National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reaction-driven ionic transport

  1. Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments - #12;Technology Options -- Ionic Transport Separation Systems Central, Semi-Central (coal/Semi-Central Systems Coal is the cheapest fuel, but requires the greatest pre-conditioning Clean-up of syngas requires Energy Systems ChevronTexaco SRI Consulting SAIC ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures #12;Performance

  2. Charge Transport and Glassy Dynamics in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangoro, Joshua R; Kremer, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) exhibit unique features such as low melting points, low vapor pressures, wide liquidus temperature ranges, high thermal stability, high ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical windows. As a result, they show promise for use in variety of applications: as reaction media, in batteries and supercapacitors, in solar and fuel cells, for electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors, for protein extraction and crystallization, and many others. Because of the ease with which they can be supercooled, ionic liquids offer new opportunities to investigate long-standing questions regarding the nature of the dynamic glass transition and its possible link to charge transport. Despite the significant steps achieved from experimental and theoretical studies, no generally accepted quantitative theory of dynamic glass transition to date has been capable of reproducing all the experimentally observed features. In this Account, we discuss recent studies of the interplay between charge transport and glassy dynamics in ionic liquids as investigated by a combination of several experimental techniques including broadband dielectric spectroscopy, pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Based on EinsteinSmoluchowski relations, we use dielectric spectra of ionic liquids to determine diffusion coefficients in quantitative agreement with independent pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, but spanning a broader range of more than 10 orders of magnitude. This approach provides a novel opportunity to determine the electrical mobility and effective number density of charge carriers as well as their types of thermal activation from the measured dc conductivity separately. We also unravel the origin of the remarkable universality of charge transport in different classes of glass-forming ionic liquids.

  3. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01

    membranes containing ionic liquid could be designed to take advantage of the interesting gas separation

  4. Defect Interactions and Ionic Transport in Scandia Stabilized Zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gale, Julian D.

    2009-06-24

    Atomistic simulation has been used to study ionic transport in scandia-stabilized zirconia, as well as scandia and yttria-co-doped zirconia, as a function of temperature and composition. The oxygen diffusion coefficient shows a peak at a composition of 6 mole % Sc2O3. Oxygen vacancies prefer to be second nearest neighbours to yttrium ions, but have little preference between first and second neighbour positions with respect to scandium ions. The Sc-O bond length is about 2.17 Ĺ compared to 2.28 Ĺ for the Y-O bond. Oxygen migration between cation tetrahedra is impeded less effectively by Sc-Sc edges than by Y-Y edges. A neutral cluster of two scandium ions with an oxygen vacancy in the common first neighbour position has a binding energy of -0.56 eV. The formation of such clusters may contribute to conductivity degradation of stabilized zirconia at elevated temperature.

  5. Enhanced electrical transport in ionic liquid dispersed TMAI-PEO solid polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Neha [Physics Department, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani-333031, Rajasthan, India and Department of Physics, JECRC University, Jaipur-303905, Rajasthan (India); Rathore, Munesh, E-mail: adalvi@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Dalvi, Anshuman, E-mail: adalvi@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Physics Department, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani-333031, Rajasthan (India); Kumar, Anil [Chemistry Department, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani-333031, Rajasthan (India)

    2014-04-24

    A polymer composite is prepared by dispersing ionic liquid [Bmim][BF{sub 4}] in Polyethylene oxide-tetra methyl ammonium iodide composite and subsequent microwave treatment. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the composite nature. To explore possibility of proton conductivity in these films, electrical transport is studied by impedance spectroscopy and DC polarization. It is revealed that addition of ionic liquid in host TMAI-PEO solid polymer electrolyte enhances the conductivity by ? 2 orders of magnitude. Polarization measurements suggest that composites are essentially ion conducting in nature. The maximum ionic conductivity is found to be ?2 × 10{sup ?5} for 10 wt % ionic liquid.

  6. Selective Ionic Transport through Tunable Subnanometer Pores in Single-Layer Graphene Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Hern, Sean C.

    We report selective ionic transport through controlled, high-density, subnanometer diameter pores in macroscopic single-layer graphene membranes. Isolated, reactive defects were first introduced into the graphene lattice ...

  7. Communication: Unusual structure and transport in ionic liquid-hexane mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Min [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Khatun, Sufia [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Castner, Edward W. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2015-03-28

    Ionic liquids having a sufficiently amphiphilic cation can dissolve large volume fractions of alkanes, leading to mixtures with intriguing properties on molecular length scales. The trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cation paired with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion provides an ionic liquid that can dissolve large mole fractions of hexane. We present experimental results on mixtures of n-C6D14 with this ionic liquid. High- energy X-ray scattering studies reveal a persistence of the characteristic features of ionic liquid structure even for 80% dilution with n-C6D14. NMR self-diffusion results reveal decidedly non-hydrodynamic behavior where the self-diffusion of the neutral, non-polar n-C6D14 is on average a factor of 21 times faster than for the cation. Exploitation of the unique structural and transport properties of these mixtures may lead to new opportunities for designer solvents for enhanced chemical reactivity and interface science.

  8. Sequencing proteins with transverse ionic transport in nanochannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, P

    2015-01-01

    {\\it De novo} protein sequencing is essential for understanding cellular processes that govern the function of living organisms and all post-translational events and other sequence modifications that occur after a protein has been constructed from its corresponding DNA code. By obtaining the order of the amino acids that composes a given protein one can then determine both its secondary and tertiary structures through structure prediction, which is used to create models for protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease. Mass spectrometry is the current technique of choice for {\\it de novo} sequencing. However, because some amino acids have the same mass the sequence cannot be completely determined in many cases. Here, we propose a new technique for {\\it de novo} protein sequencing that involves translocating a polypeptide through a synthetic nanochannel and measuring the ionic current of each amino acid through an intersecting {\\it perpendicular} nanochannel. To calculate the transverse ionic curre...

  9. Solvation and Ionic Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawodzinski, T.A., Jr.; Paddison, S.J.; Reagor, D.; Pratt, L.R.

    1999-06-03

    We developed a general theoretical framework to study the problem of proton solvation and transport in Nafion{reg_sign} and related materials.

  10. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare IronSpringReaction-Driven

  13. Ionic Transport Across Interfaces of Solid Glass and Polymer Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenhaeff, Wyatt E [ORNL; Yu, Xiang [ORNL; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Perry, Kelly A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A study of lithium cation transport across solid-solid electrolyte interfaces to identify critical resistances in nanostructured solid electrolytes is reported. Bilayers of glass and polymer thin film electrolytes were fabricated and characterized for this study. The glass electrolyte was lithium phosphorous oxynitride (Lipon), and two polymer electrolytes were studied: poly(methyl methacrylate-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) and poly(styrene-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate). Both copolymers contained LiClO{sub 4} salt. In bilayers where polymer electrolyte layers are fabricated on top of Lipon, the interfacial resistance dominates transport. At 25 C, the interfacial resistance is at least three times greater than the sum of the Lipon and polymer electrolyte resistances. By reversing the structure and fabricating Lipon on top of the polymer electrolytes, the interfacial resistance is eliminated. Experiments to elucidate the origin of the interfacial resistance in the polymer-on-Lipon bilayers reveal that the solvent mixtures used to fabricate the polymer layers do not degrade the Lipon layer. The importance of the polymer electrolytes' mechanical properties is also discussed.

  14. Communication: Unusual structure and transport in ionic liquid-hexane mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Min; Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2015-03-28

    Ionic liquids having a sufficiently amphiphilic cation can dissolve large volume fractions of alkanes, leading to mixtures with intriguing properties on molecular length scales. The trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cation paired with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion provides an ionic liquid that can dissolve large mole fractions of hexane. We present experimental results on mixtures of n-C6D14 with this ionic liquid. High- energy X-ray scattering studies reveal a persistence of the characteristic features of ionic liquid structure even for 80% dilution with n-C6D14. NMR self-diffusion results reveal decidedly non-hydrodynamic behavior where the self-diffusion of the neutral, non-polar n-C6D14 is on average a factor of 21more »times faster than for the cation. Exploitation of the unique structural and transport properties of these mixtures may lead to new opportunities for designer solvents for enhanced chemical reactivity and interface science.« less

  15. Final Report for DE-FG02-93ER14376,Ionic Transport in Electrochemical Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Halley

    2009-05-20

    This project was a molecular dynamics study of the relevant issues associated with the structure and transport of lithium in polymer electrolytes such as polyethylene oxide(PEO). In close collaboration with quantum chemist Larry Curtiss and neutron scatterers David Lee Price and Marie-Louise Saboungi at Argonne, we used molecular dynamics to study the local structure and dynamics and ion transport in the polymer. The studies elucidated the mechanism of Li transport in PEO, revealing that the rate limiting step is extremely sensitive to the magnitude of the torsion forces in the backbone of the polymer. Because the torsion forces are difficult to manipulate chemically, this makes it easier to understand why improving the conductivity of PEO based electrolytes has proven to be very difficult. We studied the transport properties of cations in ionic liquids as possible additives to polymer membranes for batteries and fuel cells and found preliminary indications that the transport is enhanced near phase separation in acid-ionic liquid mixtures.

  16. Lithium Ion Transport Mechanism in Ternary Polymer Electrolyte-Ionic Liquid Mixtures - A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diddo Diddens; Andreas Heuer

    2013-02-20

    The lithium transport mechanism in ternary polymer electrolytes, consisting of PEO/LiTFSI and various fractions of the ionic liquid N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, are investigated by means of MD simulations. This is motivated by recent experimental findings [Passerini et al., Electrochim. Acta 2012, 86, 330-338], which demonstrated that these materials display an enhanced lithium mobility relative to their binary counterpart PEO/LiTFSI. In order to grasp the underlying microscopic scenario giving rise to these observations, we employ an analytical, Rouse-based cation transport model [Maitra at al., PRL 2007, 98, 227802], which has originally been devised for conventional polymer electrolytes. This model describes the cation transport via three different mechanisms, each characterized by an individual time scale. It turns out that also in the ternary electrolytes essentially all lithium ions are coordinated by PEO chains, thus ruling out a transport mechanism enhanced by the presence of ionic-liquid molecules. Rather, the plasticizing effect of the ionic liquid contributes to the increased lithium mobility by enhancing the dynamics of the PEO chains and consequently also the motion of the attached ions. Additional focus is laid on the prediction of lithium diffusion coefficients from the simulation data for various chain lengths and the comparison with experimental data, thus demonstrating the broad applicability of our approach.

  17. Decoupling charge transport from the structural dynamics in room temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Phillip; Agapov, Alexander L; Kisliuk, Alexander; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Novikov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2011-01-01

    Light scattering and dielectric spectroscopy measurements were performed on the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [C4mim][NTf2] in a broad temperature and frequency range. Ionic conductivity was used to estimate self-diffusion of ions, while light scattering was used to study structural relaxation. We demonstrate that the ionic diffusion decouples from the structural relaxation process as the temperature of the sample decreases toward Tg. The strength of the decoupling appears to be significantly lower than that expected for a supercooled liquid of similar fragility. The structural relaxation process in the RTIL follows well the high-temperature mode coupling theory (MCT) scenario. Using the MCT analysis we estimated the dynamic crossover temperature in [C4mim][NTf2] to be Tc 225 5 K. However, our analysis reveals no sign of the dynamic crossover in the ionic diffusion process.

  18. Ionic transport through sub-10 nm diameter hydrophobic high-aspect ratio nanopores: experiment, theory and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sébastien Balme; Fabien Picaud; Manoel Manghi; John Palmeri; Mikhael Bechelany; Simon Cabello-Aguilar; Adib Abou-Chaaya; Philippe Miele; Emmanuel Balanzat; Jean Marc Janot

    2015-06-11

    Fundamental understanding of ionic transport at the nanoscale is essential for developing biosensors based on nanopore technology and new generation high-performance nanofiltration membranes for separation and purification applications. We study here ionic transport through single putatively neutral hydrophobic nanopores with high aspect ratio (of length L=6 \\mu m with diameters ranging from 1 to 10 nm) and with a well controlled cylindrical geometry. We develop a detailed hybrid mesoscopic theoretical approach for the electrolyte conductivity inside nanopores, which considers explicitly ion advection by electro-osmotic flow and possible flow slip at the pore surface. By fitting the experimental conductance data we show that for nanopore diameters greater than 4 nm a constant weak surface charge density of about 10$^{-2}$ C m$^{-2}$ needs to be incorporated in the model to account for conductance plateaus of a few pico-Siemens at low salt concentrations. For tighter nanopores, our analysis leads to a higher surface charge density, which can be attributed to a modification of ion solvation structure close to the pore surface, as observed in the molecular dynamics simulations we performed.

  19. Sandia Energy - Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic Liquids Effective for Pretreating Mixed Blends of Biofuel Feedstocks Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels...

  20. Novel Energy Sources -Material Architecture and Charge Transport in Solid State Ionic Materials for Rechargeable Li ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katiyar, Ram S; Gómez, M; Majumder, S B; Morell, G; Tomar, M S; Smotkin, E; Bhattacharya, P; Ishikawa, Y

    2009-01-19

    Since its introduction in the consumer market at the beginning of 1990s by Sony Corporation ‘Li-ion rechargeable battery’ and ‘LiCoO2 cathode’ is an inseparable couple for highly reliable practical applications. However, a separation is inevitable as Li-ion rechargeable battery industry demand more and more from this well serving cathode. Spinel-type lithium manganate (e.g., LiMn2O4), lithium-based layered oxide materials (e.g., LiNiO2) and lithium-based olivine-type compounds (e.g., LiFePO4) are nowadays being extensively studied for application as alternate cathode materials in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Primary goal of this project was the advancement of Li-ion rechargeable battery to meet the future demands of the energy sector. Major part of the research emphasized on the investigation of electrodes and solid electrolyte materials for improving the charge transport properties in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Theoretical computational methods were used to select electrodes and electrolyte material with enhanced structural and physical properties. The effect of nano-particles on enhancing the battery performance was also examined. Satisfactory progress has been made in the bulk form and our efforts on realizing micro-battery based on thin films is close to give dividend and work is progressing well in this direction.

  1. Partially fluorinated ionic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

    2008-11-25

    Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

  2. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-11-01

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  3. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  4. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Susman, Sherman (Park Forest, IL); Volin, Kenneth J. (Fort Collins, CO)

    1984-01-01

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  5. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasser, Leslie, E-mail: l.glasser@curtin.edu.au

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy, lattice energy, enthalpy, Gibbs energy values are available.

  6. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  7. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

    1998-10-27

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

  9. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Victor R. (Lincoln, MA); Nanjundiah, Chenniah (Lynn, MA); Carlin, Richard T. (Nashua, NH)

    1998-01-01

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, and R.sub.6 are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F--, Cl--, CF.sub.3 --, SF.sub.5 --, CF.sub.3 S--, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CHS-- or (CF.sub.3).sub.3 CS--; and X.sup.- is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 .ANG..sup.3.

  10. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  11. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Kang (Tempe, AZ); Liu, Changle (Tulsa, OK)

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  12. Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Geothermal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Program Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: to develop ionic liquids for two geothermal energy related applications.

  13. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  14. Relaxation dynamics and ionic conductivity in a fragile plastic crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Bauer; M. Köhler; P. Lunkenheimer; A. Loidl; C. A. Angell

    2010-06-30

    We report a thorough characterization of the dielectric relaxation behavior and the ionic conductivity in the plastic-crystalline mixture of 60% succinonitrile and 40% glutaronitrile. The plastic phase can be easily supercooled and the relaxational behavior is investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy in the liquid, plastic crystalline, and glassy crystal phases. The very pronounced alpha-relaxation found in the spectra is characterized in detail. From the temperature dependence of the alpha-relaxation time, a fragility parameter of 62 was determined making this material one of the most fragile plastic-crystalline glass formers. A well-pronounced secondary and faint indications for a third relaxation process were found, the latter most likely being of Johari-Goldstein type. In addition, relatively strong conductivity contributions were detected in the spectra exhibiting the typical features of ionic charge transport.

  15. Enhanced ionic conductivity in oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Barriocanal, Javier; Rivera-Calzada, Alberto; Varela del Arco, Maria; Sefrioui, Z.; Iborra, Enrique; Leon, C.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Santamaria, J.

    2010-01-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices used to generate energy out of hydrogen. In a fuel cell, two conducting electrodes are separated by an electrolyte that is permeable to ions (either hydrogen or oxygen, depending on the fuel-cell category) but not to electrons. An electrode catalytic process yields the ionic species, which are transported through the electrolyte, while electrons blocked by the electrolyte pass through the external circuit. Polymeric membrane (PEMFC) or phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) operating at low temperatures are the preferred option for transportation because of their quite large efficiencies (50%), compared with gasoline combustion engines (25%). Other uses are also being considered, such as battery replacements for personal electronics and stationary or portable emergency power. Solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), operating at high temperatures, are a better option for stationary power generation because of their scalability. Here O{sup 2-} ions are the mobile species that travel at elevated temperatures (800-1000 C) through a solid electrolyte material to react with H{sup +} ions in the anode to produce water (Fig. 1). The high operating temperatures of solid oxide fuel cells are a major impediment to their widespread use in power generation. Thus, reducing this operating temperature is currently a major materials research goal, involving the search for novel electrolytes as well as active catalysts for electrode kinetics (oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation). Among oxide-ion conductors, those of anion-deficient fluorite structures such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), xY{sub 2}O{sub 3}:(1-x) ZrO{sub 2}, are extensively used as electrolytes in SOFCs. Doping with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is known to stabilize the cubic fluorite structure of ZrO{sub 2} and to supply the oxygen vacancies responsible for the ionic conduction. These materials are characterized by a large number of mobile oxygen vacancies, which are randomly distributed in the structure, and thus give rise to a completely disordered anion (oxygen) sublattice. Traditionally, the main strategy to reduce the operating temperature has been to search for novel electrolyte materials with larger oxide-ion conductivity values. Only recently has the use of artificial nanostructures appeared as a promising new direction for dramatically improved properties.

  16. Early Events in Ionic Liquid Radiation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wishart, J.F.; Cook, A.; Rimmer, R.D.; Gohdo, M.

    2010-09-14

    Ionic liquids are interesting and useful materials whose solvation time scales are up to thousands of times longer than in conventional solvents. The extended lifetimes of pre-solvated electrons and other energetic species in ionic liquids has profound consequences for the radiolytic product distributions and reactivity patterns. We use a newly developed, multiplexed variation of pulse-probe spectroscopy to measure the kinetics of the early dynamical and reactive events in ionic liquids.

  17. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile-Lithium Salt Mixtures: Highly Associated Salts Revisited Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrolyte...

  18. Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz, John; Newman, John

    2008-01-01

    molten salts as lithium battery electrolyte,” ElectrochimicaFigure 15. Rechargeable lithium-ion battery. Figure 16 showsbattery. It is essential that an ionic liquid – lithium salt

  19. Partially fluorinated cyclic ionic polymers and membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhen-Yu

    2013-04-09

    Ionic polymers are made from selected partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic. The polymers are formed into membranes.

  20. ionic | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryM aterials S cience a nd ChemistryIonic

  1. Ultrastable Superbase-Derived Protic Ionic Liquids

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2010-12-08

    ORNL researchers developed a method of producing a new family of conductive,low-volatility protic ionic liquids (PILs). Protic ionic liquids can be used in protonexchange membrane fuel cells for the transformation of chemical energy to electrical energy. These liquids are also useful as separation materials and solvent systems in chemical reactions....

  2. Recovery of sugars from ionic liquid biomass liquor by solvent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Recovery of sugars from ionic liquid biomass liquor by solvent extraction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recovery of sugars from ionic liquid biomass liquor by...

  3. Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully Implemented at Larger Scale Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully Implemented at Larger Scale...

  4. Inexpensive, Nonfluorinated Anions for Lithium Salts and Ionic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anions for Lithium Salts and Ionic Liquids for Lithium Battery Electrolytes Inexpensive, Nonfluorinated Anions for Lithium Salts and Ionic Liquids for Lithium Battery Electrolytes...

  5. Space- and Time-Resolved Mapping of Ionic Dynamic and Electroresistive Phenomena in Lateral Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelcov, Evgheni [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Yen-Lin, Huang [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Yung-Chun, Teng [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Ying-Hao, Chu [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscopy (SPM) based technique for probing local ionic and electronic transport and their dynamic behavior on the 10 ms 10 s scale is presented. The time-resolved Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (tr-KPFM) allows mapping surface potential in both space and time domains, visualizing electronic and ionic charge dynamics and separating underlying processes based on their time responses. Here, tr-KPFM is employed to explore the interplay of the adsorbed surface ions and bulk oxygen vacancies and their role in the resistive switching in the Ca-substituted bismuth ferrite thin film.

  6. Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz,John; Newman, John

    2005-09-29

    We have investigated possible anticipated advantages of ionic-liquid electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries. Thermal stabilities and phase behavior were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazoliumTFSI systems, pyrrolidiniumTFSI, BMIMPF{sub 6}, BMIMBF{sub 4}, and BMIMTf. Thermal stabilities were measured for neat ionic liquids and for BMIMBF{sub 4}-LiBF{sub 4}, BMIMTf-LiTf, BMIMTFSI-LiTFSI mixtures. Conductivities have been measured for various ionic-liquid lithium-salt systems. We show the development of interfacial impedance in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell and we report results from cycling experiments for a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + 1 mol/kg LIBF{sub 4}|C cell. The interfacial resistance increases with time and the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode. As expected, imidazolium-based ionic liquids react with lithium electrodes. We seek new ionic liquids that have better chemical stabilities.

  7. Chiral Ionic Liquids: Synthesis, Properties, and Enantiomeric Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    and achiral cation toward another chiral molecule such as a quinine derivative. Introduction Ionic liquids

  8. Phosphonium-based ionic liquids and uses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Sesto, Rico E; Koppisch, Andrew T; Lovejoy, Katherine S; Purdy, Geraldine M

    2014-12-30

    Phosphonium-based room temperature ionic liquids ("RTILs") were prepared. They were used as matrices for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and also for preparing samples of dyes for analysis.

  9. Ionic liquid polyoxometalates as light emitting materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz-acosta, Denisse [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bennett, Bryan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Purdy, Geraldine M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Kigney, Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The low melting point, negligible vapor pressure, good solubility, and thermal and chemical stability make ionic liquids useful materials for a wide variety of applications. Polyoxometalates are early transition metal oxygen clusters that can be synthesized in many different sizes and with a variety of heterometals. The most attractive feature of POMs is that their physical properties, in particular electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, can be easily modified following known procedures. It has been shown that POMs can exhibit cooperative properties, as superconductivity and energy transfer. POM ionic liquids can be obtained by selecting the appropliate cation. Different alkyl ammonium and alkyl phosphonium salts are being used to produce new POM ionic liquids together with organic or inorganic luminescent centers to design light emitting materials. Ammonium and phosphonium cations with activated, polymerizable groups are being used to further polymerize the ionic liquid into transparent, solid materials with high metal density.

  10. Superbase-derived protic ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Baker, Gary A.

    2013-09-03

    Protic ionic liquids having a composition of formula (A.sup.-)(BH.sup.+) wherein A.sup.- is a conjugate base of an acid HA, and BH.sup.+ is a conjugate acid of a superbase B. In particular embodiments, BH.sup.+ is selected from phosphazenium species and guanidinium species encompassed, respectively, by the general formulas: ##STR00001## The invention is also directed to films and membranes containing these protic ionic liquids, with particular application as proton exchange membranes for fuel cells.

  11. Effect of Ferroelectric Polarization on Ionic Transport and Resistance ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-18

    spectroscopy (IS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy. (EELS), Yang et al.4 ... pinning of compensating electrons by the work function of the electrodes on ...

  12. ENHANCING BACTERIAL TRANSPORT FOR BIOAUGMENTATION OF AQUIFERS USING LOW IONIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    properties of water at 228C). Low a's were also obtained using other nonionic surfactants (Tween 80, Triton Key wordsĐAlcaligenes paradoxus bacteria, bioremediation, column tests, pollutant, soil, subsurface over such a short distance can lead to well clogging and failure of a bioremediation process. The rapid

  13. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01

    Bee, M. , Quasielastic Neutron Scattering: Principles andBee, M. , Quasielastic Neutron Scattering: Principles andand Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering ii 5.1. Introduction

  14. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01

    imide ([Im][TFSI]) and poly(styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine) (PS-behavior of mixtures of poly(styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine) (thermal properties of poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-

  15. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01

    the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energythe Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy

  16. From molten salts to room temperature ionic liquids: Simulation studies on chloroaluminate systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salanne, Mathieu; Seitsonen, Ari P; Madden, Paul A; Kirchner, Barbara; 10.1039/C1FD00053E

    2013-01-01

    An interaction potential including chloride anion polarization effects, constructed from first-principles calculations, is used to examine the structure and transport properties of a series of chloroaluminate melts. A particular emphasis was given to the study of the equimolar mixture of aluminium chloride with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, which forms a room temperature ionic liquid EMI-AlCl 4. The structure yielded by the classical simulations performed within the framework of the polarizable ion model is compared to the results obtained from entirely electronic structure-based simulations: An excellent agreement between the two flavors of molecular dynamics is observed. When changing the organic cation EMI+ by an inorganic cation with a smaller ionic radius (Li+, Na+, K+), the chloroaluminate speciation becomes more complex, with the formation of Al2Cl 7- in small amounts. The calculated transport properties (diffusion coefficients, electrical conductivity and viscosity) of EMI-AlCl4 are in good ag...

  17. Multiphysics simulation of corona discharge induced ionic wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cagnoni, Davide; MOX - Dipartimento di Matematica “F. Brioschi,” Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milano ; Agostini, Francesco; Christen, Thomas; Parolini, Nicola; Stevanovi?, Ivica; Laboratory of Electromagnetics and Acoustics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne ; Falco, Carlo de; CEN - Centro Europeo di Nanomedicina, 20133 Milano

    2013-12-21

    Ionic wind devices or electrostatic fluid accelerators are becoming of increasing interest as tools for thermal management, in particular for semiconductor devices. In this work, we present a numerical model for predicting the performance of such devices; its main benefit is the ability to accurately predict the amount of charge injected from the corona electrode. Our multiphysics numerical model consists of a highly nonlinear, strongly coupled set of partial differential equations including the Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow, Poisson's equation for electrostatic potential, charge continuity, and heat transfer equations. To solve this system we employ a staggered solution algorithm that generalizes Gummel's algorithm for charge transport in semiconductors. Predictions of our simulations are verified and validated by comparison with experimental measurements of integral physical quantities, which are shown to closely match.

  18. Three ways of abolishing automaticity in sinoatrial node: ionic modeling and nonlinear dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guevara, Michael R.

    of an ionic model allows one to probe the ionic basis underlying the particular behavior observed. The model

  19. Metal-air low temperature ionic liquid cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Cody A; Buttry, Daniel A

    2014-11-25

    The present application relates to an electrochemical metal-air cell in which a low temperature ionic liquid is used.

  20. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. V. Acetonitrile-Lithium Bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Sang D.; Borodin, Oleg; Seo, D. M.; Zhou, Zhi B.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-09-30

    Electrolytes with the salt lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) have been evaluated relative to comparable electrolytes with other lithium salts. Acetonitrile (AN) has been used as a model electrolyte solvent. The information obtained from the thermal phase behavior, solvation/ionic association interactions, quantum chemical (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with an APPLE&P many-body polarizable force field for the LiFSI salt) of the (AN)n-LiFSI mixtures provides detailed insight into the coordination interactions of the FSI- anions and the wide variability noted in the electrolyte transport property (i.e., viscosity and ionic conductivity).

  1. 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-09

    The present invention relates to compositions of matter that are ionic liquids, the compositions comprising substituted 1,2,3-triazolium cations combined with any anion. Compositions of the invention should be useful in the separation of gases and, perhaps, as catalysts for many reactions.

  2. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy(trihexyl)phosphonium dicyanamide as the RTIL. It was determined that it has good absorption properties for methanol and ?-pinene, is thermally stable, and is relatively easy to synthesize. It has a density of 0.89 g/mL at 20°C and a molecular weight of 549.9 g/mol. Trials were conducted with a small absorption system and a larger absorption system. Methanol, formaldehyde, and other HAPs were absorbed well, nearly 100%. Acetaldehyde was difficult to capture. Total VOC capture, while satisfactory on methanol and ?-pinene in a lab system, was less than expected in the field, 60-80%. The inability to capture the broad spectrum of total organics is likely due to difficulties in cleaning them from the ionic liquid rather than the ability of the ionic liquid to absorb. It’s likely that a commercial system could be constructed to remove 90 to 100% of the gas contaminates. Selecting the correct ionic liquid would be key to this. Absorption may not be the main selection criterion, but rather how easily the ionic liquid can be cleaned is very important. The ionic liquid absorption system might work very well in a system with a limited spectrum of pollutants, such as a paint spray line, where there are not very high molecular weight, non volatile, compounds in the exhaust.

