalt artifact analogs and the results of modeling the degradation of the selected asphalt composite to make life-cycle predictions.

Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification  

SciTech Connect

Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they pertain to this report; the current procedures are addressed in Section 2. This revision also addresses updates to the technical basis in supporting analysis and model reports and corroborative documentation, as presented in Sections 4 and 6 of this report. Finally, Sections 4, 5, and 6 of this report provide additional information pertaining to the relevant FEPs-related Acceptance Criteria presented in ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (YMRP) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274], Sections 2.2.1.2.1.3 and 2.2.1.3.3.3).

Jaros, W.

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, Ming-Shing (Laramie, WY, NJ); Chen, James M. (Rahway, NJ); Yang, Ralph T. (Amherst, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

1980-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect

Reactive sticking coefficients (RSCs) were measured for silane and disilane on polycrystalline silicon for a wide range of temperature and flux (pressure) conditions. The data were obtained from deposition rate measurements using molecular beam scattering and a very low pressure cold wall reactor. The RSCs have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences and decreases with increasing flux at low (710/sup 0/) temperatures. A simple model involving dissociative adsorption of silane is consistent with these results. The results are compared with previous studies of the SiH/sub 4//Si(s) reaction.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Influence of Dust on the Emissivity of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of the radiant heat transfer in attics containing dusty radiant barriers was developed. The geometrical model was a triangular enclosure in which the temperatures of the enclosing surfaces were known. The dust particles were simulated as areas of diameter equal to the mean diameter of the real dust to be analyzed and an emissivity substantially larger than the emissivity of the radiant barrier. Several shape factors were calculated using shape factor algebra, including a procedure to find the shape factor between a small rectangle and a triangular surface perpendicular to the rectangular plane. The thermal model was developed using the "Net Radiation Method" in which the net heat exchange between the surfaces surrounding the enclosure was found by solving a system of equations that has as many equations as the number of surfaces involved in the calculations. This led to the necessity of solving a very large system of equations in order to account for the dust particles in a representative amount. The solution of the system of equations provided the heat flux for each element of the enclosure. Finally, replacing the radiant barrier and the dust particles for an equivalent surface corresponding to the dusty radiant barrier provided the means to calculate the emissivity of this dusty radiant barrier. The theoretical model was tested to assess its validity. The experimentation was carried out using a reflection emissometer to measure the increase of the emissivity of aluminum radiant barrier when known quantities of dust were artificially applied to it. The experimental results showed good agreement with the theoretical model. A linear relationship between the emissivity and the area of dust coverage was found. The simple relation developed can be used in future research which still has to deal with the determination of the area of dust coverage by using the geometrical model of dust superposition or other statistical model to simulate the random location of random size dust particles over the radiant barrier.

Noboa, Homero L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Mechanistic Reactive Burn Modeling of Solid Explosives  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a computational framework for reactive burn modeling of solid explosives and the development of a test case where physical mechanisms represent RDX or RDX-based materials. The report is a sequel to LA-13794-MS, ''A Unifying Framework for Hot Spots and the Ignition of Energetic Materials,'' where we proposed a new approach to the building of a general purpose model that captures the essential features of the three primary origins of hot-spot formation: void collapse, shear banding, friction. The purpose of the present report is to describe the continuing task of coupling the unifying hot-spot model to hydrodynamic calculations to develop a mechanistic reactive burn model. The key components of the coupling include energy localization, the growth of hot spots, overall hot-spot behavior, and a phase-averaged mixture equation of state (EOS) in a Mie-Grueneisen form. The nucleation and growth of locally heated regions is modeled by a phenomenological treatment as well as a statistical model based on an exponential size distribution. The Mie-Grueneisen form of the EOS is one of many possible choices and is not a critical selection for implementing the model. In this report, model calculations are limited to proof-of-concept illustrations for shock loading. Results include (1) shock ignition and growth-to-detonation, (2) double shock ignition, and (3) quenching and reignition. A comparative study of Pop-plots is discussed based on the statistical model.

Y.Horie; Y.Hamate; D.Greening

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Reactive thermal waves in energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

Reactive thermal waves (RTWs) arise in several energetic material applications, including self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), high explosive cookoff, and the detonation of heterogeneous explosives. In this paper I exmaine ideal RTWs, by which I mean that (1) material motion is neglected, (2) the state dependence of reaction is Arrhenius in the temperature, and (3) the reaction rate is modulated by an arbitrary mass-fraction-based reaction progress function. Numerical simulations demonstrate that one's natural intuition, which is based mainly upon experience with inert materials and which leads one to expect diffusion processes to become relatively slow after a short time period, is invalid for high energy, state-sensitive reactive systems. Instead, theory predicts that RTWs can propagate at very high speeds. This result agrees with estimates for detonating heterogeneous explosives, which indicate that RTWs must spread from hot-spot nucleation sites at rates comparable to the detonation speed in order to produce experimentally-observed reaction zone thicknesses. Using dimensionless scaling and further invoking the high activation energy approximation, I obtain an analytic formula for the steady plane RTW speed from numerical calculations. I then compute the RTW speed for real explosives, and discuss aspects of their behavior.

Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work completed during the fifth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. Work this quarter focused on analytical characterization of untreated and treated Wyodak subbituminous coal and Illinois {number sign}6 bituminous coal. Mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques were used to study the effect of methanol/HCl pretreatment on the composition of each coal's inorganic phase. Results from these studies indicated that calcite is largely removed during pretreatment, but that other mineral species such as pyrite are unaffected. This finding is significant, since calcite removal appears to directly correlate with low severity liquefaction enhancement. Further work will be performed to study this phenomenon in more detail.

Miller, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Processing and Gas Barrier Behavior of Multilayer Thin Nanocomposite Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin films with the ability to impart oxygen and other types of gas barrier are crucial to commercial packaging applications. Commodity polymers, such as polyethylene (PE), polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), have insufficient barrier for goods requiring long shelf life. Current gas barrier technologies like plasma-enhanced vapor deposition (PECVD) often create high barrier metal oxide films, which are prone to cracking when flexed. Bulk composites composed of polymer and impermeable nanoparticles show improved barrier, but particle aggregation limits their practical utility for applications requiring high barrier and transparency. Layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies allow polymers and nanoparticles to be mixed with high particle loadings, creating super gas barrier thin films on substrates normally exhibiting high gas permeability. Branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) were deposited using LbL to create gas barrier films with varying pH combinations. Film thickness and mass fraction of each component was controlled by their combined charge. With lower charge density (PEI at pH 10 and PAA at pH 4), PEI/PAA assemblies exhibit the best oxygen barrier relative to other pH combinations. An 8 BL PEI/PAA film, with a thickness of 451 nm, has an oxygen permeability lower than 4.8 x 10^-21 cm^3 * cm/cm^2 * s * Pa, which is comparable to a 100 nm SiOx nanocoating. Crosslinking these films with glutaraldehyde (GA), 1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-3-ethylcarbodiimide methiodide (EDC) or heating forms covalent bonds between PEI and/or PAA. Oxygen transmission rates (OTR) of 8 BL films crosslinked with 0.1M GA or 0.01M EDC show the best oxygen barrier at 100% RH. Graphene oxide (GO) sheets and PEI were deposited via LbL with varying GO concentration. The resulting thin films have an average bilayer thickness from 4.3 to 5.0 nm and a GO mass fraction from 88 to 91wt%. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images reveal a highly-oriented nanobrick wall structure. A 10 BL PEI/GO film that is 91 nm thick, made with a 0.2 wt% GO suspension, exhibits an oxygen permeability of 2.5 x 10^-20 cm^3 * cm/cm^2 * s * Pa. Finally, the influence of deposition time on thin film assembly was examined by depositing montmorillonite (MMT) or laponite (LAP) clays paired with PEI. Film growth and microstructure suggests that smaller aspect ratio LAP clay is more dip-time dependent than MMT and larger aspect ratio MMT has better oxygen barrier. A 30 BL PEI/MMT film made with 10 second dips in PEI has the same undetectable OTR as a film with 5 minute dips (with dips in MMT held at 5 minutes in both cases), indicating LbL gas barrier can be made more quickly than initially thought. These high barrier recipes, with simple and efficient processing conditions, are good candidates for a variety of packaging applications.

Yang, You-Hao

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Comparison Test for Infection Control Barriers for Construction in Healthcare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the extent of infection control measures to be taken to protect immunosuppressed and other types of patients from airborne infection agents during construction is crucial knowledge for both healthcare and construction professionals. The number of aspergillosis-related fatalities due to dust transmission during construction activity has decreased with the improvement of antifungal therapy, however the illness is particularly debilitating and the treatment is not always successful. This experimental work is the first stage in a research program to develop better dust controls for construction at existing medical facilities to reduce the incidence of dust borne fungi, such as Aspergillus spp. To better protect at-risk patients from exposure to Aspergillus spp. and other airborne fungal infections, an experiment was conducted to determine what materials can be used to create a barrier for infection control to moderate particle transmission from the construction area to the treatment area. This study investigated the relationship between construction barriers and particle transmission. A new experimental procedure and equipment simulates the transmission of disturbed dust from construction activity across a barrier. The effective of the barrier is determined from measured particle count on filter. The results show that an effective barrier manufactured from simple and readily available building supplies stops the transmission of 12-micron dust particles under a standard set of conditions. The test provides a simple and cost effective method to compare transmission rates for dust.