  3. Energy Efficient Electrochromic Windows Incorporating Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheri Boykin; James Finley; Donald Anthony; Julianna Knowles; Richard Markovic; Michael Buchanan; Mary Ann Fuhry; Lisa Perrine

    2008-11-30

    One approach to increasing the energy efficiency of windows is to control the amount of solar radiation transmitted through a window by using electrochromic technology. What is unique about this project is that the electrochromic is based on the reduction/oxidation reactions of cathodic and anodic organic semi-conducting polymers using room temperature ionic liquids as ion transport electrolytes. It is believed that these types of coatings would be a lower cost alternative to traditional all inorganic thin film based electrochromic technologies. Although there are patents1 based on the proposed technology, it has never been reduced to practice and thoroughly evaluated (i.e. durability and performance) in a window application. We demonstrate that by using organic semi-conductive polymers, specific bands of the solar spectrum (specifically visible and near infrared) can be targeted for electrochemical variable transmittance responsiveness. In addition, when the technology is incorporated into an insulating glass unit, the energy parameters such as the solar heat gain coefficient and the light to solar gain ratio are improved over that of a typical insulating glass unit comprised of glass with a low emissivity coating. A minimum of {approx}0.02 quads of energy savings per year with a reduction of carbon emissions for electricity of {approx}320 MKg/yr benefit is achieved over that of a typical insulating glass unit including a double silver low-E coating. Note that these values include a penalty in the heating season. If this penalty is removed (i.e. in southern climates or commercial structures where cooling is predominate year-round) a maximum energy savings of {approx}0.05 quad per year and {approx}801 MKg/yr can be achieved over that of a typical insulating glass unit including a double silver low-E coating. In its current state, the technology is not durable enough for an exterior window application. The primary downfall is that the redox chemistry fails to recover to a bleached state upon exposure to heat and solar radiation while being cycled over time from the bleached to the dark state. Most likely the polymers are undergoing degradation reactions which are accelerated by heat and solar exposure while in either the reduced or oxidized states and the performance of the polymers is greatly reduced over time. For this technology to succeed in an exterior window application, there needs to be more work done to understand the degradation of the polymers under real-life application conditions such as elevated temperatures and solar exposure so that recommendations for improvements in to the overall system can be made. This will be the key to utilizing this type of technology in any future real-life applications.

  4. Ion Density Deviations in Semipermeable Ionic Microcapsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiyun Tang; Alan R. Denton

    2015-07-07

    By implementing the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory in a cell model, we theoretically investigate the influence of polyelectrolye gel permeability on ion densities and pH deviations inside the cavities of ionic microcapsules. Our calculations show that variations in permeability of a charged capsule shell cause a redistribution of ion densities within the capsule, which ultimately affects the pH deviation and Donnan potential induced by the electric field of the shell. We find that semipermeable capsules can induce larger pH deviations inside their cavities that can permeable capsules. Furthermore, with increasing capsule charge, the influence of permeability on pH deviations progressively increases. Our theory, while providing a self-consistent method for modeling the influence of permeability on fundamental properties of ionic microgels, makes predictions of practical significance for the design of microcapsules loaded with fluorescent dyes, which can serve as biosensors for diagnostic purposes.

  5. Modification of space charge transport in nanocrystalline cerium oxide by heterogeneous doping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litzelman, Scott J

    2009-01-01

    In the search for new materials for energy conversion and storage technologies such as solid oxide fuel cells, nano-ionic materials have become increasingly relevant because unique physical and transport properties that ...

  6. Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | International Nuclear Energyat Larger Scale |Ionic

  7. Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Bench test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils,...

  8. Use of ionic liquids as coordination ligands for organometallic catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Zaiwei (Moreno Valley, CA); Tang, Yongchun (Walnut, CA); Cheng; Jihong (Arcadia, CA)

    2009-11-10

    Aspects of the present invention relate to compositions and methods for the use of ionic liquids with dissolved metal compounds as catalysts for a variety of chemical reactions. Ionic liquids are salts that generally are liquids at room temperature, and are capable of dissolving a many types of compounds that are relatively insoluble in aqueous or organic solvent systems. Specifically, ionic liquids may dissolve metal compounds to produce homogeneous and heterogeneous organometallic catalysts. One industrially-important chemical reaction that may be catalyzed by metal-containing ionic liquid catalysts is the conversion of methane to methanol.

  9. Atom transfer radical polymerization of ionic liquid monomer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atom transfer radical polymerization of ionic liquid monomer: The influence of saltcounterion on polymerization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atom transfer radical...

  10. Lipid extraction from microalgae using a single ionic liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2013-05-28

    A one-step process for the lysis of microalgae cell walls and separation of the cellular lipids for use in biofuel production by utilizing a hydrophilic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium. The hydrophilic ionic liquid both lyses the microalgae cell walls and forms two immiscible layers, one of which consists of the lipid contents of the lysed cells. After mixture of the hydrophilic ionic liquid with a suspension of microalgae cells, gravity causes a hydrophobic lipid phase to move to a top phase where it is removed from the mixture and purified. The hydrophilic ionic liquid is recycled to lyse new microalgae suspensions.

  11. Compositions and methods useful for ionic liquid treatment of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dibble, Dean C.; Cheng, Aurelia; George, Anthe

    2014-07-29

    The present invention provides for novel compositions and methods for recycling or recovering ionic liquid used in IL pretreated cellulose and/or lignocellulosic biomass (LBM).

  12. Aprotic Heterocyclic Anion Triazolide Ionic Liquids - A New Class of Ionic Liquid Anion Accessed by the Huisgen Cycloaddition Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Robert L.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid

    2013-06-01

    The triazole core is a highly versatile heterocyclic ring which can be accessed easily with the Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition reaction. Herein we present the preparation of ionic liquids that incorporate a 1,2,3-triazolide anion. These ionic liquids were prepared by a facile procedure utilizing a base-labile pivaloylmethyl group at the 1-position, which can act as precursors to 1H- 4-substituted 1,2,3-triazole. These triazoles were then subsequently converted into ionic liquids after deprotonation using an appropriate ionic liquid cation hydroxide. The densities and thermal decompositions of these ionic liquids were measured. These novel ionic liquids have potential applications in gas separations and in metal-free catalysis.

  13. Ionic current inversion in pressure-driven polymer translocation through nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahin Buyukdagli; Ralf Blossey; T. Ala-Nissila

    2015-02-01

    We predict streaming current inversion with multivalent counterions in hydrodynamically driven polymer translocation events from a correlation-corrected charge transport theory including charge fluctuations around mean-field electrostatics. In the presence of multivalent counterions, electrostatic many-body effects result in the reversal of the DNA charge. The attraction of anions to the charge-inverted DNA molecule reverses the sign of the ionic current through the pore. Our theory allows for a comprehensive understanding of the complex features of the resulting streaming currents. The underlying mechanism is an efficient way to detect DNA charge reversal in pressure-driven translocation experiments with multivalent cations.

  14. Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Tonazzi, Juan C. L. (Tucson, AZ); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-11-01

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF3SO3-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF3SO2)2N-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF3CF2SO2)2N-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF3SO2)3C-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes.

  15. Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salminen, Justin; Prausnitz, John M.; Newman, John

    2006-01-01

    of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems J.battery point of view, it is essential that an ionic liquid – lithiumlead to battery short-out. The ionic-liquid / lithium-salt

  16. Ionic liquid ion source emitter arrays fabricated on bulk porous substrates for spacecraft propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, Daniel George

    2011-01-01

    Ionic Liquid Ion Sources (ILIS) are a subset of electrospray capable of producing bipolar beams of pure ions from ionic liquids. Ionic liquids are room temperature molten salts, characterized by negligible vapor pressures, ...

  17. INVESTIGATION OF IONIC CONTAMINATION REMOVAL FROM SILICON DIOXIDE SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suni, Ian Ivar

    INVESTIGATION OF IONIC CONTAMINATION REMOVAL FROM SILICON DIOXIDE SURFACES H. Lin, A. A. Busnaina, and I. I. Suni T he removal of ionic contaminants from silicon surfaces surface contamination level canM Communications L td. INTRODUCTION with increasing frequency and power, and decreases Contamination removal is one

  18. Ionic colloidal crystals of oppositely charged Mirjam E. Leunissen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leunissen, Mirjam

    Ionic colloidal crystals of oppositely charged particles Mirjam E. Leunissen1 *, Christina G charged particles can be tuned such that large ionic colloidal crystals form readily, with our theory, the stoichio- metry of our colloidal crystals is not dictated by charge neutrality; this allows us to obtain

  19. Sustainable Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

  20. Block copolymer with simultaneous electric and ionic conduction for use in lithium ion batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    Redox reactions that occur at the electrodes of batteries require transport of both ions and electrons to the active centers. Reported is the synthesis of a block copolymer that exhibits simultaneous electronic and ionic conduction. A combination of Grignard metathesis polymerization and click reaction was used successively to synthesize the block copolymer containing regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments. The P3HT-PEO/LiTFSI mixture was then used to make a lithium battery cathode with LiFePO.sub.4 as the only other component. All-solid lithium batteries of the cathode described above, a solid electrolyte and a lithium foil as the anode showed capacities within experimental error of the theoretical capacity of the battery. The ability of P3HT-PEO to serve all of the transport and binding functions required in a lithium battery electrode is thus demonstrated.

  1. Graphene terahertz modulators by ionic liquid gating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yang; Qiu, Xuepeng; Liu, Jingbo; Deorani, Praveen; Banerjee, Karan; Son, Jaesung; Chen, Yuanfu; Chia, Elbert E M; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Graphene based THz modulators are promising due to the conical band structure and high carrier mobility of graphene. Here, we tune the Fermi level of graphene via electrical gating with the help of ionic liquid to control the THz transmittance. It is found that, in the THz range, both the absorbance and reflectance of the device increase proportionately to the available density of states due to intraband transitions. Compact, stable, and repeatable THz transmittance modulation up to 93% (or 99%) for a single (or stacked) device has been demonstrated in a broad frequency range from 0.1 to 2.5 THz, with an applied voltage of only 3 V at room temperature.

  2. Durable Electrooptic Devices Comprising Ionic Liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Tonazzi, Juan C. L. (Tucson, AZ); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-11-11

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes. Some of the electrolyte solutions color to red when devices employing the solutions are powered, leading to red or neutral electrooptic devices.

  3. Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-10-10

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes.

  4. Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Cronin; John P. (Tucson, AZ); Tonazzi, Juan C. L. (Tucson, AZ); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-12-15

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes. Some of the electrolyte solutions color to red when devices employing the solutions are powered, leading to red or neutral electrooptic devices.

  5. Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California; ERC, Incorporated, Edwards Air Force Base; Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base; National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Koh, Christine J.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Harmon, Christopher W.; Strasser, Daniel; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Chambreau, Steven D.; L.Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam; Leone, Stephen R.

    2012-03-16

    Isolated ion pairs of a conventional ionic liquid, 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim+][Tf2N?]), and a reactive hypergolic ionic liquid, 1- Butyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Dicyanamide ([Bmim+][Dca?]), are generated by vaporizing ionic liquid submicron aerosol particles for the first time; the vaporized species are investigated by dissociative ionization with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light, exhibiting clear intact cations, Emim+ and Bmim+, presumably originating from intact ion pairs. Mass spectra of ion pair vapor from an effusive source of the hypergolic ionic liquid show substantial reactive decomposition due to the internal energy of the molecules emanating from the source. Photoionization efficiency curves in the near threshold ionization region of isolated ion pairs of [Emim+][Tf2N?] ionic liquid vapor are compared for an aerosol source and an effusive source, revealing changes in the appearance energy due to the amount of internal energy in the ion pairs. The aerosol source has a shift to higher threshold energy (~;;0.3 eV), attributed to reduced internal energy of the isolated ion pairs. The method of ionic liquid submicron aerosol particle vaporization, for reactive ionic liquids such as hypergolic species, is a convenient, thermally ?cooler? source of isolated intact ion pairs in the gas phase compared to effusive sources.

  6. Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California; ERC, Incorporated, Edwards Air Force Base; Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base; National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University; Koh, Christine J.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Harmon, Christopher W.; Strasser, Daniel; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Chambreau, Steven D.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2011-07-19

    Isolated ion pairs of a conventional ionic liquid, 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim+][Tf2N?]), and a reactive hypergolic ionic liquid, 1-Butyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Dicyanamide ([Bmim+][Dca?]), are generated by vaporizing ionic liquid submicron aerosol particles for the first time; the vaporized species are investigated by dissociative ionization with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light, exhibiting clear intact cations, Emim+ and Bmim+, presumably originating from intact ion pairs. Mass spectra of ion pair vapor from an effusive source of the hypergolic ionic liquid show substantial reactive decomposition due to the internal energy of the molecules emanating from the source. Photoionization efficiency curves in the near threshold ionization region of isolated ion pairs of [Emim+][Tf2N?]ionic liquid vapor are compared for an aerosol source and an effusive source, revealing changes in the appearance energy due to the amount of internal energy in the ion pairs. The aerosol source has a shift to higher threshold energy (~;;0.3 eV), attributed to reduced internal energy of the isolated ion pairs. The method of ionic liquid submicron aerosol particle vaporization, for reactive ionic liquids such as hypergolic species, is a convenient, thermally ?cooler? source of isolated intact ion pairs in the gas phase compared to effusive sources.

  7. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  8. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Rh and Pd under alternating oxidizing and catalytic conditions. Measurements for each system began with as-prepared samples at room temperature in ultrahigh vacuum and...

  9. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In AboutRe sRe:

  10. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In AboutRe

  11. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In

  12. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign

  13. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare IronSpring 2012) |

  14. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare IronSpring 2012)

  15. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton DeliveryRadioactiveRare IronSpring

  16. Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

  17. The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids: A review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Wishart, James F.

    2014-07-03

    Ionic liquids have received increasing attention as media for radiochemical separations. Recent literature includes examinations of the efficiencies and mechanisms of the solvent extraction of lanthanides, actinides and fission products into ionic liquid solutions. For radiochemical applications, including as replacement solvents for nuclear fuel reprocessing, a thorough understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids will be required. Such an understanding can be achieved based on a combination of steady-state radiolysis experiments coupled with post-irradiation product identification and pulse-radiolysis experiments to acquire kinetic information. These techniques allow for the elucidation of radiolytic mechanisms. This contribution reviews the current ionic liquidmore »radiation chemistry literature as it affects separations, with these considerations in mind.« less

  18. Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils, selected low-viscosity ionic liquids, used as neat lubricants or basestock, produced significantly lower friction and engine wear

  19. Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine Lubrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A group of oil-miscible ionic liquids has been developed by an ORNL-GM team as candidate lubricant additives with promising physical/chemical properties and potential multiple functionalities.

  20. The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids: a review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Wishart, James F.

    2014-07-03

    Ionic liquids have received increasing attention as media for radiochemical separations. Recent literature includes examinations of the efficiencies and mechanisms of the solvent extraction of lanthanides, actinides and fission products into ionic liquid solutions. For radiochemical applications, including as replacement solvents for nuclear fuel reprocessing, a thorough understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids will be required. Such an understanding can be achieved based upon a combination of steady-state radiolysis experiments coupled with post-irradiation product identification and pulse-radiolysis experiments to acquire kinetic information. These techniques allow for the elucidation of radiolytic mechanisms. This contribution reviews the current ionic liquid radiation chemistry literature as it affects separations, with these considerations in mind.

  1. The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Wishart, James F.

    2014-07-03

    Ionic liquids have received increasing attention as media for radiochemical separations. Recent literature includes examinations of the efficiencies and mechanisms of the solvent extraction of lanthanides, actinides and fission products into ionic liquid solutions. For radiochemical applications, including as replacement solvents for nuclear fuel reprocessing, a thorough understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids will be required. Such an understanding can be achieved based on a combination of steady-state radiolysis experiments coupled with post-irradiation product identification and pulse-radiolysis experiments to acquire kinetic information. These techniques allow for the elucidation of radiolytic mechanisms. This contribution reviews the current ionic liquid radiation chemistry literature as it affects separations, with these considerations in mind.

  2. Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haward, Simon J.

    In this study, we characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIAc). In steady shear flow, the semidilute solutions ...

  3. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-01-01

    High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems Tianfu Xu Earthwith H2S and SO2 in a sandstone formation, Chemical Geology,system using a Gulf Coast sandstone saline formation. 2.

  4. Structural Evolution of Colloidal Crystals with Increasing Ionic Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Structural Evolution of Colloidal Crystals with Increasing Ionic Strength Michael A. Bevan. In Final Form: June 5, 2004 We have directly observed the structural evolution of colloidal crystals colloidal crystals were shear melted and then evolved

  5. Membrane contactor assisted extraction/reaction process employing ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Yupo J. (Naperville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

    2012-02-07

    The present invention relates to a functionalized membrane contactor extraction/reaction system and method for extracting target species from multi-phase solutions utilizing ionic liquids. One preferred embodiment of the invented method and system relates to an extraction/reaction system wherein the ionic liquid extraction solutions act as both extraction solutions and reaction mediums, and allow simultaneous separation/reactions not possible with prior art technology.

  6. Salt Dependence of Ion Transport and DNA Translocation through Solid-State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Nynke

    Salt Dependence of Ion Transport and DNA Translocation through Solid-State Nanopores Ralph M. M of the salt dependence of ion transport and DNA translocation through solid-state nanopores. The ionic conductance shows a three-order-of-magnitude decrease with decreasing salt concentrations from 1 M to 1 µ

  7. Ionic Liquids with Ammonium Cations as Lubricants or Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Truhan, Jr., John J

    2006-01-01

    Friction and wear are estimated to cost 6% of the US gross national product, or around $700 billion annually. A new class of more effective lubricants could lead to huge energy savings. Limited recent literature has suggested potential for using room-temperature ionic liquids as lubricants, however only a few out of millions (or more) of species have been evaluated. Recent ORNL work discovered a new category of ionic liquids with ammonium cations that have demonstrated promising lubricating properties as net lubricants or lubricant additives, particularly in lubricating difficult-to-lubricate metals like aluminum. More than 30% friction reduction has been observed on ammonium-based ionic liquids compared to conventional hydrocarbon oils. The inherent polarity of ionic liquids is believed to provide strong adhesion to contact surfaces and form a boundary lubricating film leading to friction and wear reductions. Other advantages of ionic liquids include (1) negligible volatility, (2) high thermal stability, (3) non-flammability, and (4) better intrinsic properties that eliminate the necessity of many expensive lubricant additives. With very flexible molecular structures, this new class of lubricants, particularly ammonium-based ionic liquids, can be tailored to fit a big variety of applications including but not limited to bearings, combustion engines, MEMS, and metal forming.

  8. Phytoremediation of ionic and methyl mercury pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meagher, R.B.

    1998-06-01

    'The long-term objective of the research is to manipulate single-gene traits into plants, enabling them to process heavy metals and remediate heavy-metal pollution by resistance, sequestration, removal, and management of these contaminants. The authors are focused on mercury pollution as a case study of this plant genetic engineering approach. The working hypothesis behind this proposal was that transgenic plants expressing both the bacterial organo mercury lyase (merB) and the mercuric ion reductase gene (merA) will: (A) remove the mercury from polluted sites and (B) prevent methyl mercury from entering the food chain. The results from the research are so positive that the technology will undoubtedly be applied in the very near future to cleaning large mercury contaminates sites. Many such sites were not remediable previously due to the excessive costs and the negative environmental impact of conventional mechanical-chemical technologies. At the time this grant was awarded 20 months ago, the authors had successfully engineered a small model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, to use a highly modified bacterial mercuric ion reductase gene, merA9, to detoxify ionic mercury (Hg(II)), reducing it to much less toxic and volatile metallic Hg(0) (Rugh et al., 1996). Seeds from these plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of Hg(II) that are lethal to normal plants. In assays on transgenic seedlings suspended in a solution of Hg(II), 10 ng of Hg(0) was evolved per min per mg wet weight of plant tissue. At that time, the authors had no information on expression of merA in any other plant species, nor had the authors tested merB in any plant. However, the results were so startlingly positive and well received that they clearly presaged a paradigm shift in the field of environmental remediation.'

  9. Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobicpiperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kumar, R. Anand; Lee,Jong-Min; Kerr, John; Newman, John; Prausnitz, John M.

    2007-06-25

    Some properties are reported for hydrophobic ionic liquids (IL) containing 1-methyl-1-propyl pyrrolidinium [MPPyrro]{sup +}, 1-methyl-1-butyl pyrrolidinium [MBPyrro]{sup +}, 1-methyl-1-propyl piperidinium [MPPip]{sup +}, 1-methyl-1-butyl piperidinium [MBPip]{sup +}, 1-methyl-1-octylpyrrolidinium [MOPyrro]{sup +} and 1-methyl-1-octylpiperidinium [MOPip]{sup +} cations. These liquids provide new alternatives to pyridinium and imidazolium ILs. High thermal stability of an ionic liquid increases safety in applications like rechargeable lithium-ion batteries and other electrochemical devices. Thermal properties, ionic conductivities, viscosities, and mutual solubilities with water are reported. In addition, toxicities of selected ionic liquids have been measured using a human cancer cell-line. The ILs studied here are sparingly soluble in water but hygroscopic. We show some structure-property relationships that may help to design green solvents for specific applications. While ionic liquids are claimed to be environmentally-benign solvents, as yet few data have been published to support these claims.

  10. Characterization and Quantification of Electronic and Ionic Ohmic Overpotential and Heat Generation in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grew, Kyle N.; Izzo, John R.; Chiu, Wilson K.S.

    2011-08-16

    The development of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a higher efficiency and power density requires an improved understanding and treatment of the irreversibilities. Losses due to the electronic and ionic resistances, which are also known as ohmic losses in the form of Joule heating, can hinder the SOFC's performance. Ohmic losses can result from the bulk material resistivities as well as the complexities introduced by the cell's microstructure. In this work, two-dimensional (2D), electronic and ionic transport models are used to develop a method of quantification of the ohmic losses within the SOFC anode microstructure. This quantification is completed as a function of properties determined from a detailed microstructure characterization, namely, the tortuosity of the electronic and ionic phases, phase volume fraction, contiguity, and mean free path. A direct modeling approach at the level of the pore-scale microstructure is achieved through the use of a representative volume element (RVE) method. The correlation of these ohmic losses with the quantification of the SOFC anode microstructure are examined. It is found with this analysis that the contributions of the SOFC anode microstructure on ohmic losses can be correlated with the volume fraction, contiguity, and mean free path.

  11. Characterization and Quantification of Electronic and Ionic Ohmic Overpotential and Heat Generation in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grew, Kyle N.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a higher efficiency and power density requires an improved understanding and treatment of the irreversibilities. Losses due to the electronic and ionic resistances, which are also known as ohmic losses in the form of Joule heating, can hinder the SOFC’s performance. Ohmic losses can result from the bulk material resistivities as well as the complexities introduced by the cell’s microstructure. In this work, two-dimensional (2D), electronic and ionic transport models are used to develop a method of quantification of the ohmic losses within the SOFC anode microstructure. This quantification is completed as a function of properties determined from a detailed microstructure characterization, namely, the tortuosity of the electronic and ionic phases, phase volume fraction, contiguity, and mean free path. A direct modeling approach at the level of the pore-scale microstructure is achieved through the use of a representative volume element (RVE) method. The correlation of these ohmic losses with the quantification of the SOFC anode microstructure are examined. It is found with this analysis that the contributions of the SOFC anode microstructure on ohmic losses can be correlated with the volume fraction, contiguity, and mean free path.

  12. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  13. Phase-Changing Ionic Liquids: CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids Involving Phase Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Notre Dame is developing a new CO2 capture process that uses special ionic liquids (ILs) to remove CO2 from the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. ILs are salts that are normally liquid at room temperature, but Notre Dame has discovered a new class of ILs that are solid at room temperature and change to liquid when they bind to CO2. Upon heating, the CO2 is released for storage, and the ILs re-solidify and donate some of the heat generated in the process to facilitate further CO2 release. These new ILs can reduce the energy required to capture CO2 from the exhaust stream of a coal-fired power plant when compared to state-ofthe- art technology.

  14. Methods for separating medical isotopes using ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luo, Huimin; Boll, Rose Ann; Bell, Jason Richard; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for extracting a radioisotope from an aqueous solution, the method comprising: a) intimately mixing a non-chelating ionic liquid with the aqueous solution to transfer at least a portion of said radioisotope to said non-chelating ionic liquid; and b) separating the non-chelating ionic liquid from the aqueous solution. In preferred embodiments, the method achieves an extraction efficiency of at least 80%, or a separation factor of at least 1.times.10.sup.4 when more than one radioisotope is included in the aqueous solution. In particular embodiments, the method is applied to the separation of medical isotopes pairs, such as Th from Ac (Th-229/Ac-225, Ac-227/Th-227), or Ra from Ac (Ac-225 and Ra-225, Ac-227 and Ra-223), or Ra from Th (Th-227 and Ra-223, Th-229 and Ra-225).

  15. Effects of ionic liquids on cation dynamics in amorphous polyethylene oxide electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattoraj, Joyjit, E-mail: jchat-01@uni-muenster.de; Diddens, Diddo; Heuer, Andreas [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Corrensstrasse 28/30, D-48149 Münster (Germany)] [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Corrensstrasse 28/30, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a poly(ethylene oxide)-based polymer electrolyte material containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide salt for a wide temperature regime above and below the experimental crystallization temperature with and without N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ionic liquid (IL). The impact of the IL-concentration on the cation dynamics is studied. The increase of the cation mobility upon addition of IL is significant but temperature-independent. This can be related to distinct variations of the underlying transport properties as expressed within the previously introduced transport model of polymer electrolytes. Even for the largest IL concentration the transport model perfectly predicts the non-trivial time-dependence of the cationic mean square displacement for all temperatures. Finally, we compare our numerical and theoretical findings with the results of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. In this way we can exclusively relate the strong experimentally observed dependence of the low-temperature Li-diffusivity on the IL concentration to the impact of IL on crystallization.

  16. Composite mixed oxide ionic and electronic conductors for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Srikanth (Westborough, MA); Pal, Uday B. (Dover, MA); Karthikeyan, Annamalai (Quincy, MA); Hengdong, Cui (Allston, MA)

    2009-09-15

    A mixed ionic and electronic conducting membrane includes a two-phase solid state ceramic composite, wherein the first phase comprises an oxygen ion conductor and the second phase comprises an n-type electronically conductive oxide, wherein the electronically conductive oxide is stable at an oxygen partial pressure as low as 10.sup.-20 atm and has an electronic conductivity of at least 1 S/cm. A hydrogen separation system and related methods using the mixed ionic and electronic conducting membrane are described.

  17. Conductive Filler Morphology Effect on Performance of Ionic Polymer Conductive Network Composite Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Sheng

    Several generations of ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators have been developed since 1992. It has been discovered that the composite electrodes which are composed of electronic and ionic conductors, have great ...

  18. Chromatin Ionic Atmosphere Analyzed by a Mesoscale Electrostatic Hin Hark Gan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlick, Tamar

    Chromatin Ionic Atmosphere Analyzed by a Mesoscale Electrostatic Approach Hin Hark Gan and Tamar an electrostatic model to handle multivalent ions and compute the ionic distribution around a mesoscale chromatin

  19. Method of purifying a gas stream using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Method of purifying a gas stream using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method of purifying a gas stream using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic...

  20. Characterization of an iodine-based ionic liquid ion source and studies on ion fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Timothy Peter

    2010-01-01

    Electrosprays are a well studied source of charged droplets and ions. A specific subclass is the ionic liquid ion source (ILIS), which produce ion beams from the electrostatically stressed meniscus of ionic liquids. ILIS ...

  1. Non-Tracial Free Transport and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Brent Andrew

    2015-01-01

    tracial transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the transport element . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Free Transport . . . . . . . . . . . .

  2. Frequency dependent dynamical electromechanical response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Frequency dependent dynamical electromechanical response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors A. N dependent dynamical electromechanical response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors A. N. Morozovska,1,a) E online 9 January 2012) Frequency dependent dynamic electromechanical response of the mixed ionic

  3. High performance ultracapacitors with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Wen; Henry, Kent Douglas

    2012-10-09

    The present invention is directed to the use of carbon nanotubes and/or electrolyte structures in various electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors having an ionic liquid electrolyte. The carbon nanotubes are preferably aligned carbon nanotubes. Compared to randomly entangled carbon nanotubes, aligned carbon nanotubes can have better defined pore structures and higher specific surface areas.

  4. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  5. Modeling and precision control of ionic polymer metal composite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Nikhil Dilip

    2004-11-15

    implemented. Ionic polymer metal composite is a novel polymer in the class of electroactive polymers. IPMC consists of a base polymer coated with electrodes made up of highly conducting pure metals such as gold. The actuation behavior of IPMC can be attributed...

  6. High performance batteries with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Wen (Littleton, CO)

    2012-08-07

    The present invention is directed to lithium-ion batteries in general and more particularly to lithium-ion batteries based on aligned graphene ribbon anodes, V.sub.2O.sub.5 graphene ribbon composite cathodes, and ionic liquid electrolytes. The lithium-ion batteries have excellent performance metrics of cell voltages, energy densities, and power densities.

  7. AN EXPLORATION INTO BATTERY CHEMISTRY IONIC FLOW, INTERCALATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    AN EXPLORATION INTO BATTERY CHEMISTRY IONIC FLOW, INTERCALATION AND CRYSTAL LATTICES JAKE GARCIA ALLA ZAMARAYEVA ADVISOR: DAN STEINGART #12;A PROBLEM IN SOCIETY! · The energy problem · Batteries-cost and environmentally friendly battery? #12;BACKGROUND · Different Common Battery types: Galvanic "Wet" Cell Dry Cell

  8. Tuning the metal-insulator crossover and magnetism in SrRuO3 by ionic gating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yi, Hee Taek; Gao, Bin; Xie, Wei; Cheong, Sang -Wook; Podzorov, Vitaly

    2014-10-13

    Reversible control of charge transport and magnetic properties without degradation is a key for device applications of transition metal oxides. Chemical doping during the growth of transition metal oxides can result in large changes in physical properties, but in most of the cases irreversibility is an inevitable constraint. We report a reversible control of charge transport, metal-insulator crossover and magnetism in field-effect devices based on ionically gated archetypal oxide system - SrRuO3. In these thin-film devices, the metal-insulator crossover temperature and the onset of magnetoresistance can be continuously and reversibly tuned in the range 90–250 K and 70–100 K, respectively,more »by application of a small gate voltage. We infer that a reversible diffusion of oxygen ions in the oxide lattice dominates the response of these materials to the gate electric field. These findings provide critical insights into both the understanding of ionically gated oxides and the development of novel applications.« less

  9. Tuning the metal-insulator crossover and magnetism in SrRuO3 by ionic gating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Hee Taek; Gao, Bin; Xie, Wei; Cheong, Sang -Wook; Podzorov, Vitaly

    2014-10-13

    Reversible control of charge transport and magnetic properties without degradation is a key for device applications of transition metal oxides. Chemical doping during the growth of transition metal oxides can result in large changes in physical properties, but in most of the cases irreversibility is an inevitable constraint. We report a reversible control of charge transport, metal-insulator crossover and magnetism in field-effect devices based on ionically gated archetypal oxide system - SrRuO3. In these thin-film devices, the metal-insulator crossover temperature and the onset of magnetoresistance can be continuously and reversibly tuned in the range 90–250 K and 70–100 K, respectively, by application of a small gate voltage. We infer that a reversible diffusion of oxygen ions in the oxide lattice dominates the response of these materials to the gate electric field. These findings provide critical insights into both the understanding of ionically gated oxides and the development of novel applications.

  10. Ionic liquid pretreatment of poplar wood at room temperature: swelling and incorporation of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Marcel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Gregory L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Steven A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rector, Kirk D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass represents a potentially sustainable source of liquid fuels and commodity chemicals. It could satisfy the energy needs for transportation and electricity generation, while contributing substantially to carbon sequestration and limiting the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Potential feedstocks are abundant and include crops, agricultural wastes, forest products, grasses, and algae. Among those feedstocks, wood is mainly constituted of three components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The conversion process of lignocellulosic biomass typically consists of three steps: (1) pretreatment; (2) hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars; and (3) fermentation of the sugars into liquid fuels (ethanol) and other commodity chemicals. The pretreatment step is necessary due to the complex structure of the plant cell wall and the chemical resistance of lignin. Most current pretreatments are energy-intensive and/or polluting. So it is imperative to develop new pretreatments that are economically viable and environmentally friendly. Recently, ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest, due to their ability to dissolve biopolymers, such as cellulose, lignin, native switchgrass, and others. Ionic liquids are also considered green solvents, since they have been successfully recycled at high yields for further use with limited efficiency loss. Also, a few microbial cellulases remain active at high ionic liquid concentration. However, all studies on the dissolution of wood in ionic liquids have been conducted so far at high temperatures, typically above 90 C. Development of alternative pretreatments at room temperature is desirable to eliminate the additional energy cost. In this study, thin sections of poplar wood were swollen at room temperature by a 3 h ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate or EMIMAc) pretreatment. The pretreated sample was then exposed to an aqueous suspension of nanoparticles that resulted in the sample contraction and the deposition of nanoparticles onto the surface and embedded into the cell wall. To date, both silver and gold particles ranging in size from 40-100 nm have been incorporated into wood. Penetration of gold nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter in the cell walls was best confirmed by near-infrared confocal Raman microscopy, since the deposition of gold nanoparticles induces a significant enhancement of the Raman signal from the wood in their close proximity, an enhancement attributed to the surface-enhanced Raman effect (SERS). After rinsing with water, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman images of the same areas show that most nanoparticles remained on the pretreated sample. Raman images at different depths reveal that a significant number of nanoparticles were incorporated into the wood sample, at depths up to 4 {micro}m, or 40 times the diameter of the nanoparticles. Control experiments on an untreated wood sample resulted in the deposition of nanoparticles only at the surface and most nanoparticles were removed upon rinsing. This particle incorporation process enables the development of new pretreatments, since the nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio and could be chemically functionalized. Other potential applications for the incorporated nanoparticles include isotope tracing, catalysis, imaging agents, drug-delivery systems, energy-storage devices, and chemical sensors.

  11. Can Ionic Liquids Be Used As Templating Agents For Controlled Design of Uranium-Containing Nanomaterials?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, A.; Bridges, N.; Tosten, M.

    2013-04-09

    Nanostructured uranium oxides have been prepared in ionic liquids as templating agents. Using the ionic liquids as reaction media for inorganic nanomaterials takes advantage of the pre-organized structure of the ionic liquids which in turn controls the morphology of the inorganic nanomaterials. Variation of ionic liquid cation structure was investigated to determine the impact on the uranium oxide morphologies. For two ionic liquid cations, increasing the alkyl chain length increases the aspect ratio of the resulting nanostructured oxides. Understanding the resulting metal oxide morphologies could enhance fuel stability and design.

  12. In this research work, the process optimization of silver iodide-silver meta phosphate ionic glass molding for solid state super ionic stamping was performed. Solid state super ionic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    molding for solid state super ionic stamping was performed. Solid state super ionic stamping is a process by making use of compression molding. The compression molding process was optimized by varying the process and by optimizing the compression molding process, stamp with minimum flatness and surface roughness was obtained

  13. Strategies for Using Host-Guest Chemistry in the Extractive Separations of Ionic Guests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2005-09-12

    Host-guest chemistry has led to a new paradigm in extractive separations, generating new possibilities for efficient separations of ionic species to meet the challenging needs of industry. This account describes the approach the authors have recently undertaken, recent results, and future directions toward highly selective separations of anions based on host?guest chemistry principles. The material presented deals mainly with the genesis and discovery of new extractive systems, illustrating the potential of particular chemical concepts with examples of practical application. Major questions of interest concern the role of anions in extractive processes and factors underlying the recognition and transport of anions. Theoretical efforts explore the technique of molecular-design itself as embodied in the evolving HostDesigner program. Design calculations are capable of generating ranked candidate multifunctional ion receptors based on hydrogen-bond-donor groups having O?H and N?H donor functionalities. Efforts to synthesize candidate receptors together with studies of molecular structure and the thermodynamics of binding and transport provide a complete picture for understanding structure-function relationships and feedback for further molecular modeling. Extraction data are evaluated in a thermochemical context in which the solvent matrix, including use of anion-solvating lipophilic alcohols, plays a pivotal role. Applications are envisioned for the solution of many types of separations needs, and examples are taken mainly from the authors' own research as applied to treatment of radioactive wastes for disposal.

  14. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode. Successful extraction of metal from metal oxide dissolved in Urea/ChCl (2:1) was accomplished. The current efficiencies were relatively high in both the metal deposition processes with current efficiency greater than 86% for lead and 95% for zinc. This technology will advance the metal oxide reduction process by increasing the process efficiency and also eliminate the production of CO2 which makes this an environmentally benign technology for metal extraction.

  15. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  16. Sustainable Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  17. Mixed ionic and electronic conducting ceramic membranes for hydrocarbon processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Calcar, Pamela (Superior, CO); Mackay, Richard (Lafayette, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to mixed phase materials for the preparation of catalytic membranes which exhibit ionic and electronic conduction and which exhibit improved mechanical strength compared to single phase ionic and electronic conducting materials. The mixed phase materials are useful for forming gas impermeable membranes either as dense ceramic membranes or as dense thin films coated onto porous substrates. The membranes and materials of this invention are useful in catalytic membrane reactors in a variety of applications including synthesis gas production. One or more crystalline second phases are present in the mixed phase material at a level sufficient to enhance the mechanical strength of the mixture to provide membranes for practical application in CMRs.

  18. Ionic liquids for separation of olefin-paraffin mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Huang, Jing-Fang

    2014-07-15

    The invention is directed to an ionic liquid comprising (i) a cationic portion containing a complex of a silver (I) ion and one or more neutral ligands selected from organoamides, organoamines, olefins, and organonitriles, and (ii) an anionic portion having the chemical formula ##STR00001## wherein m and n are independently 0 or an integer of 1 or above, and p is 0 or 1, provided that when p is 0, the group --N--SO.sub.2--(CF.sub.2).sub.nCF.sub.3 subtended by p is replaced with an oxide atom connected to the shown sulfur atom. The invention is also directed to a method for separating an olefin from an olefin-paraffin mixture by passing the mixture through a layer of the ionic liquid described above.

  19. Importance of glassy fragility for energy applications of ionic liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sippel; P. Lunkenheimer; S. Krohns; E. Thoms; A. Loidl

    2015-02-24

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are salts that are liquid close to room temperature. Their possible applications are numerous, e.g., as solvents for green chemistry in various electrochemical devices, and even for such "exotic" purposes as spinning-liquid mirrors for lunar telescopes. Here we concentrate on their use for new advancements in energy-storage and -conversion devices: Batteries, supercapacitors or fuel cells using ILs as electrolytes could be important building blocks for the sustainable energy supply of tomorrow. Interestingly, ILs show glassy freezing and the universal, but until now only poorly understood dynamic properties of glassy matter, dominate many of their physical properties. We show that the conductivity of ILs, an essential figure of merit for any electrochemical application, depends in a systematic way not only on their glass temperature but also on the so-called fragility, characterizing the non-canonical super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of their ionic mobility.

  20. Carbon films produced from ionic liquid carbon precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Lee, Je Seung

    2013-11-05

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a film of porous carbon, the method comprising carbonizing a film of an ionic liquid, wherein the ionic liquid has the general formula (X.sup.+a).sub.x(Y.sup.-b).sub.y, wherein the variables a and b are, independently, non-zero integers, and the subscript variables x and y are, independently, non-zero integers, such that ax=by, and at least one of X.sup.+ and Y.sup.- possesses at least one carbon-nitrogen unsaturated bond. The invention is also directed to a composition comprising a porous carbon film possessing a nitrogen content of at least 10 atom %.

  1. Ionic liquid-induced synthesis of selenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langi, Bhushan; Shah, Chetan; Singh, Krishankant; Chaskar, Atul; Kumar, Manmohan; Bajaj, Parma N.

    2010-06-15

    A simple wet chemical method has been used to synthesize selenium nanoparticles by the reaction of ionic liquid with sodium selenosulphate, a selenium precursor, in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol stabilizer, in aqueous medium. The method is capable of producing spherical selenium nanoparticles in the size range of 76-150 nm under ambient conditions. This is a first report on the production of nano-selenium assisted by an ionic liquid. The synthesized nanoparticles can be separated easily from the aqueous sol by a high-speed centrifuge machine, and can be re-dispersed in an aqueous medium. The synthesized selenium nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  2. Ionic liquids for separation of olefin-paraffin mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Huang, Jing-Fang

    2013-09-17

    The invention is directed to an ionic liquid comprising (i) a cationic portion containing a complex of a silver (I) ion and one or more neutral ligands selected from organoamides, organoamines, olefins, and organonitriles, and (ii) an anionic portion having the chemical formula ##STR00001## wherein m and n are independently 0 or an integer of 1 or above, and p is 0 or 1, provided that when p is 0, the group --N--SO.sub.2--(CF.sub.2).sub.nCF.sub.3 subtended by p is replaced with an oxide atom connected to the shown sulfur atom. The invention is also directed to a method for separating an olefin from an olefin-paraffin mixture by passing the mixture through a layer of the ionic liquid described above.

  3. Ionic switch controls the DNA state in phage ?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dong; Liu, Ting; Zuo, Xiaobing; Li, Tao; Qiu, Xiangyun; Evilevitch, Alex

    2015-06-19

    We have recently found that DNA packaged in phage ? undergoes a disordering transition triggered by temperature, which results in increased genome mobility. This solid-to-fluid like DNA transition markedly increases the number of infectious ? particles facilitating infection. However, the structural transition strongly depends on temperature and ionic conditions in the surrounding medium. Using titration microcalorimetry combined with solution X-ray scattering, we mapped both energetic and structural changes associated with transition of the encapsidated ?-DNA. Packaged DNA needs to reach a critical stress level in order for transition to occur. We varied the stress on DNA in the capsid bymore »changing the temperature, packaged DNA length and ionic conditions. We found striking evidence that the intracapsid DNA transition is ‘switched on’ at the ionic conditions mimicking those in vivo and also at the physiologic temperature of infection at 37°C. This ion regulated on-off switch of packaged DNA mobility in turn affects viral replication. The results suggest a remarkable adaptation of phage ? to the environment of its host bacteria in the human gut. The metastable DNA state in the capsid provides a new paradigm for the physical evolution of viruses.« less

  4. Multicomponent Transport of Sulfate in a Goethite-Silica Sand System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Multicomponent Transport of Sulfate in a Goethite-Silica Sand System at Variable pH and Ionic sand column. The agreement between the experiments and the predictions is very good, especially of a goethite-coated silica sand column, which is similar to systems used in our earlier work (1, 2

  5. Mapping Ionic Currents and Reactivity on the Nanoscale: Electrochemical Strain Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinin, S.V. (Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, ORNL) [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, ORNL

    2010-10-19

    Solid-state electrochemical processes in oxides underpin a broad spectrum of energy and information storage devices, ranging from Li-ion and Li-air batteries, to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to electroresistive and memristive systems. These functionalities are controlled by the bias-driven diffusive and electromigration transport of mobile ionic species, as well as intricate a set of electrochemical and defect-controlled reactions at interfaces and in bulk. Despite the wealth of device-level and atomistic studies, little is known on the mesoscopic mechanisms of ion diffusion and electronic transport on the level of grain clusters, individual grains, and extended defects. The development of the capability for probing ion transport on the nanometer scale is a key to deciphering complex interplay between structure, functionality, and performance in these systems. Here we introduce Electrochemical Strain Microscopy, a scanning probe microscopy technique based on strong strain-bias coupling in the systems in which local ion concentrations are changed by electrical fields. The imaging capability, as well as time- and voltage spectroscopies analogous to traditional current based electrochemical characterization methods are developed. The reversible intercalation of Li and mapping electrochemical activity in LiCoO2 is demonstrated, illustrating higher Li diffusivity at non-basal planes and grain boundaries. In Si-anode device structure, the direct mapping of Li diffusion at extended defects and evolution of Li-activity with charge state is explored. The electrical field-dependence of Li mobility is studied to determine the critical bias required for the onset of electrochemical transformation, allowing reaction and diffusion processes in the battery system to be separated at each location. Finally, the applicability of ESM for probing oxygen vacancy diffusion and oxygen reduction/evolution reactions is illustrated, and the high resolution ESM maps are correlated with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. The future potential for deciphering mechanisms of electrochemical transformations on an atomically-defined single-defect level is discussed.

  6. The dynamic behavior of thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Sebastian B., E-mail: sebastian.meier@belectric.com, E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com [Department of Materials Science VI: Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT RTC MAT IEC-DE, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hartmann, David; Sarfert, Wiebke, E-mail: sebastian.meier@belectric.com, E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT RTC MAT IEC-DE, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI: Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-14

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) have received increasing attention during recent years due to their simple architecture, based on solely air-stabile materials, and ease of manufacture in ambient atmosphere, using solution-based technologies. The LEC's active layer offers semiconducting, luminescent as well as ionic functionality resulting in device physical processes fundamentally different as compared with organic light-emitting diodes. During operation, electrical double layers (EDLs) form at the electrode interfaces as a consequence of ion accumulation and electrochemical doping sets in leading to the in situ development of a light-emitting p-i-n junction. In this paper, we comment on the use of impedance spectroscopy in combination with complex nonlinear squares fitting to derive key information about the latter events in thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells based on the model compound bis-2-phenylpyridine 6-phenyl-2,2´-bipyridine iridium(III) hexafluoridophosphate ([Ir(ppy)?(pbpy)][PF?]). At operating voltages below the bandgap potential of the ionic complex used, we obtain the dielectric constant of the active layer, the conductivity of mobile ions, the transference numbers of electrons and ions, and the thickness of the EDLs, whereas the transient thickness of the p-i-n junction is determined at voltages above the bandgap potential. Most importantly, we find that charge transport is dominated by the ions when carrier injection from the electrodes is prohibited, that ion movement is limited by the presence of transverse internal interfaces and that the width of the intrinsic region constitutes almost 60% of the total active layer thickness in steady state at a low operating voltage.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Thiazolium-Based Room Temperature Ionic Liquids for Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, Patrick C [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Fulvio, Pasquale F [ORNL; Yeary, Joshua S [ORNL; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel thiazolium-bis(triflamide) based ionic liquids has been synthesized and characterized. Physicochemical properties of the ionic liquids such as thermal stability, phase transitions, and infrared spectra were analysed and compared to the imidazolium-based congeners. Several unique classes of ancillary substitutions are examined with respect to impacts on overall structure, in addition to their carbon dioxide absorption properties in supported ionic-liquid membranes for gas separation.

  8. Nonlinear space charge dynamics in mixed ionic-electronic conductors: Resistive switching and ferroelectric-like hysteresis of electromechanical response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Morozovsky, Nicholas V.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Kim, Yunseok; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-08-14

    We performed self-consistent modelling of nonlinear electrotransport and electromechanical response of thin films of mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIEC) allowing for steric effects of mobile charged defects (ions, protons, or vacancies), electron degeneration, and Vegard stresses. We establish correlations between the features of the nonlinear space-charge dynamics, current-voltage, and bending-voltage curves for different types of the film electrodes. A pronounced ferroelectric-like hysteresis of the bending-voltage loops and current maxima on the double hysteresis current-voltage loops appear for the electron-transport electrodes. The double hysteresis loop with pronounced humps indicates a memristor-type resistive switching. The switching occurs due to the strong nonlinear coupling between the electronic and ionic subsystems. A sharp meta-stable maximum of the electron density appears near one open electrode and moves to another one during the periodic change of applied voltage. Our results can explain the nonlinear nature and correlation of electrical and mechanical memory effects in thin MIEC films. The analytical expression proving that the electrically induced bending of MIEC films can be detected by interferometric methods is derived.

  9. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Qinggang

    2013-01-01

    T. ; Yu, P. T. Hydrogen Fuel Cells 2010 , 3. Lim, B. ; Yu,Jones, D. ; Bele, P. Fuel Cells (Weinheim, Ger. ) 2010 ,E. ; Kornyshev, A. A. Fuel Cells (Weinheim, Ger. ) 2003 ,

  10. Oligomerization of the E. coli mercury transporter MerT in non-ionic detergents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herkules, Frank

    2012-01-01

    a trimer and, possibly, a tetramer (Figure 5.4). While thedimer, namely trimers and tetramers. The formation of aand, the formation of a tetramer only discernable once BM(

  11. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Qinggang

    2013-01-01

    the most prominent PEM material for PEMFC and other relatedproton conductivity and high PEMFC power density. 15,16 Aplay a critical role in PEMFC performance. 36,37 In fact,

  12. Applications of Irreversible Thermodynamics: Bulk and Interfacial Electronic, Ionic, Magnetic, and Thermal Transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Matthew

    2012-10-19

    the parallels between ow in semiconductors and in spintronics devices. The wide applicability of irre- 6 versible thermodynamics to modern devices is demonstrated by consideration of three particular systems: a long-considered system involving particle ow...

  13. On the cause of conductivity degradation in sodium strontium silicate ionic conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jee, Y; Zhao, X; Huang, K

    2015-01-01

    Here we present strong experimental evidence that elucidates the fundamental cause for the conductivity degradation observed in Na-SrSiO3 ionic conductor.

  14. Methods of using ionic liquids having a fluoride anion as solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pagoria, Philip (Livermore, CA); Maiti, Amitesh (San Ramon, CA); Gash, Alexander (Brentwood, CA); Han, Thomas Yong (Pleasanton, CA); Orme, Christine (Oakland, CA); Fried, Laurence (Livermore, CA)

    2011-12-06

    A method in one embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having a fluoride anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of about 90.degree. C. or less during the contacting. A method in another embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having an acetate or formate anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of less than about 90.degree. C. during the contacting.

  15. Synthesis of Highly Ordered TiO2 Nanotubes Using Ionic Liquids for Photovoltaics Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study that deals with a new, ‘green’ approach of synthesizing highly ordered TiO2 nanotubes using ionic liquids for photovoltaics (PV) applications.

  16. Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boreo, Andrea; Li, Wei; Wunnenbuger, Douglas; Giusti, Cecilia; Cooper, John T.; Masterson, Jaimie

    2015-01-01

    Mobility throughout a community ensures freedom of movement and enhances quality of life. Traffic congestion, pollution, urban sprawl, social exclusion, safety and health can decrease mobility and should be a part of a sustainable transportation...

  17. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    programme of electrification and the potential introduction of diesel hybrids. The Department for Transport vehicles Wind turbine systems Industrial equipment The lab has full ethernet capability which will enable

  18. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-30

    Studies were initiated at the Hanford Site to evaluate the process controlling the transport of fluids in the vadose zone and to develop a reliable database upon which vadose-zone transport models can be calibrated. These models are needed to evaluate contaminant migration through the vadose zone to underlying groundwaters at Hanford. A study site that had previously been extensively characterized using geophysical monitoring techniques was selected in the 200 E Area. Techniques used previously included neutron probe for water content, spectral gamma logging for radionuclide tracers, and gamma scattering for wet bulk density. Building on the characterization efforts of the past 20 years, the site was instrumented to facilitate the comparison of nine vadose-zone characterization methods: advanced tensiometers, neutron probe, electrical resistance tomography (ERT), high-resolution resistivity (HRR), electromagnetic induction imaging (EMI), cross-borehole radar (XBR), and cross-borehole seismic (XBS). Soil coring was used to obtain soil samples for analyzing ionic and isotopic tracers.

  19. Hydrogen Fluoride Capture by Imidazolium Acetate Ionic Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Extraction of hydrofluoric acid (HF) from oils is a drastically important problem in petroleum industry, since HF causes quick corrosion of pipe lines and brings severe health problems to humanity. Some ionic liquids (ILs) constitute promising scavenger agents thanks to strong binding to polar compounds and tunability. PM7-MD simulations and hybrid density functional theory are employed here to consider HF capture ability of ILs. Discussing the effects and impacts of the cation and the anion separately and together, I will evaluate performance of imidazolium acetate and outline systematic search guidelines for efficient adsorption and extraction of HF.

  20. Kinetics and Solvent Effects in the Synthesis of Ionic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schleicher, Jay C.

    2007-12-12

    . Chapter 6 outlines reactions conducted using compressed CO 2 at a given isotherm to evaluate how CO 2 affects the overall rate of reaction. Chapter 7 is a summary of the results obtained, and will outline future work. 7 References: 1. Sato, T..." for transition metal cataylsis. Angew. Chemie. Int. Ed. 2000, 39, (21), 3773-3789. 7. Liu, Q. B.; Zhang, Z. H.; J., F., Progress in biocatayltic reactions in ionic liquids. Prog. Chem 2005, 17, (6), 1060-1066. 8. Reetz, M. T.; Wiesenhofer, W., Liquid poly...

  1. Fabrication of fiber supported ionic liquids and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luebke, David R; Wickramanayake, Shan

    2013-02-26

    One or more embodiments relates to the production of a fabricated fiber having an asymmetric polymer network and having an immobilized liquid such as an ionic liquid within the pores of the polymer network. The process produces the fabricated fiber in a dry-wet spinning process using a homogenous dope solution, providing significant advantage over current fabrication methods for liquid-supporting polymers. The fabricated fibers may be effectively utilized for the separation of a chemical species from a mixture based on the selection of the polymer, the liquid, and the solvent utilized in the dope.

  2. Nonlocal transport model in equilibrium two-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhen; Rozmus, W. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2J1 (Canada); Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Brantov, A. V. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Capjack, C. E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    The full set of linearized Fokker-Planck kinetic equations with Landau collision terms have been solved as an initial-value problem for equilibrium electron-ion plasmas. This work is a generalization of the nonlocal transport theory by Bychenkov et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 4405 (1995)] to both electron and ion components with frequency-dependent responses. Transport closure relations have been obtained for the complete set of electron and ion fluid equations which are valid over the full range of particle collisionality and for an arbitrary ionic charge. The well-known limits of collisionless and strongly collisional plasma transport theory have been recovered. Practical fits based on the numerical calculations have been introduced for nonlocal and frequency-dependent ion transport coefficients.

  3. Development of an Ionic-Liquid Absorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Don

    2011-03-29

    Solar Fueled Products (SFP) is developing an innovative ionic-liquid absorption heat pump (ILAHP). The development of an ILAHP is extremely significant, as it could result in annual savings of more than 190 billion kW h of electrical energy and $19 billion. This absorption cooler uses about 75 percent less electricity than conventional cooling and heating units. The ILAHP also has significant environmental sustainability benefits, due to reduced CO2 emissions. Phase I established the feasibility and showed the economic viability of an ILAHP with these key accomplishments: • Used the breakthrough capabilities provided by ionic liquids which overcome the key difficulties of the common absorption coolers. • Showed that the theoretical thermodynamic performance of an ILAHP is similar to existing absorption-cooling systems. • Established that the half-effect absorption cycle reduces the peak generator temperature, improving collector efficiency and reducing collector area. • Component testing demonstrated that the most critical components, absorber and generator, operate well with conventional heat exchangers. • Showed the economic viability of an ILAHP. The significant energy savings, sustainability benefits, and economic viability are compelling reasons to continue the ILAHP development.

  4. Polarizability effects on the structure and dynamics of ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalcante, Ary de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2014-04-14

    Polarization effects on the structure and dynamics of ionic liquids are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Four different ionic liquids were simulated, formed by the anions Cl{sup ?} and PF{sub 6}{sup ?}, treated as single fixed charge sites, and the 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (1-ethyl and 1-butyl-), which are polarizable. The partial charge fluctuation of the cations is provided by the electronegativity equalization model (EEM) and a complete parameter set for the cations electronegativity (?) and hardness (J) is presented. Results obtained from a non-polarizable model for the cations are also reported for comparison. Relative to the fixed charged model, the equilibrium structure of the first solvation shell around the imidazolium cations shows that inclusion of EEM polarization forces brings cations closer to each other and that anions are preferentially distributed above and below the plane of the imidazolium ring. The polarizable model yields faster translational and reorientational dynamics than the fixed charges model in the rotational-diffusion regime. In this sense, the polarizable model dynamics is in better agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Interactions of Ionic Liquids with Uranium and its Bioreduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, C.; Francis, A.

    2012-09-18

    We investigated the influence of ionic liquids (ILs) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM]{sup +}[PF{sub 6}]{sup -}, N-ethylpyridinium trifluoroacetate [EtPy]{sup +}[CF{sub 3}COO]{sup -} and N-ethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate [Et-Py]{sup +}[BF{sub 4}]{sup -} on uranium reduction by Clostridium sp. under anaerobic conditions. Potentiometric titration, UV-vis spectrophotometry, LC-MS and EXAFS analyses showed monodentate complexation between uranyl and BF{sub 4}{sup -} PF{sub 6}{sup -}; and bidentate complexation with CF{sub 3}COO{sup -}. Ionic liquids affected the growth of Clostridium sp. as evidenced by decrease in optical density, changes in pH, gas production, and the extent of U(VI) reduction and precipitation of U(IV) from solution. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was observed in the presence of [EtPy][BF{sub 4}] and [BMIM][PF{sub 6}] but not with [EtPy][CF{sub 3}COO].

  6. Ionic cloud distribution close to a charged surface in the presence of salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    OFFPRINT Ionic cloud distribution close to a charged surface in the presence of salt O. Punkkinen close to a charged surface in the presence of salt O. Punkkinen1,2(a) , A. Naji3 , R. Podgornik4,5,6 , I salts, etc. Abstract ­ Despite its importance, the understanding of ionic cloud distribution close

  7. Metal-air cell comprising an electrolyte with a room temperature ionic liquid and hygroscopic additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Cody A.; Krishnan, Ramkumar; Tang, Toni; Wolfe, Derek

    2014-08-19

    An electrochemical cell comprising an electrolyte comprising water and a hydrophobic ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. A hydrophilic or hygroscopic additive modulates the hydrophobicity of the ionic liquid to maintain a concentration of the water in the electrolyte is between 0.001 mol % and 25 mol %.

  8. Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions Simon J. Haward,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vivek

    Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions Simon J. Haward,*, Vivek Sharma characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic of the semidilute cellulose solutions in a uniaxial extensional ow that mimics the dynamics encountered in the spin

  9. A disiloxane-functionalized phosphonium-based ionic liquid as electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Wei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Science and Engineering Div.; Zhang, Zhengcheng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Science and Engineering Div.; Lu, Jun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Science and Engineering Div.; Amine, Khalil [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Science and Engineering Div.

    2011-01-01

    A disiloxane-functionalized ionic liquid based on a phosphonium cation and a bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (TFSI) anion was synthesized and characterized. This new ionic liquid electrolyte showed good stability with a lithium transition metal oxide cathode and a graphite anode in lithium ion cells.

  10. Short Communication Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Short Communication Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous solution by Clostridium sp. C. Zhang a,b, , C.J. Dodge c , S.V. Malhotra a,1 , A.J. Francis c,d a Department of Chemistry t s Uranium forms various complexes with ionic liquids. Uranium bioreduction was affected by the type

  11. Estimate of the Ionization Degree of Ionic Micelles Based on Krafft Temperature Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bales, Barney

    , 2002; In Final Form: April 22, 2003 The Krafft temperature, TK, of two classical ionic surfactants. The method is based on the fact that TK of SDS and CTAB are functions of the concentration of counterions results confirm that the Krafft temperature of ionic surfactants is one of the properties from which R can

  12. Method of purifying a gas stream using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunald; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-09

    A method for separating a target gas from a gaseous mixture using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids is presented. Industrial effluent streams may be cleaned by removing carbon dioxide from the stream by contacting the effluent stream with a 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquid compound.