Bassett, Aimee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effect of attic ventilation on the performance of radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the experiments was to quantify how attic ventilation would affect the performance of a radiant barrier. Ceiling heat flux and space cooling load were both measured. Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 13.38 m[sup 2] (nominal) test houses are presented in this paper. The test houses responded similarly to weather variations. Indoor temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.2 [degrees] C. Ceiling heat fluxes and space cooling load were within a 2.5 percent difference between both test houses. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate of 1.3 (1/sec)/m[sup 2] of the attic floor existed after which the percentage reduction in ceiling heat fluxes produced by the radiant barriers did not change with increasing attic airflow rates. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barriers were between 25 and 35 percent, with 28 percent being the percent reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. The space-cooling load reductions observed were between two to four percent. All results compiled in this paper were for attics with unfaced fiberglass insulation with a resistance level of 3.35 m[sup 2]K/W (nominal) and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities (less than 0.05) on both sides.

Medina, M.A.; O'Neal, D.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Turner, W.D. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Systematic study of projectile structure effect on fusion barrier distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasielastic excitation function measurement has been carried out for the $^{4}$He + $^{232}$Th system at $\\theta_{lab}$=160$^\\circ$ with respect to the beam direction, to obtain a representation of the fusion barrier distribution. Using the present data along with previously measured barrier distribution results on $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O, and $^{19}$F + $^{232}$Th systems a systematic analysis has been carried out to investigate the role of target and/or projectile structures on fusion barrier distribution. It is observed that for $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, and $^{16}$O + $^{232}$Th, reactions the couplings due to target states only are required in coupled channel fusion calculations to explain the experimental data, whereas for the $^{19}$F+ $^{232}$Th system along with the coupling of target states, inelastic states of $^{19}$F are also required to explain the experimental results on fusion-barrier distribution. The width of the barrier distribution shows interesting transition behavior when plotted with respect to the target-projectile charge product for the above systems.

Pratap Roy; A. Saxena; B. K. Nayak; E. T. Mirgule; B. John; Y. K. Gupta; L. S. Danu; R. P. Vind; Ashok Kumar; R. K. Choudhury

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Upsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1687 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Knudsen Layer Reduction of Fusion Reactivity Kim Molvig and Nelson...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fusion cross section determine Gamow peak in the fusion reactivity. 2 Inertially confined fusion systems typically have plasma fuel enveloped by a cold non-reacting region or...

315

SP-19: Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry...

316

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Facebook icon Twitter icon Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project...

317

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Processes Associated with Carbon Sequestration PI Name: David Trebotich Institution: Lawrence Berkeley...

318

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation The engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a key role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. This report focuses on the progress made in the evaluation of EBS design concepts, assessment of clay phase stability at repository-relevant conditions, thermodynamic database development for cement and clay phases, and THMC coupled phenomena along with the development of tools and methods to examine these processes. This report also documents the advancements of the Disposal System Evaluation Framework (DSEF) for the development of

319

Special Presentation: Key Findings from the Barrier Immune Radio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Presentation: Key Findings from the Barrier Immune Radio Special Presentation: Key Findings from the Barrier Immune Radio Communications Project Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Girish Ghatikar Peter Haugen Date: November 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Barrier Immune Radio Communications (BIRC) Project was established in January 2007 by the Demand Response Emerging Technologies Program (DRETD) to identify radio frequency technologies that could enable the widespread deployment of Demand Response strategies in buildings. Researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will present the key findings from this project in a one-hour presentation. Researchers found that several of the RF technologies tested at LBNL's Molecular Foundry building were able to provide sufficiently

320

Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier June 25, 2010 - 12:16pm Addthis EnerNex Corporation is developing documentation and validating generic wind turbine and plant models that test reliability. | File photo EnerNex Corporation is developing documentation and validating generic wind turbine and plant models that test reliability. | File photo Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE The steady increase of wind power on the grid presents new challenges for power system operators charged with making sure the grid stays up and running. "We need to ensure that we are going down a path that will lead to better reliability [with wind power]," said Bob Zavadil, an executive vice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy Department Announces New Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiative to Remove Barriers for Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry to Work with National Labs, Commercialize Technology Energy Department Announces New Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry to Work with National Labs, Commercialize Technology December 8, 2011 - 12:30pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of President Obama's commitment to helping U.S businesses create jobs and strengthen their competitiveness by speeding up the transfer of federal research and development from the laboratory to the marketplace, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman today announced a new pilot initiative to reduce some of the hurdles that prevent innovative companies from working with the Department of Energy's national laboratories. The new Agreements for Commercializing Technology

322

Sub-barrier fusion enhancement with radioactive 134Te  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections of radioactive $^{134}$Te + $^{40}$Ca were measured at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The evaporation residues produced in the reaction were detected in a zero-degree ionization chamber providing high efficiency for inverse kinematics. Both coupled-channel calculations and comparison with similar Sn+Ca systems indicate an increased sub-barrier fusion probability that is correlated with the presence of positive Q-value neutron transfer channels. In comparison, the measured fusion excitation functions of $^{130}$Te + $^{58,64}$Ni, which have positive Q-value neutron transfer channels, were accurately reproduced by coupled-channel calculations including only inelastic excitations. The results demonstrate that the coupling of transfer channels can lead to enhanced sub-barrier fusion but this is not directly correlated with positive Q-value neutron transfer channels in all cases.

Z. Kohley; J. F. Liang; D. Shapira; C. J. Gross; R. L. Varner; J. M. Allmond; J. J. Kolata; P. E. Mueller; A. Roberts

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sub-barrier fusion enhancement with radioactive 134Te  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections of radioactive 134Te + 40Ca were measured at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The evaporation residues produced in the reaction were detected in a zero-degree ionization chamber providing high efficiency for inverse kinematics. Both coupled-channel calculations and comparison with similar Sn + Ca systems indicate an increased sub-barrier fusion probability that is correlated with the presence of positive Q-value neutron transfer channels. In comparison, the measured fusion excitation functions of 130Te + 58,64Ni, which have positive Q-value neutron transfer channels, were accurately reproduced by coupled-channel calculations including only inelastic excitations. The results demonstrate that the coupling of transfer channels can lead to enhanced sub-barrier fusion but this is not directly correlated with positive Q-value neutron transfer channels in all cases.

Kohley, Zachary W [ORNL; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Allmond, James M [ORNL; Kolata, Jim J [University of Notre Dame, IN; Mueller, Paul Edward [ORNL; Roberts, Amy [University of Notre Dame, IN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Toward Understanding the Nature of Internal Rotation Barriers with a New Energy Partition Scheme: Ethane and n-Butane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on an alternative energy partition scheme where density-based quantification of the steric effect was proposed [S.B. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 244103 (2007)], the origin of the internal rotation barrier between the eclipsed and staggered conformers of ethane and n-butane is systematically investigated in this work. The new definition is repulsive, exclusive, and extensive, and is intrinsically related to Baders atoms in molecules approach. Two kinds of differences, adiabatic (with optimal structure) and vertical (with fixed geometry), are considered in this work. We find that in the adiabatic case the eclipsed conformer possesses a larger steric repulsion than the staggered conformer for both molecules, but in the vertical cases the staggered conformer retains a larger steric repulsion. For ethane, a strong correlation between the total energy difference and the fermionic quantum energy difference is discovered. This linear relationship, however, does not hold for n-butane, whose behaviors in energy component differences are found to be more complicated. The impact of basis set and density functional choices on energy components from the new energy partition scheme has been investigated, as has its comparison with another definition of the steric effect in the literature in terms of the natural bond orbital analysis through the Pauli Exclusion Principle. Profiles of conceptual DFT reactivity indices as a function of dihedral angle changes have also been examined. Put together, these results suggest that the new energy partition scheme provides insights from a different perspective of internal rotation barriers.

Liu, Shubin; Govind, Niri

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

Instrumentation @ Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Group | Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Instrumentation The Catalysis Group at BNL is leading research initiatives into the development of new tools and techniques that focus on the characterization of heterogeneous catalytic reactions and catalysts using imaging, spectroscopy and scattering techniques and integrated combinations of them under reaction conditions to unravel the morphology, chemical and structural properties, of catalysts, respectively. These efforts revolve around the use of synchrotron radiation (NSLS), electrons (CFN) and quantum tunneling tools with particular thrusts into imaging, spectroscopy and scattering. Groups Instrumentation(BNL) Three UHV chambers with diverse instrumentation for surface characterization: LEED, UPS, XPS, AES, TPD, ISS, PM-AP-IRRAS, Reactivity Cell. All the systems include ancillary instrumentation such as sputtering guns and metal evaporators. The IRRAS system was retrofitted with an ambient pressure (AP) cell on top of the UHV system. The sample can be prepared and characterized in UHV and then transfer in vacuum to the AP cell.