  13. Ionic colloidal crystals: Ordered, multicomponent structures via controlled heterocoagulation Garry R. Maskaly,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, R. Edwin

    Ionic colloidal crystals: Ordered, multicomponent structures via controlled heterocoagulation Garry, the "ionic colloidal crystal" ICC , which is stabilized by attractive electrostatic interactions analogous rearrange. In this work, we investigate the possibility of a new type of two-component colloidal crystal

  14. A Simulation Study of the Lithium Ion Transport Mechanism in Ternary Polymer Electrolytes - The Critical Role of the Segmental Mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diddo Diddens; Andreas Heuer

    2013-10-01

    We present an extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of the lithium ion transport in ternary polymer electrolytes consisting of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), lithium-bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI) and the ionic liquid N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (PYR13TFSI). In particular, we focus on two different strategies by which the ternary electrolytes can be devised, namely by (a) adding the ionic liquid to PEO20LiTFSI, and (b) substituting the PEO chains in PEO20LiTFSI by the ionic liquid. In order to grasp the changes of the overall lithium transport mechanism, we employ an analytical, Rouse-based cation transport model (Maitra et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2007, 98, 227802), which has originally been devised for binary PEO-based electrolytes. This model distinguishes three different microscopic transport mechanisms, each quantified by an individual time scale. In the course of our analysis, we extend this mathematical description to account for an entirely new transport mechanism, namely the TFSI-supported diffusion of lithium ions decoupled from the PEO chains, which emerges for certain stoichiometries. We find that the segmental mobility plays a decisive role in PEO-based polymer electrolytes. That is, whereas the addition of the ionic liquid to PEO20LiTFSI plasticizes the polymer network and thus also increases the lithium diffusion, the amount of free, mobile ether oxygens reduces when substituting the PEO chains by the ionic liquid, which compensates the plasticizing effect. In total, our observations allow us to formulate some general principles about the lithium ion transport mechanism in ternary polymer electrolytes. Moreover, our insights also shed light on recent experimental observations (Joost et al., Electrochim. Acta, 2012, 86, 330).

  15. Thermodynamics and Ionic Conductivity of Block Copolymer Electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanakule, Nisita Sidra

    2010-01-01

    et al. , Transport properties of sulfonated poly (styrene-b-isobutylene-b- styrene) triblock copolymers at high iondoped poly(isoprene-b-styrene-b-ethylene oxide) and poly(

  16. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2011-06-12

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields, which need to be quantified for the successful use under radiolytic conditions. Electron solvation dynamics in ILs are measured directly when possible and estimated using proxies (e.g. coumarin-153 dynamic emission Stokes shifts or benzophenone anion solvation) in other cases. Electron reactivity is measured using ultrafast kinetics techniques for comparison with the solvation process.

  17. Preface: Nonclassical Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolshov, L.

    2010-01-01

    models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologicSemenov. 2008b. Nonclassical transport processes in geologicand L. Matveev. 2008. Transport regimes and concentration

  18. Intelligent Transport Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth; Frick, Karen Trapenberg; Skabardonis, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    in Sustainable Urban Transport: City Interview Synthesis (of Leeds, Institute for Transport Studies, forthcoming.I NTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS LINKING TECHNOLOGY AND

  19. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Gilbert is a Toronto-based transport and energy consultantof the forthcoming book Transport Revolutions: Making theand substantial transition to transport systems based on

  20. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Safety Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Transportation Safety Transportation SafetyTara...

  1. Tunable wavelength soft photoionization of ionic liquid vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasser, Daniel; Goulay, Fabien; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg; Koh, Christine; Chambreau, Steven D.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-11-11

    Combined data of photoelectron spectra and photoionization efficiency curves in the near threshold ionization region of isolated ion-pairs from [emim][Tf2N], [emim][Pf2N]and [dmpim][Tf2N]ionic liquid vapors reveal small shifts in the ionization energies of ion-pair systems due to cation and anion substitutions. Shifts towards higher binding energy following anion substitution are attributed to increased electronegativity of the anion itself, while shifts towards lower binding energies following cation substitution are attributed to an increase in the cation-anion distance that causes a lower Coulombic binding potential. The predominant ionization mechanism in the near threshold photon energy region is identified as dissociative ionization, involving dissociation of the ion-pair and the production of intact cations as the positively charged products.

  2. Chirality-selected phase behaviour in ionic polypeptide complexes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Perry, Sarah L.; Leon, Lorraine; Hoffmann, Kyle Q.; Kade, Matthew J.; Priftis, Dimitrios; Black, Katie A.; Wong, Derek; Klein, Ryan A.; Pierce, III, Charles F.; Margossian, Khatcher O.; et al

    2015-01-14

    In this study, polyelectrolyte complexes present new opportunities for self-assembled soft matter. Factors determining whether the phase of the complex is solid or liquid remain unclear. Ionic polypeptides enable examination of the effects of stereochemistry on complex formation. Here we demonstrate that chirality determines the state of polyelectrolyte complexes, formed from mixing dilute solutions of oppositely charged polypeptides, via a combination of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Fluid complexes occur when at least one of the polypeptides in the mixture is racemic, which disrupts backbone hydrogen-bonding networks. Pairs of purely chiral polypeptides, of any sense, form compact, fibrillar solids with amore »?-sheet structure. Analogous behaviour occurs in micelles formed from polypeptide block copolymers with polyethylene oxide, where assembly into aggregates with either solid or fluid cores, and eventually into ordered phases at high concentrations, is possible. Chirality is an exploitable tool for manipulating material properties in polyelectrolyte complexation.« less

  3. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS #12;SUSTAINABLE;6 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS #12;1 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

  4. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurityBeam Transport Beam

  5. Stochastic Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'!Transport in PPCD Discharges by

  6. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene's 3DGreenGreenTransportation

  7. Selective extraction of copper, mercury, silver and palladium ions from water using hydrophobic ionic liquids.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Lee, Jong-Min; Salminen, Justin; Von Stosch, Moritz; Prausnitz, John M.

    2008-01-01

    for metal-ion extraction from water. All ionic liquids (useful for extraction of cations from water. 9-15 Previoussingle extraction of mercury in water with either [3MOPYR

  8. The use of ionic liquid ion sources (ILIS) in FIB applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zorzos, Anthony Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    A new monoenergetic, high-brightness ion source can be constructed using an arrangement similar to liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) by substituting the liquid metal with an ionic liquid, or room temperature molten salt. Ion ...

  9. Enhanced Gas Absorption in the Ionic Liquid 1-n-Hexyl-3-methylimidazol...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhanced Gas Absorption in the Ionic Liquid 1-n-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (hmimTfsub 2N) Confined in Silica Slit Pores: A Molecular...

  10. Nanopatterned Protein Films Directed by Ionic Complexation with Water-Soluble Diblock Copolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bokyung

    The use of ionic interactions to direct both protein templating and block copolymer self-assembly into nanopatterned films with only aqueous processing conditions is demonstrated using block copolymers containing both ...

  11. Synthesis and physico-chemical properties of ionic liquidscontaining tetrakis(perfluorophenyl)borate, tetraphenylborate andtrifluorophenylborate anions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Salminen, Justin; Yakelis, Neal; Prausnitz, John M.

    2006-03-01

    Synthesis and some physico-chemical properties are reported for six new hydrophobic ionic liquids containing tetrakis(perfluorophenyl)borate, tetraphenylborate or trfluorophenylborate anions and imidazolium or pyridinium cations.

  12. 81891 - A New Class of Solvents for TRU Dissolution and Separation: Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin D. Rogers

    2004-12-10

    Through the current EMSP funding, solvent extraction technologies based on liquid-liquid partitioning of TRU to an Ionic Liquid phase containing conventional complexants has been shown to be viable. The growing understanding of the role that the different components of an ionic liquid can have on the partitioning mechanism, and on the nature of the subsequent dissolved species indicates strongly that ionic liquids are not necessarily direct replacements for volatile or otherwise hazardous organic solvents. Separations and partitioning can be exceptionally complex with competing solvent extraction, cation, anion and sacrificial ion exchange mechanisms are all important, depending on the selection of components for formation of the ionic liquid phase, and that control of these competing mechanisms can be utilized to provide new, alternative separations schemes.

  13. Phase Behavior of Polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) Copolymers in a Selective Ionic Liquid Solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virgili, Justin M.

    2011-01-01

    ionic liquid and the poly(styrene-6/ocA:-2- vinylpyridine) (e phase behavior o f poly(styrene-Woc/c-2-vinylpyridine) c oand Characterization. A poly(styrene- WoeA:-2-vinylpyridine)

  14. Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salminen, Justin; Prausnitz, John M.; Newman, John

    2006-01-01

    Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systemsobstacles for their use in lithium-ion batteries. However,devices. For rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, it is

  15. A Microfabricated Planar Electrospray Array Ionic Liquid Ion Source With Integrated Extractor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gassend, Blaise

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of a fully microfabricated planar array of externally fed electrospray emitters that produces heavy molecular ions from the ionic liquids ...

  16. High Temperature/Low Humidity Polymer Electrolytes Derived from Ionic Liquids

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on High Temperature/Low Humidity Polymer Electrolytes Derived from Ionic Liquids to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005.

  17. Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites: Thermodynamical Modeling and Finite Element Solution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Jayavel

    2012-10-19

    This thesis deals with developing a thermodynamically consistent model to simulate the electromechanical response of ionic polymer-metal composites based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. Constitutive assumptions are made for the Helmholtz free...

  18. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Shutthanandan, V.; Hu, Jian Z.; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2014-01-10

    The interfacial region between graphene and an imidazolium based ionic liquid is studied using spectroscopic analysis and computational modelling. This combined approach reveals that the molecular level structure of the interfacial region is significantly influenced by functional group defects on the graphene surface.The combined experimental and computational study reveals that the molecular structure at interfacial region between graphene and imidazolium based ionic liquid is defined by the hydroxyl functional groups on the graphene surface

  19. Enhancing Ionic Conductivity of Bulk Single Crystal Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia by Tailoring Dopant Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eunseok; Cai, Wei

    2010-01-01

    We present an ab-initio based kinetic Monte Carlo model for ionic conductivity in single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia. Ionic interactions are taken into account by combining density functional theory calculations and the cluster expansion method and are found to be essential in reproducing the effective activation energy observed in experiments. The model predicts that the effective energy barrier can be reduced by 0.15-0.25 eV by arranging the dopant ions into a super-lattice.

  20. Enhancing ionic conductivity of bulk single-crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia by tailoring dopant distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.; Prinz, F. B.; Cai, W.

    2011-02-11

    We present an ab initio–based kinetic Monte Carlo model for ionic conductivity in single-crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia. Ionic interactions are taken into account by combining density functional theory calculations and the cluster expansion method and are found to be essential in reproducing the effective activation energy observed in experiments. The model predicts that the effective energy barrier can be reduced by 0.15–0.25 eV by arranging the dopant ions into a superlattice.

  1. Understanding the impact of the central atom on the ionic liquid behavior: Phosphonium vs ammonium cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, Pedro J.; Ventura, Sónia P. M.; Batista, Marta L. S.; Schröder, Bernd; Coutinho, Joăo A. P., E-mail: jcoutinho@ua.pt [CICECO, Departamento de Química, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)] [CICECO, Departamento de Química, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia e CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)] [Departamento de Biologia e CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Esperança, José [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal)] [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Mutelet, Fabrice [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés, CNRS (UPR3349), Nancy-Université, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451 54001 Nancy (France)] [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés, CNRS (UPR3349), Nancy-Université, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451 54001 Nancy (France)

    2014-02-14

    The influence of the cation's central atom in the behavior of pairs of ammonium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids was investigated through the measurement of densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, activity coefficients at infinite dilution, refractive indices, and toxicity against Vibrio fischeri. All the properties investigated are affected by the cation's central atom nature, with ammonium-based ionic liquids presenting higher densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, and enthalpies. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution show the ammonium-based ionic liquids to present slightly higher infinite dilution activity coefficients for non-polar solvents, becoming slightly lower for polar solvents, suggesting that the ammonium-based ionic liquids present somewhat higher polarities. In good agreement these compounds present lower toxicities than the phosphonium congeners. To explain this behavior quantum chemical gas phase DFT calculations were performed on isolated ion pairs at the BP-TZVP level of theory. Electronic density results were used to derive electrostatic potentials of the identified minimum conformers. Electrostatic potential-derived CHelpG and Natural Population Analysis charges show the P atom of the tetraalkylphosphonium-based ionic liquids cation to be more positively charged than the N atom in the tetraalkylammonium-based analogous IL cation, and a noticeable charge delocalization occurring in the tetraalkylammonium cation, when compared with the respective phosphonium congener. It is argued that this charge delocalization is responsible for the enhanced polarity observed on the ammonium based ionic liquids explaining the changes in the thermophysical properties observed.

  2. Proton Transport in Imidazoles: Unraveling the Role of Supramolecular Structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosby, James T.; Holt, Adam P.; Griffin, Phillip; Wang, Yangyang; Sangoro, Joshua R.

    2015-09-18

    The impact of supramolecular hydrogen bonded networks on dynamics and charge transport in 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (2E4MIm), a model proton-conducting system, is investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, depolarized dynamic light scattering, viscometry, and calorimetry. It is observed that the slow, Debye-like relaxation reflecting the supramolecular structure in neat 2E4MIm is eliminated upon the addition of minute amounts of levulinic acid. This is attributed to the dissociation of imidazole molecules and the breaking down of hydrogen-bonded chains, which leads to a 10-fold enhancement of ionic conductivity.

  3. Theory of phase separation and polarization for dissociated ionic liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir Gavish; Arik Yochelis

    2015-12-17

    Room temperature ionic liquids are attractive to numerous applications and particularly, to renewable energy devices. As solvent free electrolytes, they demonstrate a paramount connection between the material morphology and Coulombic interactions: unlike dilute electrolytes, the electrode/RTIL interface is a product of both electrode polarization and spatiotemporal bulk properties. Yet, theoretical studies have dealt almost exclusively with independent models of morphology and electrokinetics. In this work, we develop a novel Cahn-Hilliard-Poisson type mean-field framework that couples morphological evolution with electrokinetic phenomena. Linear analysis of the model shows that spatially periodic patterns form via a finite wavenumber instability, a property that cannot arise in the currently used Fermi-Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. Numerical simulations in above one-space dimension, demonstrate that while labyrinthine type patterns develop in the bulk, stripe patterns emerge near charged surfaces. The results qualitatively agree with empirical observations and thus, provide a physically consistent methodology to incorporate phase separation properties into an electrochemical framework.

  4. Structure and Osmotic Pressure of Ionic Microgel Dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mary M. Hedrick; Jun Kyung Chung; Alan R. Denton

    2015-01-23

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels -- soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model's limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions.

  5. Model of ionic currents through microtubule nanopores and the lumen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holly Freedman; Vahid Rezania; Avner Priel; Eric Carpenter; Sergei Y. Noskovd; Jack A. Tuszynski

    2009-12-09

    It has been suggested that microtubules and other cytoskeletal filaments may act as electrical transmission lines. An electrical circuit model of the microtubule is constructed incorporating features of its cylindrical structure with nanopores in its walls. This model is used to study how ionic conductance along the lumen is affected by flux through the nanopores when an external potential is applied across its two ends. Based on the results of Brownian dynamics simulations, the nanopores were found to have asymmetric inner and outer conductances, manifested as nonlinear IV curves. Our simulations indicate that a combination of this asymmetry and an internal voltage source arising from the motion of the C-terminal tails causes a net current to be pumped across the microtubule wall and propagate down the microtubule through the lumen. This effect is demonstrated to enhance and add directly to the longitudinal current through the lumen resulting from an external voltage source, and could be significant in amplifying low-intensity endogenous currents within the cellular environment or as a nano-bioelectronic device.

  6. EFFECTS OF GAMMA RADIATION ON ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF IONIC LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, A; Nicholas Bridges, N; Thad Adams, T; John Mickalonis, J; Mark02 Williamson, M

    2009-04-21

    The electrochemical properties of ionic liquids (ILs) make them attractive for possible replacement of inorganic salts in high temperature molten salt electrochemical processing of nuclear fuel. To be a feasible replacement solvent, ILs need to be stable in moderate and high doses of radiation without adverse chemical and physical effects. Here, we exposed seven different ILs to a 1.2 MGy dose of gamma radiation to investigate their physical and chemical properties as they related to radiological stability. The azolium-based ILs experienced the greatest change in appearance, but these ILs were chemically more stable to gamma radiation than some of the other classes of ILs tested, due to the presence of aromatic electrons in the azolium ring. All the ILs exhibited a decrease in their conductivity and electrochemical window (at least 1.1 V), both of which could affect the utility of ILs in electrochemical processing. The concentration of the irradiation decomposition products was less than 3 mole %, with no impurities detectable using NMR techniques.

  7. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  8. Interfacial Ionic Liquids: Connecting Static and Dynamic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmet Uysal; Hua Zhou; Guang Feng; Sang Soo Lee; Song Li; Peter T. Cummings; Pasquale F. Fulvio; Sheng Dai; John K. McDonough; Yury Gogotsi; Paul Fenter

    2014-12-06

    It is well-known that room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) often adopt a charge-separated layered structure, i.e., with alternating cation- and anion-rich layers, at electrified interfaces. However, the dynamic response of the layered structure to temporal variations in applied potential is not well understood. We used in situ, real-time X-ray reflectivity (XR) to study the potential-dependent electric double layer (EDL) structure of an imidazolium-based RTIL on charged epitaxial graphene during potential cycling as a function of temperature. The results suggest that the graphene-RTIL interfacial structure is bistable in which the EDL structure at any intermediate potential can be described by the combination of two extreme-potential structures whose proportions vary depending on the polarity and magnitude of the applied potential. This picture is supported by the EDL structures obtained by fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at various static potentials. The potential-driven transition between the two structures is characterized by an increasing width but with an approximately fixed hysteresis magnitude as a function of temperature. The results are consistent with the coexistence of distinct anion and cation adsorbed structures separated by an energy barrier (~0.15 eV).

  9. Complex Capacitance Scaling in Ionic Liquids-Filled Nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumpter, Bobby G

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that the capacitance of subnanometer pores increases anomalously as the pore width decreases, thereby opening a new avenue for developing supercapacitors with enhanced energy density. However, this behavior is still subject to some controversy since its physical origins are not well understood. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the capacitance of slit-shaped nanopores in contact with room-temperature ionic liquids exhibits a U-shaped scaling behavior in pores with widths from 0.75 to 1.26 nm. The left branch of the capacitance scaling curve directly corresponds to the anomalous capacitance increase and thus reproduces the experimental observations. The right branch of the curve indirectly agrees with experimental findings that so far have received little attention. The overall U-shaped scaling behavior provides insights on the origins of the difficulty in experimentally observing the pore-width-dependent capacitance. We establish a theoretical framework for understanding the capacitance of electrical double layers in nanopores and provide mechanistic details into the origins of the observed scaling behavior. The framework highlights the critical role of 'ion solvation' in controlling pore capacitance and the importance of choosing anion/cation couples carefully for optimal energy storage in a given pore system.

  10. Complex Capacitance Scaling in Ionic Liquids-filled Nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiao, Rui; Huang, Jingsong; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G; Peng, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that the capacitance of sub-nanometer pores increases anomalously as the pore width decreases, thereby opening a new avenue for developing supercapacitors with enhanced energy density. However, this behavior is still subject to some controversy since its physical origins are not well understood. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the capacitance of slit-shaped nanopores in contact with room-temperature ionic liquids exhibits a U-shaped scaling behavior in pores with width from 0.75 to 1.26 nm. The left branch of the capacitance scaling curve directly corresponds to the anomalous capacitance increase and thus reproduces the experimental observations. The right branch of the curve indirectly agrees with experimental findings that so far have received little attention. The overall U-shaped scaling behavior provides insights on the origins of the difficulty in experimentally observing the pore-width dependent capacitance. We establish a theoretical framework for understanding the capacitance of electrical double layers in nanopores and provide mechanistic details into the origins of the observed scaling behavior. The framework highlights the critical role of ion solvation in controlling pore capacitance and the importance of choosing anion/cation couples carefully for optimal energy storage in a given pore system.

  11. Thermoelectric energy recovery at ionic-liquid/electrode interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bonetti; Sawako Nakamae; Bo Tao Huang; Thomas J. Salez; Cecile Wiertel-Gasquet; Michel Roger

    2015-06-22

    A Thermally Chargeable Capacitor containing a binary solution of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide (EMIMTFSI) in acetonitrile is electrically charged by applying a tempera- ture gradient to two ideally polarisable electrodes. The corresponding thermoelectric coefficient is -1.7 mV/K for platinum foil electrodes and -0.3 mV/K for nanoporous carbon electrodes. Stored electrical energy is extracted by discharging the capacitor through a resistor. The measured capacitance of the electrode/ionic- liquid interface is 5 micro $\\mu$F for each platinum electrode while it becomes four orders of magnitude larger $\\approx 36$ mF for a single nanoporous carbon electrode. Reproducibility of the effect through repeated charging-discharging cycles under a steady-state temperature gradient demonstrates the robustness of the electrical charging pro- cess at the liquid/electrode interface. The acceleration of the charging by convective flows is also observed. This offers the possibility to convert waste-heat into electric energy without exchanging electrons between ions and electrodes, in contrast to what occurs in most thermogalvanic cells.

  12. Ion transport through a graphene nanopore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guohui Hu; Mao Mao; Sandip Ghosal

    2013-01-09

    Molecular dynamics simulation is utilized to investigate the ionic transport of NaCl in solution through a graphene nanopore under an applied electric field. Results show the formation of concentration polarization layers in the vicinity of the graphene sheet. The non-uniformity of the ion distribution gives rise to an electric pressure which drives vortical motions in the fluid if the electric field is sufficiently strong to overcome the influence of viscosity and thermal fluctuations. The relative importance of hydrodynamic transport and thermal fluctuations in determining the pore conductivity is investigated. A second important effect that is observed is the mass transport of water through the nanopore, with an average velocity proportional to the applied voltage and independent of the pore diameter. The flux arises as a consequence of the asymmetry in the ion distribution with respect to reflection about the plane of the graphene sheet. The accumulation of liquid molecules in the vicinity of the nanopore due to reorientation of the water dipoles by the local electric field is seen to result in a local increasein the liquid density. Results confirm that the electric conductance is proportional to the nanopore diameter for the parameter regimes that we simulated. The occurrence of fluid vortices is found to result in an increase in the effective electrical conductance.

  13. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  14. Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book,Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data...

  15. Erosion and Optimal Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

    2010-01-01

    383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

  16. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, J.; Viola, M. B.

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  17. New ionic liquids based on complexation of dipropylsulfide and AlCl3 for electrochodeposition of aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Youxing; Jiang, Xueguang; Dai, Sheng; Sun, Xiao-Guang

    2015-01-01

    A new kind of ionic liquid based on complexation of dipropyl sulfide (DPS) and AlCl3 has been prepared. The equivalent concentration of AlCl3 in the ionic liquid is as high as 2.3 M. More importantly, it is highly fluidic and exhibits an ambient ionic conductivity of 1.25 x 10-4 S cm-1. This new ionic liquid can be successfully used as an electrolyte for electrodeposition of aluminum.

  18. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  19. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  20. Systematic computational and experimental investigation of lithium-ion transport mechanisms in polyester-based polymer electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Webb, Michael A.; Jung, Yukyung; Pesko, Danielle M.; Savoie, Brett M.; Yamamoto, Umi; Coates, Geoffrey W.; Balsara, Nitash P.; Wang, Zhen -Gang; Miller, III, Thomas F.

    2015-07-10

    Understanding the mechanisms of lithium-ion transport in polymers is crucial for the design of polymer electrolytes. We combine modular synthesis, electrochemical characterization, and molecular simulation to investigate lithium-ion transport in a new family of polyester-based polymers and in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Theoretical predictions of glass-transition temperatures and ionic conductivities in the polymers agree well with experimental measurements. Interestingly, both the experiments and simulations indicate that the ionic conductivity of PEO, relative to the polyesters, is far higher than would be expected from its relative glass-transition temperature. The simulations reveal that diffusion of the lithium cations in the polyesters proceeds viamore »a different mechanism than in PEO, and analysis of the distribution of available cation solvation sites in the various polymers provides a novel and intuitive way to explain the experimentally observed ionic conductivities. This work provides a platform for the evaluation and prediction of ionic conductivities in polymer electrolyte materials.« less

  1. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and Additives for Diesel Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    The lubricating properties of two ionic liquids with the same anion but different cations, one ammonium IL [C8H17]3NH.Tf2N and one imidazolium IL C10mim.Tf2N, were evaluated both in neat form and as oil additives. Experiments were conducted using a standardized reciprocating sliding test using a segment of a Cr-plated diesel engine piston ring against a grey cast iron flat specimen with simulated honing marks as on the engine cylinder liner. The selected ionic liquids were benchmarked against conventional hydrocarbon oils. Substantial friction and wear reductions, up to 55% and 34%, respectively, were achieved for the neat ionic liquids compared to a fully-formulated 15W40 engine oil. Adding 5 vol% ILs into mineral oil has demonstrated significant improvement in the lubricity. One blend even outperformed the 15W40 engine oil with 9% lower friction and 34% less wear. Lubrication regime modeling, worn surface morphology examination, and surface chemical analysis were conducted to help understand the lubricating mechanisms for ionic liquids. Results suggest great potential for using ionic liquids as base lubricants or lubricant additives for diesel engine applications.

  2. Electrotunable friction with ionic liquid lubricants: how important is the molecular structure of the ions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Y. Fajardo; Fernando Bresme; Alexei A. Kornyshev; Michael Urbakh

    2015-08-23

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and a coarse grained model of ionic liquids, we have investigated the impact that the shape and the intramolecular charge distribution of the ions have on the electrotuneable friction with ionic-liquid nanoscale films. We show that the electric-field induces significant structural changes in the film, leading to dramatic modifications of the friction force. Comparison of the present work with previous studies using different models of ionic liquids indicate that the phenomenology presented here applies to a wide range of ionic liquids. In particular, the electric-field-induced shift of the slippage plane from the solid-liquid interface to the interior of the film and the non-monotonic variation of the friction force are common features of ionic lubricants under strong confinement. We also demonstrate that the molecular structure of the ions plays an important role in determining the electrostriction and electroswelling of the confined film, hence showing the importance of ion-specific effects in electrotuneable friction.

  3. Ionic liquid assisted hydrothermal fabrication of hierarchically organized ?-AlOOH hollow sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Zhe; Liu, Yunqi; Li, Guangci; Hu, Xiaofu; Liu, Chenguang

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? The ?-AlOOH hollow spheres were synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal treatment. ? Ionic liquid plays an important role in the morphology of the product. ? Ionic liquid can be easily removed from the product and reused in next experiment. ? A “aggregation–solution–recrystallization” formation mechanism may occur in the system. -- Abstract: Hierarchically organized ?-AlOOH hollow spheres with nanoflake-like porous surface texture have been successfully synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal synthesis method in citric acid monohydrate (CAMs). It was found that ionic liquid [bmim]{sup +}Cl{sup ?} played an important role in the morphology of the product due to its strong interactions with reaction particles. The samples were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The results show that the product has narrow particle size distribution (500–900 nm particle diameter range), high specific surface area (240.5 m{sup 2}/g) and large pore volume (0.61 cm{sup 3}/g). The corresponding ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow spheres can be obtained by calcining it at 550 °C for 3 h. The proposed formation mechanism and other influencing factors of the ?-AlOOH hollow sphere material, such as reaction temperature, reaction duration, CAMs and urea, have also been investigated.

  4. Topological defects in electric double layers of ionic liquids at carbon interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Black, Jennifer M.; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Feng, Guang; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-06-07

    The structure and properties of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids is of interest in a wide range of areas including energy storage, catalysis, lubrication, and many more. Theories describing the electrical double layer for ionic liquids have been proposed, however a full molecular level description of the double layer is lacking. To date, studies have been predominantly focused on ion distributions normal to the surface, however the 3D nature of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids requires a full picture of the double layer structure not only normal to the surface, but also in plane. Here wemore »utilize 3D force mapping to probe the in plane structure of an ionic liquid at a graphite interface and report the direct observation of the structure and properties of topological defects. The observation of ion layering at structural defects such as step-edges, reinforced by molecular dynamics simulations, defines the spatial resolution of the method. Observation of defects allows for the establishment of the universality of ionic liquid behavior vs. separation from the carbon surface and to map internal defect structure. In conclusion, these studies offer a universal pathway for probing the internal structure of topological defects in soft condensed matter on the nanometer level in three dimensions.« less

  5. Surface Tension of Electrolyte Interfaces: Ionic Specificity within a Field-Theory Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markovich, Tomer; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    We study the surface tension of ionic solutions at air/water and oil/water interfaces. By using field-theoretical methods and including a finite proximal surface-region with ionic-specific interactions. The free energy is expanded to first-order in a loop expansion beyond the mean-field result. We calculate the excess surface tension and obtain analytical predictions that reunite the Onsager-Samaras pioneering result (which does not agree with experimental data), with the ionic specificity of the Hofmeister series. We derive analytically the surface-tension dependence on the ionic strength, ionic size and ion-surface interaction, and show consequently that the Onsager-Samaras result is consistent with the one-loop correction beyond the mean-field result. Our theory fits well a wide range of salt concentrations for different monovalent ions using one fit parameter, and reproduces the reverse Hofmeister series for anions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces.

  6. Surface Tension of Electrolyte Interfaces: Ionic Specificity within a Field-Theory Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomer Markovich; David Andelman; Rudolf Podgornik

    2015-01-10

    We study the surface tension of ionic solutions at air/water and oil/water interfaces. By using field-theoretical methods and including a finite proximal surface-region with ionic-specific interactions. The free energy is expanded to first-order in a loop expansion beyond the mean-field result. We calculate the excess surface tension and obtain analytical predictions that reunite the Onsager-Samaras pioneering result (which does not agree with experimental data), with the ionic specificity of the Hofmeister series. We derive analytically the surface-tension dependence on the ionic strength, ionic size and ion-surface interaction, and show consequently that the Onsager-Samaras result is consistent with the one-loop correction beyond the mean-field result. Our theory fits well a wide range of salt concentrations for different monovalent ions using one fit parameter per electrolyte, and reproduces the reverse Hofmeister series for anions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces.

  7. Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salminen, Justin; Prausnitz, John M.; Newman, John

    2006-06-01

    In this work, thermal and electrochemical properties of neat and mixed ionic liquid - lithium salt systems have been studied. The presence of a lithium salt causes both thermal and phase-behavior changes. Differential scanning calorimeter DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis TGA were used for thermal analysis for several imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, trifluoromethansulfonate, BF{sub 4}, and PF{sub 6} systems. Conductivities and diffusion coefficient have been measured for some selected systems. Chemical reactions in electrode - ionic liquid electrolyte interfaces were studied by interfacial impedance measurements. Lithium-lithium and lithium-carbon cells were studied at open circuit and a charged system. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazolium systems that are already known to be electrochemically unstable in the presence of lithium metal. In this work the development of interfacial resistance is shown in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell as well as results from some cycling experiments. As the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode the interfacial resistance increases. The results show the magnitude of reactivity due to reduction of the ionic liquid electrolyte that eventually has a detrimental effect on battery performance.

  8. Colloid and ionic tracer migration within SRS sediments: Final summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, R.N.; Seaman, J.C.; Bertsch, P.M.; Miller, W.P.

    1996-04-09

    The generation of a stable colloidal suspension in geologic materials has a number of environmental implications. Mobile colloids may act as vectors for the transport of adsorbed contaminants through soils and within aquifers and can cause serious problems related to well monitoring and formation permeability in an injections well system. Colloid-facilitated transport has been implicated in the migration of contaminants from seepage basins on the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) at a rate greater than was predicted in two- phase transport models. From 1955 to 1988, seepage basins overlying the water-table aquifer received acidic wastes containing high levels of Na+ and nitric acid, as well as trace radionuclides and metals from the nuclear materials processing facilities. Numerical simulations predicted that metal contaminants would not reach the water table, but measurable quantities of these contaminants have been detected in monitoring wells down gradient from the basins. Lack of agreement between predicted and observed contaminant migration in this and other studies has been attributed to both local non equilibrium situation, preferential flow paths within the geologic material, and to transport of the contaminant in association with a mobile solid phase, i.e. dispersed colloids. Additionally, the association of contaminants with a mobile colloidal phase has important ramifications for groundwater sampling on SRS intended to evaluate the potential environmental hazards of a given contaminant. As part of the F- and H-Area reclamation project, the Department of Energy has proposed the capture and treatment of the contaminant plume followed by reinjection of the treated water into the water table and upper confined aquifers. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. Temperature Dependent Interaction Non-Additivity in the Inorganic Ionic Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01

    Interaction non-additivity in the chemical context means that binding of certain atom to a reference atom cannot be fully predicted from the interactions of these two atoms with other atoms. This constitutes one of key phenomena determining an identity of our world, which would have been much poorer otherwise. Ionic systems provide a good example of the interaction non-additivity in most cases due to electron transfer and delocalization effects. We report Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations of LiCl, NaCl, and KCl at 300, 1500, and 2000 K. We show that our observations originate from interplay of thermal motion during BOMD and cation nature. In the case of alkali cations, ionic nature plays a more significant role than temperature. Our results bring fundamental understanding of electronic effects in the condensed phase of ionic systems and foster progress in physical chemistry and engineering.

  10. Transport Equations Thomas Hillen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillen, Thomas

    Transport Equations Thomas Hillen supported by NSERC University of Alberta, Edmonton Transport V , V compact and symmetric. Transport Equations ­ p.2/33 #12;Directed Movement The equation pt(t, x of v. Transport Equations ­ p.3/33 #12;With Directional Changes µ: turning rate. T(v, v ): probability

  11. Motor Transport Co. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN Prepared by: The Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization In cooperation with: o City of Longview o City of White Oak o Gregg County o Harrison County o Texas Department of Transportation o U.S. Department... of Transportation o Federal Highway Administration o Federal Transit Administration Adopted November 12, 2009 TRANSPORTATION 2035 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION...

  12. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals Using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei; Zheng, Richard; Brown, Heather; Li, Joanne; Holladay, John; Cooper, Alan; Rao, Tony; ,

    2012-04-13

    This project provides critical innovations and fundamental understandings that enable development of an economically-viable process for catalytic conversion of biomass (sugar) to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). A low-cost ionic liquid (Cyphos 106) is discovered for fast conversion of fructose into HMF under moderate reaction conditions without any catalyst. HMF yield from fructose is almost 100% on the carbon molar basis. Adsorbent materials and adsorption process are invented and demonstrated for separation of 99% pure HMF product and recovery of the ionic liquid from the reaction mixtures. The adsorbent material appears very stable in repeated adsorption/regeneration cycles. Novel membrane-coated adsorbent particles are made and demonstrated to achieve excellent adsorption separation performances at low pressure drops. This is very important for a practical adsorption process because ionic liquids are known of high viscosity. Nearly 100% conversion (or dissolution) of cellulose in the catalytic ionic liquid into small molecules was observed. It is promising to produce HMF, sugars and other fermentable species directly from cellulose feedstock. However, several gaps were identified and could not be resolved in this project. Reaction and separation tests at larger scales are needed to minimize impacts of incidental errors on the mass balance and to show 99.9% ionic liquid recovery. The cellulose reaction tests were troubled with poor reproducibility. Further studies on cellulose conversion in ionic liquids under better controlled conditions are necessary to delineate reaction products, dissolution kinetics, effects of mass and heat transfer in the reactor on conversion, and separation of final reaction mixtures.

  13. Fluorescence energy transfer efficiency in labeled yeast cytochrome c: a rapid screen for ion biocompatibility in aqueous ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Sheila N; Zhao, Hua; Pandey, Siddharth; Heller, William T; Bright, Frank; Baker, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescence energy transfer de-quenching assay was implemented to follow the equilibrium unfolding behaviour of site-specific tetramethylrhodamine-labelled yeast cytochrome c in aqueous ionic liquid solutions; additionally, this approach offers the prospect of naked eye screening for biocompatible ion combinations in hydrated ionic liquids.

  14. Water dynamics at neutral and ionic interfaces Emily E. Fenn, Daryl B. Wong, and M. D. Fayer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water dynamics at neutral and ionic interfaces Emily E. Fenn, Daryl B. Wong, and M. D. Fayer1 (sent for review June 12, 2009) The orientational dynamics of water at a neutral surfactant reverse, and the results are compared to orienta- tional relaxation of water interacting with an ionic interface

  15. HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS AND MASS TRANSFER IN BIPHASIC IONIC LIQUID SYSTEMS WITH COMPRESSED CO2 AND ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahosseini, Azita

    with compressed CO2 and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) are reported for further studies to choose the best media (ionic liquid/compressed gas) for reactions. Due to significant impacts of mass transfer on the reaction because of the high viscosity of ionic...

  16. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  17. Gelled Ionic Liquid-Based Membranes: Achieving a 10,000 GPU Permeance for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture with Gelled Ionic Liquid-Based Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-02-02

    IMPACCT Project: Alongside Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute, CU-Boulder is developing a membrane made of a gelled ionic liquid to capture CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants. The membranes are created by spraying the gelled ionic liquids in thin layers onto porous support structures using a specialized coating technique. The new membrane is highly efficient at pulling CO2 out of coal-derived flue gas exhaust while restricting the flow of other materials through it. The design involves few chemicals or moving parts and is more mechanically stable than current technologies. The team is now working to further optimize the gelled materials for CO2 separation and create a membrane layer that is less than 1 micrometer thick.

  18. Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Broadview Heights, OH); Belieres, Jean-Philippe (Chandler, AZ); Yoshizawa, Masahiro (Tokyo, JP)

    2011-01-11

    Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  19. Persistence of transition state structure in chemical reactions driven by fields oscillating in time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galen T. Craven; Thomas Bartsch; Rigoberto Hernandez

    2014-04-29

    Chemical reactions subjected to time-varying external forces cannot generally be described through a fixed bottleneck near the transition state barrier or dividing surface. A naive dividing surface attached to the instantaneous, but moving, barrier top also fails to be recrossing-free. We construct a moving dividing surface in phase space over a transition state trajectory. This surface is recrossing-free for both Hamiltonian and dissipative dynamics. This is confirmed even for strongly anharmonic barriers using simulation. The power of transition state theory is thereby applicable to chemical reactions and other activated processes even when the bottlenecks are time-dependent and move across space.

  20. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  1. Equation of state for high explosives detonation products with explicit polar and ionic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastea, S; Glaesemann, K R; Fried, L E

    2006-06-28

    We introduce a new thermodynamic theory for detonation products that includes polar and ionic species. The new formalism extends the domain of validity of the previously developed EXP6 equation of state library and opens the possibility of new applications. We illustrate the scope of the new approach on PETN detonation properties and water ionization models.

  2. Relaxation dynamics and ionic conductivity in a fragile plastic crystal Th. Bauer,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen

    Relaxation dynamics and ionic conductivity in a fragile plastic crystal Th. Bauer,1 M. Köhler,1 P is investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy in the liquid, plastic crystalline, and glassy crystal phases with Freon112, this material stands out among all other plastic crystals by being a relatively fragile glass

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Baolin

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel cell organic matter using elec- trochemically active bacteria as catalysts to generate electrical energy of the most exciting applications of MFCs is their use as benthic unattended generators to power electrical

  4. Rotational Relaxation of Ionic Molecules in Electrolyte Solutions. Anisotropy Relaxation and Molecular Dynamics Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnikova, Maria

    and the metal cation. Conductivity measure- ments and ab initio electronic structure calculations are used structure and the solute dynamics occur for ionic solute molecules. Both experimental4-10 and theoretical11 of experimental studies, ab initio electronic struc- ture, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used

  5. Ion Specificity and Micellization of Ionic Surfactants: A Monte Carlo Alexandre P. dos Santos,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Yan

    and variation of the critical coagulation concentrations (CCCs) of hydrophobic colloidal suspensions solutions,15-18 with anions affecting the stability of proteins more strongly than cations. Hofmeister colloidal science,20-24 bacterial growth,25 mi- celle-vesicle transitions,26 ionic liquids,27,28 surface ten

  6. Modeling of electrochemomechanical response of ionic polymer-metal composites with various solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Modeling of electrochemomechanical response of ionic polymer-metal composites with various solvents and the amount of solvent uptake, the morphology of the electrodes, the composition of the backbone ionomer variations of the applied potential. Our most recent experimental results show that solvents can have

  7. WHEN IT COMES TO SOLVENTS, IONIC LIQUIDS are in a class by themselves. Compared to other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haimovich, Alexander

    WHEN IT COMES TO SOLVENTS, IONIC LIQUIDS are in a class by themselves. Compared to other solvents indicates that these solvents can be customized with the chemical muscle to dissolve almost any material are a groundbreaking green alternative to highly toxic solvents capable of causing signifi- cant environmental harm

  8. Effect of solvents on the chemical and physical properties of ionic polymer-metal composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Effect of solvents on the chemical and physical properties of ionic polymer-metal composites Sia of solvent uptake, the morphology of the electrodes, the composition of the backbone ionomer, the geometry of the applied potential. With water as the solvent, the applied electric potential must be limited to less than

  9. Study of Ionic Conductivity Profiles of the Air Cathode of a PEMFC by AC Impedance Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study of Ionic Conductivity Profiles of the Air Cathode of a PEMFC by AC Impedance Spectroscopy membrane fuel cell PEMFC cathode by ac impedance measurement at open-circuit potential conditions membrane fuel cell PEMFC .1 The function of a proton-conducting ionomer such as Nafion® is to provide

  10. Ionic Current Mapping Techniques and Applications to Aluminum-Copper Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaacs, H. S.; Jeffcoate, C. S.; Missert, N. A.; Barbour, J. C.

    1999-10-17

    Measurements have been made of the aluminum/metal galvanic couple. A wide range of geometries were investigated varying the areas of anodic and cathodic surfaces and employing specially designed galvanic cells with crevices. In situ ionic current density mapping was used to monitor galvanic corrosion and currents flowing between separated metals was measured.

  11. Ab-initio Kinetic Monte Carlo Model of Ionic Conduction in Bulk Yttria-stabilized Zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    Ab-initio Kinetic Monte Carlo Model of Ionic Conduction in Bulk Yttria-stabilized Zirconia Eunseok in bulk single crystal Yttria-stabilized Zirconia. An interacting energy barrier model is developed dynamics to simulate the vacancy diffusion in Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ). They concluded

  12. Solid State Ionics 111 (1998) 117123 Composite polymer electrolytes using surface-modified fumed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    1998-01-01

    Solid State Ionics 111 (1998) 117­123 Composite polymer electrolytes using surface-modified fumed April 1998 Abstract We report results from our studies on composite polymer electrolytes based on novel surface-modified fumed silicas. The electrolytes were prepared by dispersing fumed silica in a matrix

  13. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 80, 014611 (2009) Nuclear fusion reaction rates for strongly coupled ionic mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 80, 014611 (2009) Nuclear fusion reaction rates for strongly coupled ionic.014611 PACS number(s): 26.30.-k I. INTRODUCTION Nuclear fusion in dense stellar matter is most important the nuclear interaction. We will mostly focus on the Coulomb barrier penetration problem. Fusion reactions

  14. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  15. Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

  16. J-aggregation of ionic liquid solutions of meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Maroof; Kumar, Vinod; Baker, Sheila N; Baker, Gary A; Pandey, Siddharth

    2010-01-01

    The title porphyrin was dissolved in the hydrophilic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmim][BF4], and triggered to assemble into J-aggregates by the addition of incremental volumes of water containing various amounts of acid (0.1, 0.2, or 1.0 M HCl). In contrast to recent studies, the current investigation is unique in that it centers on media that contain a predominant ionic liquid component (2.9 5.4 M [bmim][BF4]), as opposed to an aqueous electrolyte containing a small fraction of ionic liquid as dissociated solute. Complex aggregation and underlying photophysical behavior are revealed from absorption spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence, and resonance light scattering studies. Upon addition of aqueous HCl, the efficient formation of H4TPPS2 J-aggregates from the diprotonated form of meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (H2TPPS4) occurs in [bmim][BF4]-rich media in a manner highly dependent upon the acidity, TPPS concentration, and solvent composition. The unique features of TPPS aggregation in this ionic liquid were elucidated, including the surprising disassembly of J-aggregates at higher aqueous contents, and our results are described qualitatively in terms of the molecular exciton theory. Finally, the potential of this system for the optical sensing of water at a sensitivity below 0.5 wt% is demonstrated. Overall, our findings accentuate how little is known about functional self-assembly within ionic liquids and suggest a number of avenues for exploring this completely untouched research landscape.

  17. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  18. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Supersedes DOE O 460.1B.

  19. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    also known there as sustainable mobility. This de?nition wasfor De?ning Sustainable Transport and Mobility. [cited 13Sustainable transporta- tion is de?ned as a means to satisfy current transport and mobility

  20. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  1. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  2. Transportation Conference Speakers - 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

  3. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  4. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01

    roads and parking facilities is exempt from rent and taxes,road transport relative to rail (which pays rent and taxesroad tolls, parking fees, and Litman, Transportation Market Distortions higher fuel taxes

  5. Introduction to Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 of City & Metropolitan Planning; Associate Dean, College of Architecture + Planning; former associate, social equity, fiscal health, and public health. Unfortunately, most transportation planning processes

  6. Transportation Conference Speakers - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Thiamin transport in Escherichia coli is a model system to establish the tolerance of derivatives for transport into the cell. Since little is known about what types of thiamin derivatives may be successfully taken into the cell through...

  7. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  8. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  9. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  10. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation's (IndyGo's) hybrid electric buses.

  11. Parking & Transportation Services Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    : 2011 #12;As a long-time leader in the areas of waste abatement, pollution reduction, energy management Metro Commuter Services Infinity Award ­ in recognition of alternative transportation programs. · 1996 to maintaining impressive and viable alternative transportation programs. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM DESIGNS

  12. Superoxide Electrochemistry in an Ionic Liquid Inas M. AlNashef, Matthew L. Leonard, Michael A. Matthews,* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Superoxide Electrochemistry in an Ionic Liquid Inas M. AlNashef, Matthew L. Leonard, Michael A-20 The electrochemistry of dioxygen reduction has been the subject of numerous studies in aqueous, nonaque- ous, and high

  13. "Control of protein folding and misfolding in ionic liquid media, and a conjecture on early earth biology".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen

    "Control of protein folding and misfolding in ionic liquid media, and a conjecture on early earth, such as protein folding and fibrillization, are reproduced (with little change from biological behavior

  14. On the identification and mitigation of life-limiting mechanisms of ionic liquid ion sources envisaged for propulsion of microspacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brikner, Natalya Anna

    2015-01-01

    Life-limiting processes affecting ionic liquid ion sources (ILIS) are investigated in this research, motivated by the development of ILIS for propulsion of microspacecraft and other industrial applications. Micropropulsion ...

  15. High-Pressure Phase Equilibria of Ionic Liquids and Compressed Gases for Applications in Reactions and Absorption Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Wei

    2009-12-29

    properties, especially their lack of volatility. However, using ionic liquids over common organic solvents has several challenges, i.e., higher viscosity (lower diffusivity) than common organic solvents; lower solubility of reaction gases and large number...

  16. Study of the aggregation behaviour of egg yolk lecithin/bile salt mixtures by increasing the ionic strength 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madenci, Dilek

    2009-11-25

    This thesis describes a study of the aggregational behaviour of egg yolk lecithin (EYL), a natural lecithin, and bile salt mixtures especially with respect to an increase of the ionic strength of the solvent. Mixtures ...

  17. High Electromechanical Response of Ionic Polymer Actuators with Controlled-Morphology Aligned Carbon Nanotube/Nafion Nanocomposite Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Sheng

    Recent advances in fabricating controlled-morphology vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) with ultrahigh volume fraction create unique opportunities for markedly improving the electromechanical performance of ionic ...

  18. Click grafting of seaweed bioactive polysaccharides onto PVC surfaces using ionic liquid as green solvent and catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Click grafting of seaweed bioactive polysaccharides onto PVC surfaces using ionic liquid as green solvent and catalyst Sandra Bigota , Guy Louarnb , Nasreddine Kébir*a and Fabrice Burela a Normandie

  19. Project Profile: Thermally-Stable Ionic Liquid Carriers for Nanoparticle-Based Heat Transfer in CSP Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Savannah River National Laboratory, under an ARRA CSP Award, is performing research to better understand the thermal stability of low-temperature organic molten salts, which are commonly referred to as ionic liquids (ILs).

  20. Anion effects in the extraction of lanthanide 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone complexes into an ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Mark P.; Beitz, James V.; Rickert, Paul G.; Borkowski, Marian; Laszak, Ivan; Dietz, Mark L.

    2012-07-01

    The extraction of trivalent lanthanides from an aqueous phase containing 1 M NaClO{sub 4} into the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium nonafluoro-1-butane sulfonate by the beta-diketone extractant 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) was studied. Radiotracer distribution, absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption fine structure measurements point to the extraction of multiple lanthanide species. At low extractant concentrations, fully hydrated aqua cations of the lanthanides are present in the ionic liquid phase. As the extractant concentration is increased 1:2 and 1:3 lanthanide:tta species are observed. In contrast, 1:4 Ln:tta complexes were observed in the extraction of lanthanides by Htta into 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. (authors)

  1. Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

    2009-01-11

    The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

  2. Iron hydroxyl phosphate microspheres: Microwave-solvothermal ionic liquid synthesis, morphology control, and photoluminescent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Shaowen; Zhu Yingjie; Cui Jingbiao

    2010-07-15

    A variety of iron hydroxyl phosphate (NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}OH.2H{sub 2}O) nanostructures such as solid microspheres, microspheres with the core in the hollow shell, and double-shelled hollow microspheres were synthesized by a simple one-step microwave-solvothermal ionic liquid method. The effects of the experimental parameters on the morphology and crystal phase of the resultant materials were investigated. Structural dependent photoluminescence was observed from the double-shelled hollow microspheres and the underlying mechanisms were discussed. - Graphical abstract: A variety of iron hydroxyl phosphate (NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}OH.2H{sub 2}O) nanostructures were synthesized by a simple one-step microwave-solvothermal ionic liquid method. Structural dependent photoluminescence was observed from the double-shelled hollow microspheres.

  3. Effect of Hydrogen Passivation on the Electronic Structure of Ionic Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, H. X.; Li, S. S.; Li, J. B.; Wei, S. H.

    2012-05-15

    In theoretical studies of thin film and nanostructured semiconductors, pseudohydrogen (PH) is widely used to passivate the surface dangling bonds. Based on these calculations, it is often believed that nanostructured semiconductors, due to quantum confinement, have a larger band gap than their bulk counterparts. Using first-principles band structure theory calculation and comparing systematically the differences between PH-passivated and real-hydrogen-passivated (RH-passivated) semiconductor surfaces and nanocrystals, we show that, unlike PH passivation that always increases the band gap with respect to the bulk value, RH passivation of the nanostructured semiconductors can either increase or decrease the band gap, depending on the ionicity of the nanocompounds. The differences between PH and RH passivations decreases when the covalency of the semiconductor increases and can be explained using a band coupling model. This observation greatly increases the tunability of nanostructured semiconductor properties, especially for wide-gap ionic semiconductors.

  4. Aqueous Solutions of Amino Acid Based Ionic Liquids. Dispersion and Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly V

    2014-01-01

    New ionic liquids (ILs) are continuously introduced involving an increasing number of organic and inorganic ions. Amino acid based ILs (AAILs) represent a specific interest due to their natural origin and, allegedly, low cost. We apply our recently developed force field for imidazolium-based AAILs to investigate structure properties in their aqueous solutions via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By reporting cluster analysis, radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions, we argue that AAIL ions are well dispersed in the aqueous media, irrespective of the AAIL content. Aqueous solutions of AAILs exhibit desirable properties as solvents for chemical engineering. The AAILs in relatively dilute aqueous solutions (10 mol% AAIL) exist as ion pairs, while more concentrated solutions feature certain amount of larger ionic aggregates.

  5. Properties of some ionic liquids based on1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium and 4-methyl-N-butylpyridinium cations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Yakelis, Neal; Salminen, Justin; Bergman,Robert; Prausnitz, John M.

    2005-09-29

    Syntheses are reported for ionic liquids containing 1-methyl-3octylimidazolium and 4-methyl-N-butylpyridinium cations, and trifluoromethansulfonate, dicyanamide, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, and nonafluorobutanesulfonate anions. Densities, melting points and glass transition points, solubility in water as well as polarities have been measured. Ionic liquids based on pyridinium cations exhibit higher melting points, lower solubility in water, and higher polarity than those based on imidazolium cations.

  6. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

    2008-11-18

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  7. Synergistic Effects Between Phosphonium-Alkylphosphate Ionic Liquids and Zinc Dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) as Lubricant Additives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qu, Jun; Barnhill, William C.; Luo, Huimin; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Landauer, Alexander K.; Kheireddin, Bassem; Gao, Hong; Papke, Brian L; Dai, Sheng

    2015-07-14

    Unique synergistic effects between phosphonium-alkylphosphate ionic liquids and zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) are discovered when used together as lubricant additives, resulting in significant friction and wear reduction along with distinct tribofilm composition and mechanical properties. The synergism is attributed to the 30-70× higher-than-nominal concentrations of hypothetical new compounds (via anion exchange between IL and ZDDP) on the fluid surface/interface.

  8. An Ionic Liquid Reaction and Separation Process for Production of Hydroxymethylfurfural from Sugars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei; Zheng, Feng; Li, Joanne; Cooper, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    There has been world-wide interest to making plastics out of renewable biomass feedstock for recent years. Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is viewed as an attractive alternate to terephthalic acid (TPA) for production of polyesters (PET) and polyamides. Conversion of sugars into HMF has been studied in numerous publications. In this work, a complete ionic liquid reaction and separation process is presented for nearly stoichiometric conversion of fructose into HMF. Different adsorbent materials are evaluated and silicalite material is demonstrated effective for isolation of 99% pure HMF from actual ionic liquid reaction mixtures and for recovery of the un-converted sugars and reaction intermediate along with the ionic liquid. Membrane-coated silicalite particles are prepared and studied for a practical adsorption process operated at low pressure drops but with separation performances comparable or better than the powder material. Complete conversion of fresh fructose feed into HMF in the recycled ionic liquid is shown under suitable reaction conditions. Stability of HMF product is characterized. A simplified process flow diagram is proposed based on these research results, and the key equipment such as reactor and adsorbent bed is sized for a plant of 200,000 ton/year of fructose processing capacity. The proposed HMF production process is much simpler than the current paraxylene (PX) manufacturing process from petroleum oil, which suggests substantial reduction to the capital cost and energy consumption be possible. At the equivalent value to PX on the molar basis, there can be a large gross margin for HMF production from fructose and/or sugars.

  9. Li-rich anti-perovskite Li3OCl films with enhanced ionic conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, XJ; Wu, G; Howard, JW; Chen, AP; Zhao, YS; Daemen, LL; Jia, QX

    2014-08-13

    Anti-perovskite solid electrolyte films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition, and their room-temperature ionic conductivity can be improved by more than an order of magnitude in comparison with its bulk counterpart. The cyclability of Li3OCl films in contact with lithium was evaluated using a Li/Li3OCl/Li symmetric cell, showing self-stabilization during cycling test.

  10. Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometer size few layers graphene sheets using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Fulvio, P. F.; Baker, G. A.; Veith, G. M.; Unocic, R. R.; Mahurin, S., M.; Chi, M.; Dai, S.

    2010-01-01

    Stable high-concentration suspensions (up to 0.95 mg mL{sup ?1}) of non-oxidized few layer graphene (FLG), five or less sheets, with micrometre-long edges were obtained via direct exfoliation of natural graphite flakes in ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoro-methane-sulfonyl)imide ([Bmim]-[Tf{sub 2}N]), by tip ultrasonication.

  11. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

    2011-07-12

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  12. Fabrication of hollow mesoporous NiO hexagonal microspheres via hydrothermal process in ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinbo; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan ; Wu, Lili; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan ; Zou, Ke; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni(OH){sub 2} precursors were synthesized in ionic liquid and water solution by hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO hollow microspheres were prepared by thermal treatment of Ni(OH){sub 2} precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO hollow microspheres were self-assembled by mesoporous cubic and hexagonal nanocrystals with high specific surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mesoporous structure is stable at 773 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ionic liquid absorbed on the O-terminate surface of the crystals to form hydrogen bond and played key roles in determining the final shape of the NiO novel microstructure. -- Abstract: The novel NiO hexagonal hollow microspheres have been successfully prepared by annealing Ni(OH){sub 2}, which was synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The results show that the hollow NiO microstructures are self-organized by mesoporous cubic and hexagonal nanocrystals. The mesoporous structure possessed good thermal stability and high specific surface area (ca. 83 m{sup 2}/g). The ionic liquid 1-butyl-3methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF{sub 4}]) was found to play a key role in controlling the morphology of NiO microstructures during the hydrothermal process. The special hollow mesoporous architectures will have potential applications in many fields, such as catalysts, absorbents, sensors, drug-delivery carriers, acoustic insulators and supercapacitors.

  13. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  14. Ionic exclusion phase transition in neutral and weakly charged cylindrical nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahin Buyukdagli; Manoel Manghi; John Palmeri

    2011-05-13

    A field theoretic variational approach is introduced to study ion penetration into water-filled cylindrical nanopores in equilibrium with a bulk reservoir. It is shown that (i) an ion located in a neutral pore undergoes two opposing mechanisms: the deformation of its surrounding ionic cloud of opposite charge, with respect to the reservoir, which increases the surface tension and tends to exclude ions form the pore, and (ii) the attractive contribution to the ion self-energy of the repulsive image forces associated with the dielectric jump between the solvent and the pore wall, which becomes more and more screened when ions enter the pore. For pore radii around 1 nm and bulk concentrations lower than 0.2 mol/L, this mechanism leads to a first-order phase transition, similar to capillary "evaporation", from an ionic-penetration state to an ionic-exclusion state. The discontinuous phase transition survives within the biological concentration range (~ 0.15 mol/L) for small enough membrane dielectric permittivities (characterized by two regimes: at low reservoir concentration or small pore radii, coions are excluded and the energy barrier for counterions is reduced but image forces remain strong enough, so that the counterion partition coefficient in the pore decreases with increasing reservoir concentration up to a characteristic value; for larger reservoir concentrations, image forces are screened and the partition coefficient of counterions increases with the reservoir electrolyte concentration.

  15. Solubilities of Solutes in Ionic Liquids from a SimplePerturbed-Hard-Sphere Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Yuan; Prausnitz, John M.