326

Market and Policy Barriers to Deployment of Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

There has recently been resurgent interest in energy storage, due to a number of developments in the electricity industry. Despite this interest, very little storage, beyond some small demonstration projects, has been deployed recently. While technical issues, such as cost, device efficiency, and other technical characteristics are often listed as barriers to storage, there are a number of non-technical and policy-related issues. This paper surveys some of these main barriers and proposes some potential research and policy steps that can help address them. While the discussion is focused on the United States, a number of the findings and observations may be more broadly applicable.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.; Jenkin, T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Functional Requirements and Design Basis for Information Barriers  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the Information Barrier Working Group workshop held at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, February 2-4, 1999. This workshop was convened to establish the functional requirements associated with warhead radiation signature information barriers, to identify the major design elements of any such system or approach, and to identify a design basis for each of these major elements. Such information forms the general design basis to be used in designing, fabricating, and evaluating the complete integrated systems developed for specific purposes.

Fuller, James L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Goos-Hanchen like Shifts in Graphene Double Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Goos-Hanchen like shifts for Dirac fermions in graphene scattered by double barrier structures. After obtaining the solution for the energy spectrum, we use the boundary conditions to explicitly determine the Goos-Hanchen like shifts and the associated transmission probability. We analyze these two quantities at resonances by studying their {main} characteristics as a function of the energy and electrostatic potential parameters. To check the validity of our computations we recover previous results obtained for a single barrier under appropriate limits.

Ahmed Jellal; Ilham Redouani; Youness Zahidi; Hocine Bahlouli

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow  

SciTech Connect

Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geothermal (Ground-Source) Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pump systems (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pump or Geo-Exchange systems, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national energy and climate strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE s request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential and other benefits, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in a report along with conclusions and recommendations. This paper summarizes the key information from the report.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geothermal(Ground-Source)Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pumps, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in this report along with conclusions and recommendations.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Artificial bee colony algorithm solution for optimal reactive power flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent foraging behavior of honeybee swarm. Optimal reactive power flow (ORPF) based on ABC algorithm to minimize active power loss in power systems is studied in this ... Keywords: Artificial bee colony, Optimal reactive power flow, Penalty function, Power system

Kr?at Ayan; Ula? K?l?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A formal approach for the development of reactive systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Context: This paper deals with the development and verification of liveness properties on reactive systems using the Event-B method. By considering the limitation of the Event-B method to invariance properties, we propose to apply the language TLA^+ ... Keywords: Event-B method, Language TLA+, Liveness properties, Reactive systems, Refinement, Verification

Olfa Mosbahi; Leila Jemni Ben Ayed; Mohamed Khalgui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

MARKETS FOR REACTIVE POWER AND RELIABILITY: A WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 MARKETS FOR REACTIVE POWER AND RELIABILITY: A WHITE PAPER Engineering and Economics as efficient and optimal production and prices for real and reactive power. The purpose of this paper delivery of electric power. To accomplish this end, the paper opens with specification of an economic

336

Differential evolution approach for optimal reactive power dispatch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential evolution based optimal reactive power dispatch for real power loss minimization in power system is presented in this paper. The proposed methodology determines control variable settings such as generator terminal voltages, tap positions ... Keywords: Differential evolution, Loss minimization, Optimal power flow, Penalty function, Reactive power dispatch

M. Varadarajan; K. S. Swarup

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Reactive Power Compensation Technologies, State-of-the-Art Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactors to provide or absorb the required reactive power have been developed [7], [8], [9]. Also, the use static VAR generators, using power electronic technologies have been proposed and developed [7 compensators (SVC) consist of standard reactive power shunt elements (reactors and capacitors) which

Rudnick, Hugh

338

Improved HEPA Filter Technology for Flexible and Rigid Containment Barriers  

SciTech Connect

Safety and reliability in glovebox operations can be significantly improved and waste packaging efficiencies can be increased by inserting flexible, lightweight, high capacity HEPA filters into the walls of plastic sheet barriers. This HEPA filter/barrier technology can be adapted to a wide variety of applications: disposable waste bags, protective environmental barriers for electronic equipment, single or multiple use glovebag assemblies, flexible glovebox wall elements, and room partitions. These reliable and inexpensive filtered barriers have many uses in fields such as radioactive waste processing, HVAC filter changeout, vapor or grit blasting, asbestos cleanup, pharmaceutical, medical, biological, and electronic equipment containment. The applications can result in significant cost savings, improved operational reliability and safety, and total waste volume reduction. This technology was developed at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in 1993 and has been used at ANL-W since then at the TRU Waste Characterization Chamber Gloveboxes. Another 1998 AGS Conference paper titled "TRU Waste Characterization Gloveboxes", presented by Mr. David Duncan of ANL-W, describes these boxes.

P. A. Pinson

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Geostrophic Pumping, Inflows and Upwelling in Barrier Reefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The communication between shallow and deep oceans via gaps in the separating barrier reefs is examined using a simplified two-layer analytical model. Attention is focused on the flow resulting from a sea-level difference between the ocean and the ...

Doron Nof; Jason H. Middleton

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Interdiffusion between Zr Diffusion Barrier and U-Mo Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment uranium fuels under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Significant reactions have been observed between U-Mo fuels and Al or Al alloy matrix. Refractory metal Zr has been proposed as barrier material to reduce the interactions. In order to investigate the compatibility and barrier effects between U-Mo alloy and Zr, solid-to-solid U-10wt.%Mo vs. Zr diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 C for various times. The microstructures and concentration profiles due to interdiffusion and reactions were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. Intermetallic phase Mo2Zr was found at the interface and its population increased when annealing temperature decreased. Diffusion paths were also plotted on the U-Mo-Zr ternary phase diagrams with good consistency. The growth rate of interdiffusion zone between U-10wt.%Mo and Zr was also calculated under the assumption of parabolic diffusion, and was determined to be about 103 times lower than the growth rate of diffusional interaction layer found in diffusion couples U-10wt.%Mo vs. Al or Al-Si alloy. Other desirable physical properties of Zr as barrier material, such as neutron adsorption rate, melting point and thermal conductivity are presented as supplementary information to demonstrate the great potential of Zr as the diffusion barrier for U-Mo fuel systems in RERTR.

K. Huang; Y. Park; Y. H. Sohn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fact Sheet Radiant barriers and interior radiation control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the insulation, the radiant barrier will lose most of its effectiveness in reducing heating and cooling loads in central Florida. Subsequent monitoring and data analysis showed cooling energy savings of 9%, peak load with air-conditioning ductwork in the attic in the deep south (such as in Miami in Zone 1 or Austin in Zone

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

344

A Theoretical Study of Mountain Barrier Jets over Sloping Valleys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow-water model is developed to examine the dynamics of mountain-barrier jets over a mesoscale sloping valley between two mountain ridges. In this model, the cold air trapped in the valley is represented by a shallow-water layer that is ...

Qin Xu; Ming Liu; Douglas L. Westphal

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers  

SciTech Connect

A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work to develop new thermal barrier coating systems, which will be essential to the operation of the ATS engine which is under development. Work is at the stage of process improvement and bond coat improvement, along with proof testing of the coatings under thermal conditions typical of what can be expected in the ATS engine.

NONE

1998-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

347

Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualifies for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH.sub.2).sub.11 --COOH Which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces.

King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Czanderna, Alvin W. (Denver, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Microstructural Evolution and interfacial motion in systems with diffusion barriers  

SciTech Connect

This research program was designed to model and simulate phase transformations in systems containing diffusion barriers. The modeling work included mass flow, phase formation, and microstructural evolution in interdiffusing systems. Simulation work was done by developing Cahn-Hilliard and phase field equations governing both the temporal and spatial evolution of the composition and deformation fields and other important phase variables.

Perry H. Leo

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

Temperature-Dependent Fission Barriers of Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. We study the temperature-dependent fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The equivalence of isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. For nuclei around $^{278}$112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with temperature as compared to the nuclei around $^{292}$114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and fission-barrier temperatures. Our calculations are consistent with the long survival probabilities of the superheavy elements produced in Dubna with th...

Pei, J C; Sheikh-Javid, A; Kerman, A K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Analysis of annual energy savings due to radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiant barriers are receiving increasing attention as an energy conservation measure for residential buildings, especially for warmer climates. They are being actively promoted for use in residential attics, sometimes with exaggerated claims about savings in utility bills that will results from their installation. In order to provide consumers with factual information that would assist them in deciding upon an investment in a radiant barrier, the Department of Energy, along with an industry advisory panel, has developed a Radiant Barrier Fact Sheet. A major part of this fact sheet is estimates of energy savings that might be expected from radiant barriers in various climates. This paper presents the details of the methodology underlying the energy savings estimates, and gives a summary of values listed in the Fact Sheet. The energy savings estimates were obtained from calculations using a detailed attic thermal model coupled with DOE-2.1C. A life cycle cost analysis was performed to estimate the present value savings on utility fuel costs. The results show that the fuel cost savings vary significantly with the level of conventional insulation already in the attic and from one climate to another.