    2005-09-20

    In recent years, several publications have provided solubilities of ordinary gases and liquids in ionic liquids. This work reports an initial attempt to correlate the experimental data using a perturbed-hard-sphere theory; the perturbation is based on well-known molecular physics when the solution is considered as a dielectric continuum. For this correlation, the most important input parameters are hard-sphere diameters of the solute and of the cation and anion that constitute the ionic liquid. In addition, the correlation uses the solvent density and the solute's polarizability and dipole and quadrupole moments, if any. Dispersion-energy parameters are obtained from global correlation of solubility data. Results are given for twenty solutes in several ionic liquids at normal temperatures; in addition, some results are given for gases in two molten salts at very high temperatures. Because the theory used here is much simplified, and because experimental uncertainties (especially for gaseous solutes) are often large, the accuracy of the correlation presented here is not high; in general, predicted solubilities (Henry's constants) agree with experiment to within roughly {+-} 70%. As more reliable experimental data become available, modifications in the characterizing parameters are likely to improve accuracy. Nevertheless, even in its present form, the correlation may be useful for solvent screening in engineering design.

  16. Effect of low energy oxygen ion beam irradiation on ionic conductivity of solid polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manjunatha, H., E-mail: gnk-swamy@blr.amrita.edu; Kumaraswamy, G. N., E-mail: gnk-swamy@blr.amrita.edu [Department of Physics, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Bengaluru-560035 (India); Damle, R. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bengaluru-560056 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Over the past three decades, solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have drawn significant attention of researchers due to their prospective commercial applications in high energy-density batteries, electrochemical sensors and super-capacitors. The optimum conductivity required for such applications is about 10{sup ?2} – 10{sup ?4} S/cm, which is hard to achieve in these systems. It is known that the increase in the concentration of salt in the host polymer results in a continuous increase in the ionic conductivity. However, there is a critical concentration of the salt beyond which the conductivity decreases due to formation of ion pairs with no net charge. In the present study, an attempt is made to identify the concentration at which ion pair formation occurs in PEO: RbBr. We have attempted to modify microstructure of the host polymer matrix by low energy ion (Oxygen ion, O{sup +1} with energy 100 keV) irradiation. Ionic conductivity measurements in these systems were carried out using Impedance Spectroscopy before and after irradiation to different fluencies of the oxygen ion. It is observed that the conductivity increases by one order in magnitude. The increase in ionic conductivity may be attributed to the enhanced segmental motion of the polymer chains. The study reveals the importance of ion irradiation as an effective tool to enhance conductivity in SPEs.

  17. Regional Transportation Coordination Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination Study.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 357268 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination... Study.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Golden Crescent Regional Transit i Regional Transportation Coordination Study: 7-County Golden Crescent Region Regional...

  18. FUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Fuel Cells for Transportation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation............................................................................................. 101 A. R&D of a 50-kW, High-Efficiency, High-Power-Density, CO-Tolerant PEM Fuel Cell Stack SystemFUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department

  19. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01

    of the Fuel Cell in Transportation Applications Workshop,practical fuel cell for commercial or consumer applicationfuel cell system engineer- ing is made, vehicle applications

  20. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuel Grand BC and High-Level Radioactive Waste - Jeff Williams, Director, Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project, DOEOffice of Nuclear Energy National...

  1. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  3. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    gas vehicles Annual road tax differentiated by vintageand charges for road transport Tax/pricing measure Optimalannual circulation taxes, tolls and road charges and parking

  4. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  5. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  6. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    of reduction options/ AERO. Ministry of Transport, Publicfrom aviation with the AERO modeling system Part I.from aviation with the AERO modeling system. Montreal,

  7. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Transportation Resiliency Anders Johnson Director Pipeline System Design April 29, 2014 Confidential and Illustrative for discussion purposes only. The views expressed in this...

  8. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    modes, manage the demand for transportation, and shift the fuel mix to more sustainable sources necessary to reach these significant outcomes. Coordinating a...

  9. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  10. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  11. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY Investigator CCIT Research Report UCB-ITS-CWP-2011-2 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works;CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

  12. Transportation Todd Litman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumer cost savings. #12;11 Per Capita Transport EnergyPer Capita Transport Energy 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 D Problem? · Traffic congestion? · Road construction costs? · Parking congestion or costs? · Excessive costs to consumers? · Government costs? · Traffic crashes? · Lack of mobility for non-drivers? · Poor freight

  13. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  14. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  15. Transport Layer Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Transport Layer Ao Tang Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 Lachlan L. H. Andrew California. Low California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 I. INTRODUCTION The Internet has evolved of the physical layer, the link layer, the network layer, the transport layer and the application layer1 . See

  16. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The project also tested a Caterpillar C15 engine certified to 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ January 2011 Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption Improvement Illustration of a heavy-duty tractor-trailer modified to meet the SmartWayTM Equipment Standards for lower fuel

  17. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2006-05-01

    In this quarter a systematic analysis on the decomposition behavior of the OTM membranes at air and nitrogen were initiated to understand the structural and stoichiometric changes associated with elevated temperatures. Evaluation of the flexural strengths using 4-point bend test was also started for the dual phase membranes. Initial results on the synthesis of dual phase composite materials have been obtained. The measurements have focused on the compatibility of mixed conductors with the pure ionic conductors yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinium doped ceria (GDC). The initial results obtained for three different mixed conductors suggest that (GDC) is the better choice. A new membrane permeation system has been designed and tested and sintering studies of biphasic systems are in progress.

  18. STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS OF ORGANIC ANION TRANSPORTING POLYPEPTIDE MEDIATED TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Yi Miao

    2010-04-12

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATP; other: Oatp) form a mammalian transporter superfamily that mediates the transport of structurally unrelated compounds across the cell membrane. Members in this superfamily participate...

  19. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    and Transportation Energy Policy Chun Kon Kim University of California,California Goyang, KOREA viii P???????????? ??? W?????? P????? The Impacts of Transportation EnergyCalifornia Transportation Center (UCTC) Regents’ Dissertation Fellowship University of California, Irvine California Energy

  20. First Principles Study of the Li[subscript 10]GeP[subscript 2]S[subscript 12] Lithium Super Ionic Conductor Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mo, Yifei

    The continued drive for high performance lithium batteries has imposed stricter requirements on the electrolyte materials. Solid electrolytes comprising lithium super ionic conductor materials exhibit good safety and ...

  1. Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies More...

  2. Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Gap...

  3. Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaging and Transportation Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) The Department of...

  4. Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzl, Michael

    Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan T. Moncaster, M. Welzl, D. Ros: dra5-moncaster-tsvwg-transport-services-00 h Reducing Internet Transport Latency Michael Welzl, with help from (alphabe/cal): Anna

  5. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  6. Superconnections and Parallel Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrescu, Florin

    2007-01-01

    This note addresses the construction of a notion of parallel transport along superpaths arising from the concept of a superconnection on a vector bundle over a manifold $M$. A superpath in $M$ is, loosely speaking, a path in $M$ together with an odd vector field in $M$ along the path. We also develop a notion of parallel transport associated with a connection (a.k.a. covariant derivative) on a vector bundle over a \\emph{supermanifold} which is a direct generalization of the classical notion of parallel transport for connections over manifolds.

  7. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  8. Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maginn, Edward

    2012-09-30

    This is the final report for DE-FC26-07NT43091 â??Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Captureâ?ť. A detailed summary is provided of the ionic liquid (IL) discovery process, synthesis and testing results, process / systems modeling, lab-scale operational testing, corrosion testing and commercialization possibilities. The work resulted in the discovery of a new class of ionic liquids (ILs) that efficiently react with CO{sub 2} in a 1:1 stoichiometry with no water present and no increase in viscosity. The enthalpy of reaction was tuned to optimize process economics. The IL was found to have excellent corrosion behavior with and without CO{sub 2} present. In lab-scale tests, the IL was able to effectively remove CO{sub 2} from a simulated flue gas stream, although mass transfer was slower than with aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) due to higher viscosities. The non-volatile nature of the solvent and its high thermal stability, however, make it an intriguing option. An independent systems analysis indicates that the economics of using the best IL discovered to date (NDIL0157), are at least comparable to â?? and potentially slightly better than -â?? the Fluor Econamine FG PlusTM process (DOE Case 12). Further work should be directed at improving mass transfer / lowering viscosity and developing commercial synthesis routes to make these ILs at scale in an inexpensive manner. Demonstration of the process at larger scales is also warranted, as is the exploration of other process configurations that leverage the anhydrous nature of the solvent and its extremely low volatility.

  9. Bicyclic imidazolium ionic liquids as potential electrolytes for rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Chen [ORNL; Shao, Nan [ORNL; Bell, Jason R [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A bicyclic imidazolium ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-2,3-trimethyleneimidazolium bis(tri fluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([ETMIm][TFSI]), and reference imidazolium compounds, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([EMIm][TFSI]) and 1, 2-dimethyl-3-butylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([DMBIm][TFSI]), were synthesized and investigated as solvents for lithium ion batteries. Although the alkylation at the C-2 position of the imidazolium ring does not affect the thermal stability of the ionic liquids, with or without the presence of 0.5 molar lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI), the stereochemical structure of the molecules has shown profound influences on the electrochemical properties of the corresponding ionic liquids. [ETMIm][TFSI] shows better reduction stability than do [EMIm][TFSI] and [DMBIm][TFSI], as confirmed by both linear sweep voltammery (LSV) and theoretical calculation. The Li||Li cell impedance of 0.5M LiTFSI/[ETMIm][TFSI] is stabilized, whereas that of 0.5M LiTFSI/[DMBIm][TFSI] is still fluctuating after 20 hours, indicating a relatively stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is formed in the former. Furthermore, the Li||graphite half-cell based on 0.5M LiTFSI/[BTMIm][TFSI] exhibits reversible capacity of 250mAh g-1 and 70mAh g-1 at 25 C, which increases to 330 mAh g-1 and 250 mAh g-1 at 50 C, under the current rate of C/20 and C/10, respectively. For comparison, the Li||graphite half-cell based on 0.5M LiTFSI/[DMBIm][TFSI] exhibits poor capacity retention under the same current rate at both temperatures.

  10. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  11. Office of Secure Transportation Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6th, 2012 WIPP Knoxville, TN OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION Agency Integration Briefing Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons,...

  12. Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and...

  13. THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOPARTICLE-ENHANCED IONIC LIQUIDS HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, E.

    2013-04-15

    An experimental investigation was completed on nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids as an alternative to conventional organic based heat transfer fluids (HTFs). These nanoparticle-based HTFs have the potential to deliver higher thermal conductivity than the base fluid without a significant increase in viscosity at elevated temperatures. The effect of nanoparticle morphology and chemistry on thermophysical properties was examined. Whisker shaped nanomaterials were found to have the largest thermal conductivity temperature dependence and were also less likely to agglomerate in the base fluid than spherical shaped nanomaterials.

  14. Characterization of voltage-gated ionic currents in a peripheral sensory neuron in larval Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Amit; Bate, Michael; Pulver, Stefan R

    2010-06-02

    and Shab K+ currents to neuronal firing patterns in Drosophila. J Neurophysiol 2007, 97(1):780-794. 2. O'Dowd DK, Aldrich RW: Voltage-clamp analysis of sodium channels in wild-type and mutant Drosophila neurons. J Neurosci 1988, 8(10):3633-3643. 3. O... 'Dowd DK: Voltage-gated currents and firing properties of embryonic Drosophila neurons grown in a chemically defined medium. J Neurobiol 1995, 27(1):113-126. 4. Saito M, Wu CF: Ionic channels in cultured Drosophila neurons. EXS 1993, 63:366-389. 5...

  15. Ionic-passivated FeS2 photocapacitors for energy conversion and storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Maogang; Kirkeminde, Alec; Kumar, Nardeep; Zhao, Hui; Ren, Shenqiang

    2013-08-08

    /plain; charset=UTF-8 KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Ionic-passivated FeS2 photocapicitors for energy conversion and storage by Maogang Gong et al. KU ScholarWorks is a service provided by the KU Libraries’ Office of Scholarly... for Energy Conversion and Storage. Chemical Communications Published version: http://www.dx.doi.org/10.1039/C3CC45088K Terms of Use: http://www2.ku.edu/~scholar/docs/license.shtml Please share your stories about how Open Access to this article benefits you...

  16. Influence of Physico-Chemical Changes on Enzymatic Digestibility of Ionic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBarthe Gold-Ionic Liquid

  17. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    IEA personnel (WBCSD, 2004b), the WEO 2004 and Mobility 2030are quite similar. The WEO 2006 (IEA, 2006b) includes higherwhile the IEA’s more recent WEO 2006 projects transport

  18. Optimization of Maritime Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and Technology Management Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Enterprise and D. Ronen (2007). Maritime transportation. Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science (consolidation in the manufacturing sector, increasing competition, profit margins reduced, mergers and pooling

  19. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  20. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  1. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  2. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    next webinar is scheduled to occur in June 2013 TRIBAL NATIONS CAUCUS UPDATE WIKI AND NTSF WEB SITES ntsf.wikidot.com www.em.doe.govPagesNationalTransportationForum.aspx...

  3. Transport in granular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendell, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1983-

    2011-01-01

    There are many situations in which a continuum view of granular systems does not fully capture the relevant mechanics. In order for engineers to be able to design systems for transporting granular materials, there needs ...

  4. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in above- ground bunkers, each of which is about the size of a one-car garage. Spent Fuel Storage: Dual Purpose Cask Systems 8 Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation: Framework...

  5. PBA Transportation Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PBA Transportation Websites presented to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  6. High Cyclability of Ionic Liquid-Produced TiO2 Nanotube Arrays As an Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huaqing; Martha, Surendra K; Unocic, Raymond R; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs) are considered as a potential SEI-free anode material for Li-ion batteries to offer enhanced safety. Organic solutions, dominatingly ethylene glycol (EG)-based, have widely been used for synthesizing TiO{sub 2} NTs via anodization because of their ability to generate long tubes and well-aligned structures. However, it has been revealed that the EG-produced NTs are composited with carbonaceous decomposition products of EG, release of which during the tube crystallization process inevitably causes nano-scale porosity and cracks. These microstructural defects significantly deteriorate the NTs charge transport efficiency and mechanical strength/toughness. Here we report using ionic liquids (ILs) to anodize titanium to grow low-defect TiO{sub 2} NTs by reducing the electrolyte decomposition rate (less IR drop due to higher electrical conductivity) as well as the chance of the decomposition products mixing into the TiO{sub 2} matrix (organic cations repelled away). Promising electrochemical results have been achieved when using the IL-produced TiO{sub 2} NTs as an anode for Li-ion batteries. The ILNTs demonstrated excellent capacity retention without microstructural damage for nearly 1200 cycles of charge-discharge, while the NTs grown in a conventional EG solution totally pulverized in cycling, resulting in significant capacity fade.

  7. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  8. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  9. 2012 ROCK DEFORMATION: FEEDBACK PROCESSES IN ROCK DEFORMATION GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 19-24, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelemen, Peter

    2012-08-24

    Topics covered include: Failure At High Confining Pressure; Fluid-assisted Slip, Earthquakes & Fracture; Reaction-driven Cracking; Fluid Transport, Deformation And Reaction; Localized Fluid Transport And Deformation; Earthquake Mechanisms; Subduction Zone Dynamics And Crustal Growth.

  10. Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell Membranes by Steroid-Based Receptors-established that molecules which transport cations across cell membranes (cationophores) can have potent biological effects of biological activity. Indeed, chloride transporters have direct medical potential as treatments for cystic

  11. Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy Category: Facilities, Campus Life 1. PURPOSE To standardise and manage parking and transport on the Curtin Bentley campus including that support both State Government and University objectives in a manner that encourages public transport use

  12. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2010-4 This work was performed by the California Center for Innovative Transportation, a research group at the University of California, Berkeley, in cooperation with the State of California Business, Transportation

  13. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2011-6 ISSN 1557-2269 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works with researchers that improve the efficiency, safety, and security of the transportation system. #12;#12;CALIFORNIA CENTER

  14. Oil-Miscible and Non-Corrosive Phosphonium Ionic Liquids as Candidate Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Bo; Bansal, Dinesh G; Qu, Jun; Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Blau, Peter Julian; Bunting, Bruce G; Mordukhovich, Gregory; Smolenski, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been receiving considerable attention from the lubricants industry as potential friction and wear-reducing additives, but their solubility in oils is an issue. Unlike most ionic liquids that are insoluble in non-polar hydrocarbon oils, this study reports phosphonium-based ILs (PP-ILs) that are fully miscible with both mineral oil-based and synthetic lubricants. Both the cation and anion in quaternary structures, long alkyl chains, and capability of pairing the cation and the anion via a H-O bond are hypothesized to improve the compatibility between ions and neutral oil molecules. The measured viscosities of the oil-IL blends agree well with the Refutas equation that is for solutions containing multiple components. High thermal stability and non-corrosiveness were observed for the PP-ILs. Effective friction reduction and anti-wear functionality have been demonstrated in tribological tests when adding 5 wt% of a PP-IL into a base oil, suggesting potential applications for using the oil-miscible PP-ILs as lubricant additives.

  15. Process for CO2 Capture Using Ionic Liquid That Exhibits Phase Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisinger, RS; Keller, GE

    2014-11-01

    A novel process for capturing carbon dioxide from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant has been shown to reduce parasitic power consumption substantially. The process employs an ionic liquid created at the University of Notre Dame that has a high capacity for absorbing CO2 by chemical reaction. A distinguishing property of this ionic liquid is that it changes phase from solid to liquid upon reaction with CO2. The process uses heat generated by this phase transition to lower parasitic power consumption. The driving force for CO2 separation is a combination of temperature and pressure differences; the process could even work without the addition of heat. A realistic process was created to capture CO2 efficiently. Computer simulation of the process enabled calculation of viable process conditions and power usage. The main concepts of the process were shown to work using a lab-scale apparatus. Parasitic power consumes 23% of net power generation, 55% lower than that of the monoethanolamine (MEA) process. However, capital cost is higher. The cost of electricity (COE) is 28% lower than that of the MEA process.

  16. Water uptake, ionic conductivity and swelling properties of anion-exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, QJ; Ge, SH; Wang, CY

    2013-12-01

    Water uptake, ionic conductivity and dimensional change of the anion-exchange membrane made by Tokuyama Corporation (A201 membrane) are investigated at different temperatures and water activities. Specifically, the amount of water taken up by membranes exposed to water vapor and membranes soaked in liquid water is determined. The water uptake of the A201 membrane increases with water content as well as temperature. In addition, water sorption data shows Schroeder's paradox for the AEMs investigated. The swelling properties of the A201 membrane exhibit improved dimensional stability compared with Nafion membrane. Water sorption of the A201 membrane occurs with a substantial negative excess volume of mixing. The threshold value of hydrophilic fraction in the A201 membrane for ionic conductivity is around 0.34, above which, the conductivity begins to rise quickly. This indicates that a change in the connectivity of the hydrophilic domains occurs when hydrophilic fraction approaches 0.34. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrochemical investigations of ionic liquids with vinylene carbonate for applications in rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Ionic liquids based on methylpropylpyrrolidinium (MPPY) and methylpropylpiperidinium (MPPI) cations and bis(trifluoromethanesulfionyl)imide (TFSI) anion have been synthesized and characterized by thermal analysis, cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy as well as gavanostatic charge/discharge tests. 10 wt% of vinylene carbonate (VC) was added to the electrolytes of 0.5 M LiTFSI/MPPY.TFSI and 0.5 M LiTFSI/MPPI.TFSI, which were evaluated in Li || natural graphite (NG) half cells at 25 oC and 50 oC under different current densities. At 25 oC, due to their intrinsic high viscosities, the charge/discharge capacities under the current density of 80 A cm-2 were much lower than those under the current density of 40 A cm-2. At 50 oC, with reduced viscosities, the charge/discharge capacities under both current densities were almost indistinguishable, which were also close to the typical values obtained using conventional carbonate electrolytes. In addition, the discharge capacities of the half cells were very stable with cycling, due to the effective formation of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the graphite electrode. On the contrary, the charge/discharge capacities of the Li || LiCoO2 cells using both ionic liquid electrolytes under the current density of 40 A cm-2 decreased continually with cycling, which were primarily due to the low oxidative stability of VC on the surface of LiCoO2.

  18. Ionic content dependence of viscoelasticity of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal sunset yellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang Zhou; Adam J. Cervenka; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2014-10-10

    A lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) is an orientationally ordered system made by self-assembled aggregates of charged organic molecules in water, bound by weak non-covalent attractive forces and stabilized by electrostatic repulsions. We determine how the ionic content of the LCLC, namely the presence of mono- and divalent salts and pH enhancing agent, alter the viscoelastic properties of the LCLC. Aqueous solutions of the dye Sunset Yellow with a uniaxial nematic order are used as an example. By applying a magnetic field to impose orientational deformations, we measure the splay $K_1$, twist $K_2$ and bend $K_3$ elastic constants and rotation viscosity $\\gamma_1$ as a function of concentration of additives. The data indicate that the viscoelastic parameters are influenced by ionic content in dramatic and versatile ways. For example, the monovalent salt NaCl decreases $K_3$ and $K_2$ and increases $\\gamma_1$, while an elevated pH decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals formed by covalently bound units of fixed length.

  19. Heats of vaporization of room temperature ionic liquids by tunable vacuum ultraviolet photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambreau, Steven D.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; To, Albert; Koh, Christine; Strasser, Daniel; Kostko, Oleg; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-11-25

    The heats of vaporization of the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide, N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide are determined using a heated effusive vapor source in conjunction with single photon ionization by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron source. The relative gas phase ionic liquid vapor densities in the effusive beam are monitored by clearly distinguished dissociative photoionization processes via a time-of-flight mass spectrometer at a tunable vacuum ultraviolet beamline 9.0.2.3 (Chemical Dynamics Beamline) at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron facility. Resulting in relatively few assumptions, through the analysis of both parent cations and fragment cations, the heat of vaporization of N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide is determined to be Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 195+-19 kJ mol-1. The observed heats of vaporization of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 174+-12 kJ mol-1) and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 171+-12 kJ mol-1) are consistent with reported experimental values using electron impact ionization. The tunable vacuum ultraviolet source has enabled accurate measurement of photoion appearance energies. These appearance energies are in good agreement with MP2 calculations for dissociative photoionization of the ion pair. These experimental heats of vaporization, photoion appearance energies, and ab initio calculations corroborate vaporization of these RTILs as intact cation-anion ion pairs.

  20. Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckert, Charles; Liotta, Charles

    2011-09-30

    We have developed a novel class of CO{sub 2} capture solvents, Reversible Ionic Liquids (RevILs), that offer high absorption capacity through two modes of capture: chemical reaction (chemisorption) and physical solubility (physisorption). These solvents are silicon containing alkaline compounds such as silylamines that form a liquid salt (ionic liquid) upon reaction with CO{sub 2}. Subsequently, modest elevations in temperature reverse the reaction and yield pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. By incorporating Si in the molecules we have reduced the viscosity, thereby improving the mass transfer rates of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption and decreasing the processing costs for pumping the solvent. In this project, we have made systematic changes to the structure of these compounds to improve several physical and thermodynamic properties important for CO{sub 2} capture. Through these structure-property paradigms, we have obtained a RevIL which requires only a third of the energy required by conventional aqueous MEA process for 90% CO{sub 2} capture.

  1. Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Eckert; Charles Liotta

    2011-09-30

    We have developed a novel class of CO{sub 2} capture solvents, Reversible Ionic Liquids (RevILs), that offer high absorption capacity through two modes of capture: chemical reaction (chemisorption) and physical solubility (physisorption). These solvents are silicon containing alkaline compounds such as silylamines that form a liquid salt (ionic liquid) upon reaction with CO{sub 2}. Subsequently, modest elevations in temperature reverse the reaction and yield pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. By incorporating Si in the molecules we have reduced the viscosity, thereby improving the mass transfer rates of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption and decreasing the processing costs for pumping the solvent. In this project, we have made systematic changes to the structure of these compounds to improve several physical and thermodynamic properties important for CO{sub 2} capture. Through these structure-property paradigms, we have obtained a RevIL which requires only a third of the energy required by conventional aqueous MEA process for 90% CO{sub 2} capture.

  2. Role of the dielectric constant of ferroelectric ceramic in enhancing the ionic conductivity of a polymer electrolyte composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pramod Kumar Singh; Amreesh Chandra

    2003-04-21

    The dispersal of high dielectric constant ferroelectric ceramic material Ba(0.7)Sr(0.3)TiO(3) (Tc~30 C) and Ba(0.88)Sr(0.12)TiO(3) (Tc~90 C) in an ion conducting polymer electrolyte (PEO:NH4I) is reported to result in an increase in the room temperature ionic conductivity by two orders of magnitude. The conductivity enhancememt "peaks" as we approach the dielectric phase transition of the dispersed ferroelectric material where the dielectric constant changes from ~ 2000 to 4000. This establishes the role of dielectric constant of the dispersoid in enhancing the ionic conductivity of the polymeric composites.

  3. Hydrolysis, formation and ionization constants at 25/sup 0/C, and at high temperature-high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S.L.; Phillips, C.A.; Skeen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Thermochemical data for nuclear waste disposal are compiled. The resulting computerized database consists of critically evaluated data on Gibbs energy of formation, enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of selected substances for about 16 elements at 25/sup 0/C and zero ionic strength. Elements covered are Am, As, Br, C, Cl, F, I, Mo, Np, N, O, P, Pu, Si, Sr, S, and U. Values of these thermodynamic properties were used to calculate equilibrium quotients for hydrolysis, complexation and ionization reactions up to 300/sup 0/C and 3 ionic strength, for selected chemical reactions.

  4. Local structure analysis of solid state ionic conductors, perovskite-derived structures by NMR and computational studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dervisoglu, Riza

    2013-10-08

    Analysis of Solid State Ionic Conductors, Perovskite-derived Structures by NMR and Computational StudiesR?za Dervis¸og?lu Department of Chemistry / Darwin College University of Cambridge A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 20/09/2013 I... with perovskite and perovskite-derived crystallographic structures, i.e. Ba2In2O5, Ba2(In1-xGax)2O5 and Ba2In2O4(OH)2, were investigated for their high ionic (O2– and H+) mobility at elevated tem- peratures. Two general methods were employed in this investigation...

  5. Method to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification using an ionically labeled probe and measuring impedance change

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Belgrader, Phillip (Severna Park, MD); Fuller, Christopher D. (Oakland, CA)

    2007-01-02

    Impedance measurements are used to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification. A pair of spaced electrodes are located on a surface of a microfluidic channel and an AC or DC voltage is applied across the electrodes to produce an electric field. An ionically labeled probe will attach to a complementary DNA segment, and a polymerase enzyme will release the ionic label. This causes the conductivity of the solution in the area of the electrode to change. This change in conductivity is measured as a change in the impedance been the two electrodes.

  6. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Deployment Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccess StoriesTransportation

  7. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure Data

  8. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure

  9. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation

  10. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2011-01-01

    of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  11. Attoheat transport phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc; M. A. Kozlowski

    2009-06-09

    Fascinating developments in optical pulse engineering over the last 20 years lead to the generation of laser pulses as short as few femtosecond, providing a unique tool for high resolution time domain spectroscopy. However, a number of the processes in nature evolve with characteristic times of the order of 1 fs or even shorter. Time domain studies of such processes require at first place sub-fs resolution, offered by pulse depicting attosecond localization. The generation, characterization and proof of principle applications of such pulses is the target of the attoscience. In the paper the thermal processes on the attosecond scale are described. The Klein-Gordon and Proca equations are developed. The relativistic effects in the heat transport on nanoscale are discussed. It is shown that the standard Fourier equation can not be valid for the transport phenomena induced by attosecond laser pulses. The heat transport in nanoparticles and nanotubules is investigated.

  12. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

  13. Heavy-flavor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2015-10-29

    The formation of a hot deconfined medium (Quark-Gluon Plasma) in high-energy nuclear collisions affects heavy-flavor observables. In the low/moderate-pT range transport calculations allow one to simulate the propagation of heavy quarks in the plasma and to evaluate the effect of the medium on the final hadronic spectra: results obtained with transport coefficients arising from different theoretical approaches can be compared to experimental data. Finally, a discussion of possible effects on heavy-flavor observables due to the possible formation of a hot-medium in small systems (like in p-A collisions) is presented.

  14. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  15. Auto Template Assembly of CaCO3-Chitosan Hybrid Nanoboxes and Nanoframes in Ionic Liquid Medium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hsingming Anna

    2012-07-16

    . The purpose of this thesis is to describe a method for forming hollow inorganic-organic hybrid nanoboxes and nanoframes. This approach relies upon ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride) mediated auto-templating assembly of CaCO3 and chitosan...

  16. Mixed-Salt Effects on the Ionic Conductivity of Lithium-Doped PEO-Containing Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Wen-Shiue; Albert, Julie N.L.; Schantz, A. Benjamin; Epps, III, Thomas H.

    2012-10-10

    We demonstrate a simple, yet effective, mixed-salt method to increase the room temperature ionic conductivity of lithium-doped block copolymer electrolyte membranes by suppressing the crystalline phases in the conducting block. We examined a mixed-salt system of LiClO{sub 4} and LiN(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} (LiTFSI) doped into a lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) diblock copolymer. The domain spacings, morphologies, thermal behavior, and crystalline phases of salt-doped PS-PEO samples were characterized, and the ionic conductivities of block copolymer electrolytes were obtained through ac impedance measurements. Comparing the ionic conductivity profiles of salt-doped PS-PEO samples at different mixed-salt ratios and total salt concentrations, we found that the ionic conductivity at room temperature can be improved by more than an order of magnitude when coinhibition of crystallite growth is promoted by the concerted behavior of the PEO:LiClO{sub 4} and PEO:LiTFSI phases. Additionally, we examined the influence of mixed-salt ratio and total salt concentration on copolymer energetics, and we found that the slope of the effective interaction parameter ({chi}{sub eff}) vs salt concentration in our lamellae-forming PS-PEO system was lower than that reported for a cylinder-forming PS-PEO system due to the balance between chain stretching and salt segregation in the PEO domains.

  17. Subangstrom Crystallography Reveals that Short Ionic Hydrogen Bonds, and Not a His-Asp Low-Barrier Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agard, David

    Subangstrom Crystallography Reveals that Short Ionic Hydrogen Bonds, and Not a His-Asp Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bond, Stabilize the Transition State in Serine Protease Catalysis Cynthia N. Fuhrmann, Matthew D that destabilizes the His57-Ser195 hydrogen bond, preventing the back-reaction. In both structures the His57-Asp102

  18. Solvent-Dependent Molecular Structure of Ionic Species Directly Measured by Ultrafast X-Ray Solution Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Solvent-Dependent Molecular Structure of Ionic Species Directly Measured by Ultrafast X often play important roles in chemical reactions occurring in water and other solvents, but it has been elusive to determine the solvent-dependent molecular structure with atomic resolution. The triiodide ion

  19. Laser Transferable Polymer-Ionic Liquid Separator/Electrolytes for Solid-State Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Microbatteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Craig B.

    Laser Transferable Polymer-Ionic Liquid Separator/Electrolytes for Solid-State Rechargeable Lithium-Ion characterized by ac-impedance spectroscopy and in lithium- ion microbatteries. Size and weight percent effects be laser transferred onto a substrate to form a solid separator/electrolyte layer for a lithium ion power

  20. TiO2 nanotube arrays grown in ionic liquids: high-efficiency in photocatalysis and pore-widening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huaqing; Qu, Jun; Cui, Qingzhou; Xu, Hanbing; Luo, Huimin; Chi, Miaofang; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Wang, Wei; Dai, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Debris-free, long, well-separated TiO2 nanotube arrays were obtained using an ionic liquid (IL) as electrolyte. The high conductivity of IL resulted in fast pore widening and few contaminants from electrolyte decomposition leading to high photocatalytic efficiency in water splitting.

  1. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 052301 (2011) Enhancing ionic conductivity of bulk single-crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    2011-01-01

    -stabilized zirconia by tailoring dopant distribution Eunseok Lee, Friedrich B. Prinz, and Wei Cai Department in single-crystal yttria- stabilized zirconia. Ionic interactions are taken into account by combining.1103/PhysRevB.83.052301 PACS number(s): 66.30.-h, 82.45.Gj, 82.20.Wt, 82.47.Ed Yttria-stablized zirconia

  2. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  3. Spin Transport Shingo Katsumoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iye, Yasuhiro

    -1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, Japan According to DARPA's definition, "Spintronics"[1] means "Spin Transport Electronics". The issue "Spin Trans- port" thus covers all the fields of spintronics and one devices. In semiconductor spintronics devices, we therefore utilize the differences in n, , m for up

  4. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  5. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  6. Storing and transporting energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Brown, Kenneth (Reading, MA)

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  7. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    @virginia.edu http://cts.virginia.edu/Demetsky.htm Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works and Operations The mobility of freight is vital to the national economy. The growth in demand for freight

  8. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  9. Strain effects on the ionic conductivity of Y-doped ceria: A simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burbano, Mario; Watson, Graeme W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report a computational study of the effects of strain on the conductivity of Y-doped ceria (YDC). This material was chosen as it is of technological interest in the field of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs). The simulations were performed under realistic operational temperatures and strain (\\epsilon) levels. For bulk and thin film YDC, the results show that tensile strain leads to conductivity enhancements of up to 3.5x and 1.44x, respectively. The magnitude of these enhancements is in agreement with recent experimental and computational evidence. In addition, the methods presented herein allowed us to identify enhanced ionic conductivity in the surface regions of YDC slabs and its anisotropic character.

  10. Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Wysocki, Joseph A. (Oxnard, CA); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM); Szklarz, Eugene G. (Los Alamos, NM); Behrens, Robert G. (Los Alamos, NM); Swanson, Lynwood W. (McMinnville, OR); Bell, Anthony E. (McMinnville, OR)

    1987-06-02

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably constructed of rhenium and tungsten, both of which are readily fabricated. The ion sources emit continuous beams of ions having sufficiently high currents of the desired species to be useful in ion implantation of semiconductor wafers for preparing integrated circuit devices. The sources are stable in operation, experience little corrosion during operation, and have long operating lifetimes.

  11. Are Fluorination and Chlorination of the Morpholinium-Based Ionic Liquids Favorable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) constitute a fine-tunable class of compounds. Morpholinium-based cations are new to the field. They are promising candidates for electrochemistry, micellization and catalytic applications. We investigate halogenation (fluorination and chlorination) of the N-ethyl-N-methylmorpholinium cation from thermodynamics perspective. We find that substitutional fluorination is much more energetically favorable than substitutional chlorination, although the latter is also a permitted process. Although all halogenation at different locations are possible, they are not equally favorable. Furthermore, the trends are not identical in the case of fluorination and chlorination. We link the thermodynamic observables to electron density distribution within the investigated cation. The reported insights are based on the coupled-cluster technique, which is a highly accurate and reliable electron-correlation method. Novel derivatives of the morpholinium-based RTILs are discussed, motivating fu...

  12. Impact of Mixed Feedstocks and Feedstock Densification on Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Shi; Vicki S. Thompson; Neal A. Yancey; Vitalie Stavila; Blake A. Simmons; Seema Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lignocellulosic biorefineries must be able to efficiently process the regional feedstocks that are available at cost-competitive prices year round. These feedstocks typically have low energy densities and vary significantly in composition. One potential solution to these issues is blending and/or densifying the feedstocks in order to create a uniform feedstock. Results/discussion: We have mixed four feedstocks - switchgrass, lodgepole pine, corn stover, and eucalyptus - in flour and pellet form and processed them using the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Sugar yields from both the mixed flour and pelletized feedstocks reach 90% within 24 hours of saccharification. Conclusions: Mixed feedstocks, in either flour or pellet form, are efficiently processed using this pretreatment process, and demonstrate that this approach has significant potential.

  13. The Force Field for Amino Acid Based Ionic Liquids: Polar Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fileti, Eudes Eterno

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) constitute one of the most active fields of research nowadays. Many organic and inorganic molecules can be converted into ions via relatively simple procedures. These ions can be combined into ILs. Amino acid based ILs (AAILs) represent a specific interest due to solubilization of biological species, participation in enzymatic catalysis, and capturing toxic gases. We develop a new force field (FF) for the seven selected AAILs comprising 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and amino acid anions with polar residues. The anions were obtained via deprotonation of carboxyl group. We account for peculiar interactions between the anion and the cation by fitting electrostatic potential for an ion pair, in contrast to isolated ions. The van der Waals interactions were transferred from the CHARMM36 FF with minor modifications, as suggested by hybrid density functional theory. Compatibility between our parameters and CHARMM36 parameters is preserved. The developed interaction model fosters computation...

  14. Lubricants or lubricant additives composed of ionic liquids containing ammonium cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Jun (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Truhan, Jr.,; John J. (Cookeville, TN) [Cookeville, TN; Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Blau, Peter J. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    A lubricant or lubricant additive is an ionic liquid alkylammonium salt. The alkylammonium salt has the structure R.sub.xNH.sub.(4-x).sup.+,[F.sub.3C(CF.sub.2).sub.yS(O).sub.2].sub.2N.sup- .- where x is 1 to 3, R is independently C.sub.1 to C.sub.12 straight chain alkyl, branched chain alkyl, cycloalkyl, alkyl substituted cycloalkyl, cycloalkyl substituted alkyl, or, optionally, when x is greater than 1, two R groups comprise a cyclic structure including the nitrogen atom and 4 to 12 carbon atoms, and y is independently 0 to 11. The lubricant is effective for the lubrication of many surfaces including aluminum and ceramics surfaces.

  15. Ceramic membranes for catalytic membrane reactors with high ionic conductivities and low expansion properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mackay, Richard (Lafayette, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics of the composition: Ln.sub.x Sr.sub.2-x-y Ca.sub.y B.sub.z M.sub.2-z O.sub.5+.delta. where Ln is an element selected from the fblock lanthanide elements and yttrium or mixtures thereof; B is an element selected from Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; M is a d-block transition element of mixtures thereof; 0.01.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0; 0.01.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.7; 0.01.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.1.0 and .delta. is a number that varies to maintain charge neutrality are provided. These ceramics are useful in ceramic membranes and exhibit high ionic conductivity, high chemical stability under catalytic membrane reactor conditions and low coefficients of expansion. The materials of the invention are particularly useful in producing synthesis gas.

  16. Integrated Mg/TiO{sub 2}-ionic liquid system for deep desulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yee Cia; Kait, Chong Fai E-mail: hayyiratulfatimah@yahoo.com Fatimah, Hayyiratul E-mail: hayyiratulfatimah@yahoo.com Wilfred, Cecilia E-mail: hayyiratulfatimah@yahoo.com

    2014-10-24

    A series of Mg/TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts were prepared using wet impregnation method followed by calcination at 300, 400 and 500°C for 1 h. The photocatalysts were characterized using Thermal Gravimetric Analysis, Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy. The performance for deep desulfurization was investigated using model oil with 100 ppm sulfur (in the form of dibenzothiophene). The integrated system involves photocatalytic oxidation followed by ionic liquid-extraction processes. The best performing photocatalyst was 0.25wt% Mg loaded on titania calcined at 400°C (0.25Mg400), giving 98.5% conversion of dibenzothiophene to dibenzothiophene sulfone. The highest extraction efficiency of 97.8% was displayed by 1,2-diethylimidazolium diethylphosphate. The overall total sulfur removal was 96.3%.

  17. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Jennifer M; Walters, Deron; Labuda, Aleksander; Feng, Guang; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Bias-dependent structure of electrochemical double layers at liquid-solid interfaces underpin a multitude of phenomena in virtually all areas of scientific enquiry ranging from energy storage and conversion systems, biology, to geophysics and geochemistry. Here we report the bias-evolution of the electric double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model system for carbon-based electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors measured by atomic force microscopy. Matching the observed structures to molecular dynamics simulations allows us to resolve steric effects due to cation and anion layers. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long- and short range interactions. This insight will improve understanding of the mechanism of charge storage in electrochemical capacitors on a molecular level which can be used to enhance their electrochemical performance.

  18. A Transport Synthetic Acceleration method for transport iterations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramone, Gilles Lionel

    1996-01-01

    We present a family of Transport Synthetic Acceleration (TSA) methods to iteratively solve within-group scattering problems. A single iteration in these schemes consists of a transport sweep followed by a low-order calculation ...

  19. Leaching behavior of copper from waste printed circuit boards with Brřnsted acidic ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jinxiu; Chen, Mengjun Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Shu; Sun, Quan

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A Brřnsted acidic ILs was used to leach Cu from WPCBs for the first time. • The particle size of WPCBs has significant influence on Cu leaching rate. • Cu leaching rate was higher than 99% under the optimum leaching conditions. • The leaching process can be modeled with shrinking core model, and the E{sub a} was 25.36 kJ/mol. - Abstract: In this work, a Brřnsted acidic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([bmim]HSO{sub 4}), was used to leach copper from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs, mounted with electronic components) for the first time, and the leaching behavior of copper was discussed in detail. The results showed that after the pre-treatment, the metal distributions were different with the particle size: Cu, Zn and Al increased with the increasing particle size; while Ni, Sn and Pb were in the contrary. And the particle size has significant influence on copper leaching rate. Copper leaching rate was higher than 99%, almost 100%, when 1 g WPCBs powder was leached under the optimum conditions: particle size of 0.1–0.25 mm, 25 mL 80% (v/v) ionic liquid, 10 mL 30% hydrogen peroxide, solid/liquid ratio of 1/25, 70 °C and 2 h. Copper leaching by [bmim]HSO{sub 4} can be modeled with the shrinking core model, controlled by diffusion through a solid product layer, and the kinetic apparent activation energy has been calculated to be 25.36 kJ/mol.

  20. 35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential means for diversifying an energy resource base for the transportation sector. Largely as a result, there is a potential for the entrance of an estimated one million alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) into the California35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California Chapter 4 ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS

  1. Integrated transportation system design optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christine P. (Christine Pia), 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design or the network flow, assuming the other as given. However, to define a system level architecture for a transportation system, ...

  2. Transport Properties of Bilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Minsheng

    2013-01-01

    Electrical spin injection and transport in germanium”. Phys.P. , Temperature- Dependent Transport in Suspended Graphene.Y. M. , Quantum Transport: Introduction to Nanoscience.

  3. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarctic1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarcticthe dynamics and transport of Southern California stormwater

  4. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport in Achieving Clean Air, Climate Goals, Economic Growth and Healthy Communities in California Jack Kitowski April 19, 2013 1 #12;Freight Impacts at Many Levels 2 #12;Freight Transport Today: Contribution

  5. Parallel Transports in Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2003-07-17

    For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that every web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports in a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group. This Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of the chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient criteria for the holonomical independence of webs are derived. The results above can even be sharpened: Given an arbitrary neighbourhood of the base points of a web, then this neighbourhood contains some segments of the web whose parameter intervals coincide, but do not include 0 (that corresponds to the base points of the web), and whose parallel transports already form the same Lie subgroup as those of the full web do.

  6. Fuel cell water transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  7. Rail transportation update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-01-15

    Record western coal shipments and lucrative export traffic lead America's railroad to their fourth most profitable year in history. But with the coal boom going bust, higher rates, and a new administration and congress, what sort of transportation year can coal mines and shippers expect in 2009? The article gives the opinions of company executives and discusses findings of the recent so-called Christenson Report which investigated growing railroad market power. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  8. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  9. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  10. Transportation Energy Futures Analysis Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the nation's total carbon emissions. The TEF project explores how combining multiple strategies could reduce GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. Researchers examined four key areas – lightduty vehicles, non-light-duty vehicles, fuels, and transportation demand – in the context of the marketplace, consumer behavior, industry capabilities, technology and the energy and transportation infrastructure. The TEF reports support DOE long-term planning. The reports provide analysis to inform decisions about transportation energy research investments, as well as the role of advanced transportation energy technologies and systems in the development of new physical, strategic, and policy alternatives.

  11. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

  12. Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mynick, Harry E.

    Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton transport in stellarators is presented. A primary deficiency of stellarators has been elevated transport this difficulty, developing a range of techniques for reducing transport, both neoclassical and, more recently

  13. Modified normal-phase ion-pair chromatographic methods for the facile separation and purification of imidazolium-based ionic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, ND; Schenkel, MR; Robertson, LA; Noble, RD; Gin, DL

    2012-07-04

    lmidazolium- and oligo(imidazolium)-based ionic organic compounds are important in the design of room-temperature ionic liquid materials; however, the chromatographic analysis and separation of such compounds are often difficult. A convenient and inexpensive method for effective thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis and column chromatography separation of imidazolium-based ionic compounds is presented. Normal-phase ion-pair TLC is used to effectively analyze homologous mixtures of these ionic compounds. Subsequent separation of the mixtures is performed using ion-pair flash chromatography on normal-phase silica gel, yielding high levels of recovery. This method also results in a complete exchange of the counter anion on the imidazolium compounds to the anion of the ion-pair reagent. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Ionic Liquids as Anti-Wear Additives for Next-Generation Low-Viscosity Fuel-Efficient Engine Lubricants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ionic liquids...

  15. Update on EM Transportation Program Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organizations * DOE Orders, Policy, Guidance Transportation Risk Reduction * Motor Carrier Evaluations * Physical Protection * Transportation Compliance Reviews * Safety...

  16. Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine and Powertrain Research Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine...

  17. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  18. Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

  19. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...

  20. Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies 2005...

  1. Competing effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss on microstructural evolution in ionic-covalent materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Varga, Tamas; Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu; Edmondson, Dr. Philip; Xue, Haizhou; Liu, Peng; Moll, Sandra; Namavar, Fereydoon; Hardiman, Chris; Shannon, Prof. Steven; Weber, William J

    2014-01-01

    Ever increasing energy needs have raised the demands for advanced fuels and cladding materials that withstand the extreme radiation environments with improved accident tolerance over a long period of time. Ceria (CeO2) is a well known ionic conductor that is isostructural with urania and plutonia-based nuclear fuels. In the context of nuclear fuels, immobilization and transmutation of actinides, CeO2 is a model system for radiation effect studies. Covalent silicon carbide (SiC) is a candidate for use as structural material in fusion, cladding material for fission reactors, and an inert matrix for the transmutation of plutonium and other radioactive actinides. Understanding microstructural change of these ionic-covalent materials to irradiation is important for advanced nuclear energy systems. While displacements from nuclear energy loss may be the primary contribution to damage accumulation in a crystalline matrix and a driving force for the grain boundary evolution in nanostructured materials, local non-equilibrium disorder and excitation through electronic energy loss may, however, produce additional damage or anneal pre-existing defect. At intermediate transit energies where electronic and nuclear energy losses are both significant, synergistic, additive or competitive processes may evolve that affect the dynamic response of materials to irradiation. The response of crystalline and nanostructured CeO2 and SiC to ion irradiation are studied under different nuclear and electronic stopping powers to describe some general material response in this transit energy regime. Although fast radiation-induced grain growth in CeO2 is evident with no phase transformation, different fluence and dose dependence on the growth rate is observed under Si and Au irradiations. While grain shrinkage and amorphization are observed in the nano-engineered 3C SiC with a high-density of stacking faults embedded in nanosize columnar grains, significantly enhanced radiation resistance is attributed to stacking faults that promote efficient point defect annihilation. Moreover, competing effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss on the damage accumulation and annihilation are observed in crystalline 4H-SiC. Systematic experiments and simulation effort are needed to understand the competitive or synergistic effects.

  2. High-Permeance Room-Temperature Ionic-Liquid-Based Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, JS; Mok, MM; Cowan, MG; McDanel, WM; Carlisle, TK; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2014-12-24

    We have developed and fabricated thin-film composite (TFC) membranes with an active layer consisting of a room-temperature ionic liquid/polymerized (room-temperature ionic liquid) [i.e., (RTIL)/poly(RTIL)] composite material. The resulting membrane has a CO2 permeance of 6100 +/- 400 GPU (where 1 GPU = 10(-6) cm(3)/(cm(2) s cmHg)) and an ideal CO2/N-2 selectivity of 22 +/- 2. This represents a new membrane with state-of-the-art CO2 permeance and good CO2/N-2 selectivity. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a TFC gas separation membrane composed of an RTIL-containing active layer.

  3. Bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BFMB) Anion Based Ionic Liquid As an Additive for Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL] [ORNL; Liao, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL] [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Propylene carbonate (PC) is a good solvent for lithium ion battery applications due to its low melting point and high dielectric constant. However, PC is easily intercalated into graphite causing it to exfoliate, killing its electrochemical performance. Here we report on the synthesis of a new ionic liquid electrolyte based on partially fluorinated borate anion, 1-butyl-1,2-dimethylimidazolium bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BDMIm.BFMB), which can be used as an additive in 1 M LiPF6/PC electrolyte to suppress graphite exfoliation and improve cycling performance. In addition, both PC and BDMIm.BFMB can be used synergistically as additive to 1.0M LiPF6/methyl isopropyl sulfone (MIPS) to dramatically improve its cycling performance. It is also found that the chemistry nature of the ionic liquids has dramatic effect on their role as additive in PC based electrolyte.

  4. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu

    2000-07-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with synthetic based drilling fluids under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic oil base drilling fluids. PVT tests with Petrobras Synthetic base mud have been conducted and results are being analyzed Foam flow experiments have been conducted and the analysis of the data has been carried out to characterize the rheology of the foam. Comparison of pressure loss prediction from the available foam hydraulic models and the test results has been made. Cuttings transport experiments in horizontal annulus section have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Currently, cuttings transport tests in inclined test section are being conducted. Foam PVT analysis tests have been conducted. Foam stability experiments have also been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. Design of ACTS flow loop modification for foam and aerated mud flow has been completed. A flow loop operation procedure for conducting foam flow experiments under EPET conditions has been prepared Design of the lab-scale flow loop for dynamic foam characterization and cuttings monitoring instrumentation tests has been completed. The construction of the test loop is underway. As part of the technology transport efforts, Advisory Board Meeting with ACTS-JIP industry members has been organized on May 13, 2000.

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  6. Aqueous Biphasic Systems Based on Salting-Out Polyethylene Glycol or Ionic Solutions: Strategies for Actinide or Fission Product Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Robin D.; Gutowski, Keith E.; Griffin, Scott T.; Holbrey, John D.

    2004-03-29

    Aqueous biphasic systems can be formed by salting-out (with kosmotropic, waterstructuring salts) water soluble polymers (e.g., polyethylene glycol) or aqueous solutions of a wide range of hydrophilic ionic liquids based on imidazolium, pyridinium, phosphonium and ammonium cations. The use of these novel liquid/liquid biphases for separation of actinides or other fission products associated with nuclear wastes (e.g., pertechnetate salts) has been demonstrated and will be described in this presentation.

  7. A novel approach to prepare optically active ion doped luminescent materials via electron beam evaporation into ionic liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Richter, K.; Lorbeer, C.; Mudring, A. -V.

    2014-11-10

    A novel approach to prepare luminescent materials via electron-beam evaporation into ionic liquids is presented which even allows doping of host lattices with ions that have a strong size mismatch. Thus, to prove this, MgF2 nanoparticles doped with Eu3+ were fabricated. The obtained nanoparticles featured an unusually high luminescence lifetime and the obtained material showed a high potential for application.

  8. Direct Probing of Charge Injection and Polarization-Controlled Ionic Mobility on Ferroelectric LiNbO3 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Dr. Anton; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Shur, V.Y.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Mapping surface potential with time-resolved Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (tr-KPFM) in LiNbO3 periodically-poled single crystal revealed activation of the surface ionic subsystem. Electric fields higher than certain threshold value but lower than the switching field induce injection of charge from the biased electrode, formation of an active region in its vicinity and uneven distribution of screening charge on the opposite ferroelectric domains. Tr-KPFM technique allows investigating these phenomena in details.

  9. Multilayered YSZ/GZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Jiaming; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Shutthanandan, V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Lian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Strain confinement in heterostructured films significantly affects ionic conductivity of the electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells based on a multi-layered design strategy. Nearly ideal tensile strain can be achieved by a dedicated manipulation of the lattice mismatch between adjacent layers and fine control of the layer thicknesses to minimize the formation of dislocations and thus to achieve optimized ionic conduction. This strategy was demonstrated by a model system of multilayered 8 mol%Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) with Gd2Zr2O7 (GZO) films, which were epitaxially grown on Al2O3 (0001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with the {111} planes of YSZ/GZO along the Al2O3 [0 1 ?1 0] direction. The tensile strain (3%) resulting from the lattice mismatch can be confined in individual YSZ layers with the formation of a coherent, dislocation-free interface upon the manipulation of the layer thickness below a critical value, e.g., down to 5 nm. The strained heterostructure displays a two order-of-magnitude increase in oxide-ion conductivity as compared with bulk YSZ, and a high ionic conductivity of 0.01 S cm?1 at 475 °C can be achieved, five times greater than that of Gd-doped ceria/zirconia. The approach of strain confinement by fine control of lattice mismatch and layer thickness represents a promising strategy in developing advanced electrolytes enabling the miniaturization of solid-state ionic devices that can be operated at low temperatures below 500 °C.

  10. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  11. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-ForumTransportation

  12. Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown ofTransportToolkit Prototype Jump

  13. Transportation Fuel Supply | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently accounts for

  14. Transportation Representation | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently

  15. Transportation and Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation

  16. Electron Heat Transport Measured

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroicAward |Electron CorrelationHeat Transport

  17. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home Analysis Final

  18. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home

  19. Influence of magnetic field on laser-produced barium plasmas: Spectral and dynamic behaviour of neutral and ionic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raju, Makaraju Srinivasa; Gopinath, Pramod, E-mail: pramod@iist.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695547 (India); Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-10-21

    The expansion dynamics and spectral behaviour of plasma produced by a Nd:YAG laser (?=1.064 ?m, pulse width: 8 ns) from barium target and expanding in 0.45 T transverse magnetic field in vacuum (10??Torr pressure) are investigated using time-of-flight optical emission spectroscopy. The experiments are carried out at various laser fluences from 12 to 31 J/cm˛. The temporal profiles of neutral (Ba I 553.5 and 577.7 nm) lines are temporally broadened, while that of ionic (Ba II 413.0 and 455.4 nm) lines show strong confinement in the presence of a magnetic field. In the absence of magnetic field, the temporal profile of Ba I 553.5 nm is exactly reproduced by fitting with two Shifted Maxwell Boltzmann (SMB) Distribution components, while in the presence of a magnetic field the profile could only be fitted with three components. The field enhanced and field induced SMB components of neutral profile are correlated with populations of ground state, metastable states, and long-lived Rydberg states present in the barium plasma, while SMB components of ionic lines are explained on the basis of the presence of super-elastic collisions among the excited species in the plasma. The spatial variation of electron temperature and temporal variation of electron density are deduced and correlated to the different collisional processes in the barium plasma. The ionic profiles show efficient confinement in the presence of a magnetic field at higher fluences.

  20. Effect of ionic liquid treatment on the structures of lignins in solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Kent, Michael S [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Varanasi, Patanjali [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Dibble, Dean [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Simmons, Blake [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Singh, Seema [Joint Bioenergy Institute

    2012-01-01

    The solution structures of three types of isolated lignin - organosolv (OS), Kraft (K), and low sulfonate (LS) - before and after treatment with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate were studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) over a concentration range of 0.3-2.4 wt %. The results indicate that each of these lignins is comprised of aggregates of well-defined basal subunits, the shapes and sizes of which, in D{sub 2}O and DMSO-d{sub 6}, are revealed using these techniques. LS lignin contains a substantial amount of nanometer-scale individual subunits. In aqueous solution these subunits have a well-defined elongated shape described well by ellipsoidal and cylindrical models. At low concentration the subunits are highly expanded in alkaline solution, and the effect is screened with increasing concentration. OS lignin dissolved in DMSO was found to consist of a narrow distribution of aggregates with average radius 200 {+-} 30 nm. K lignin in DMSO consists of aggregates with a very broad size distribution. After ionic liquid (IL) treatment, LS lignin subunits in alkaline solution maintained the elongated shape but were reduced in size. IL treatment of OS and K lignins led to the release of nanometer-scale subunits with well-defined size and shape.

  1. Water confined in self-assembled ionic surfactants nano-structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Hanot; Sandrine Lyonnard; Stefano Mossa

    2014-12-02

    We present a coarse-grained model for ionic surfactants in explicit aqueous solutions, and study by computer simulation both the impact of water content on the morphology of the system, and the consequent effect of the formed interfaces on the structural features of the adsorbed fluid. On increasing the hydration level at ambient conditions, the model exhibits a series of three distinct phases: lamellar, cylindrical and micellar. We characterize the different structures in terms of diffraction patterns and neutron scattering static structure factors. We demonstrate that the rate of variation of the nano-metric sizes of the self-assembled water domains shows peculiar changes in the different phases. We also analyse in depth the structure of the water/confining matrix interfaces, the implications of their tunable degree of curvature, and the properties of water molecules in the different restricted environments. Finally, we discuss our results compared to experimental data and their impact on a wide range of important scientific and technological domains, where the behavior of water at the interface with soft materials is crucial.

  2. Ionic field effect and memristive phenomena in single-point ferroelectric domain switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ievlev, Anton; Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Electric field induced polarization switching underpins most functional applications of ferroelectric materials in information technology, materials science, and optoelectronics. In the last 20 years, much attention has been focused on the switching of individual domains using scanning probe microscopy, both as model of ferroelectric data storage and approach to explore fundamental physics of ferroelectric switching. The classical picture of tip induced switching includes formation of cylindrical domain oriented along the tip field, with the domain size is largely determined by the tip-induced field distribution and domain wall motion kinetics. The polarization screening is recognized as a necessary precondition to the stability of ferroelectric phase; however, screening processes are generally considered to be uniformly efficient and not leading to changes in switching behavior. Here, we demonstrate that single-point tip-induced polarization switching can give rise to a surprisingly broad range of domain morphologies, including radial and angular instabilities. These behaviors are traced to the surface screening charge dynamics, which in some cases can even give rise to anomalous switching against the electric field (ionic field effect). The implications of these behaviors for ferroelectric materials and devices are discussed.

  3. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru˛?(bpy)? solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {ąH-ą?F} HOESY and {ąH-ąH} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru˛?(bpy)? solute is rather different from the bulkmore »IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru˛?(bpy)? solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.« less

  4. Hormetic effect of ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate on bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nancharaiah, Y. V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Kalpakkam (India). Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Sect.; Francis, A. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Environmental Sciences Dept.; POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Rep. of). Div. of Advanced Nuclear Engineering

    2015-06-01

    The biological effect of ionic liquids (ILs) is one of the highly debated topics as they are being contemplated for various industrial applications. 1-ethyl-2-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM][Ac]) showed remarkable hormesis on anaerobic Clostridium sp. and aerobic Psueudomonas putida. Bacterial growth was stimulated at up to 2.5 g L-1 and inhibited at > 2.5 g L-1 of ([EMIM][Ac]). The growth of Clostridium sp. and P. putida were higher by 0.4 and 4-fold respectively, in the presense of 0.5 g L-1 of ([EMIM][Ac]). Assessment of the effect of [EMIM][Ac] under different growth conditions showed that the hormesis of [EMIM][Ac] was mediated via regulation of medium pH. Hormetic effect of [EMIM][Ac] was evident only in medium with poor buffering capacity and in the presence of a fermentable substrate as the carbon source. The hormetic effect of [EMIM][Ac] on bacterial growth is most likely associated with the buffering capacity of acetate anion. These observations have implications in ILs toxicity studies and ecological risk assessment.