Wilkes, K.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Variational reactivity estimates: new analyses and new results  

SciTech Connect

A modified form of the variational estimate of the reactivity worth ofa perturbation was previously developed to extend the range of applicability of variational perturbation theory for perturbations leading to negative reactivity worths. Recent numerical results challenged the assumptions behind the modified form. In this paper, more results are obtained, leading to the conclusion that sometimes the modified form extends the range ofapplicability of variational perturbation theory for positive reactivity worths as well, and sometimes the standard variational form is more accurate for negative-reactivity perturbations. In addition, this paper proves that using the exact generalized adjoint function would lead to an inaccurate variational reactivity estimate when the error in the first-order estimate is large; the standard generalized adjoint function, an approximation to the exact one, leads to Lore accurate results. This conclusion is also demonstrated numerically. Transport calculations use the PARTISN multi group discrete ordinates code

Favorite, Jeffrey A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND RELEVANCE TO THE DOE COMPLEX  

SciTech Connect

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was initiated to reduce risk and uncertainties in the performance assessments that directly impact U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup and closure programs. The CBP is supported by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and has been specifically addressing the following critical EM program needs: (i) the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities and (ii) increased understanding of contaminant transport behavior within cementitious barrier systems to support the development and deployment of adequate closure technologies. To accomplish this, the CBP has two initiatives: (1) an experimental initiative to increase understanding of changes in cementitious materials over long times (> 1000 years) over changing conditions and (2) a modeling initiative to enhance and integrate a set of computational tools validated by laboratory and field experimental data to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. In FY10, the CBP developed the initial phase of an integrated modeling tool that would serve as a screening tool which could help in making decisions concerning disposal and tank closure. The CBP experimental programs are underway to validate this tool and provide increased understanding of how CM changes over time and under changing conditions. These initial CBP products that will eventually be enhanced are anticipated to reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the DOE assessment process. These tools have application to low activity waste forms, high level waste tank closure, D&D and entombment of major nuclear facilities, landfill waste acceptance criteria, and in-situ grouting and immobilization of vadose zone contamination. This paper summarizes the recent work provided by the CBP to support DOE operations and regulatory compliance and the accomplishments over the past 2 years. Impacts of this work include: (1) a forum for DOE-NRC technical exchange, (2) material characterization to support PA predictions, (3) reducing uncertainty in PA predictions, (4) establishing base case performance to improve PA predictions, and (5) improving understanding and quantification of moisture and contaminant transport used in PAs. Additional CBP accomplishments include: sponsorship of a national test bed workshop to obtain collaboration in establishing the path forward in obtaining actual data to support future predictions on cementitious barrier performance evaluations, and participation in an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Cooperative Research Project on the use of cementitious barriers for low-level radioactive waste treatment and disposal.

Burns, H.; Langton, C.; Flach, G.; Kosson, D.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiant barriers were tested in attics of three unoccupied research houses which are located near Knoxville, Tennessee. The prime purpose of the testing was to determine the interaction, if any, between two types of radiant barriers, horizontal (barrier laid on top of attic insulation) and truss (barrier attached to underside of roof trusses), and three levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation, R-11, R-19, and R-30. Testing of radiant barriers with R-19 fiberglass-batt attic insulation was done at the houses in the summer of 1985 and in the winter of 1985-86. The R-11 and R-30 testing was done in the summer of 1986. These results showed that horizontal barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing house cooling and heating loads. The summer of 1986 testing showed that increasing the attic insulation from R-11 to R-30 reduced the house cooling load (Btu) by approximately 16%. Adding a horizontal barrier to R-11 also reduced the cooling load compared to R-11 with no barrier by about 16%, while a truss barrier reduced it by 11%. A horizontal barrier with R-30 only reduced the cooling load by 2% compared to R-30 with no barrier, while an increase in the cooling load of 0.7% was measured with a truss barrier and R-30. Radiant barriers were not effective in reducing house cooling loads when R-30 attic insulation was present. The results from the summer of 1985 were integrated into the latest work through the use of a modeling effort using the building load simulation program, DOE-2.1B. This showed that R-19 insulation in conjunction with a horizontal barrier was (for Knoxville) the most effective barrier/insulation combination and could reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% compared to R-11 with no barrier.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Properties of dc magnetron reactively sputtered TiN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Titanium nitride is of interest for IC fabrication because of its excellent performance as a metallic diffusion barrier. TiN films have been deposited in a batch sputtering system equipped with dc magnetron cathodes

Jim Stimmell

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Early maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field on Morwell Brown coal structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early maturation processes in coal. Part 2: Reactive dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field on Morwell Brown coal structures Elodie Salmon a , Adri C.T. van Duin b , François Lorant Brown coal using the ReaxFF reactive force field. We find that these reactive MD simulations

Goddard III, William A.

356

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the reaction of room-temperature silane and disilane on a hot polycrystalline silicon surface using both a collision-free molecular beam and a very low pressure CVD cell. Reactive sticking coefficients were obtained from deposition rate data over a wide range of temperatures and silane (disilane) fluxes. The RSCs are substantially less than one, ranging from 6 x 10/sup -5/ to 4 x 10/sup -2/. For silane we observed curved Arrhenius plots with slopes decreasing from approx.60 kcal mol/sup -1/ at low temperatures to approx.2 kcal mol/sup -1/ at higher temperatures. The RSCs are independent of flux (pressure) at 1040/sup 0/C, but vary as flux to the approx.-1/2 power at 710/sup 0/C. A model comprised of a dissociative adsorption mechanism with competing associative desorption and reaction was found to give reasonable agreement. For disilane, we observed RSCs that were roughly ten times higher than those for silane. We also observed a curved Arrhenius plot and a flux dependence at 710/sup 0/C for disilane. 22 refs., 5 figs.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Reactivity of coals under coprocessing conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the recent years greater interest has developed for processes involving coal and petroleum fractions to produce distillate fuels. Coprocessing is especially attractive as a direct liquefaction process because it involves the use of heavy petroleum fractions, so both coal and heavy petroleum resids are upgraded simultaneously. The main distinction of coprocessing from other direct liquefaction processes is that coprocessing is more complex from a chemical standpoint than direct liquefaction processes which use traditional solvents, due to the greater variety of hydrocarbons (aromatic from the coal and aliphatics from the petroleum) present in the system. Therefore, need arises for better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions during coprocessing. The aim of the present study is to examine the influence of reaction conditions, coal and petroleum resid properties as well as the compatibility of the coal/petroleum resid pairs in terms of structural components on total coal conversion. Special focus will be given to the reactivity of coals and interaction of the coal and resid which lead to anisotropic coke.

Tomic, J.; Schobert, H.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Reactivity of coals under coprocessing conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the recent years greater interest has developed for processes involving coal and petroleum fractions to produce distillate fuels. Coprocessing is especially attractive as a direct liquefaction process because it involves the use of heavy petroleum fractions, so both coal and heavy petroleum resids are upgraded simultaneously. The main distinction of coprocessing from other direct liquefaction processes is that coprocessing is more complex from a chemical standpoint than direct liquefaction processes which use traditional solvents, due to the greater variety of hydrocarbons (aromatic from the coal and aliphatics from the petroleum) present in the system. Therefore, need arises for better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions during coprocessing. The aim of the present study is to examine the influence of reaction conditions, coal and petroleum resid properties as well as the compatibility of the coal/petroleum resid pairs in terms of structural components on total coal conversion. Special focus will be given to the reactivity of coals and interaction of the coal and resid which lead to anisotropic coke.

Tomic, J.; Schobert, H.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Beyond parallax barriers: applying formal optimization methods to multilayer automultiscopic displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on resolving long-standing limitations of parallax barriers by applying formal optimization methods. We consider two generalizations of conventional parallax barriers. First, we consider general two-layer ...

Lanman, Douglas

360

Quantifying overwash flux in barrier systems : an example from Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal barriers are particularly susceptible to the predicted effects of accelerated of sea-level rise and the potential for increased impacts of intense storms. Over centennial scales, barriers are maintained via overtopping ...

Carruthers, Emily A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dust and Ventilation Effects on Radiant Barriers: Cooling Season Energy Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study on the effects of attic ventilation area and type and dust buildup on horizontal and truss radiant barriers in insulated homes can help utilities reduce cooling season electric energy requirements. Increasing the ventilation area ratio and changing ventilation types had little effect on radiant barrier performance. Dust did degrade performance, but insulated homes with radiant barriers still had lower energy requirements than those without radiant barriers.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizational Barriers to Cogeneration OrganizationTechnologies Cogeneration. MSW . Wind. ResidentialPage Industrial Cogeneration. Residential Photovoltaics.

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Reactivity Control Schemes for Fast Spectrum Space Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different reactivity control schemes are considered for future space nuclear reactor power systems. Each of these control schemes uses a combination of boron carbide absorbers and/or beryllium oxide reflectors to achieve sufficient reactivity swing to keep the reactor subcritical during launch and to provide sufficient excess reactivity to operate the reactor over its expected 715 year lifetime. The size and shape of the control system directly impacts the size and mass of the space reactor's reflector and shadow shield

Aaron E. Craft; Jeffrey C. King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Multiple-humped fission and fusion barriers of the heaviest elements and ellipsoidal deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leading possibly to superheavy elements, double-humped potential barriers appear for cold fusionMultiple-humped fission and fusion barriers of the heaviest elements and ellipsoidal deformations G barriers and the predicted half-lives of actinides follow the experimental results. In the fusion path

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Low temperature barriers with heat interceptor wells for in situ processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for reducing heat load applied to a frozen barrier by a heated formation is described. The system includes heat interceptor wells positioned between the heated formation and the frozen barrier. Fluid is positioned in the heat interceptor wells. Heat transfers from the formation to the fluid to reduce the heat load applied to the frozen barrier.

McKinzie, II, Billy John (Houston, TX)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

Laughlin, David E.

368

On the implementation of a log-barrier progressive hedging method for multistage stochastic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A progressive hedging method incorporated with self-concordant barrier for solving multistage stochastic programs is proposed recently by Zhao [G. Zhao, A Lagrangian dual method with self-concordant barrier for multistage stochastic convex nonlinear ... Keywords: Lagrangian dual, Log-barrier method, Multistage stochastic programs, Progressive hedging method

Xinwei Liu; Kim-Chuan Toh; Gongyun Zhao

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cooling season energy measurements of dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. Testing showed that increasing the attic ventilation area ratio from the minimum recommended of 1/300 (1 ft{sup 2} of effective ventilation area per 300 ft{sup 2} of attic area) to 1/150 had little if any effect on the house cooling load with either truss or horizontal barriers present in the attics. Radiant barriers, however, still reduced the house cooling load. 18 refs., 17 figs., 26 tabs.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hall, J.A. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level.

Brown, Ralph L. (Albuquerque, NM); Guilford, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stichman, John H. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level. 4 figs.

Brown, R.L.; Guilford, R.P.; Stichman, J.H.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Houston We have a Solution: University Teams Tackle Efficiency's Barriers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Houston We have a Solution: University Teams Tackle Efficiency's Houston We have a Solution: University Teams Tackle Efficiency's Barriers Houston We have a Solution: University Teams Tackle Efficiency's Barriers March 5, 2012 - 11:00am Addthis Secretary Chu with students from MIT at the Better Buildings Case Competition finale, held in Washington D.C. | Photo by Ken Shipp. Secretary Chu with students from MIT at the Better Buildings Case Competition finale, held in Washington D.C. | Photo by Ken Shipp. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs On Friday, Secretary Chu joined a group of bright, ambitious university students for the finale of the Better Buildings Case Competition in Washington, DC. The initiative, part of the President's Better Buildings Challenge, taps into the innovative, out-of-the-box thinking of university energy

374

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

375

Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Microgrids, IEEE Transactions onEconomic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supplyof creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive

Appen, Jan von

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Synthesis of Sm-Fe-N Hard Magnets by Reactive Mechanical Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we have performed reactive mechanical milling on Sm2Fe17 alloy under hydrogen atmosphere. After reactive mechanical milling, the Sm2Fe17...

378

Immobilization technology down-selection radiation barrier approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six immobilization technology projects variants, previously selected for evaluation during the PEIS/ROD process, have been evaluated with respect to the nine basic criteria for fissile materials disposition. Metrics for the criteria were developed to facilitate a comparative analysis of the technology variants. The six technology variants are grouped according to their radiation barrier approach. Information and data for the technology options were provided by limited experimental studies, definitions of process flowsheets, and preliminary evaluations of facility concepts and costs.

Gray, L.W.; Gould, T.H.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

In Situ Temporary Repair of Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on combustion turbine blades and vanes is a critical issue in the power generation industry. Degradation of TBCs occur by the spallation of the ceramic layer partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) that resides on the Al2O3-covered MCrAlY bondcoat. In the event of such local failures of the TBC, a quick in-situ technique to repair the coating would be desirable.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

An ultraviolet barrier-discharge OH molecular lamp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy and spectral parameters of a barrier discharge in a mixture of argon with hydroxyl {sup .}OH are studied experimentally. A sealed lamp with the radiation intensity maximum at {lambda} = 309.2 nm, an emitting surface area of {approx}700 cm{sup 2}, and a radiant excitance of 1.5 mW cm{sup -2} has been fabricated. The radiant power of the lamp is 1.1 W. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Sosnin, E A; Erofeev, M V; Avdeev, S M; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Panarin, V A; Skakun, V S; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Shitts, D V [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biofuels Topics: Implementation, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: tech-action.org/Perspectives/BioenergyIndia.pdf Country: India Cost: Free UN Region: Southern Asia Coordinates: 20.593684°, 78.96288° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":20.593684,"lon":78.96288,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

382

Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Background analysis Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2010/bali_2_copenhagen_Chile_Jun2010.pdf Country: Chile UN Region: Latin America and the Caribbean Coordinates: -35.675147°, -71.542969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-35.675147,"lon":-71.542969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

In-situ chemical barrier and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical barrier is formed by injecting a suspension of solid particles or colloids into the subsurface. First, a stable colloid suspension is made including a surfactant and a non-Newtonian fluid. This stable colloid suspension is characterized by colloid concentration, colloid size, colloid material, solution ionic strength, and chemical composition. A second step involves injecting the optimized stable colloid suspension at a sufficiently high flow rate to move the colloids through the subsurface sediment, but not at such a high rate so as to induce resuspending indigenous soil particles in the aquifer. While injecting the stable colloid suspension, a withdrawal well may be used to draw the injected colloids in a direction perpendicular to the flow path of a contaminant plume. The withdrawal well, may then be used as an injection well, and a third well, in line with the first two wells, may then be used as a withdrawal well, thereby increasing the length of the colloid barrier. This process would continue until emplacement of the colloid barrier is complete. 7 figs.

Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

In-situ chemical barrier and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical barrier is formed by injecting a suspension of solid particles or colloids into the subsurface. First, a stable colloid suspension is made including a surfactant and a non-Newtonian fluid. This stable colloid suspension is characterized by colloid concentration, colloid size, colloid material, solution ionic strength, and chemical composition. A second step involves injecting the optimized stable colloid suspension at a sufficiently high flow rate to move the colloids through the subsurface sediment, but not at such a high rate so as to induce resuspending indigenous soil particles in the aquifer. While injecting the stable colloid suspension, a withdrawal well may be used to draw the injected colloids in a direction perpendicular to the flow path of a contaminant plume. The withdrawal well, may then be used as an injection well, and a third well, in line with the first two wells, may then be used as a withdrawal well, thereby increasing the length of the colloid barrier. This process would continue until emplacement of the colloid barrier is complete.

Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richland, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hurdling barriers through market uncertainty: Case studies ininnovative technology adoption  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The crisis atmosphere surrounding electricity availability in California during the summer of 2001 produced two distinct phenomena in commercial energy consumption decision-making: desires to guarantee energy availability while blackouts were still widely anticipated, and desires to avoid or mitigate significant price increases when higher commercial electricity tariffs took effect. The climate of increased consideration of these factors seems to have led, in some cases, to greater willingness on the part of business decision-makers to consider highly innovative technologies. This paper examines three case studies of innovative technology adoption: retrofit of time-and-temperature signs on an office building; installation of fuel cells to supply power, heating, and cooling to the same building; and installation of a gas-fired heat pump at a microbrewery. We examine the decision process that led to adoption of these technologies. In each case, specific constraints had made more conventional energy-efficient technologies inapplicable. We examine how these barriers to technology adoption developed over time, how the California energy decision-making climate combined with the characteristics of these innovative technologies to overcome the barriers, and what the implications of hurdling these barriers are for future energy decisions within the firms.

Payne, Christopher T.; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Payne, Jack

2002-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

386

Water-retaining barrier and method of construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An agricultural barrier providing a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface, the barrier being disposed on native soil of the region, the barrier including: a first layer composed of pieces of basalt, the first layer being porous and being in contact with the native soil; a porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel, the second layer being less porous than, and overlying, the first layer; and a porous third layer containing soil which favors plant growth, the third layer being less porous than, and overlying, the second layer and having an exposed upper surface, wherein the porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer.

Adams, Melvin R. (Richland, WA); Field, Jim G. (Richland, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Systematic Study of Fission Barriers of Excited Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic study of fission-barrier dependence on excitation energy has been performed using the self-consistent finite-temperature Hartree-Fock+BCS (FT-HF+BCS) formalism with the SkM* Skyrme energy density functional. The calculations have been carried out for even-even superheavy nuclei with Z ranging between 110 and 124. For an accurate description of fission pathways, the effects of triaxial and reflection-asymmetric degrees of freedom have been fully incorporated. Our survey demonstrates that the dependence of isentropic fission barriers on excitation energy changes rapidly with particle number, pointing to the importance of shell effects even at large excitation energies characteristic of compound nuclei. The fastest decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy is predicted for deformed nuclei around N=164 and spherical nuclei around N=184 that are strongly stabilized by ground-state shell effects. For nuclei 240Pu and 256Fm, which exhibit asymmetric spontaneous fission, our calculations predict a transition to symmetric fission at high excitation energies due to the thermal quenching of static reflection asymmetric deformations.