  5. Deprotonation and oligomerization in photo-, radiolytically and electrochemically induced redox reactions in hydrophobic alkylalkylimidazolium ionic liquids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkrob, I . A.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-14

    Radical chemistry initiated by one-electron reduction of 1-methyl-3-alkylimidazolium cations in the corresponding ionic liquids (ILs) is examined. The reaction scheme is examined in light of the recent experimental data on photo-, radiation-, and electrochemically induced degradation of the practically important hydrophobic alkylimidazolium ILs. It is suggested that the primary species leading to the formation of the oligomers and acidification of the IL is a {sigma}{sigma}* dimer radical cation that loses a proton, yielding a neutral radical whose subsequent reactions produce C(2)-C(2) linked oligomers, both neutral and charged. The neutral oligomers (up to the tetramer) account for the features observed in the NMR spectra of cathodic liquid generated in electrolytic breakdown of the IL solvent. In photolysis and radiolysis, these neutral species and/or their radical precursors are oxidized by radical (ions) derived from the counteranions, and only charged dimers are observed. The dication dimers account for the features observed in the mass spectra of irradiated ILs. The products of these ion radical and radical reactions closely resemble those generated via carbene chemistry, without the formation of the carbene via the deprotonation of the parent cation. As the loss of 2-protons increases the proticity of the irradiated IL, it interferes with the extraction of metal ions by ionophore solutes, while the formation of the oligomers modifies solvent properties. Thus, the peculiarities of radical chemistry in the alkylimidazolium ILs have significant import for their practical applications.

  6. Hormetic effect of ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate on bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nancharaiah, Y. V.; Francis, A. J.

    2015-02-19

    The biological effect of ionic liquids (ILs) is one of the highly debated topics as they are being contemplated for various industrial applications. 1-ethyl-2-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM][Ac]) showed remarkable hormesis on anaerobic Clostridium sp. and aerobic Psueudomonas putida. Bacterial growth was stimulated at up to 2.5 g L-1 and inhibited at > 2.5 g L-1 of ([EMIM][Ac]). The growth of Clostridium sp. and P. putida were higher by 0.4 and 4-fold respectively, in the presense of 0.5 g L-1 of ([EMIM][Ac]). Assessment of the effect of [EMIM][Ac] under different growth conditions showed that the hormesis of [EMIM][Ac] was mediated via regulationmore »of medium pH. Hormetic effect of [EMIM][Ac] was evident only in medium with poor buffering capacity and in the presence of a fermentable substrate as the carbon source. The hormetic effect of [EMIM][Ac] on bacterial growth is most likely associated with the buffering capacity of acetate anion. These observations have implications in ILs toxicity studies and ecological risk assessment.« less

  7. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF IONIC LIQUID ELECTROLYTES FOR HYDROXIDE CONDUCTING POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES IN ALKALINE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, E.

    2012-05-01

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) operation is currently limited to specialty applications such as low temperatures and pure H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} due to the corrosive nature of the electrolyte and formation of carbonates. AFCs are the cheapest and potentially most efficient (approaching 70%) fuel cells. The fact that non-Pt catalysts can be used, makes them an ideal low cost alternative for power production. The anode and cathode are separated by and solid electrolyte or alkaline porous media saturated with KOH. However, CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere or fuel feed severely poisons the electrolyte by forming insoluble carbonates. The corrosivity of KOH (electrolyte) limits operating temperatures to no more than 80?C. This chapter examines the development of ionic liquids electrolytes that are less corrosive, have higher operating temperatures, do not chemically bond to CO{sub 2}, and enable alternative fuels. Work is detailed on the IL selection and characterization as well as casting methods within the polybenzimidazole based solid membrane. This approach is novel as it targets the root of the problem (the electrolyte) unlike other current work in alkaline fuel cells which focus on making the fuel cell components more durable.

  8. Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Chen, Honghao; Meduri, Praveen; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-05-16

    Li-S battery is a complicated system with many challenges existing before its final market penetration. While most of the reported work for Li-S batteries is focused on the cathode design, we demonstrate in this work that the anode consumption accelerated by corrosive polysulfide solution also critically determines the Li-S cell performance. To validate this hypothesis, ionic liquid (IL) N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Py14TFSI) has been employed to modify the properties of SEI layer formed on Li metal surface in Li-S batteries. It is found that the IL-enhanced passivation film on the lithium anode surface exhibits much different morphology and chemical compositions, effectively protecting lithium metal from continuous attack by soluble polysulfides. Therefore, both cell impedance and the irreversible consumption of polysulfides on lithium metal are reduced. As a result, the Coulombic efficiency and the cycling stability of Li-S batteries have been greatly improved. After 120 cycles, Li-S battery cycled in the electrolyte containing IL demonstrates a high capacity retention of 94.3% at 0.1 C rate. These results unveil another important failure mechanism for Li-S batteries and shin the light on the new approaches to improve Li-S battery performances.

  9. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  10. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-07-30

    This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

  11. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  12. Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenn, M.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these accessibility patterns? How are commodity flows and transportation services responding to global competition, deregulation, economic restructuring, and new information technologies? How do U.S. patterns of personal mobility and freight movement compare with other advanced industrialized countries, formerly centrally planned economies, and major newly industrializing countries? Finally, how is the rapid adoption of new information technologies influencing the patterns of transportation demand and the supply of new transportation services? Indeed, how are information technologies affecting the nature and organization of transportation services used by individuals and firms?

  13. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN) [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  14. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofMAC) refrigerant replacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for

  15. Heat transport within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to interpret Earth's dynamic processes based upon heat transport concepts derived from ordinary experience. But, ordinary experience can be misleading, especially when underlain by false assumptions. Geodynamic considerations traditionally have embraced three modes of heat transport: conduction, convection, and radiation. Recently, I introduced a fourth, "mantle decompression thermal tsunami" that, I submit, is responsible for emplacing heat at the base of the Earth's crust. Here, I review thermal transport within the Earth and speculate that there might be a fifth mode: "heat channeling", involving heat transport from the core to "hot-spots" such as those that power the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland.

  16. Transportation Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    share of petroleum use, carbon dioxide (a primary greenhouse gas) emissions, and air pollution, advances in fuel cell power systems for transportation could substantially improve...

  17. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    a critical role in combustion processes just as chemicalparameters are essential for combustion modeling; molecularwith Application to Combustion. Transport Theor Stat 2003;

  18. TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY DATA EXPANSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    in Transportation August 2007 #12;Table of Contents 1. Introduction and trip data associated with the households in that geographic area. The UTM coordinates belonging to each

  19. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in...

  20. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    thereby contributing to energy security. Most also reducesuch as improved energy security, many transport GHGincluding energy cost savings, oil security, and pollution

  1. Institute of Transport Studies PSU Transportation Seminar, 21 May 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    of Electric Bicycles Assoc. Prof. Geoff Rose Director, ITS (Monash) Transport Theme Leader, Monash expand the role of the bicycle in the context of urban transportation · This seminar examines electric Battery technology · Sealed lead acid (SLA) ­ Well understood and cheapest ­ Heavy ­ Modest life · Nickel

  2. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    on Transportation, Energy and Policy convened in 1988. Oilon Transportation, Energy and Policy has been held at theon Transportation, Energy and Policy in July 2009 was the

  3. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    cials (AASHTO), Transport Canada, the California DepartmentA case study of California. ” Transport. Res. Part D. West,smaller transport-related carbon footprint than California,

  4. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    California Department of Transportation, the California EnergyCalifornia Energy Commission Climate and TransportationTransportation and Energy Policy, at Paci?c Grove, California.

  5. Transport in holographic superfluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Herzog; Nir Lisker; Piotr Surowka; Amos Yarom

    2011-01-17

    We construct a slowly varying space-time dependent holographic superfluid and compute its transport coefficients. Our solution is presented as a series expansion in inverse powers of the charge of the order parameter. We find that the shear viscosity associated with the motion of the condensate vanishes. The diffusion coefficient of the superfluid is continuous across the phase transition while its third bulk viscosity is found to diverge at the critical temperature. As was previously shown, the ratio of the shear viscosity of the normal component to the entropy density is 1/(4 pi). As a consequence of our analysis we obtain an analytic expression for the backreacted metric near the phase transition for a particular type of holographic superfluid.

  6. Heat transport system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkness, Samuel D. (McMurray, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  7. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  8. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  9. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

  10. Liquid/Liquid Interface Polymerized Porphyrin Membranes Displaying Size-Selective Molecular and Ionic Permeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liquid/Liquid Interface Polymerized Porphyrin Membranes Displaying Size-Selective Molecular of ca. 3.5 Ĺ. Molecular transport can be modulated by axially ligating pore- blocking moieties of studies of photophysical and photochemical processes, including solar-cell-related processes. In many

  11. Indirect determination of zeta potential at high ionic strength: Specific application to semipermeable polymeric membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reserved. 1. Introduction Membranes are rapidly becoming the leading separation method in a broad range and gas industry [6,12,29,30]. The fouling propensity of RO, NF, and FO membranes and mass transport to semipermeable polymeric membranes Bryan D. Coday a , Thomas Luxbacher b , Amy E. Childress c , Nohemi Almaraz

  12. Combined Measurement of Translational and Rotational Diffusion in Quaternary Acyclic Ammonium and Cyclic Pyrrolidinium Ionic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ruoff§ Department of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials, Sandia National Laboratories to be incorporated into a wide range of applications including liquid electrolytes for energy storage and production devices, use in CO2 capture, and as green solvents.1-5 Understanding the transport properties as well

  13. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04

    This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Supersedes DOE M 460.2-1.

  14. Phytoremediation of ionic and methyl mercury pollution. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meagher, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    'The long-term goal of this research is to manipulate single-gene traits into plants, enabling them to process heavy metals and remediate heavy-metal pollution by resistance, sequestration, removal, and management of these contaminants (Meagher and Rugh, 1996; Meagher et al., 1997). The working hypothesis behind this proposal was that transgenic plants expressing both the bacterial organo mercury lyase (merB) and the mercuric ion reductase gene (merA) will (A) remove the mercury from polluted sites and (B) prevent methyl mercury from entering the food chain. The authors have had a very successful first year either testing aspects of this hypothesis directly or preparing material needed for future experiments. The results are outlined below under goals A and B, which are explicit in this hypothesis. There were less than 10% of the funds remaining in any category as projected in the first 12 month budget at the end of the first year, with the exception of the equipment category which had 25% of the funds remaining ({approximately} $8,000). Much of this remaining equipment money is being spent this week on a mercury vapor analyzer. It might be useful to remember that at the time this grant was awarded, the authors had successfully engineered a small model plant, Arabidopsis thalianat to use a highly modified bacterial mercuric ion reductase gene, merA9, to detoxify ionic mercury (Hg(II)), reducing it to Hg(0) (Rugh et al., 1996). Seeds from these plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of Hg(II) that are lethal to normal plants. In assays on transgenic seedlings suspended in a solution of Hg(II), 10 ng of Hg(0) was evolved per min per mg wet weight of plant tissue. However, at that time, they had no information on expression of merA in any other plant species, nor had they expressed merB in any plant.'

  15. Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-02-17

    Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

  16. Generation of gas-phase zirconium fluoroanions by electrospray of an ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; James E. Delmore; Michael T. Benson; Tetsuya Tsuda; Rika Hagiwara

    2014-06-01

    RATIONALE: When measuring extremely wide isotope ratios (= 1 x 109) accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the instrument of choice, however it requires an anion for injection into the tandem accelerator. Since many elements do not have positive electronegativities they do not form stable negative atomic ions, and hence are not compatible for isotope ratio measurement using AMS. Thus new approaches for forming anions are sought; fluoroanions are particularly attractive because fluorine is monoisotopic, and thus will not have overlapping isobars with the isotope of interest. METHODS: An approach is described for making zirconium fluoroanions using the fluorinating ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium fluorohydrogenate, which was used to generate abundant [ZrF5-] using electrospray ionization. The IL was dissolved in acetonitrile, combined with a dilute solution of either Zr4+ or ZrO2+, and then electrosprayed. Mass analysis and collision induced dissociation were conducted using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Cluster structures were predicted using density functional theory calculations. RESULTS: The fluorohydrogenate IL solutions generated abundant [ZrF5-] starting from solutions of both Zr4+ and ZrO2+. The mass spectra also contained IL-bearing cluster ions, whose compositions indicated the presence of [ZrF6]2- in solution, a conclusion supported by the structural calculations. Rinsing out the zirconium-IL solution with acetonitrile decreased the IL clusters, but enhanced [ZrF5]-, which was sorbed by the polymeric electrospray supply capillary, and then released upon rinsing. This reduced the ion background in the mass spectrum. CONCLUSIONS: The fluorohydrogenate-IL solutions are a facile way to form zirconium fluoroanions in the gas phase using electrospray. The approach has potential as a source of fluoroanions for injection into an AMS, which would enable high-sensitivity measurement of minor zirconium isotopes, and benefits from the absence of overlapping isobars caused by the charge carrier (i.e., the monoisotopic fluorine atoms).

  17. The importance of ion size and electrode curvature on electrical double layers in ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, G.; Qiao, R.; Huang, J; Dai, S.; Sumpter, B. G.; Meunier, V.

    2011-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are an emerging class of electrolytes for supercapacitors. We investigate the effects of ion size and electrode curvature on the electrical double layers (EDLs) in two ILs 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [BMIM][Cl] and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF{sub 6}], using a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum density functional theory (DFT) simulations. The sizes of the counter-ion and co-ion affect the ion distribution and orientational structure of EDLs. The EDL capacitances near both planar and cylindrical electrodes were found to follow the order: [BMIM][Cl] (near the positive electrode) > [BMIM][PF{sub 6}] (near the positive electrode) ? [BMIM][Cl] (near the negative electrode) ? [BMIM][PF{sub 6}] (near the negative electrode). The EDL capacitance was also found to increase as the electrode curvature increases. These capacitance data can be fit to the Helmholtz model and the recently proposed exohedral electrical double-cylinder capacitor (xEDCC) model when the EDL thickness is properly parameterized, even though key features of the EDLs in ILs are not accounted for in these models. To remedy the shortcomings of existing models, we propose a “Multiple Ion Layers with Overscreening” (MILO) model for the EDLs in ILs that takes into account two critical features of such EDLs, i.e., alternating layering of counter-ions and co-ions and charge overscreening. The capacitance computed from the MILO model agrees well with the MD prediction. Although some input parameters of the MILO model must be obtained from MD simulations, the MILO model may provide a new framework for understanding many important aspects of EDLs in ILs (e.g., the variation of EDL capacitance with the electrode potential) that are difficult to interpret using classical EDL models and experiments.

  18. The Importance of Ion Size and Electrode Curvature on Electrical Double Layers in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Guang; Qiao, Rui; Huang, Jingsong; Dai, Sheng; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are an emerging class of electrolytes for supercapacitors. We investigate the effects of ion size and electrode curvature on the electrical double layers (EDLs) in two ILs 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [BMIM][Cl] and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF(6)], using a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum density functional theory (DFT) simulations. The sizes of the counter-ion and co-ion affect the ion distribution and orientational structure of EDLs. The EDL capacitances near both planar and cylindrical electrodes were found to follow the order: [BMIM][Cl] (near the positive electrode) > [BMIM][PF(6)] (near the positive electrode) {approx} [BMIM][Cl] (near the negative electrode) {approx} [BMIM][PF(6)] (near the negative electrode). The EDL capacitance was also found to increase as the electrode curvature increases. These capacitance data can be fit to the Helmholtz model and the recently proposed exohedral electrical double-cylinder capacitor (xEDCC) model when the EDL thickness is properly parameterized, even though key features of the EDLs in ILs are not accounted for in these models. To remedy the shortcomings of existing models, we propose a 'Multiple Ion Layers with Overscreening' (MILO) model for the EDLs in ILs that takes into account two critical features of such EDLs, i.e., alternating layering of counter-ions and co-ions and charge overscreening. The capacitance computed from the MILO model agrees well with the MD prediction. Although some input parameters of the MILO model must be obtained from MD simulations, the MILO model may provide a new framework for understanding many important aspects of EDLs in ILs (e.g., the variation of EDL capacitance with the electrode potential) that are difficult to interpret using classical EDL models and experiments.

  19. Coal Transportation Rate Sensitivity Analysis

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On December 21, 2004, the Surface Transportation Board (STB) requested that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze the impact of changes in coal transportation rates on projected levels of electric power sector energy use and emissions. Specifically, the STB requested an analysis of changes in national and regional coal consumption and emissions resulting from adjustments in railroad transportation rates for Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) coal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). However, because NEMS operates at a relatively aggregate regional level and does not represent the costs of transporting coal over specific rail lines, this analysis reports on the impacts of interregional changes in transportation rates from those used in the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) reference case.

  20. Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains an overview of the aggregate transportation sector, combining both passenger and freight segments of this sector. The specific energy intensity indicators for passenger and freight can be obtained from the links, passenger transportation, or freight transportation. For further detail within the transportation sector, download the appropriate Trend Data worksheet containing detailed data and graphics for specific transportation modes.

  1. Transportes em Revista.com Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Transportes em Revista.com País: Portugal Period.: Diária Âmbito: Online Pag.: 1 de 2ID: 41904396 22-05-2012 Receba gr átis a Transportes Online | Assinar a Transportes em Revista | Fazer da TR a sua Transport Rodas de mudança Et si nos villes #12;Transportes em Revista.com País:

  2. Uphill transport and the probabilistic transport model B. Ph. van Milligen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Milligen, Boudewijn

    Uphill transport and the probabilistic transport model B. Ph. van Milligen Asociacio´n EURATOM-CIEMAT

  3. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER OF IONIC LIQUID IN A RECTANGULAR ENCLOSURE HEATED FROM BELOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, E.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-07-18

    This paper presents an experimental study of natural convection heat transfer for an Ionic Liquid. The experiments were performed for 1-butyl-2, 3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}]) at a Raleigh number range of 1.26 x 10{sup 7} to 8.3 x 10{sup 7}. In addition to determining the convective heat transfer coefficients, this study also included experimental determination of thermophysical properties of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] such as, density, viscosity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. The results show that the density of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] varies from 1.437-1.396 g/cm{sup 3} within the temperature range of 10-50 C, the thermal conductivity varies from 0.105-0.116 W/m.K between a temperature of 10 to 60 C, the heat capacity varies from 1.015 J/g.K - 1.760 J/g.K within temperature range of 25-340 C and the viscosity varies from 18cp-243cp within temperature range 10-75 C. The results for density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and viscosity were in close agreement with the values in the literature. Measured dimensionless Nusselt number was observed to be higher for the ionic liquid than that of DI water. This is expected as Nusselt number is the ratio of heat transfer by convection to conduction and the ionic liquid has lower thermal conductivity (approximately 18%) than DI water.

  4. Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions into solvation water and ionic contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, Klaus F.; Netz, Roland R.; Gekle, Stephan

    2014-12-07

    Using extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we determine the dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI. The ion-specific and concentration-dependent shifts of the static dielectric constants and the dielectric relaxation times match experimental results very well, which serves as a validation of the classical and non-polarizable ionic force fields used. The purely ionic contribution to the dielectric response is negligible, but determines the conductivity of the salt solutions. The ion-water cross correlation contribution is negative and reduces the total dielectric response by about 5%-10% for 1?M solutions. The dominating water dielectric response is decomposed into different water solvation shells and ion-pair configurations, by this the spectral blue shift and the dielectric decrement of salt solutions with increasing salt concentration is demonstrated to be primarily caused by first-solvation shell water. With rising salt concentration the simulated spectra show more pronounced deviations from a single-Debye form and can be well described by a Cole-Cole fit, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our spectral decomposition into ionic and different water solvation shell contributions does not render the individual contributions more Debye-like, this suggests the non-Debye-like character of the dielectric spectra of salt solutions not to be due to the superposition of different elementary relaxation processes with different relaxation times. Rather, the non-Debye-like character is likely to be an inherent spectral signature of solvation water around ions.

  5. Transport Survey 2008 (Staff and student)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Transport Survey 2008 (Staff and student) April 2008 Ramon Arigoni Ortiz Wan-Jung Chou Department................................................................................................6 2. Transport use and travel behaviour......................................................................10 2.1. Modes of transport

  6. co2-transport | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport Cost Model FENETL CO2 Transport Cost Model About the model: This model was developed to estimate the cost of transporting a user-specified mass rate of CO2 by pipeline...

  7. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  8. Transportes em Revista.com Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Transportes em Revista.com País: Portugal Period.: Diária Âmbito: Online Pag.: 1 de 2ID: 44168021 10-10-2012 Receba gr átis a Transportes Online | Assinar a Transportes em Revista | Fazer da TR a sua

  9. Transport Protocol Services (TAPS) Problem: more and more transport protocols available, with various features,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzl, Michael

    Transport Protocol Services (TAPS) · Problem: more and more transport protocols that would not offer "TCP or UDP" but "transport services" ­ A transport system: transport-services@ifi.uio.no hXps://sympa.uio.no/ifi.uio.no/info/transport-services · Problem

  10. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    truck activity in California. Transport Policy. Volume 16,in California Travel Demand Reductions Decreasing transportCalifornia, USA. Transportation Research, Part D: Transport

  11. Mechanistic Studies of Charge Injection from Metallic Electrodes into Organic Semiconductors Mediated by Ionic Functionalities: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen [UCSB; Bazan, Guillermo [UCSB; Mikhailovsky, Alexander [UCSB

    2014-04-15

    Metal-organic semiconductor interfaces are important because of their ubiquitous role in determining the performance of modern electronics such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), fuel cells, batteries, field effect transistors (FETs), and organic solar cells. Interfaces between metal electrodes required for external wiring to the device and underlying organic structures directly affect the charge carrier injection/collection efficiency in organic-based electronic devices primarily due to the mismatch between energy levels in the metal and organic semiconductor. Environmentally stable and cost-effective electrode materials, such as aluminum and gold typically exhibit high potential barriers for charge carriers injection into organic devices leading to increased operational voltages in OLEDs and FETs and reduced charge extraction in photovoltaic devices. This leads to increased power consumption by the device, reduced overall efficiency, and decreased operational lifetime. These factors represent a significant obstacle for development of next generation of cheap and energy-efficient components based on organic semiconductors. It has been noticed that introduction of organic materials with conjugated backbone and ionic pendant groups known as conjugated poly- and oligoelectrolytes (CPEs and COEs), enables one to reduce the potential barriers at the metal-organic interface and achieve more efficient operation of a device, however exact mechanisms of the phenomenon have not been understood. The goal of this project was to delineate the function of organic semiconductors with ionic groups as electron injection layers. The research incorporated a multidisciplinary approach that encompassed the creation of new materials, novel processing techniques, examination of fundamental electronic properties and the incorporation of the resulting knowledgebase into development of novel organic electronic devices with increased efficiency, environmental stability, and reduced cost. During the execution of the project, main efforts were focused on the synthesis of new charge-bearing organic materials, such as CPEs and COEs, and block copolymers with neutral and ionic segments, studies of mechanisms responsible for the charge injection modulation in devices with ionic interlayers, and use of naturally occurring charged molecules for creation of enhanced devices. The studies allowed PIs to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach for the improvement of operational parameters in model OLED and FET systems resulting in increased efficiency, decreased contact resistance, and possibility to use stable metals for fabrication of device electrodes. The successful proof-of-the-principle results potentially promise development of light-weight, low fabrication cost devices which can be used in consumer applications such as displays, solar cells, and printed electronic devices. Fundamental mechanisms responsible for the phenomena observed have been identified thus advancing the fundamental knowledgebase.

  12. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J.G.

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  13. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    E?ects of Transportation Energy policy on Tra?c Crashes .e?ciency standards. Energy Policy, 33(3), 407–419. Blincoe,what’s necessary? Energy Policy, 34(9), 971–974. Bose, R.

  14. Environment-Assisted Quantum Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Rebentrost; Masoud Mohseni; Ivan Kassal; Seth Lloyd; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2009-02-10

    Transport phenomena at the nanoscale are of interest due to the presence of both quantum and classical behavior. In this work, we demonstrate that quantum transport efficiency can be enhanced by a dynamical interplay of the system Hamiltonian with pure dephasing induced by a fluctuating environment. This is in contrast to fully coherent hopping that leads to localization in disordered systems, and to highly incoherent transfer that is eventually suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. We study these phenomena in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complex as a prototype for larger photosynthetic energy transfer systems. We also show that disordered binary tree structures exhibit enhanced transport in the presence of dephasing.

  15. Momentum Transport in Granular Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg Lois; Anael Lemaitre; Jean M. Carlson

    2006-02-10

    We investigate the error induced by only considering binary collisions in the momentum transport of hard-sphere granular materials, as is done in kinetic theories. In this process, we first present a general microscopic derivation of the momentum transport equation and compare it to the kinetic theory derivation, which relies on the binary collision assumption. These two derivations yield different microscopic expressions for the stress tensor, which we compare using simulations. This provides a quantitative bound on the regime where binary collisions dominate momentum transport and reveals that most realistic granular flows occur in the region of phase space where the binary collision assumption does not apply.

  16. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  17. Turbulence Induced Transport in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldas, I. L.; Marcus, F. A.; Heller, M. V. A. P.; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, A. M. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Viana, R. L.; Lopes, S. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Morrison, P. J.; Horton, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States); Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2006-12-04

    This report is concerned with plasma edge turbulence and its relation to anomalous particle transport in tokamaks. First, experimental evidence of turbulence driven particle transport and measurements of the gradients of the equilibrium profiles in the Brazilian tokamaks TBR and TCABR are presented. Next, diffusion in a two drift-wave system is discussed. In this nonintegrable system, particle transport is associated with the onset of chaotic orbits. Finally, numerical evidence suggesting that a nonlinear three-mode interaction could contribute to the intermittent plasma fluctuations observed in tokamaks is presented.

  18. UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-08-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during extended storage. The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage system SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Hanson et al. 2011). Other sources of information surveyed to develop the list of SSCs and their degradation mechanisms included references such as Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel (NWTRB 2010), Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification, Revision 1 (OCRWM 2008), Data Needs for Long-Term Storage of LWR Fuel (EPRI 1998), Technical Bases for Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EPRI 2002), Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program (EPRI 2010a), Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (EPRI 2010b), and Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, Issues Resolution (EPRI 2010c). SSCs include items such as the fuel, cladding, fuel baskets, neutron poisons, metal canisters, etc. Potential degradation mechanisms (FEPs) included mechanical, thermal, radiation and chemical stressors, such as fuel fragmentation, embrittlement of cladding by hydrogen, oxidation of cladding, metal fatigue, corrosion, etc. These degradation mechanisms are discussed in Section 2 of this report. The degradation mechanisms have been evaluated to determine if they would be influenced by extended storage or high burnup, the need for additional data, and their importance to transportation. These categories were used to identify the most significant transportation degradation mechanisms. As expected, for the most part, the transportation importance was mirrored by the importance assigned by the UFD Storage Task. A few of the more significant differences are described in Section 3 of this report

  19. Texarkana Urban Transportation Study 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texarkana Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-10-01

    And Local Resource Agencies 1-7 Inclusion of Indian Tribes in the Transportation Process 1-8 2 SOCIO-ECONOMIC DATA 5 ROADS & BRIDGES Population Data 2-1 Road Performance 5-1 Housing Data 2... to increased motor fuels taxes or alternative revenue sources 4. Decaying infrastructure 5. Increasing demand for new infrastructure and access to alternative modes Starting with the Intermodal Surface Transportation Act of 1991 (ISTEA), the regulatory...

  20. Molecular Aspects of Transport in Thin Films of Controlled Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul W. Bohn

    2009-04-16

    Our laboratory focuses on developing spatially localized chemistries which can produce structures of controlled architecture on the supermolecular length scale -- structures which allow us to control the motion of molecular species with high spatial resolution, ultimately on nanometer length scales. Specifically, nanocapillary array membranes (NCAMs) contain an array of nanometer diameter pores connecting vertically separated microfluidic channels. NCAMs can manipulate samples with sub-femtoliter characteristic volumes and attomole sample amounts and are opening the field of chemical analysis of mass-limited samples, because they are capable of digital control of fluid switching down to sub-attoliter volumes; extension of analytical “unit operations” down to sub-femtomole sample sizes; and exerting spatiotemporal control over fluid mixing to enable studies of reaction dynamics. Digital flow switching mediated by nanocapillary array membranes can be controlled by bias, ionic strength, or pore diameter and is being studied by observing the temporal characteristics of transport across a single nanopore in thin PMMA membranes. The control of flow via nanopore surface characteristics, charge density and functional group presentation, is being studied by coupled conductivity and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. Reactive mixing experiments previously established low millisecond mixing times for NCAM-mediated fluid transfer, and this has been exploited to demonstrate capture of mass-limited target species by Au colloids. Voltage and thermally-activated polymer switches have been developed for active control of transport in NCAMs. Thermally-switchable and size-selective transport was achieved by grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes onto the exterior surface of a Au-coated polycarbonate track-etched membrane, while the voltage-gated properties of poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) were characterized dynamically. Electrophoretic separations have been coupled to analyte sampling both by LIF and mass spectrometry. Detection of electrophoresis separation products by electrospray mass spectrometry was achieved through direct interfacing to an electrospray mass spectrometer. Pb(II) interactions with the DNAzyme have been realized in an NCAM-coupled integrated microfluidic structure allowing cation separations to be coupled to molecular beacon detection motifs for the determination of Pb(II) in an electroplating sludge reference material. By changing the DNAzyme to select for other compounds of interest, it is possible to incorporate multiple sensing systems within a single device, thereby achieving great flexibility.