J. A. Sheikh; W. Nazarewicz; J. C. Pei

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

Water-retaining barrier and method of construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An agricultural barrier is disclosed which provides a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface. The barrier is disposed on native soil of the region. The barrier includes a first porous layer composed of pieces of basalt, and is in contact with the native soil. There is a less porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel. The second layer overlies the first layer. A third layer, less porous than the second layer, contains soil which favors plant growth. The third layer overlies the second layer and has an exposed upper surface. The porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer. 2 figs.

Adams, M.R.; Field, J.G.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

390

Process for preparing schottky diode contacts with predetermined barrier heights  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for producing a Schottky diode having a preselected barrier height .phi..sub.Bn. The substrate is preferably n-GaAs, the metallic contact is derived from a starting alloy of the Formula [.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ](Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x) wherein: .SIGMA.M is a moiety which consists of at least one M, and when more than one M is present, each M is different, M is a Group VIII metal selected from the group consisting of nickel, cobalt, ruthenium, rhodium, indium and platinum, .delta. is a stoichiometric coefficient whose total value in any given .SIGMA.M moiety is 1, and x is a positive number between 0 and 1 (that is, x ranges from greater than 0 to less than 1). Also, the starting alloy is capable of forming with the substrate a two phase equilibrium reciprocal system of the binary alloy mixture [.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ]Ga-[.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ]Al-AlAs-GaAs. When members of an alloy subclass within this Formula are each preliminarily correlated with the barrier height .phi..sub.Bn of a contact producable therewith, then Schottky diodes of predetermined barrier heights are producable by sputtering and annealing. Further provided are the product Schottky diodes that are produced according to this process.

Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Jan, Chia-Hong (Portland, OR); Chen, Chia-Ping (Madison, WI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

TRITIUM BARRIER MATERIALS AND SEPARATION SYSTEMS FOR THE NGNP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contamination of downstream hydrogen production plants or other users of high-temperature heat is a concern of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Due to the high operating temperatures of the NGNP (850-900 C outlet temperature), tritium produced in the nuclear reactor can permeate through heat exchangers to reach the hydrogen production plant, where it can become incorporated into process chemicals or the hydrogen product. The concentration limit for tritium in the hydrogen product has not been established, but it is expected that any future limit on tritium concentration will be no higher than the air and water effluent limits established by the NRC and the EPA. A literature survey of tritium permeation barriers, capture systems, and mitigation measures is presented and technologies are identified that may reduce the movement of tritium to the downstream plant. Among tritium permeation barriers, oxide layers produced in-situ may provide the most suitable barriers, though it may be possible to use aluminized surfaces also. For tritium capture systems, the use of getters is recommended, and high-temperature hydride forming materials such as Ti, Zr, and Y are suggested. Tritium may also be converted to HTO in order to capture it on molecular sieves or getter materials. Counter-flow of hydrogen may reduce the flux of tritium through heat exchangers. Recommendations for research and development work are provided.

Sherman, S; Thad Adams, T

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Photo of the Week: Reactive Ion Etching | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactive Ion Etching Reactive Ion Etching Photo of the Week: Reactive Ion Etching October 17, 2013 - 1:26pm Addthis Have you ever heard of Laue lenses? These multilayer lenses are used to focus high-intensity x-ray beams to show the details of nano material structures. In this photo, the drop-like domes were carved through a process called reactive ion etching, which produced the striped bubbles you see in the Laue lens. The prototype in this image helped scientists perfect the process of creating lenses so precise that scientists are able to focus x-rays to within a single nanometer. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Have you ever heard of Laue lenses? These multilayer lenses are used to focus high-intensity x-ray beams to show the details of nano material

393

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species James F. Wishart In "Ionic Liquids as Green Solvents: Progress and Prospects" Rogers, R. D. and Seddon, K. R. , Eds.; ACS Symp. Ser. 856, Ch. 31, pp. 381-395, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2003. (ISBN 0-84123-856-1) [Information about the book] Abstract: An understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is important for development of their applications in radioactive material processing and for the application of pulse radiolysis techniques to the general study of chemical reactivity in ionic liquids. The distribution of primary radiolytic species and their reactivities determine the yields of ultimate products and the radiation stability of a particular ionic liquid. This chapter introduces some principles of radiation chemistry and the

394

A-26: Nanoindentation Investigation of the Reactive Pulsed Laser ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Reactive Pulsed Laser Deposited Superconducting Niobium Nitride Thin Films. Author(s) ... A-33: Modeling of a Displacive Transformation within Continuous ... Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by Introducing a TiN Nanocrystalline Thin Film.

395

Pre-plated reactive diffusion-bonded battery electrode plaques  

SciTech Connect

A high strength, metallic fiber battery plaque is made using reactive diffusion bonding techniques, where a substantial amount of the fibers are bonded together by an iron-nickel alloy.

Maskalick, Nicholas J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Land Use and Reactive Nitrogen Discharge: Effects of Dietary Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern agriculture alters natural biological and geophysical processes, with magnitudes proportional to its spatial extent. Cultivation is also the main cause of artificially enhanced reactive nitrogen (Nr) availability in natural ecosystems. ...

Gidon Eshel; Pamela A. Martin; Esther E. Bowen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reactive Reserve Requirements and Optimal Allocation Among Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage stability is a major concern in power system operation, and the need to maintain it limits power transfers in the prevailing open access environment. In a power system with significant induction motor loads, voltage instability can be manifested either in the form of delayed voltage recovery or voltage collapse. Inadequate reactive supply is a major factor in causing these problems. Reactive supply is an important ingredient in maintaining healthy power system voltages and facilitating power tran...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

(Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

[Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept  

SciTech Connect

Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition and Growth concept, introduced by Lee and Tarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homogeneized burn rate needs to account for three mesoscale physical effects (i) the density of burnt hot spots, which depends on the lead shock strength; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by hot spots, which depends on the local deflagration speed; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent hot spots. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable {lambda}(t) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t)/{ell}{sub hs}, rather than by xpecifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale {ell}{sub hs} is the average distance between hot spots, which is proportional to [N{sub hs}(P{sub s})]{sup -1/3}, where N{sub hs} is the number density of hot spots activated by the lead shock. The reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t) = {line_integral}{sub 0}{sup t} D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single hot spot, where D is the deflagration speed and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. They have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Heating energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the heating energy savings achieved by installing attic radiant barriers. The radiant barriers used for the test consist of a material with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses operated by ORNL. Two variations in the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with a kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The winter test with the radiant barrier showed that the horizontal barrier was able to save space-heating electical energy in both the resistance and heat pump modes amounting to 10.1% and 8.5%, respectively. The roof truss radiant barrier increased consumption by 2.6% in the resistance mode and 4.0% in the heat pump mode. The horizontal orientation of the radiant barrier is the more energy-effective method of installation.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/etsd/btric/pdfs/geothermal_report_12-08.pdf References: Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers[1] Overview "This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope included determining the status of global GHP markets

403

Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu; Enguang Zhao

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers: Cooling season energy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. Testing showed that increasing the attic ventilation area ratio from the minimum recommended of 1/300 to 1/150 had little if any effect on the house cooling load with either truss or horizontal barriers present in the attics. Radiant barriers, however, still reduced the house cooling load. There was essentially no difference in house cooling load reduction between either ridge/soffit or gable/soffit vent type with a truss radiant barrier, as both reduced cooling loads by about 8% when compared to no radiant barrier conditions. The attic-ventilation-type testing was done with a ventilation area ratio of 1/150.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hall, J.A. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cooling-energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test is a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The purpose of the radiant barrier is to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. The radiant barrier works as a system in conjunction with an air space and can theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. Two variations on the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption were 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicate that the most effective way of installing the foil is to lay it on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to the house by approximately 30 to 35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Radiant barriers in houses: Energy, comfort, and moisture considerations in a northern climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the conditions under which radiant barrier utilization in attics is appropriate technology in building construction for a northern climate in Utah. A sample of 12 appropriate houses with radiant barriers were selected using predetermined criteria. Another 12 houses without radiant barriers were selected as a control sample and paired with the first 12 houses using predetermined criteria. The research involved three different types of data and analyses. First, a questionnaire survey was completed by the occupants of the 12 sample houses, with radiant barriers. The survey included such factors as: (1) comfort, (2) energy, and (3) potential increased moisture content as perceived by the occupants. Second, a t-test was used to calculate the statistical comparison of utility usage between the 12 sample houses with radiant barriers and the 12 control houses without radiant barriers. Third, the moisture content of the wood framing above and below the radiant barriers was measured over a three month period during the winter months. Data analysis indicated: (1) occupants did perceive that more comfort resulted from the installation of radiant barriers, (2) occupants did not observe additional moisture artifacts after the installation of radiant barriers, (3) occupants did perceive cost savings from utility benefits resulting from the use of radiant barriers, especially in cooling the houses in summer, (4) there was no significant difference between utility usage of houses with radiant barriers and houses without radiant barriers, (5) the moisture content in the ceiling joists of all 24 houses, except one, had a moisture content measurement less than eight percent, and (6) houses with radiant barriers have higher humidity levels within the living space than houses without radiant barrier installation.

Mendenhall, R.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reactive behavior in object-oriented applications: an analysis and a research roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive applications are difficult to implement. Traditional solutions based on event systems and the Observer pattern have a number of inconveniences, but programmers bear them in return for the benefits of OO design. On the other hand, reactive approaches ... Keywords: functional-reactive programming, incremental computation, object-oriented programming, reactive programming

Guido Salvaneschi; Mira Mezini

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of a PECVD advanced barrier (k=3.7) for 32nm CMOS technology and below  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced dielectric barrier proposed for sub-45nm CMOS technology nodes is firstly characterized on 300mm full sheet wafers. The barrier is a bi-layer deposited by PECVD. The copper diffusion barrier property is ensured by a depositing dense initiation ... Keywords: Dielectric barrier, Dual damascene, Electromigration, Etch stop layer, RC delay

L. L. Chapelon; E. Petitprez; P. Brun; A. Farcy; J. Torres

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment : a study for the energy storage systems program.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.; Kirby, Brendan [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Cooling season energy measurements of dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. 18 refs., 18 figs., 30 tabs.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hall, J.A. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

Hoffman, W.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Tunneling through a parabolic barrier viewed from Wigner phase space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the tunneling of a particle through a repulsive potential resulting from an inverted harmonic oscillator in the quantum mechanical phase space described by the Wigner function. In particular, we solve the partial differential equations in phase space determining the Wigner function of an energy eigenstate of the inverted oscillator. The reflection or transmission coefficients $R$ or $T$ are then given by the total weight of all classical phase space trajectories corresponding to energies below, or above the top of the barrier given by the Wigner function.

D. M. Heim; W. P. Schleich; P. M. Alsing; J. P. Dahl; S. Varro

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Dielectric barrier plasma dynamics for active control of separated flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of separation mitigation with asymmetric dielectric barrier discharges is explored by considering the gas flow past a flat plate at an angle of attack. A self-consistent model utilizing motion of electrons, ions, and neutrals is employed to couple the electric force field to the momentum of the fluid. The charge separation and concomitant electric field yield a time-averaged body force which is oriented predominantly downstream, with a smaller transverse component towards the wall. This induces a wall-jet-like feature that effectively eliminates the separation bubble. The impact of several geometric and electrical operating parameters is elucidated.

Roy, Subrata; Singh, K.P.; Gaitonde, Datta V. [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States); Computational Sciences Branch, Air Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Glovebox characterization and barrier integrity testing using fluorescent powder  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method for characterizing the spread of contamination and testing the barrier integrity of a new glovebox during material transfer operations and glove change-outs using fluorescent powder. Argonne National Laboratory-West has performed this test on several new gloveboxes prior to putting them into service. The test is performed after the glovebox has been leak tested and all systems have been verified to be operational. The purpose of the test is to show that bag-in/bag-out operations and glove change-outs can be accomplished without spreading the actual contaminated material to non-contaminated areas. The characterization test also provides information as to where contamination might be expected to build-up during actual operations. The fluorescent powder is used because it is easily detectable using an ultra-violet light and disperses in a similar fashion to radioactive material. The characterization and barrier integrity test of a glovebox using fluorescent powder provides a visual method of determining areas of potential contamination accumulation and helps evaluate the ability to perform clean transfer operations and glove change-outs.

Wahlquist, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Heat barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility is disclosed herein. Generally, the thermal barrier comprises a flexible, heat-resistant web mounted over the annular space between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel in order to prevent convection currents generated in the nitrogen atmosphere in this space from entering the relatively cooler atmosphere of the reactor cavity which surrounds these vessels. Preferably, the flexible web includes a blanket of heat-insulating material formed from fibers of a refractory material, such as alumina and silica, sandwiched between a heat-resistant, metallic cloth made from stainless steel wire. In use, the web is mounted between the upper edges of the guard vessel and the flange of a sealing ring which surrounds the reactor vessel with a sufficient enough slack to avoid being pulled taut as a result of thermal differential expansion between the two vessels. The flexible web replaces the rigid and relatively complicated structures employed in the prior art for insulating the reactor cavity from the convection currents generated between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel.

Keegan, Charles P. (South Huntingdon Twp., Westmoreland County, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry's SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry`s SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Ionic Liquids and Ionizing Radiation: Reactivity of Highly Energetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionizing Radiation: Reactivity of Highly Energetic Ionizing Radiation: Reactivity of Highly Energetic Species James F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 1, 3225-3231 (2010). [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request View the video on this Perspective article at The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters (5:03) Selected for the ACS Special Virtual Issue on Ionic Liquids (March 2011). Abstract: Due to their unique properties, ionic liquids present many opportunities for basic research on the interactions of radiation with materials under conditions not previously available. At the same time, there are practical applied reasons for characterizing, understanding, and being able to predict how ionic-liquid-based devices and industrial-scale systems will perform under conditions of extreme reactivity, including radiation. This

419

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal structure, hygroscopic and Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Print Friday, 13 May 2011 00:00 Scientists recently combined experimental approaches and molecular dynamics modeling to gain new insights into the internal structure of sea salt particles and relate it to their fundamental chemical reactivity in the atmosphere. This research shows that surface enhancement or depletion of chemical components in marine particles can occur because of the difference in the chemical nature of the species. Because the atmospheric chemistry of the salt particles takes place at the gas-particle interface, understanding their complex surfaces provides new insights about their effect on the environment and climate change. Article Link.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

OPF for reactive pricing studies on the NGC system  

SciTech Connect

Retail transmission services like those being provided by the National Grid Company (NGC) in England and Wales pose new challenges for the pricing of reactive power supply. A reactive power market approach has been proposed by NGC and continues to be evaluated. Such an approach includes a novel requirement for transmission constrained economic dispatch of VArs, a problem in the security constrained optimal power flow (OPF) class. The problem formulations handled by the OPF package in use could not accommodate NGC`s requirements. This paper describes the reactive pricing problem being addressed, the modeling requirements, and the resulting extensions made to the OPF formulation and package. It discusses the test results obtained to date on the NGC system.

Dandachi, N.H.; Rawlins, M.J. [National Grid Co., Sindlesham (United Kingdom). Control Technology Centre; Alsac, O.; Prais, M.; Stott, B. [PCA Corp., Mesa, AZ (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Effect of superbanana diffusion on fusion reactivity in stellarators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion reactivity is usually obtained using a Maxwellian distribution. However, energy-dependent radial diffusion can modify the energy distribution. Superbanana diffusion is energy-dependent and occurs in nonaxisymmetric magnetic confinement devices, such as stellarators, because of ripple-trapped particles which can take large steps between collisions. In this paper, the D-T fusion reactivity is calculated using a non-Maxwellian energy distribution obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically, including radial superbanana diffusion as well as energy scattering. The ions in the tail of the distribution, with energies larger than thermal, which are most needed for fusion, are depleted by superbanana diffusion. In this paper, it is shown that the D-T fusion reactivity is reduced by tail ion depletion due to superbanana diffusion, by roughly a factor of 0.5 for the parameters used in the calculation.

Hinton, Fred L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Step 6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption 6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption Description It is important for a state or jurisdiction to identify and overcome a variety of political, economic, and technical challenges when adopting or updating an energy code. Confusion throughout the process and unclear adoption language are two of the most common barriers associated with code adoption. Other barriers identified by advocates and stakeholders include initial cost, limited outreach and education resources, cost and availability of code support information, and state and local confusion. These barriers are often resolved by amending the adoption process, providing code education, or selecting a model energy code for adoption. Adoption Process The adoption process itself can be a barrier to code adoption. States

425

Plasma Surface Modification of Polymer Backsheets: Origins of Future Interfacial Barrier/Backsheet Failure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flexible polymer substrates coated with inorganic oxide moisture barriers are a potential replacement for glass backsheets in thin film PV modules. Silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) deposited by PECVD on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) represents one potential new backsheet candidate. Barrier deposition runs at NREL have typically included a nitrogen-rich plasma pretreatment prior to actual barrier deposition with the intention of cleaning the PET surface as well as enhancing adhesion of the SiOxNy barrier film to PET; however, test coupons of PET/barrier/EVA/TPE failed after damp heat exposure. PET substrates exposed to plasma conditions similar to those used in pre-treatment were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to reveal new low molecular weight PET fragments are created which are volatile upon heating and water soluble. Failure analysis of the coupons determined that the moisture barrier is, in fact, transferred to the encapsulant side.

Pankow, J. W.; Glick, S. H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

Dielectric covered hairpin probe for its application in reactive plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hairpin probe is a well known technique for measuring local electron density in low temperature plasmas. In reactive plasmas, the probe characteristics are affected by surface sputtering, contamination, and secondary electron emission. At higher densities, the plasma absorbs the entire electromagnetic energy of hairpin and hence limits the density measurements. These issues can be resolved by covering the hairpin surface with a thin layer of dielectric. In this letter, the dielectric contribution to the probe characteristics is incorporated in a theory which is experimentally verified. The dielectric covering improves the performance of probe and also allows the hairpin tip to survive in reactive plasma where classical electrical probes are easily damaged.

Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M. [NCPST, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Karkari, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Center, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

428

Thermochemistry and reaction barriers for the formation of levoglucosenone from cellobiose.  

SciTech Connect

Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Northwestern Univ.)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

429

In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Effects of surface properties on barrier height and barrier inhomogeneities of platinum contacts to n-type 4H-SiC  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the Schottky barrier of Pt/4H-SiC contact as a function of 4H-SiC surface properties which effectively controlled by electronic cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma pretreatment for different periods and annealing. It is found that the effective barrier height monotonically increases with decreasing the degree of Fermi level pinning. Electrically homogeneous contacts are observed when the Fermi level (FL) is 'pinned (Bardeen limit)' and 'free-pinned (Schottky limit).' However, a partial pinning of FL leads to Gaussian distribution of inhomogeneous barrier height. These results could be correlated with changes in the magnitude and spatial distribution of surface state density after different pretreatments.

Huang Lingqin; Li Shijuan; Wang Dejun [School of Electronic Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Qin Fuwen [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in Integrated Gas Combined Cycle Turbine Engines. Author(s), Andrew D.

432

Modeling and Optimization of Seawater Intrusion Barriers in Southern California Coastal Plain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the locations of new injection wells that maximize thelocations for new injection wells are identified that resultannually through 43 injection wells along the barrier. The A

Yeh, William W-G.; Bray, Ben

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Strategies for and Barriers to Managing Weight When Eating at Restaurants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suggested citation for this article: Timmerman GM, Earvolino-Ramirez M. Strategies for and barriers to managing weight when eating at restaurants. Prev Chronic

Gayle M. Timmerman; Cns Marie Earvolino-ramirez; Peer Reviewed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Postponing the Choice of the Barrier Parameter in Mehrotra-Type ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2005 ... Postponing the Choice of the Barrier Parameter in Mehrotra-Type Predictor- Corrector Algorithms. Maziar Salahi (salahim ***at*** mcmaster.ca)

435

ENTREPRENEURSHIP ON THE FARM: KENTUCKY GROWERS PERCEPTIONS OF BENEFITS AND BARRIERS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study analyzed the perceptions of Kentucky Homebased Processors and Microprocessors of the benefits of and barriers to developing and selling value-added products. The final (more)

Camenisch, Amy L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

MICROSCOPIC CALCULATIONS OF FISSION BARRIERS AND CRITICAL ANGULAR MOMENTA FOR EXCITED HEAVY NUCLEAR SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics and Chemistry of Fission, Vienna 1969 (IAEA, ViennaDeformation energies along the fission path plotted againstMICROSCOPIC CALCULATIONS OF FISSION BARRIERS AND CRITICAL

Diebel, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy efficiency in the South Africa crude oil refining industry drivers, barriers and opportunities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Includes abstract. This study has explored a range of barriers, drivers and opportunities to improving energy performance in the South African crude oil refining industry, (more)

Bergh, Caitlin.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report -- October 28, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy's Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Technology Workshop, held October 28, 2010 in Denver, Colorado.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in Lycopersicon. Second yearly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study employs Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii as model systems to study the interspecific reproductive barriers unilateral incongruity (UI), hybrid breakdown and interspecific aberrant ratio syndrome (IARS).

Mutschler, M.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); McCormick, S. [Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA (United States). Plant Gene Expression Center

1993-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizational Barriers to Wind Energy Organizationalcapital financing of wind energy producers are four. Thesales without requiring the wind energy firm to meet all the

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reactive barrier prb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy measurements of attic radiant barriers installed in single-family houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the energy savings attributable to radiant barriers installed in attics of unoccupied single-family houses. Three levels of fiberglass attic insulation (R-11 ,R-19, and R-30) were tested with two types of barrier installation (horizontal and truss). The results showed that horizontally installed radiant barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing heating and cooling loads. Measured cooling load reductions ranged form 0 to 22% (compared to same attic insulation insulation R-value with no radiant barrier) and heating load changes from /plus/4% to /minus/10% were measured (compared to same attic insulation R-value with no radiant barrier). Radiant barriers appeared to decrease the heating and cooling loads more when lesser amounts of insulation (R-11 and R-19) were present in an attic. Minimal changes were measured when R-30 was present in an attic. Long-term effects of dust on the performance of radiant barriers as well as the effects of moisture condensing on the surface of a radiant barrier during cold winter temperatures remain unanswered.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comparison of the systematics of fusion barrier with and without L-dependence has been presented.

S. V. S. Sastry; S. Kailas; A. K. Mohanty; A. Saxena

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 10-14, 1988, The Geothermal Research Society ofcaused by the mixing of different geothermal fluids, Proc.Twenty-third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,

Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Development of a model for reactive emissions from industrial stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a model, CAPAS, capable of estimating short-term concentrations of primary and secondary pollutants resulting from point source emissions. The model is designed to simulate the complex interaction of plume dispersion and non-linear ... Keywords: Air pollutants, Dispersion models, Non-linear chemistry, Plume reactivity, Stiff solvers

Luis E. Olcese; Beatriz M. Toselli

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Reactive transport in surface sediments I. Mexity and software quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of three recent diagenetic model codes (OMEXDIA, CANDI and STEADYSED) revealed that codes have a rigid, static and problem-specific character, leaving little autonomy for the application user. The resulting lack of flexibility and extensibility, ... Keywords: early diagenesis, object-oriented design, problem-solving environment, reactive transport modelling, software quality assurance

Filip J. R. Meysman; Jack J. Middelburg; Peter M. J. Herman; Carlo H. R. Heip

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Modeling and Verification of Reactive Systems using Rebeca  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actor-based modeling has been successfully applied to the representation of concurrent and distributed systems. Besides having an appropriate and efficient way for modeling these systems, one needs a formal verification approach for ensuring their correctness. ... Keywords: actor model, compositional verification, model checking, property preserving abstraction, reactive systems

Marjan Sirjani; Ali Movaghar; Amin Shali; Frank S. de Boer

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and non-invasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. No external neutron-emitting interrogation source or fissile material is used and no scanning is required, although if a profile is desired scanning can be used. As in active assays, here both reactivity and content of fissionable material can be measured. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly. The return flux is altered by changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

Lee, David M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lindquist, Lloyd O. (Santa Fe, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NETL: News Release - Fuel Cell Projects Address Barriers to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 1, 2006 June 1, 2006 Fuel Cell Projects Address Barriers to Commercialization Six Projects Focus on Improvements to Materials, Key Components WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development (R&D) projects expected to further enhance solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, moving it one step closer to commercialization. These projects, part of DOE's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), build upon earlier Phase I research to support the development of efficient, low-cost and near-zero emissions SOFC power systems. "The projects selected reflect yet another step forward in the President's Hydrogen and Climate Initiatives, which envision a key role for fuel cells," said Jeffrey Jarrett, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy. "These projects are expected to further push fuel cell technology toward the ultimate application of fuel cells in FutureGen, the zero-emissions coal-fired plant of the future."

450

Carbon Capture and Storage Projects Overcoming Legal and Regulatory Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006/1236 2006/1236 June 23, 2006 International Carbon Capture and Storage Projects Overcoming Legal Barriers Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

451

Energy Savings Certificate Markets: Opportunities and Implementation Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6A2-45970 6A2-45970 July 2009 Energy Savings Certificate Markets: Opportunities and Implementation Barriers Barry Friedman and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Galen Barbose Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presented at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Third International Conference on Energy Sustainability San Francisco, California July 19-23, 2009 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

452

Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

Scharman, Alan J. (Hebron, CT); Yonushonis, Thomas M. (Columbus, IN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Stalker: overcoming linguistic barriers in open source intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The revolution in information technology is making open sources more accessible, ubiquitous and valuable. The international intelligence communities have seen open sources become increasingly easier and cheaper to acquire in recent years. But up to 80% ... Keywords: ICT, Stalker, communications technology, content-enabling systems, cultural diversity, deep searching, distributed multimedia, dynamic classification, electronic data, encoded information, focused crawling, functional role labelling, heterogeneous data, hidden information, information technology, intelligence communities, internet, language-independent searches, languages, linguistic barriers, morpho-syntactic analysis, multilinguality, natural language processing, networks, online organisations, open source intelligence, raw data, semantic analysis, supervised clustering, textual analysis, textual synthesis, unclassified information, unstructured information, unsupervised clustering, virtual organisations, web based organisations, web mining, world wide web

Federico Neri; Paolo Geraci; Massimo Pettoni

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Nondestructive evaluation of environmental barrier coatings in CFCC combustor liners.  

SciTech Connect

Advanced combustor liners fabricated of SiC/SiC continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) and covered with environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been successfully tested in Solar Turbines Inc. field engines. The primary goal for the CFCC/EBC liners is to reach a 30,000-h lifetime. Because the EBCs, when applied on the hot surfaces of liners, protect the underlying CFCC from oxidation damage, their performance is critical in achieving the lifetime goal. To determine CFCC/EBC liner condition and assess operating damage, the liners were subjected to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) during various processing stages, as well as before and after the engine test. The NDE techniques included pulsed infrared thermal imaging, air-coupled ultrasonic scanning, and X-ray computerized tomography. It was found that EBC damage and spallation depend on the condition of the CFCC material. The NDE results and correlations with destructive exam